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    $139.00
    1. Kindle Wireless Reading Device,
    $189.00
    2. Kindle 3G Wireless Reading Device,
    $34.99
    3. Kindle Leather Cover, Black (Fits
    $59.99
    4. Kindle Lighted Leather Cover,
    $279.95
    5. Apple iPod touch 32 GB (4th Generation)
    $210.00
    6. Apple iPod touch 8 GB (4th Generation)
    $189.00
    7. Kindle 3G Wireless Reading Device,
    $59.99
    8. Kindle Lighted Leather Cover,
    $7.99
    9. AmazonBasics High-Speed HDMI Cable
    $19.99
    10. Scotch Thermal Laminator 15.5
    $6.75
    11. Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash
    $48.99
    12. Xbox 360 12 Month Live Gold Card
    $0.01
    13. HDMI Cable 2M (6 Feet)
    $34.99
    14. Kindle Leather Cover, Burgundy
    $34.99
    15. Kindle Leather Cover, Apple Green
    $119.99
    16. Garmin nvi 265W/265WT 4.3-Inch
    $26.99
    17. Transcend 16 GB Class 10 SDHC
    $26.99
    18. Transcend 16GB Class 10 SDHC Card
    $59.99
    19. Kindle Lighted Leather Cover,
    $21.98
    20. Lexar SDHC 4 GB Class 6 Flash

    1. Kindle Wireless Reading Device, Wi-Fi, Graphite, 6" Display with New E Ink Pearl Technology
    Electronics
    list price: $139.00 -- our price: $139.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B002Y27P3M
    Manufacturer: Amazon.com
    Sales Rank: 2
    Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    The all-new Kindle has a new electronic-ink screen with 50 percent better contrast than any other e-reader, a new sleek design with a 21 percent smaller body while still keeping the same 6-inch-size reading area, and a 17 percent lighter weight at just 8.5 ounces.The new Kindle also offers 20 percent faster page turns, up to one month of battery life, double the storage to 3,500 books, built-in Wi-Fi, a graphite color option and more—all for only $139. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle vs. Nook (updated 12/1/2010), August 28, 2010
    If you're trying to choose between a Nook and a Kindle, perhaps I can help. My wife and I have owned a Nook (the original one, not the new Nook Color), a Kindle 2, and a Kindle DX. When Amazon announced the Kindle 3 this summer, we pre-ordered two Kindle 3's: the wi-fi only model in graphite, and the wi-fi + 3G model in white. They arrived in late August and we have used them very regularly since then. For us, Kindle is better than Nook, but Nook is a good device with its own advantages that I will discuss below. I'll end this review with a few words about the Nook Color.

    First, reasons why we prefer the Kindle:

    * Speed

    In our experience, the Kindle is very zippy compared to the Nook. Page refresh speed (the time it takes a new page to appear after you push the page-turn button) was WAY quicker on Kindle 2 than on Nook, and it's quicker yet on Kindle 3. Yet, I read a whole book on the Nook and didn't find the slower page refresh to be annoying - you get used to it, and it's not a problem.

    For me, the more important speed difference concerns navigation - moving the cursor around the screen, for example to pick a book from your library, or to jump to a chapter by selecting it in the table of contents. On Kindle, you do this by pushing a 5-way rocker button, and the cursor moves very quickly. On Nook, you do this by activating the color LCD touchscreen (which normally shuts off when not in use, to conserve battery). A "virtual rocker button" appears on the screen, and you touch it to move the cursor. Unfortunately, the Nook cursor moves very sluggishly. This might not be a big deal to you, but it really got annoying to me, especially since my wife's Kindle was so quick and responsive.

    In November 2010, Nook got a software upgrade that increases page refresh speed and makes navigation more responsive. I returned my Nook months ago, so I cannot tell you if the Nook's performance is now equal to the Kindle's, but Nook owners in the comments section have convinced me that the software update improves the experience of using the Nook. If performance is a big factor in your decision, visit a Best Buy and compare Kindle and Nook side by side.

    * Screen contrast

    You've seen Amazon's claims that the Kindle 3 e-ink has 50% better contrast than Kindle 2 or other e-ink devices. I have no way of precisely measuring the improvement in contrast, but I can tell you that the Kindle 3 display definitely has more contrast than Kindle 2 or Nook. The difference is noticeable, and important: more screen contrast means less eyestrain when reading in poorly lit rooms.

    In well-lit rooms, the Nook and Kindle 2 have enough contrast to allow for comfortable reading. But I often read in low-light conditions, like in bed at night, or in a poorly lit room. In these situations, reading on Nook or Kindle 2 was a bit uncomfortable and often gave me a mild headache. When I got the Kindle 3, the extra contrast was immediately noticeable, and made it more comfortable to read under less-than-ideal lighting conditions. (If you go with a Nook, just make sure you have a good reading lamp nearby.)

    * Battery life

    The Nook's color LCD touch screen drains its battery quickly - I could never get more than 5 days out of a charge. The Kindle 2 had longer battery life than the Nook, and Kindle 3 has even longer life: in the 3 months since we received our Kindle 3's, we typically get 3 weeks of battery life between charges. (We keep wireless off about half the time to save battery power.)

    * Weight

    Nook weighs about 3 ounces more than the new Kindle, and you can really feel the difference. Without a case, Nook is still light enough to hold in one hand for long reading sessions without fatigue. But in a case, Nook is a heavy sucker. The new Kindle 3 is so light, even in a case, we find it comfortable holding in one hand for long reading sessions.

    Reasons some people might prefer the Nook:

    * In-store experience

    If you need help with your nook, you can take it to any barnes and noble and get a real human to help. You can take your nook into the coffee shop section of your local B&N store and read any book for free for up to one hour per day. When you take your nook to B&N, some in-store special deals and the occasional free book pop up on your screen.

    * User-replaceable battery

    Rechargeable batteries eventually lose their ability to hold a charge. Nook's battery is user-replaceable and relatively inexpensive. To replace Kindle's battery, Amazon wants you to ship your Kindle to Amazon, and they will ship you back a DIFFERENT Kindle than the one you sent (it's the same model, for example if you send a white Kindle 3, you get a white Kindle 3 back, but you get a "refurbished" one, NOT the exact one you sent them). I don't like this at all.

    However, several people have posted comments here that have eased my concerns. Someone looked up statistics on the Kindle's battery and did some simple calculations to show that it should last for 3 or more years. Before that happens, I will surely have upgraded to a newer Kindle model by then. Also, someone found some companies that sell Kindle batteries at reasonable cost and have how-to videos that demonstrate how we can replace the battery ourselves. Doing this would void the Kindle's warranty, but the battery will probably not fail until long after the warranty expires.

    * ePub

    Nook uses the ePub format, a widely used open format. Amazon uses a proprietary ebook format. Many libraries will "lend" ebooks in the ePub format, which works with nook but not kindle. However, a free and reputable program called Calibre allows you to translate ebooks from one format to another - it supports many formats, including ePub and Kindle. The only catch is that it doesn't work with copy-protected ebooks, so you can't, for example, buy a Kindle book (which is copy protected) and translate it to ePub so you can read it on a Nook.

    * lending e-books to friends

    Nook owners can "loan" ebooks they purchased to other nook owners for up to two weeks. You can't do this with kindle - yet. Amazon has announced it will soon add this lending feature to all kindles (via a software update that will be available to people who already own kindles).

    * Nook's color LCD touchscreen

    This could be a pro or con, depending on your preferences. It makes nook hipper and less drab than kindle. Some people enjoy using the color LCD to view their library or navigate. I did, at first. But after two weeks of use, and comparisons with my wife's kindle, I found the dedicated buttons of the kindle easier and far quicker to use than the nook's color touchscreen. I also found the bright light from the color screen distracting when I was trying to read a book or newspaper (though when not in use, it shuts off after a minute or so to conserve battery).

    * expandable capacity

    Nook comes with 2GB of internal memory. If you need more capacity, you can insert a microSD card to add up to 16GB more memory. Kindle comes with 4GB of internal memory - twice as much as Nook - but there's no way to expand that. Kindle doesn't accept memory cards of any type. If you mainly use your device to read ebooks and newspapers, this shouldn't be an issue. I have over 100 books on my Kindle, and I've used only a tiny fraction of the memory. Once Kindle's memory fills up, just delete books you don't need immediate access to; you can always restore them later, in seconds, for free.

    A few other notes:

    Kindle and Nook have other features, such as an MP3 player and a web browser, but I caution you to have low expectations for these features. The MP3 player on the Kindle is like the first-generation iPod shuffle - you can't see what song is playing, and you can't navigate to other songs on your device. I don't like the browser on either device; e-ink is just not a good technology for surfing the web; it's slower and clunkier than LCD screen technology, so even the browser on an Android phone or iPod touch is more enjoyable to use. However, some commenters have more favorable views of either device's browser, and you might, too.

    * PDF support

    Kindle and Nook both handle PDF files, but in different ways. When you put a PDF file on your nook, nook converts it into an ebook-like file, then you can adjust the font size, and the text and pagination will adjust just like with any ebook. But you cannot see the original PDF file in the native format in which it was created. Kindle 3 and Kindle DX have native support for PDF files. You can see PDF files just as they would appear on your computer. You can also convert PDF files to an ebook-like format, and then Kindle handles them just the way the Nook handles them - text and pagination adjust when you change the font size. Unfortunately, some symbols, equations, and graphics get lost or mangled in the translation - even when viewing PDF files in their native format on the Kindle. Moreover, the small screen size of the Kindle 3 and the Nook is not great for PDF files, most of which are designed for a larger page size. You can zoom and pan, but this is cumbersome and tiresome. Thanks to commenters who suggested viewing PDF files in landscape mode on the Kindle (I don't know if you can do this on Nook); this way, you can see the entire top half of the page without panning, and then scroll down to the bottom half. This works a little better.

    SUMMARY:

    Nook and Kindle each offer their own advantages. We like the nook's user-replaceable battery, compatibility with ePub format, and in-store experience. But we strongly prefer Kindle 3 because its performance is zippier, its higher-contrast screen is easier to read, and it's smaller and lighter so it is more portable and more comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    * Nook Color

    Everything I wrote about the Nook in this review applies to the original Nook (which continues to be available), not the new Nook Color. To me, the Nook Color is in a different product category than the Kindle or original Nook. Nook Color has an LCD screen, like an iPad or most computer monitors. Reading on a computer screen for long periods of time is not comfortable for me - it causes fatigue and headaches. The e-ink Kindle is very comfortable for long reading sessions. So I'll take a pass on the Nook Color. But it will probably be great for others, especially people who want to watch movies, surf the web and play games on their e-reader, and don't mind the extra cost, weight, or lack of 3G. I've seen and played with a Nook Color at my local B&N, and it is a very attractive device. I'm looking forward to reading user reviews of the Nook Color when people start getting them. If you get one, please post a comment to let us know how you like it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Worth the money. Not perfect, but very very good for start to finish novels in good light, August 31, 2010
    I woke up to a nice surprise this morning: a new kindle as a gift. I have an iPad and a Kindle DX, but I guess someone heard my complaints of them being too heavy and difficult to do extended-reading on. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love my iPad and DX, but this new generation of Kindle is perfect for reading outside and for long periods of time. The iPad gets completely washed out in sunlight and often irritates my eyes staring at it for more than a couple of hours. The DX was my go-to device for those extended/outdoor reading periods, but now I have a new friend for reading novels. Instead of a replacement, this one seems more like a companion to the other devices and is a different class. The iPad works great for web browsing, shopping, productivity, games, etc while the Kindle falls short in those areas. The Kindle works great for reading novels, where the iPad falls short. For those that love to do extended-reading of magazines, newspapers, research articles, etc, I find that the DX is the go-to device.

    Without a doubt, the size and weight of the new kindle is the biggest draw for me. It's smaller than the last edition by a significant margin. I've played around with the Kindle 2 and was impressed, but now looking at the size of the new Kindle, I'm blown away. It's the absolute perfect size. Smaller would be unmanageable and larger wouldn't feel nearly as good. This is a device that you can hold up, read, and just forget that it's there. Compared to other e-readers I've tried, it's much smaller and much lighter.

    One of my biggest complaints about the previous generation Kindles and the DX is the speed. It sometimes takes a while after you push `next page' for it to actually change. In addition, the web browsing feature was so slow and clunky that it is really unusable in my opinion. Two additions to the new Kindle have helped attenuate these issues. First, the pages do flip quicker (albeit, still slow in my opinion), and the addition of wifi has allowed faster connection for wireless activities (much better than only relying on 3G). I still can't see myself using the Kindle as an internet browsing tool or really doing much online aside from purchasing reading material, but the faster connection at least opens up the possibility - something that would only frustrate me on previous editions.

    The new Kindle also offers a better contrast than previous editions and it looks fantastic compared to every other e-reader I have seen. I have no trouble seeing the screen in dim light or in bright sunlight - it really opens up the ability to read almost anywhere you are. Of course, you'll still need a separate light for extremely dark areas.

    Another big addition to the Kindle 3 is that it offers double the storage compared to Kindle 2. I've never had a problem with the amount of storage since I can't possibly see myself filling up that much space (I don't put mp3's on it), but perhaps in the future, if certain applications or media files are put on the kindle, it could have been a problem. The additional space in the new model is definitely a welcome addition, but bringing back the memory card slot that was included on Kindle 1 would have been an even more welcome addition in my opinion.

    Among e-readers, I definitely recommend the Kindle 3 if not just because it has a better size/form-factor, contrast, battery life, and speed compared to every other e-reader I have tried. On top of that, you get the wonderful amazon buying experience and selection for all your literature and can keep your kindle library intact between whatever other device you want to download a Kindle application onto.

    The question of whether you need a Kindle vs another type of device for reading becomes a little more tricky and really comes down to what you want to use it for.

    Do you want a device to read novels on, perhaps read outside, and have something very light that you almost forget it's there? Buy the Kindle.

    Do you want something to lie in bed with for short periods of time while surfing the web? I might suggest going with the iPad, a different tablet, or a netbook.

    Do you already have a Kindle 1 or 2? That's a tough one.... I don't think the new edition has enough `new' to it to warrant the upgrade in my mind, but some might value the new size and wifi capabilities even more-so than I do. For me, the new Kindle was a welcome addition to my family of devices since I didn't have anything anywhere near its form factor and convenience.

    Should you get 3G + Wifi or just Wifi? I think this question can be answered simply by asking yourself if you travel a lot. Being able to buy books and access wireless content on the road is an indispensable option and well worth the extra money in my mind. Keeping the device mainly at home or near wifi hotspots really negates the need for 3G though.

    Overall, I have to give the Kindle a 5 star rating because it does what it was designed to do very well, and in my opinion better than any of the competition. While the new features and capabilities aren't game-changing and truly outstanding, it is smaller, more capable, and better than any other e-reader out there. If you want `one device to handle it all', this isn't the place to look, but If you want a fantastic device solely for reading books, this is what you want.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A hesistant buyer rejoices on his choice, September 2, 2010
    When I first unboxed the new K3, I was slightly disappointed. The new 5-way appeared to be harder to used than the little joystick of the K2. I have to say, though, two days later, I'm liking it much better. Since I'm getting used to it so quickly, I think in another day I won't know the difference.

    The size is absolutely perfect. In the Amazon cover, it is exactly like reading from a paperback book. It's noticeably lighter and easier to hold for reading, even with arthritis in my hands. The page turn buttons are wonderful. Almost no noise, and you don't have to push them as hard. It should make it much easier for those with weak or disabled hands. I also like have next page and previous buttons on both sides. I didn't think it would make a difference to me, but it really does.

    I tried a couple of times to connect the WiFi, but didn't get it to work. Today I had more time so I thought I'd try to puzzle through it. But when I navigated to the wireless menu, it had somehow figured out how to connect on its own. The browser is MUCH faster, and it made buying a book a breeze.

    I haven't had it long enough to comment on the extended battery life. But I was honestly fine with the more than 10 days I always got with K2.

    And the FONTS! My word what a difference! I can practically read in the dark! I've been able to reduce the font size from 4 to 2. Combine sharper contrast with better fonts and it's an unbeatable combo.

    The ONLY thing I would change if I could is to move the Menu button, and especially the Back button. I'm having a little trouble navigating with the down arrow because I hit Back. But I'm starting to get the hang of it.

    All in all, I think Amazon hit it out of the park with the K3!

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 Even Better than its Predecessor, August 28, 2010
    It's no longer necessary to write about how desirable the Kindle is (or, for that matter, e-readers generally). Books and text and reading are with us to stay; only paper is becoming unnecessary. What we can discuss is how well a device performs its intended task(s), and how it compares to its competition on an absolute basis and for the price.

    My wife and I share a last gen 6" Kindle and just received a new 6" display K3. I know, Amazon doesn't call it that, but how else can users refer to it? In twenty words or less, it is an improvement over an already excellent product. Smaller, but not too small to be held comfortably. Same size display, but sharper and crisper, better contrast. Easy to use, somewhat smaller keyboard that takes a little, but very little, getting used to. It took me a few hours to stop accidentally pressing some neighboring keys, but now using the keyboard is second nature. And the page turning buttons are silent, but have sufficient tactile feedback, excellent feel.

    I found it very easy to duplicate our library from our older Kindle to our new K3, and to activate our home wifi. I don't like to say I "transferred" our books because that could be understood to mean they were taken from our old Kindle to our new one. I say "duplicate" because they reside on both Kindles. The instruction manual is detailed and somewhat lengthy, but very understandable. (It's 200 pages, but don't let that scare you; it's easy to find the parts you need, and you will never need more than a few pages at one time.) The manual is published on the device, as in the past, and can also be downloaded to your computer as a pdf file so you can read the instructions from your computer as you apply them to the K3.

    If you have wifi at home, which we do, when you are in range of a wifi that you have activated in your K3, it automatically uses that wifi, instead of connecting to the 3G AT&T network, assuming, of course, you have a 3G+wifi K3. It works faster on my home wifi than on the 3G network, so much so that if I had really thought it through before I bought it, or if I were to buy another, I would probably go wifi only and save $50. The only reasons to get the 3G+wifi model would seem to be if you don't have reliable access to wifi or if you travel a good deal to places that don't have a lot of wifi access, but do have AT&T connectivity AND you have need to download books or periodicals on a regular basis or without delay while you are away from home or office. If you can plan ahead and stock up on a few good books, and you have reliable access to wifi, such as at home/office, McDonalds or Starbucks, I suggest you think twice about whether you want the 3G+wifi K3, or the wifi only.

    Each K3 has its own email address and you can send documents to it, including Word and pdf docs, and photos. Of course, the photos are B&W, but very detailed and clear. The K3 permits surfing the web, although I haven't used it much for that purpose and, other than saying it works, I hesitate to pass judgment on how well I think someone who uses it for web browsing would like it.

    I can't compare it to other dedicated e-readers because I haven't used them. People seem to be interested in how I think it compares to the iPad, which I don't own but have "played with" somewhat extensively at the Apple Store. My assessment is that there is no comparison. The iPad will do much more, but as an e-reader I think the K3 is superior. I don't need color for reading text, the K3 is a fraction of the cost, and its smaller size makes it much more convenient to tote around. However, what kills the iPad as an e-reader, as far as I am concerned, is its weight. I suspect most of us are the same in this regard, but I tend to read for an hour or two at a stretch. A pound and a half doesn't sound too heavy, but I held an iPad for five minutes, literally, and my hands ached. It is simply too heavy to use as a book reading device, while the K3 is light as a feather. For reading, a cheaper and significantly lighter K3 as a dedicated e-reader is, IMHO, the way to go (compared to an iPad). BTW, a recent (in Aug. 2010) report from Taiwan said Apple in making a 6" iPod, which, depending on size and weight, could change the equation. It will be interesting to see how the e-reader market develops. I said I can't compare the K3 to other competitors, and I won't, but I can say I am completely satisfied with Amazon as an e-book seller. I've only had a few occasions to need support (on my old Kindle), but that has also been entirely satisfactory.

    Bottom line: my wife and I both like the K3 very much and recommend it to anyone considering buying an e-reader. I don't think you will regret buying one, with or without the free 3G.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle vs. Nook (updated 12/1/2010), August 28, 2010
    If you're trying to choose between a Nook and a Kindle, perhaps I can help. My wife and I have owned a Nook (the original one, not the new Nook Color), a Kindle 2, and a Kindle DX. When Amazon announced the Kindle 3 this summer, we pre-ordered two Kindle 3's: the wi-fi only model in graphite, and the wi-fi + 3G model in white. They arrived in late August and we have used them very regularly since then. For us, Kindle is better than Nook, but Nook is a good device with its own advantages that I will discuss below. I'll end this review with a few words about the Nook Color.

    First, reasons why we prefer the Kindle:

    * Speed

    In our experience, the Kindle is very zippy compared to the Nook. Page refresh speed (the time it takes a new page to appear after you push the page-turn button) was WAY quicker on Kindle 2 than on Nook, and it's quicker yet on Kindle 3. Yet, I read a whole book on the Nook and didn't find the slower page refresh to be annoying - you get used to it, and it's not a problem.

    For me, the more important speed difference concerns navigation - moving the cursor around the screen, for example to pick a book from your library, or to jump to a chapter by selecting it in the table of contents. On Kindle, you do this by pushing a 5-way rocker button, and the cursor moves very quickly. On Nook, you do this by activating the color LCD touchscreen (which normally shuts off when not in use, to conserve battery). A "virtual rocker button" appears on the screen, and you touch it to move the cursor. Unfortunately, the Nook cursor moves very sluggishly. This might not be a big deal to you, but it really got annoying to me, especially since my wife's Kindle was so quick and responsive.

    In November 2010, Nook got a software upgrade that increases page refresh speed and makes navigation more responsive. I returned my Nook months ago, so I cannot tell you if the Nook's performance is now equal to the Kindle's, but Nook owners in the comments section have convinced me that the software update improves the experience of using the Nook. If performance is a big factor in your decision, visit a Best Buy and compare Kindle and Nook side by side.

    * Screen contrast

    You've seen Amazon's claims that the Kindle 3 e-ink has 50% better contrast than Kindle 2 or other e-ink devices. I have no way of precisely measuring the improvement in contrast, but I can tell you that the Kindle 3 display definitely has more contrast than Kindle 2 or Nook. The difference is noticeable, and important: more screen contrast means less eyestrain when reading in poorly lit rooms.

    In well-lit rooms, the Nook and Kindle 2 have enough contrast to allow for comfortable reading. But I often read in low-light conditions, like in bed at night, or in a poorly lit room. In these situations, reading on Nook or Kindle 2 was a bit uncomfortable and often gave me a mild headache. When I got the Kindle 3, the extra contrast was immediately noticeable, and made it more comfortable to read under less-than-ideal lighting conditions. (If you go with a Nook, just make sure you have a good reading lamp nearby.)

    * Battery life

    The Nook's color LCD touch screen drains its battery quickly - I could never get more than 5 days out of a charge. The Kindle 2 had longer battery life than the Nook, and Kindle 3 has even longer life: in the 3 months since we received our Kindle 3's, we typically get 3 weeks of battery life between charges. (We keep wireless off about half the time to save battery power.)

    * Weight

    Nook weighs about 3 ounces more than the new Kindle, and you can really feel the difference. Without a case, Nook is still light enough to hold in one hand for long reading sessions without fatigue. But in a case, Nook is a heavy sucker. The new Kindle 3 is so light, even in a case, we find it comfortable holding in one hand for long reading sessions.

    Reasons some people might prefer the Nook:

    * In-store experience

    If you need help with your nook, you can take it to any barnes and noble and get a real human to help. You can take your nook into the coffee shop section of your local B&N store and read any book for free for up to one hour per day. When you take your nook to B&N, some in-store special deals and the occasional free book pop up on your screen.

    * User-replaceable battery

    Rechargeable batteries eventually lose their ability to hold a charge. Nook's battery is user-replaceable and relatively inexpensive. To replace Kindle's battery, Amazon wants you to ship your Kindle to Amazon, and they will ship you back a DIFFERENT Kindle than the one you sent (it's the same model, for example if you send a white Kindle 3, you get a white Kindle 3 back, but you get a "refurbished" one, NOT the exact one you sent them). I don't like this at all.

    However, several people have posted comments here that have eased my concerns. Someone looked up statistics on the Kindle's battery and did some simple calculations to show that it should last for 3 or more years. Before that happens, I will surely have upgraded to a newer Kindle model by then. Also, someone found some companies that sell Kindle batteries at reasonable cost and have how-to videos that demonstrate how we can replace the battery ourselves. Doing this would void the Kindle's warranty, but the battery will probably not fail until long after the warranty expires.

    * ePub

    Nook uses the ePub format, a widely used open format. Amazon uses a proprietary ebook format. Many libraries will "lend" ebooks in the ePub format, which works with nook but not kindle. However, a free and reputable program called Calibre allows you to translate ebooks from one format to another - it supports many formats, including ePub and Kindle. The only catch is that it doesn't work with copy-protected ebooks, so you can't, for example, buy a Kindle book (which is copy protected) and translate it to ePub so you can read it on a Nook.

    * lending e-books to friends

    Nook owners can "loan" ebooks they purchased to other nook owners for up to two weeks. You can't do this with kindle - yet. Amazon has announced it will soon add this lending feature to all kindles (via a software update that will be available to people who already own kindles).

    * Nook's color LCD touchscreen

    This could be a pro or con, depending on your preferences. It makes nook hipper and less drab than kindle. Some people enjoy using the color LCD to view their library or navigate. I did, at first. But after two weeks of use, and comparisons with my wife's kindle, I found the dedicated buttons of the kindle easier and far quicker to use than the nook's color touchscreen. I also found the bright light from the color screen distracting when I was trying to read a book or newspaper (though when not in use, it shuts off after a minute or so to conserve battery).

    * expandable capacity

    Nook comes with 2GB of internal memory. If you need more capacity, you can insert a microSD card to add up to 16GB more memory. Kindle comes with 4GB of internal memory - twice as much as Nook - but there's no way to expand that. Kindle doesn't accept memory cards of any type. If you mainly use your device to read ebooks and newspapers, this shouldn't be an issue. I have over 100 books on my Kindle, and I've used only a tiny fraction of the memory. Once Kindle's memory fills up, just delete books you don't need immediate access to; you can always restore them later, in seconds, for free.

    A few other notes:

    Kindle and Nook have other features, such as an MP3 player and a web browser, but I caution you to have low expectations for these features. The MP3 player on the Kindle is like the first-generation iPod shuffle - you can't see what song is playing, and you can't navigate to other songs on your device. I don't like the browser on either device; e-ink is just not a good technology for surfing the web; it's slower and clunkier than LCD screen technology, so even the browser on an Android phone or iPod touch is more enjoyable to use. However, some commenters have more favorable views of either device's browser, and you might, too.

    * PDF support

    Kindle and Nook both handle PDF files, but in different ways. When you put a PDF file on your nook, nook converts it into an ebook-like file, then you can adjust the font size, and the text and pagination will adjust just like with any ebook. But you cannot see the original PDF file in the native format in which it was created. Kindle 3 and Kindle DX have native support for PDF files. You can see PDF files just as they would appear on your computer. You can also convert PDF files to an ebook-like format, and then Kindle handles them just the way the Nook handles them - text and pagination adjust when you change the font size. Unfortunately, some symbols, equations, and graphics get lost or mangled in the translation - even when viewing PDF files in their native format on the Kindle. Moreover, the small screen size of the Kindle 3 and the Nook is not great for PDF files, most of which are designed for a larger page size. You can zoom and pan, but this is cumbersome and tiresome. Thanks to commenters who suggested viewing PDF files in landscape mode on the Kindle (I don't know if you can do this on Nook); this way, you can see the entire top half of the page without panning, and then scroll down to the bottom half. This works a little better.

    SUMMARY:

    Nook and Kindle each offer their own advantages. We like the nook's user-replaceable battery, compatibility with ePub format, and in-store experience. But we strongly prefer Kindle 3 because its performance is zippier, its higher-contrast screen is easier to read, and it's smaller and lighter so it is more portable and more comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    * Nook Color

    Everything I wrote about the Nook in this review applies to the original Nook (which continues to be available), not the new Nook Color. To me, the Nook Color is in a different product category than the Kindle or original Nook. Nook Color has an LCD screen, like an iPad or most computer monitors. Reading on a computer screen for long periods of time is not comfortable for me - it causes fatigue and headaches. The e-ink Kindle is very comfortable for long reading sessions. So I'll take a pass on the Nook Color. But it will probably be great for others, especially people who want to watch movies, surf the web and play games on their e-reader, and don't mind the extra cost, weight, or lack of 3G. I've seen and played with a Nook Color at my local B&N, and it is a very attractive device. I'm looking forward to reading user reviews of the Nook Color when people start getting them. If you get one, please post a comment to let us know how you like it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Worth the money. Not perfect, but very very good for start to finish novels in good light, August 31, 2010
    The Kindle is my first e-ink reader. I own an iPad, an iPhone, and have owned a Windows-based phone in the past that I used as an ereader.

    My overall impression of the device is good.

    The good:
    I'd honestly rather read linear (read from page one to the end, one page at a time) fiction from it than a book, because I can't always get comfortable with a book. Hardcovers are sometimes a bit heavy, and paperbacks don't always lie open easily. The Kindle is incredibly light and thin. I can hold it in one hand easily. The page turn buttons are conveniently located. Page-turns aren't instant, but they're probably quicker than turning a physical page in a printed book (there are just a lot more page-turns unless you choose a small font). The contrast is better than other ereaders I've seen. There is zero eye strain in good light. My eyesight isn't the greatest and I like being able to increase the font size and read without glasses. I love being able to browse the Kindle store and read samples before deciding to purchase. The "experimental" browser is surprisingly usable, but isn't great. It is useful for browsing wikipedia and blogs. The biggest drawback to the browser is the awkward pointer navigation, using the 5-way pad. It syncs your furthest read page over the internet so you can pick up where you left off using your iPhone or iPad.

    The so-so:
    The kindle store could use more categories and sorting options. You can't sort by "top rated," and there is no category for "alternate histories," for example. Finding a very-specific type of fiction relies on keyword searches, which don't do a great job. The wifi sometimes doesn't connect before it times-out. You rarely need the wifi, but it is annoying if you change a setting, answer "OK" to the prompt to connect, and the thing tells you it failed to connect two seconds later (the exact moment it indicates that it did finally connect, then you need to go back to update the setting again). Most settings don't require a connection, but it is a minor annoyance. Most of your time will be spent reading, and of course your books are stored on the device and a connection is not required. Part of me wishes I'd bought the 3G model, because the browser is good enough that having lifetime free 3G wireless would be worth the extra money. Magazines don't look very good and are not very easy to navigate. There is minor glare in some lighting conditions, mostly when a lamp is positioned behind the reader's head.

    The bad:
    The contrast is fair to poor in dim light. It is much easier to read a printed page in dim light. In good light, contrast is on par with a pulp paperback. In dim light it feels almost like reading from an old Palm Pilot (resolution is better than an old Palm, but contrast is bad in dim light). The screen is small enough that the frequency of page turns is pretty high. Even in good light, the light gray background is less pleasant than the eggshell background of a printed page. You must tell it to sync before you switch it off, if you expect the feature allowing you to pick up where you left off using other devices to work correctly. The copy protection prevents you from using the files on anything other than Kindle software or devices.

    Vs iPad:
    IPad is a lot better for magazines, reference materials, and illustrated materials. Kindle is worlds better for reading novels. IPad is pretty heavy, making it more difficult to hold in your hand or carry with you everywhere. Kindle is much more portable and easier to hold. IPad has some amazing children's books and magazines, which take advantage of its multimedia features. IPad is unreadable in sunlight and glare is bad in bright light. Kindle is as good as a printed page in bright light. Ipad serves as a creative tool, a computing tool, a gaming tool, and a communication tool. Kindle is only a novel machine. I don't regret buying either one of them. An iPad won't replace books, but a Kindle can, if the book is text-only.

    I highly recommend this device at its new low price if you are a frequent reader of novels. I love my kindle. Just don't expect it to be more than it is. Leave the magazines and such to the tablet computers.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I Wanted a Dedicated E-Reader, and That's What I Got, September 7, 2010
    I'm a first-time Kindle owner, so I have nothing to "compare" the latest Kindle to. I don't own a Nook. I don't own an iPad (and, in any case, that's comparing apples to oranges). I don't have a Sony e-reader. '

    This will be a short, simple review.

    I received my Kindle about a week ago and haven't been able to put it down.

    Things I like about my Kindle?
    1. The e-ink display is amazing.
    2. Using the 5-way controller is simple and effective.
    3. Page turn speeds are faster than I thought they would be.
    4. It's lightweight, even with the attached cover (I have an Amazon cover with a built-in light)
    5. Page-turning buttons are quiet and well-placed.
    6. Recharge time is fast.
    7. I can order a book and start reading it in less than 60 seconds. Nice!
    8. Portability... I can take 3,000 books with me when I travel for work and not require additional suitcases or baggage fees.

    Things I'm not too keen on?
    1. Buttons are too close together and are laid out oddly.
    2. Lack of individual number buttons is frustrating.
    3. Power button on the bottom? Not a bad thing. Just an odd thing. (Same for the headphone input). I usually rest the "bottom" of a book on my lap when I read.

    Things I hope change in the future?
    1. How books are organized... When I put a book in a collection (which is actually a "tag"), it still appears in the main list. It's not actually "moved", it's merely associated.
    2. The look of the main screen. I'd like "folders" or some other way to display "collections".
    3. Ability to create personal "screen savers."
    4. E-book pricing, though Amazon has little control over this. Still, most titles are the same price as or less than their hardback/paperback counterparts. (And I'm not opposed to paying more for convenience and portability).

    Things that don't bother me regarding other reviews?
    1. The browser is experimental. Amazon has created a dedicated e-reader, and it's meant to be used to read. Period. Not browse the web. If you want to browse the web, get a computer -- not an e-reader.
    2. The Kindle is not an mP3 player, either. Yes, it's nice to have some classical music playing in the background while I read, but I don't need to see the title of the song, album art, etc. (And you can skip from track to track on the Kindle using shortcut keys).
    3. Lack of a "color" or "touch" screen.

    In summary, for $139, I'm quite thrilled with my purchase and have arleady read multiple books on it. In fact, I think I've read more in the past week than I've read in the past month.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not the perfect "do-it-all" device, but very close to being the perfect e-reading device!, August 26, 2010
    I woke up to a nice surprise this morning: a new kindle as a gift. I have an iPad and a Kindle DX, but I guess someone heard my complaints of them being too heavy and difficult to do extended-reading on. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love my iPad and DX, but this new generation of Kindle is perfect for reading outside and for long periods of time. The iPad gets completely washed out in sunlight and often irritates my eyes staring at it for more than a couple of hours. The DX was my go-to device for those extended/outdoor reading periods, but now I have a new friend for reading novels. Instead of a replacement, this one seems more like a companion to the other devices and is a different class. The iPad works great for web browsing, shopping, productivity, games, etc while the Kindle falls short in those areas. The Kindle works great for reading novels, where the iPad falls short. For those that love to do extended-reading of magazines, newspapers, research articles, etc, I find that the DX is the go-to device.

    Without a doubt, the size and weight of the new kindle is the biggest draw for me. It's smaller than the last edition by a significant margin. I've played around with the Kindle 2 and was impressed, but now looking at the size of the new Kindle, I'm blown away. It's the absolute perfect size. Smaller would be unmanageable and larger wouldn't feel nearly as good. This is a device that you can hold up, read, and just forget that it's there. Compared to other e-readers I've tried, it's much smaller and much lighter.

    One of my biggest complaints about the previous generation Kindles and the DX is the speed. It sometimes takes a while after you push `next page' for it to actually change. In addition, the web browsing feature was so slow and clunky that it is really unusable in my opinion. Two additions to the new Kindle have helped attenuate these issues. First, the pages do flip quicker (albeit, still slow in my opinion), and the addition of wifi has allowed faster connection for wireless activities (much better than only relying on 3G). I still can't see myself using the Kindle as an internet browsing tool or really doing much online aside from purchasing reading material, but the faster connection at least opens up the possibility - something that would only frustrate me on previous editions.

    The new Kindle also offers a better contrast than previous editions and it looks fantastic compared to every other e-reader I have seen. I have no trouble seeing the screen in dim light or in bright sunlight - it really opens up the ability to read almost anywhere you are. Of course, you'll still need a separate light for extremely dark areas.

    Another big addition to the Kindle 3 is that it offers double the storage compared to Kindle 2. I've never had a problem with the amount of storage since I can't possibly see myself filling up that much space (I don't put mp3's on it), but perhaps in the future, if certain applications or media files are put on the kindle, it could have been a problem. The additional space in the new model is definitely a welcome addition, but bringing back the memory card slot that was included on Kindle 1 would have been an even more welcome addition in my opinion.

    Among e-readers, I definitely recommend the Kindle 3 if not just because it has a better size/form-factor, contrast, battery life, and speed compared to every other e-reader I have tried. On top of that, you get the wonderful amazon buying experience and selection for all your literature and can keep your kindle library intact between whatever other device you want to download a Kindle application onto.

    The question of whether you need a Kindle vs another type of device for reading becomes a little more tricky and really comes down to what you want to use it for.

    Do you want a device to read novels on, perhaps read outside, and have something very light that you almost forget it's there? Buy the Kindle.

    Do you want something to lie in bed with for short periods of time while surfing the web? I might suggest going with the iPad, a different tablet, or a netbook.

    Do you already have a Kindle 1 or 2? That's a tough one.... I don't think the new edition has enough `new' to it to warrant the upgrade in my mind, but some might value the new size and wifi capabilities even more-so than I do. For me, the new Kindle was a welcome addition to my family of devices since I didn't have anything anywhere near its form factor and convenience.

    Should you get 3G + Wifi or just Wifi? I think this question can be answered simply by asking yourself if you travel a lot. Being able to buy books and access wireless content on the road is an indispensable option and well worth the extra money in my mind. Keeping the device mainly at home or near wifi hotspots really negates the need for 3G though.

    Overall, I have to give the Kindle a 5 star rating because it does what it was designed to do very well, and in my opinion better than any of the competition. While the new features and capabilities aren't game-changing and truly outstanding, it is smaller, more capable, and better than any other e-reader out there. If you want `one device to handle it all', this isn't the place to look, but If you want a fantastic device solely for reading books, this is what you want.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A hesistant buyer rejoices on his choice, September 2, 2010
    I researched the purchase of a Kindle for a long time. I couldn't decide whether or not it was worth buying a dedicated e-reader. Boy am I glad I made this purchase. The downside to Amazon's online selling of Kindle 3 is that the customers don't get to see it in person. It is much better in person. This may sound stupid, but when I got my new Kindle, I thought there was a stuck-on overlay on the screen containing a diagram of the unit's buttons, etc. I actually tried to peel it off. Doh! The e-ink on this unit is THAT good. I didn't realize that I was staring at the actual display. I also didn't realize that no power is required until the display changes. (thus the great battery life) I do a lot of reading, but was facing the prospect of reading less or buying large type books because of my variable and deteriorating eyesight. The new Kindle has been a godsend. Now, I can decide the size of type I need depending on my level of fatigue among other things. The weight and ergonomics are very good. For someone, like me, with neuropathy in his hands, it is extremely easy to manage and enjoyable to own. To me, it is easier to read than print books. The ease of navigation is great as is the speed. The battery life, so far, has been extraordinary. It easily connected to our home Wi-Fi, which by design does not broadcast an SSID. It downloads books so fast that I almost thought they were not completely received. I did not buy the 3G version because of the price difference and the fact that there is no coverage where I live. If you are not constantly traveling, I don't see the need to spend the extra bucks, but that is a matter of personal choice. For those who have no Wi-Fi at home, remember that you can always download the material to your computer and transfer it via USB. Just today I was watching an interview with Tony Blair on TV. He was talking about his new book, which sounded interesting. I picked up the Kindle and downloaded a free sample before the interview was over. I have only read the preface so far, but will probably buy the book. Now THAT is a great way to buy a book! I haven't used online browsing extensively yet, but find it reasonable for what the device is. This is primarily a book reader, not a laptop or notebook. They are great for what they do, but can't match the e-ink display, or the light weight. For those of you worrying about the wait for the new Kindle, let me end with, "It is worth the wait" This new Kindle is all about the quality of experience. There are many format choices for electronic reading. If you want the best experience, go with the Kindle.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Solid Improvements! Check out my video review!, August 27, 2010
    I just received my new Kindle, and my early impressions are very positive - it's definitely a solid step up from the previous generation Kindle. Check out my video review to see/hear more!

    UPDATE 9/7/2010: Hey guys - based on the comments received there are definitely some questions that people are interested in that I didn't touch on in my video review - so I wanted to take some time to answer some of those questions here. Hopefully this is helpful!

    Q: Is the Kindle 3 backlit? If not, then how do you see it at night?

    A: The Kindle 3 is not backlit. For the Kindle 2 I used a leather case with a reading light clipped to it. For the Kindle 3 Amazon produced a leather case that has a built-in reading light. I've been using it since day 1 and I love it. I made a video review for that also if you want to check it out:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R27V1SXQSI9M86/

    Q: How well does the new joystick control work?

    A: The new Kindle replaces the old five-way navigation joystick with a center button surrounded by a thin 4-way directional control. After messing around with both of these approaches, I don't really have a strong personal preference one way or another - they both work fine for me.

    If you have big hands then I can definitely see having a bit of trouble getting used to the new joystick. The directional control is very thin, and if you're going to have trouble with any button on the Kindle... that's definitely going to be the one.

    Q: How is viewing PDFs on the Kindle 3? Are they easy to upload onto the Kindle?

    A: Uploading PDFs to the Kindle is very easy. You just connect your Kindle to your computer via USB cable and then drag and drop the PDFs. Totally simple. Viewing them is pretty decent, but the major problem is that most PDFs aren't designed for a 6 inch screen. You might have to do a lot of zooming and panning to see the content you want. If you plan on viewing a ton of PDFs, then you may want to check out the Kindle DX Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G, 9.7" Display, Graphite, 3G Works Globally  Latest Generation.

    Q: How well does the text-to-speech work?

    A: It's ok. You definitely won't mistake it for a professionally produced audiobook, but it doesn't sound as bad as you may think it will. Also note that text-to-speech is not available for every book. You can see on the product page for each Kindle book if text-to-speech is enabled or not.

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 is perfect, August 28, 2010
    When I first unboxed the new K3, I was slightly disappointed. The new 5-way appeared to be harder to used than the little joystick of the K2. I have to say, though, two days later, I'm liking it much better. Since I'm getting used to it so quickly, I think in another day I won't know the difference.

    The size is absolutely perfect. In the Amazon cover, it is exactly like reading from a paperback book. It's noticeably lighter and easier to hold for reading, even with arthritis in my hands. The page turn buttons are wonderful. Almost no noise, and you don't have to push them as hard. It should make it much easier for those with weak or disabled hands. I also like have next page and previous buttons on both sides. I didn't think it would make a difference to me, but it really does.

    I tried a couple of times to connect the WiFi, but didn't get it to work. Today I had more time so I thought I'd try to puzzle through it. But when I navigated to the wireless menu, it had somehow figured out how to connect on its own. The browser is MUCH faster, and it made buying a book a breeze.

    I haven't had it long enough to comment on the extended battery life. But I was honestly fine with the more than 10 days I always got with K2.

    And the FONTS! My word what a difference! I can practically read in the dark! I've been able to reduce the font size from 4 to 2. Combine sharper contrast with better fonts and it's an unbeatable combo.

    The ONLY thing I would change if I could is to move the Menu button, and especially the Back button. I'm having a little trouble navigating with the down arrow because I hit Back. But I'm starting to get the hang of it.

    All in all, I think Amazon hit it out of the park with the K3!

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 Even Better than its Predecessor, August 28, 2010
    It's no longer necessary to write about how desirable the Kindle is (or, for that matter, e-readers generally). Books and text and reading are with us to stay; only paper is becoming unnecessary. What we can discuss is how well a device performs its intended task(s), and how it compares to its competition on an absolute basis and for the price.

    My wife and I share a last gen 6" Kindle and just received a new 6" display K3. I know, Amazon doesn't call it that, but how else can users refer to it? In twenty words or less, it is an improvement over an already excellent product. Smaller, but not too small to be held comfortably. Same size display, but sharper and crisper, better contrast. Easy to use, somewhat smaller keyboard that takes a little, but very little, getting used to. It took me a few hours to stop accidentally pressing some neighboring keys, but now using the keyboard is second nature. And the page turning buttons are silent, but have sufficient tactile feedback, excellent feel.

    I found it very easy to duplicate our library from our older Kindle to our new K3, and to activate our home wifi. I don't like to say I "transferred" our books because that could be understood to mean they were taken from our old Kindle to our new one. I say "duplicate" because they reside on both Kindles. The instruction manual is detailed and somewhat lengthy, but very understandable. (It's 200 pages, but don't let that scare you; it's easy to find the parts you need, and you will never need more than a few pages at one time.) The manual is published on the device, as in the past, and can also be downloaded to your computer as a pdf file so you can read the instructions from your computer as you apply them to the K3.

    If you have wifi at home, which we do, when you are in range of a wifi that you have activated in your K3, it automatically uses that wifi, instead of connecting to the 3G AT&T network, assuming, of course, you have a 3G+wifi K3. It works faster on my home wifi than on the 3G network, so much so that if I had really thought it through before I bought it, or if I were to buy another, I would probably go wifi only and save $50. The only reasons to get the 3G+wifi model would seem to be if you don't have reliable access to wifi or if you travel a good deal to places that don't have a lot of wifi access, but do have AT&T connectivity AND you have need to download books or periodicals on a regular basis or without delay while you are away from home or office. If you can plan ahead and stock up on a few good books, and you have reliable access to wifi, such as at home/office, McDonalds or Starbucks, I suggest you think twice about whether you want the 3G+wifi K3, or the wifi only.

    Each K3 has its own email address and you can send documents to it, including Word and pdf docs, and photos. Of course, the photos are B&W, but very detailed and clear. The K3 permits surfing the web, although I haven't used it much for that purpose and, other than saying it works, I hesitate to pass judgment on how well I think someone who uses it for web browsing would like it.

    I can't compare it to other dedicated e-readers because I haven't used them. People seem to be interested in how I think it compares to the iPad, which I don't own but have "played with" somewhat extensively at the Apple Store. My assessment is that there is no comparison. The iPad will do much more, but as an e-reader I think the K3 is superior. I don't need color for reading text, the K3 is a fraction of the cost, and its smaller size makes it much more convenient to tote around. However, what kills the iPad as an e-reader, as far as I am concerned, is its weight. I suspect most of us are the same in this regard, but I tend to read for an hour or two at a stretch. A pound and a half doesn't sound too heavy, but I held an iPad for five minutes, literally, and my hands ached. It is simply too heavy to use as a book reading device, while the K3 is light as a feather. For reading, a cheaper and significantly lighter K3 as a dedicated e-reader is, IMHO, the way to go (compared to an iPad). BTW, a recent (in Aug. 2010) report from Taiwan said Apple in making a 6" iPod, which, depending on size and weight, could change the equation. It will be interesting to see how the e-reader market develops. I said I can't compare the K3 to other competitors, and I won't, but I can say I am completely satisfied with Amazon as an e-book seller. I've only had a few occasions to need support (on my old Kindle), but that has also been entirely satisfactory.

    Bottom line: my wife and I both like the K3 very much and recommend it to anyone considering buying an e-reader. I don't think you will regret buying one, with or without the free 3G.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Quality control problems, September 7, 2010
    First, the good stuff. Kindle 3 has a very readable high contrast screen. The form factor is small and light enough to be a book replacement. Purchasing and downloading content is simple and convenient.

    However, I had a series of problems which eventually led me to return my Kindle.

    After unpacking and charging my Kindle 3, it refused to connect to my wireless network. I have a variety of other devices ranging from a Nintendo Wii to an iPod Touch and two computers that work just fine on my wireless network, but the Kindle couldn't connect after many attempts. I eventually gave up and turned it off. When I turned it back on several hours later, it had mysteriously connected to my WiFi network with the exact same settings that did not work earlier. I have noticed that several other users have ran into the same problem.

    The next problem I noticed was that something was rolling around inside the casing. This is obviously not a good sign. Then, my Kindle 3 started freezing. The first freeze happened while using the experimental browser. As this is an "experimental" application, I wasn't too concerned. After a power reset, the Kindle came back up. The second freeze happened while playing Shuffled Row, which is a good game. After this freeze, my Kindle refused to reboot after many power reset attempts. (Yes, I did try keeping the power switch in the "turn-on" position for up to 30 seconds as suggested by the manual.) I eventually gave up and put it down. However, after a few minutes, the Kindle started to reboot itself. The was another freeze while reading a book, which was fixed with a power reset. I tried to contact Amazon for service, but it looks like the only way to get Kindle customer service is through a phone call.

    And then my Kindle froze again while reading a book. This time, nothing would reset the kindle. When this last freeze happened, the battery was charged about 75%. At this point, there was no option but to return the kindle. There are some comments among the negative reviews here that the usual Amazon.com return process does not work. In my case, I was able to follow the regular Amazon return process and print a return label. So my Kindle is back to Amazon after less than a week of use.

    Judging from other reviews that had similar experiences as mine, Amazon appears to have a specific quality control problem with this latest version of the Kindle. People may be more tolerant of the reliability other electronic gadgets, however, it is unacceptable for a product that is primarily intended to replace paper books to have issues like freezing and/or rebooting. After all, I never had a "paper" book freeze or reboot on me so far. Receiving a product with defects that should have been caught during testing before shipping pretty much destroys the "Kindle experience".

    UPDATE (October 31, 2010): Since I do like the Kindle concept, after reading about the improvement in stability with the latest software upgrades, I purchased another Kindle WiFi. Everything was great for almost two weeks, no crashes. However, yesterday, the second Kindle also ended up with a frozen screen. After following through the instructions on Amazon's Kindle troubleshooting page and talking to the customer service, there was no way to get the Kindle out of the frozen state, so this one is also going back. The fact that this situation can happen to the same customer twice in a matter of few months indicates either a serious quality control problem or component reliability problem.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Details on working with PDF, Wi-fi vs 3G, Starbucks, Audio books, MP3 and other things, August 27, 2010
    NOTE: Amazon limits the video size and duration, so I targeted what I thought were some key points.
    I check comments, so leave one if you have any questions not covered in the video or below and I'll try and answer.

    First off I love this device!!
    Like ipods are the king of MP3 players, this is the king of ebook readers in my opinion.

    I've been looking at this thing for at least 7+ hrs today and my eyes don't feel tired at all.

    If you want. . .
    * a low cost eBook reader
    * that allows you to read books
    * looks great
    * easy to setup
    * easy to hold/carry
    * easy on the eyes (no getting tired eyes from a glaring screen)
    . . . then look no further than this product!



    **Adding updates as I find other feature behaviors**

    - The comic I converted to PDF when emailed to my kindle email address the conversion process didn't like it too much. Better to not use the conversion process for those types of PDFs. Other PDF's converted just fine.
    - Emailing PDF = the conversion process seems to cut off the cover page each time
    - Emailing and having amazon convert is fast. I like it!
    - You can plug the kindle into the USB, then "eject" it from the OS. This allows you to continue to charge the kindle and read it at the same time. You could also just plug it into an electrical socket and read from it too.
    - If you stop/pause your MP3 music it will start all the way back at track #1. This is not an MP3 player. It also plays the most recently added track first
    - 10 minutes it goes into sleep mode, but if you leave Wi-fi on = drains your battery quicker. Better to turn Wi-fi off when not using it
    - Buy a case to protect it and get yourself a light for times when you don't have enough light to read by. This is not a cell-phone screen, meaning you can't read it in the dark. The screen very much simulates paper in this case.
    - Manual even states...you cannot connect the Wi-fi to a corporate wi-fi. Most companies require VPN of some sort, which is not supported here.
    - Loaded a 25Mb PDF and when when trying to search I get the following error message, ""your search can not be completed as this item has not been indexed. Please try again later." Found forum posts that said give the Kindle at least 10 minutes to complete indexing the file. . .longer if file if big. Sure enough, about 30 minutes later I tried again and was able to search this large PDF.

    8/29/10 update:
    - Just got back from Starbucks
    * Turned wi-fi on
    * Menu > Settings > Wifi Settings and selected the attwifi network option
    * Home > Menu > Experimental > Launch browser
    * zoom in on the terms & agreement checkbox and use the spacebar to check the box
    * click continue button and you are on the internet at the coffee shop!!

    9/3/10 update:
    - A week later, I haven't charged the unit nor shut it down, I've only put it into sleep mode. Battery indicator is still more than 80% full. Nice!
    - Someone pointed me towards "Calibre" a free conversion utility. Totally supports the Kindle 3 and converts to PDF, ePub, Mobi, etc. Works great and you can have the program send the converted document directly to your device via USB or email. The program also acts as your own "backup" by creating a document library on your hard drive that can be sorted, metadata updated, etc. It's very cool!

    9/5/10 update:
    - I kept getting unconverted PDFs (PDFs copied directly to unit via USB vs. sending to email for conversion) would result in the unit restarting when trying to access the PDF. Found forums that said you need to reset the unit. Slide & hold the power button for 15 seconds. Let it take the 20 seconds to reboot. This worked for me.

    9/10/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Annotating PDFs, then accessing these notes for later review on a laptop/desktop
    - Is there an auto-scrolling for PDFs? = No
    - What its like to have the kindle "read" back to you? = robotic voice that ignores punctuation
    - More info on document conversion, including sending emails to the kindle for conversion?
    - The ability to access Gmail from the kindle? = yes, works fine though a bit slow on wi-fi

    9/19/10 update:
    - Check out the comments for my answer to, "Should I buy 3G or is wifi good enough?" = need to buy a book on the run, then get 3G. If you can wait till you get home or a coffee shop, then wi-fi works fine.

    9/24/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Exactly how does an Audible audio book work with the Kindle?
    - Possible causes for why MP3 music is not recognized by the device?

    10/2/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you play Audible audio books while at the same time reading along? = for all intents and purposes, no
    - How easy is it to register a new/used K3 to a different owner? = easy as pie

    10/23/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you change out the battery yourself? = no
    - Can you share your documents with other kindle users? = legally only if both devices are under the same user account

    12/7/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can a color document show up as color on the kindle? = No, doc will be converted to greyscale
    - Able to support textbooks? = Yes, if in a supported document type
    - Should I pay the extra $50 for 3G in order to more easily access websites? = Up to you...many sites have mobile versions that load great on wi-fi. NOTE: still doesn't support sites that use Java
    - Will I have 3G coverage in my rural area? = Amazon gives a disclaimer in their FAQ that 3G connection is not guaranteed in some areas
    - Should I get the K3 for my 10 year old? = I personally feel this is a great device for any age reader. . .and gives the parent control/visibility to what is being read
    ... Read more


    2. Kindle 3G Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G + Wi-Fi, 3G Works Globally, Graphite, 6" Display with New E Ink Pearl Technology
    Electronics
    list price: $189.00 -- our price: $189.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B002FQJT3Q
    Manufacturer: Amazon.com
    Sales Rank: 1
    Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    The all-new Kindle has a new electronic-ink screen with 50 percent better contrast than any other e-reader, a new sleek design with a 21 percent smaller body while still keeping the same 6-inch-size reading area, and a 15 percent lighter weight at just 8.7 ounces.The new Kindle also offers 20 percent faster page turns, up to one month of battery life, double the storage to 3,500 books, built-in Wi-Fi, a graphite color option and more—all for only $189, and still with free 3G wireless—no monthly bills or annual contracts. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle vs. Nook (updated 12/1/2010), August 28, 2010
    If you're trying to choose between a Nook and a Kindle, perhaps I can help. My wife and I have owned a Nook (the original one, not the new Nook Color), a Kindle 2, and a Kindle DX. When Amazon announced the Kindle 3 this summer, we pre-ordered two Kindle 3's: the wi-fi only model in graphite, and the wi-fi + 3G model in white. They arrived in late August and we have used them very regularly since then. For us, Kindle is better than Nook, but Nook is a good device with its own advantages that I will discuss below. I'll end this review with a few words about the Nook Color.

    First, reasons why we prefer the Kindle:

    * Speed

    In our experience, the Kindle is very zippy compared to the Nook. Page refresh speed (the time it takes a new page to appear after you push the page-turn button) was WAY quicker on Kindle 2 than on Nook, and it's quicker yet on Kindle 3. Yet, I read a whole book on the Nook and didn't find the slower page refresh to be annoying - you get used to it, and it's not a problem.

    For me, the more important speed difference concerns navigation - moving the cursor around the screen, for example to pick a book from your library, or to jump to a chapter by selecting it in the table of contents. On Kindle, you do this by pushing a 5-way rocker button, and the cursor moves very quickly. On Nook, you do this by activating the color LCD touchscreen (which normally shuts off when not in use, to conserve battery). A "virtual rocker button" appears on the screen, and you touch it to move the cursor. Unfortunately, the Nook cursor moves very sluggishly. This might not be a big deal to you, but it really got annoying to me, especially since my wife's Kindle was so quick and responsive.

    In November 2010, Nook got a software upgrade that increases page refresh speed and makes navigation more responsive. I returned my Nook months ago, so I cannot tell you if the Nook's performance is now equal to the Kindle's, but Nook owners in the comments section have convinced me that the software update improves the experience of using the Nook. If performance is a big factor in your decision, visit a Best Buy and compare Kindle and Nook side by side.

    * Screen contrast

    You've seen Amazon's claims that the Kindle 3 e-ink has 50% better contrast than Kindle 2 or other e-ink devices. I have no way of precisely measuring the improvement in contrast, but I can tell you that the Kindle 3 display definitely has more contrast than Kindle 2 or Nook. The difference is noticeable, and important: more screen contrast means less eyestrain when reading in poorly lit rooms.

    In well-lit rooms, the Nook and Kindle 2 have enough contrast to allow for comfortable reading. But I often read in low-light conditions, like in bed at night, or in a poorly lit room. In these situations, reading on Nook or Kindle 2 was a bit uncomfortable and often gave me a mild headache. When I got the Kindle 3, the extra contrast was immediately noticeable, and made it more comfortable to read under less-than-ideal lighting conditions. (If you go with a Nook, just make sure you have a good reading lamp nearby.)

    * Battery life

    The Nook's color LCD touch screen drains its battery quickly - I could never get more than 5 days out of a charge. The Kindle 2 had longer battery life than the Nook, and Kindle 3 has even longer life: in the 3 months since we received our Kindle 3's, we typically get 3 weeks of battery life between charges. (We keep wireless off about half the time to save battery power.)

    * Weight

    Nook weighs about 3 ounces more than the new Kindle, and you can really feel the difference. Without a case, Nook is still light enough to hold in one hand for long reading sessions without fatigue. But in a case, Nook is a heavy sucker. The new Kindle 3 is so light, even in a case, we find it comfortable holding in one hand for long reading sessions.

    Reasons some people might prefer the Nook:

    * In-store experience

    If you need help with your nook, you can take it to any barnes and noble and get a real human to help. You can take your nook into the coffee shop section of your local B&N store and read any book for free for up to one hour per day. When you take your nook to B&N, some in-store special deals and the occasional free book pop up on your screen.

    * User-replaceable battery

    Rechargeable batteries eventually lose their ability to hold a charge. Nook's battery is user-replaceable and relatively inexpensive. To replace Kindle's battery, Amazon wants you to ship your Kindle to Amazon, and they will ship you back a DIFFERENT Kindle than the one you sent (it's the same model, for example if you send a white Kindle 3, you get a white Kindle 3 back, but you get a "refurbished" one, NOT the exact one you sent them). I don't like this at all.

    However, several people have posted comments here that have eased my concerns. Someone looked up statistics on the Kindle's battery and did some simple calculations to show that it should last for 3 or more years. Before that happens, I will surely have upgraded to a newer Kindle model by then. Also, someone found some companies that sell Kindle batteries at reasonable cost and have how-to videos that demonstrate how we can replace the battery ourselves. Doing this would void the Kindle's warranty, but the battery will probably not fail until long after the warranty expires.

    * ePub

    Nook uses the ePub format, a widely used open format. Amazon uses a proprietary ebook format. Many libraries will "lend" ebooks in the ePub format, which works with nook but not kindle. However, a free and reputable program called Calibre allows you to translate ebooks from one format to another - it supports many formats, including ePub and Kindle. The only catch is that it doesn't work with copy-protected ebooks, so you can't, for example, buy a Kindle book (which is copy protected) and translate it to ePub so you can read it on a Nook.

    * lending e-books to friends

    Nook owners can "loan" ebooks they purchased to other nook owners for up to two weeks. You can't do this with kindle - yet. Amazon has announced it will soon add this lending feature to all kindles (via a software update that will be available to people who already own kindles).

    * Nook's color LCD touchscreen

    This could be a pro or con, depending on your preferences. It makes nook hipper and less drab than kindle. Some people enjoy using the color LCD to view their library or navigate. I did, at first. But after two weeks of use, and comparisons with my wife's kindle, I found the dedicated buttons of the kindle easier and far quicker to use than the nook's color touchscreen. I also found the bright light from the color screen distracting when I was trying to read a book or newspaper (though when not in use, it shuts off after a minute or so to conserve battery).

    * expandable capacity

    Nook comes with 2GB of internal memory. If you need more capacity, you can insert a microSD card to add up to 16GB more memory. Kindle comes with 4GB of internal memory - twice as much as Nook - but there's no way to expand that. Kindle doesn't accept memory cards of any type. If you mainly use your device to read ebooks and newspapers, this shouldn't be an issue. I have over 100 books on my Kindle, and I've used only a tiny fraction of the memory. Once Kindle's memory fills up, just delete books you don't need immediate access to; you can always restore them later, in seconds, for free.

    A few other notes:

    Kindle and Nook have other features, such as an MP3 player and a web browser, but I caution you to have low expectations for these features. The MP3 player on the Kindle is like the first-generation iPod shuffle - you can't see what song is playing, and you can't navigate to other songs on your device. I don't like the browser on either device; e-ink is just not a good technology for surfing the web; it's slower and clunkier than LCD screen technology, so even the browser on an Android phone or iPod touch is more enjoyable to use. However, some commenters have more favorable views of either device's browser, and you might, too.

    * PDF support

    Kindle and Nook both handle PDF files, but in different ways. When you put a PDF file on your nook, nook converts it into an ebook-like file, then you can adjust the font size, and the text and pagination will adjust just like with any ebook. But you cannot see the original PDF file in the native format in which it was created. Kindle 3 and Kindle DX have native support for PDF files. You can see PDF files just as they would appear on your computer. You can also convert PDF files to an ebook-like format, and then Kindle handles them just the way the Nook handles them - text and pagination adjust when you change the font size. Unfortunately, some symbols, equations, and graphics get lost or mangled in the translation - even when viewing PDF files in their native format on the Kindle. Moreover, the small screen size of the Kindle 3 and the Nook is not great for PDF files, most of which are designed for a larger page size. You can zoom and pan, but this is cumbersome and tiresome. Thanks to commenters who suggested viewing PDF files in landscape mode on the Kindle (I don't know if you can do this on Nook); this way, you can see the entire top half of the page without panning, and then scroll down to the bottom half. This works a little better.

    SUMMARY:

    Nook and Kindle each offer their own advantages. We like the nook's user-replaceable battery, compatibility with ePub format, and in-store experience. But we strongly prefer Kindle 3 because its performance is zippier, its higher-contrast screen is easier to read, and it's smaller and lighter so it is more portable and more comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    * Nook Color

    Everything I wrote about the Nook in this review applies to the original Nook (which continues to be available), not the new Nook Color. To me, the Nook Color is in a different product category than the Kindle or original Nook. Nook Color has an LCD screen, like an iPad or most computer monitors. Reading on a computer screen for long periods of time is not comfortable for me - it causes fatigue and headaches. The e-ink Kindle is very comfortable for long reading sessions. So I'll take a pass on the Nook Color. But it will probably be great for others, especially people who want to watch movies, surf the web and play games on their e-reader, and don't mind the extra cost, weight, or lack of 3G. I've seen and played with a Nook Color at my local B&N, and it is a very attractive device. I'm looking forward to reading user reviews of the Nook Color when people start getting them. If you get one, please post a comment to let us know how you like it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Worth the money. Not perfect, but very very good for start to finish novels in good light, August 31, 2010
    The Kindle is my first e-ink reader. I own an iPad, an iPhone, and have owned a Windows-based phone in the past that I used as an ereader.

    My overall impression of the device is good.

    The good:
    I'd honestly rather read linear (read from page one to the end, one page at a time) fiction from it than a book, because I can't always get comfortable with a book. Hardcovers are sometimes a bit heavy, and paperbacks don't always lie open easily. The Kindle is incredibly light and thin. I can hold it in one hand easily. The page turn buttons are conveniently located. Page-turns aren't instant, but they're probably quicker than turning a physical page in a printed book (there are just a lot more page-turns unless you choose a small font). The contrast is better than other ereaders I've seen. There is zero eye strain in good light. My eyesight isn't the greatest and I like being able to increase the font size and read without glasses. I love being able to browse the Kindle store and read samples before deciding to purchase. The "experimental" browser is surprisingly usable, but isn't great. It is useful for browsing wikipedia and blogs. The biggest drawback to the browser is the awkward pointer navigation, using the 5-way pad. It syncs your furthest read page over the internet so you can pick up where you left off using your iPhone or iPad.

    The so-so:
    The kindle store could use more categories and sorting options. You can't sort by "top rated," and there is no category for "alternate histories," for example. Finding a very-specific type of fiction relies on keyword searches, which don't do a great job. The wifi sometimes doesn't connect before it times-out. You rarely need the wifi, but it is annoying if you change a setting, answer "OK" to the prompt to connect, and the thing tells you it failed to connect two seconds later (the exact moment it indicates that it did finally connect, then you need to go back to update the setting again). Most settings don't require a connection, but it is a minor annoyance. Most of your time will be spent reading, and of course your books are stored on the device and a connection is not required. Part of me wishes I'd bought the 3G model, because the browser is good enough that having lifetime free 3G wireless would be worth the extra money. Magazines don't look very good and are not very easy to navigate. There is minor glare in some lighting conditions, mostly when a lamp is positioned behind the reader's head.

    The bad:
    The contrast is fair to poor in dim light. It is much easier to read a printed page in dim light. In good light, contrast is on par with a pulp paperback. In dim light it feels almost like reading from an old Palm Pilot (resolution is better than an old Palm, but contrast is bad in dim light). The screen is small enough that the frequency of page turns is pretty high. Even in good light, the light gray background is less pleasant than the eggshell background of a printed page. You must tell it to sync before you switch it off, if you expect the feature allowing you to pick up where you left off using other devices to work correctly. The copy protection prevents you from using the files on anything other than Kindle software or devices.

    Vs iPad:
    IPad is a lot better for magazines, reference materials, and illustrated materials. Kindle is worlds better for reading novels. IPad is pretty heavy, making it more difficult to hold in your hand or carry with you everywhere. Kindle is much more portable and easier to hold. IPad has some amazing children's books and magazines, which take advantage of its multimedia features. IPad is unreadable in sunlight and glare is bad in bright light. Kindle is as good as a printed page in bright light. Ipad serves as a creative tool, a computing tool, a gaming tool, and a communication tool. Kindle is only a novel machine. I don't regret buying either one of them. An iPad won't replace books, but a Kindle can, if the book is text-only.

    I highly recommend this device at its new low price if you are a frequent reader of novels. I love my kindle. Just don't expect it to be more than it is. Leave the magazines and such to the tablet computers.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I Wanted a Dedicated E-Reader, and That's What I Got, September 7, 2010
    I'm a first-time Kindle owner, so I have nothing to "compare" the latest Kindle to. I don't own a Nook. I don't own an iPad (and, in any case, that's comparing apples to oranges). I don't have a Sony e-reader. '

    This will be a short, simple review.

    I received my Kindle about a week ago and haven't been able to put it down.

    Things I like about my Kindle?
    1. The e-ink display is amazing.
    2. Using the 5-way controller is simple and effective.
    3. Page turn speeds are faster than I thought they would be.
    4. It's lightweight, even with the attached cover (I have an Amazon cover with a built-in light)
    5. Page-turning buttons are quiet and well-placed.
    6. Recharge time is fast.
    7. I can order a book and start reading it in less than 60 seconds. Nice!
    8. Portability... I can take 3,000 books with me when I travel for work and not require additional suitcases or baggage fees.

    Things I'm not too keen on?
    1. Buttons are too close together and are laid out oddly.
    2. Lack of individual number buttons is frustrating.
    3. Power button on the bottom? Not a bad thing. Just an odd thing. (Same for the headphone input). I usually rest the "bottom" of a book on my lap when I read.

    Things I hope change in the future?
    1. How books are organized... When I put a book in a collection (which is actually a "tag"), it still appears in the main list. It's not actually "moved", it's merely associated.
    2. The look of the main screen. I'd like "folders" or some other way to display "collections".
    3. Ability to create personal "screen savers."
    4. E-book pricing, though Amazon has little control over this. Still, most titles are the same price as or less than their hardback/paperback counterparts. (And I'm not opposed to paying more for convenience and portability).

    Things that don't bother me regarding other reviews?
    1. The browser is experimental. Amazon has created a dedicated e-reader, and it's meant to be used to read. Period. Not browse the web. If you want to browse the web, get a computer -- not an e-reader.
    2. The Kindle is not an mP3 player, either. Yes, it's nice to have some classical music playing in the background while I read, but I don't need to see the title of the song, album art, etc. (And you can skip from track to track on the Kindle using shortcut keys).
    3. Lack of a "color" or "touch" screen.

    In summary, for $139, I'm quite thrilled with my purchase and have arleady read multiple books on it. In fact, I think I've read more in the past week than I've read in the past month.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not the perfect "do-it-all" device, but very close to being the perfect e-reading device!, August 26, 2010
    I woke up to a nice surprise this morning: a new kindle as a gift. I have an iPad and a Kindle DX, but I guess someone heard my complaints of them being too heavy and difficult to do extended-reading on. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love my iPad and DX, but this new generation of Kindle is perfect for reading outside and for long periods of time. The iPad gets completely washed out in sunlight and often irritates my eyes staring at it for more than a couple of hours. The DX was my go-to device for those extended/outdoor reading periods, but now I have a new friend for reading novels. Instead of a replacement, this one seems more like a companion to the other devices and is a different class. The iPad works great for web browsing, shopping, productivity, games, etc while the Kindle falls short in those areas. The Kindle works great for reading novels, where the iPad falls short. For those that love to do extended-reading of magazines, newspapers, research articles, etc, I find that the DX is the go-to device.

    Without a doubt, the size and weight of the new kindle is the biggest draw for me. It's smaller than the last edition by a significant margin. I've played around with the Kindle 2 and was impressed, but now looking at the size of the new Kindle, I'm blown away. It's the absolute perfect size. Smaller would be unmanageable and larger wouldn't feel nearly as good. This is a device that you can hold up, read, and just forget that it's there. Compared to other e-readers I've tried, it's much smaller and much lighter.

    One of my biggest complaints about the previous generation Kindles and the DX is the speed. It sometimes takes a while after you push `next page' for it to actually change. In addition, the web browsing feature was so slow and clunky that it is really unusable in my opinion. Two additions to the new Kindle have helped attenuate these issues. First, the pages do flip quicker (albeit, still slow in my opinion), and the addition of wifi has allowed faster connection for wireless activities (much better than only relying on 3G). I still can't see myself using the Kindle as an internet browsing tool or really doing much online aside from purchasing reading material, but the faster connection at least opens up the possibility - something that would only frustrate me on previous editions.

    The new Kindle also offers a better contrast than previous editions and it looks fantastic compared to every other e-reader I have seen. I have no trouble seeing the screen in dim light or in bright sunlight - it really opens up the ability to read almost anywhere you are. Of course, you'll still need a separate light for extremely dark areas.

    Another big addition to the Kindle 3 is that it offers double the storage compared to Kindle 2. I've never had a problem with the amount of storage since I can't possibly see myself filling up that much space (I don't put mp3's on it), but perhaps in the future, if certain applications or media files are put on the kindle, it could have been a problem. The additional space in the new model is definitely a welcome addition, but bringing back the memory card slot that was included on Kindle 1 would have been an even more welcome addition in my opinion.

    Among e-readers, I definitely recommend the Kindle 3 if not just because it has a better size/form-factor, contrast, battery life, and speed compared to every other e-reader I have tried. On top of that, you get the wonderful amazon buying experience and selection for all your literature and can keep your kindle library intact between whatever other device you want to download a Kindle application onto.

    The question of whether you need a Kindle vs another type of device for reading becomes a little more tricky and really comes down to what you want to use it for.

    Do you want a device to read novels on, perhaps read outside, and have something very light that you almost forget it's there? Buy the Kindle.

    Do you want something to lie in bed with for short periods of time while surfing the web? I might suggest going with the iPad, a different tablet, or a netbook.

    Do you already have a Kindle 1 or 2? That's a tough one.... I don't think the new edition has enough `new' to it to warrant the upgrade in my mind, but some might value the new size and wifi capabilities even more-so than I do. For me, the new Kindle was a welcome addition to my family of devices since I didn't have anything anywhere near its form factor and convenience.

    Should you get 3G + Wifi or just Wifi? I think this question can be answered simply by asking yourself if you travel a lot. Being able to buy books and access wireless content on the road is an indispensable option and well worth the extra money in my mind. Keeping the device mainly at home or near wifi hotspots really negates the need for 3G though.

    Overall, I have to give the Kindle a 5 star rating because it does what it was designed to do very well, and in my opinion better than any of the competition. While the new features and capabilities aren't game-changing and truly outstanding, it is smaller, more capable, and better than any other e-reader out there. If you want `one device to handle it all', this isn't the place to look, but If you want a fantastic device solely for reading books, this is what you want.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A hesistant buyer rejoices on his choice, September 2, 2010
    I researched the purchase of a Kindle for a long time. I couldn't decide whether or not it was worth buying a dedicated e-reader. Boy am I glad I made this purchase. The downside to Amazon's online selling of Kindle 3 is that the customers don't get to see it in person. It is much better in person. This may sound stupid, but when I got my new Kindle, I thought there was a stuck-on overlay on the screen containing a diagram of the unit's buttons, etc. I actually tried to peel it off. Doh! The e-ink on this unit is THAT good. I didn't realize that I was staring at the actual display. I also didn't realize that no power is required until the display changes. (thus the great battery life) I do a lot of reading, but was facing the prospect of reading less or buying large type books because of my variable and deteriorating eyesight. The new Kindle has been a godsend. Now, I can decide the size of type I need depending on my level of fatigue among other things. The weight and ergonomics are very good. For someone, like me, with neuropathy in his hands, it is extremely easy to manage and enjoyable to own. To me, it is easier to read than print books. The ease of navigation is great as is the speed. The battery life, so far, has been extraordinary. It easily connected to our home Wi-Fi, which by design does not broadcast an SSID. It downloads books so fast that I almost thought they were not completely received. I did not buy the 3G version because of the price difference and the fact that there is no coverage where I live. If you are not constantly traveling, I don't see the need to spend the extra bucks, but that is a matter of personal choice. For those who have no Wi-Fi at home, remember that you can always download the material to your computer and transfer it via USB. Just today I was watching an interview with Tony Blair on TV. He was talking about his new book, which sounded interesting. I picked up the Kindle and downloaded a free sample before the interview was over. I have only read the preface so far, but will probably buy the book. Now THAT is a great way to buy a book! I haven't used online browsing extensively yet, but find it reasonable for what the device is. This is primarily a book reader, not a laptop or notebook. They are great for what they do, but can't match the e-ink display, or the light weight. For those of you worrying about the wait for the new Kindle, let me end with, "It is worth the wait" This new Kindle is all about the quality of experience. There are many format choices for electronic reading. If you want the best experience, go with the Kindle.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Solid Improvements! Check out my video review!, August 27, 2010
    I just received my new Kindle, and my early impressions are very positive - it's definitely a solid step up from the previous generation Kindle. Check out my video review to see/hear more!

    UPDATE 9/7/2010: Hey guys - based on the comments received there are definitely some questions that people are interested in that I didn't touch on in my video review - so I wanted to take some time to answer some of those questions here. Hopefully this is helpful!

    Q: Is the Kindle 3 backlit? If not, then how do you see it at night?

    A: The Kindle 3 is not backlit. For the Kindle 2 I used a leather case with a reading light clipped to it. For the Kindle 3 Amazon produced a leather case that has a built-in reading light. I've been using it since day 1 and I love it. I made a video review for that also if you want to check it out:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R27V1SXQSI9M86/

    Q: How well does the new joystick control work?

    A: The new Kindle replaces the old five-way navigation joystick with a center button surrounded by a thin 4-way directional control. After messing around with both of these approaches, I don't really have a strong personal preference one way or another - they both work fine for me.

    If you have big hands then I can definitely see having a bit of trouble getting used to the new joystick. The directional control is very thin, and if you're going to have trouble with any button on the Kindle... that's definitely going to be the one.

    Q: How is viewing PDFs on the Kindle 3? Are they easy to upload onto the Kindle?

    A: Uploading PDFs to the Kindle is very easy. You just connect your Kindle to your computer via USB cable and then drag and drop the PDFs. Totally simple. Viewing them is pretty decent, but the major problem is that most PDFs aren't designed for a 6 inch screen. You might have to do a lot of zooming and panning to see the content you want. If you plan on viewing a ton of PDFs, then you may want to check out the Kindle DX Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G, 9.7" Display, Graphite, 3G Works Globally  Latest Generation.

    Q: How well does the text-to-speech work?

    A: It's ok. You definitely won't mistake it for a professionally produced audiobook, but it doesn't sound as bad as you may think it will. Also note that text-to-speech is not available for every book. You can see on the product page for each Kindle book if text-to-speech is enabled or not.

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 is perfect, August 28, 2010
    When I first unboxed the new K3, I was slightly disappointed. The new 5-way appeared to be harder to used than the little joystick of the K2. I have to say, though, two days later, I'm liking it much better. Since I'm getting used to it so quickly, I think in another day I won't know the difference.

    The size is absolutely perfect. In the Amazon cover, it is exactly like reading from a paperback book. It's noticeably lighter and easier to hold for reading, even with arthritis in my hands. The page turn buttons are wonderful. Almost no noise, and you don't have to push them as hard. It should make it much easier for those with weak or disabled hands. I also like have next page and previous buttons on both sides. I didn't think it would make a difference to me, but it really does.

    I tried a couple of times to connect the WiFi, but didn't get it to work. Today I had more time so I thought I'd try to puzzle through it. But when I navigated to the wireless menu, it had somehow figured out how to connect on its own. The browser is MUCH faster, and it made buying a book a breeze.

    I haven't had it long enough to comment on the extended battery life. But I was honestly fine with the more than 10 days I always got with K2.

    And the FONTS! My word what a difference! I can practically read in the dark! I've been able to reduce the font size from 4 to 2. Combine sharper contrast with better fonts and it's an unbeatable combo.

    The ONLY thing I would change if I could is to move the Menu button, and especially the Back button. I'm having a little trouble navigating with the down arrow because I hit Back. But I'm starting to get the hang of it.

    All in all, I think Amazon hit it out of the park with the K3!

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 Even Better than its Predecessor, August 28, 2010
    It's no longer necessary to write about how desirable the Kindle is (or, for that matter, e-readers generally). Books and text and reading are with us to stay; only paper is becoming unnecessary. What we can discuss is how well a device performs its intended task(s), and how it compares to its competition on an absolute basis and for the price.

    My wife and I share a last gen 6" Kindle and just received a new 6" display K3. I know, Amazon doesn't call it that, but how else can users refer to it? In twenty words or less, it is an improvement over an already excellent product. Smaller, but not too small to be held comfortably. Same size display, but sharper and crisper, better contrast. Easy to use, somewhat smaller keyboard that takes a little, but very little, getting used to. It took me a few hours to stop accidentally pressing some neighboring keys, but now using the keyboard is second nature. And the page turning buttons are silent, but have sufficient tactile feedback, excellent feel.

    I found it very easy to duplicate our library from our older Kindle to our new K3, and to activate our home wifi. I don't like to say I "transferred" our books because that could be understood to mean they were taken from our old Kindle to our new one. I say "duplicate" because they reside on both Kindles. The instruction manual is detailed and somewhat lengthy, but very understandable. (It's 200 pages, but don't let that scare you; it's easy to find the parts you need, and you will never need more than a few pages at one time.) The manual is published on the device, as in the past, and can also be downloaded to your computer as a pdf file so you can read the instructions from your computer as you apply them to the K3.

    If you have wifi at home, which we do, when you are in range of a wifi that you have activated in your K3, it automatically uses that wifi, instead of connecting to the 3G AT&T network, assuming, of course, you have a 3G+wifi K3. It works faster on my home wifi than on the 3G network, so much so that if I had really thought it through before I bought it, or if I were to buy another, I would probably go wifi only and save $50. The only reasons to get the 3G+wifi model would seem to be if you don't have reliable access to wifi or if you travel a good deal to places that don't have a lot of wifi access, but do have AT&T connectivity AND you have need to download books or periodicals on a regular basis or without delay while you are away from home or office. If you can plan ahead and stock up on a few good books, and you have reliable access to wifi, such as at home/office, McDonalds or Starbucks, I suggest you think twice about whether you want the 3G+wifi K3, or the wifi only.

    Each K3 has its own email address and you can send documents to it, including Word and pdf docs, and photos. Of course, the photos are B&W, but very detailed and clear. The K3 permits surfing the web, although I haven't used it much for that purpose and, other than saying it works, I hesitate to pass judgment on how well I think someone who uses it for web browsing would like it.

    I can't compare it to other dedicated e-readers because I haven't used them. People seem to be interested in how I think it compares to the iPad, which I don't own but have "played with" somewhat extensively at the Apple Store. My assessment is that there is no comparison. The iPad will do much more, but as an e-reader I think the K3 is superior. I don't need color for reading text, the K3 is a fraction of the cost, and its smaller size makes it much more convenient to tote around. However, what kills the iPad as an e-reader, as far as I am concerned, is its weight. I suspect most of us are the same in this regard, but I tend to read for an hour or two at a stretch. A pound and a half doesn't sound too heavy, but I held an iPad for five minutes, literally, and my hands ached. It is simply too heavy to use as a book reading device, while the K3 is light as a feather. For reading, a cheaper and significantly lighter K3 as a dedicated e-reader is, IMHO, the way to go (compared to an iPad). BTW, a recent (in Aug. 2010) report from Taiwan said Apple in making a 6" iPod, which, depending on size and weight, could change the equation. It will be interesting to see how the e-reader market develops. I said I can't compare the K3 to other competitors, and I won't, but I can say I am completely satisfied with Amazon as an e-book seller. I've only had a few occasions to need support (on my old Kindle), but that has also been entirely satisfactory.

    Bottom line: my wife and I both like the K3 very much and recommend it to anyone considering buying an e-reader. I don't think you will regret buying one, with or without the free 3G.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Quality control problems, September 7, 2010
    First, the good stuff. Kindle 3 has a very readable high contrast screen. The form factor is small and light enough to be a book replacement. Purchasing and downloading content is simple and convenient.

    However, I had a series of problems which eventually led me to return my Kindle.

    After unpacking and charging my Kindle 3, it refused to connect to my wireless network. I have a variety of other devices ranging from a Nintendo Wii to an iPod Touch and two computers that work just fine on my wireless network, but the Kindle couldn't connect after many attempts. I eventually gave up and turned it off. When I turned it back on several hours later, it had mysteriously connected to my WiFi network with the exact same settings that did not work earlier. I have noticed that several other users have ran into the same problem.

    The next problem I noticed was that something was rolling around inside the casing. This is obviously not a good sign. Then, my Kindle 3 started freezing. The first freeze happened while using the experimental browser. As this is an "experimental" application, I wasn't too concerned. After a power reset, the Kindle came back up. The second freeze happened while playing Shuffled Row, which is a good game. After this freeze, my Kindle refused to reboot after many power reset attempts. (Yes, I did try keeping the power switch in the "turn-on" position for up to 30 seconds as suggested by the manual.) I eventually gave up and put it down. However, after a few minutes, the Kindle started to reboot itself. The was another freeze while reading a book, which was fixed with a power reset. I tried to contact Amazon for service, but it looks like the only way to get Kindle customer service is through a phone call.

    And then my Kindle froze again while reading a book. This time, nothing would reset the kindle. When this last freeze happened, the battery was charged about 75%. At this point, there was no option but to return the kindle. There are some comments among the negative reviews here that the usual Amazon.com return process does not work. In my case, I was able to follow the regular Amazon return process and print a return label. So my Kindle is back to Amazon after less than a week of use.

    Judging from other reviews that had similar experiences as mine, Amazon appears to have a specific quality control problem with this latest version of the Kindle. People may be more tolerant of the reliability other electronic gadgets, however, it is unacceptable for a product that is primarily intended to replace paper books to have issues like freezing and/or rebooting. After all, I never had a "paper" book freeze or reboot on me so far. Receiving a product with defects that should have been caught during testing before shipping pretty much destroys the "Kindle experience".

    UPDATE (October 31, 2010): Since I do like the Kindle concept, after reading about the improvement in stability with the latest software upgrades, I purchased another Kindle WiFi. Everything was great for almost two weeks, no crashes. However, yesterday, the second Kindle also ended up with a frozen screen. After following through the instructions on Amazon's Kindle troubleshooting page and talking to the customer service, there was no way to get the Kindle out of the frozen state, so this one is also going back. The fact that this situation can happen to the same customer twice in a matter of few months indicates either a serious quality control problem or component reliability problem.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Details on working with PDF, Wi-fi vs 3G, Starbucks, Audio books, MP3 and other things, August 27, 2010
    NOTE: Amazon limits the video size and duration, so I targeted what I thought were some key points.
    I check comments, so leave one if you have any questions not covered in the video or below and I'll try and answer.

    First off I love this device!!
    Like ipods are the king of MP3 players, this is the king of ebook readers in my opinion.

    I've been looking at this thing for at least 7+ hrs today and my eyes don't feel tired at all.

    If you want. . .
    * a low cost eBook reader
    * that allows you to read books
    * looks great
    * easy to setup
    * easy to hold/carry
    * easy on the eyes (no getting tired eyes from a glaring screen)
    . . . then look no further than this product!



    **Adding updates as I find other feature behaviors**

    - The comic I converted to PDF when emailed to my kindle email address the conversion process didn't like it too much. Better to not use the conversion process for those types of PDFs. Other PDF's converted just fine.
    - Emailing PDF = the conversion process seems to cut off the cover page each time
    - Emailing and having amazon convert is fast. I like it!
    - You can plug the kindle into the USB, then "eject" it from the OS. This allows you to continue to charge the kindle and read it at the same time. You could also just plug it into an electrical socket and read from it too.
    - If you stop/pause your MP3 music it will start all the way back at track #1. This is not an MP3 player. It also plays the most recently added track first
    - 10 minutes it goes into sleep mode, but if you leave Wi-fi on = drains your battery quicker. Better to turn Wi-fi off when not using it
    - Buy a case to protect it and get yourself a light for times when you don't have enough light to read by. This is not a cell-phone screen, meaning you can't read it in the dark. The screen very much simulates paper in this case.
    - Manual even states...you cannot connect the Wi-fi to a corporate wi-fi. Most companies require VPN of some sort, which is not supported here.
    - Loaded a 25Mb PDF and when when trying to search I get the following error message, ""your search can not be completed as this item has not been indexed. Please try again later." Found forum posts that said give the Kindle at least 10 minutes to complete indexing the file. . .longer if file if big. Sure enough, about 30 minutes later I tried again and was able to search this large PDF.

    8/29/10 update:
    - Just got back from Starbucks
    * Turned wi-fi on
    * Menu > Settings > Wifi Settings and selected the attwifi network option
    * Home > Menu > Experimental > Launch browser
    * zoom in on the terms & agreement checkbox and use the spacebar to check the box
    * click continue button and you are on the internet at the coffee shop!!

    9/3/10 update:
    - A week later, I haven't charged the unit nor shut it down, I've only put it into sleep mode. Battery indicator is still more than 80% full. Nice!
    - Someone pointed me towards "Calibre" a free conversion utility. Totally supports the Kindle 3 and converts to PDF, ePub, Mobi, etc. Works great and you can have the program send the converted document directly to your device via USB or email. The program also acts as your own "backup" by creating a document library on your hard drive that can be sorted, metadata updated, etc. It's very cool!

    9/5/10 update:
    - I kept getting unconverted PDFs (PDFs copied directly to unit via USB vs. sending to email for conversion) would result in the unit restarting when trying to access the PDF. Found forums that said you need to reset the unit. Slide & hold the power button for 15 seconds. Let it take the 20 seconds to reboot. This worked for me.

    9/10/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Annotating PDFs, then accessing these notes for later review on a laptop/desktop
    - Is there an auto-scrolling for PDFs? = No
    - What its like to have the kindle "read" back to you? = robotic voice that ignores punctuation
    - More info on document conversion, including sending emails to the kindle for conversion?
    - The ability to access Gmail from the kindle? = yes, works fine though a bit slow on wi-fi

    9/19/10 update:
    - Check out the comments for my answer to, "Should I buy 3G or is wifi good enough?" = need to buy a book on the run, then get 3G. If you can wait till you get home or a coffee shop, then wi-fi works fine.

    9/24/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Exactly how does an Audible audio book work with the Kindle?
    - Possible causes for why MP3 music is not recognized by the device?

    10/2/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you play Audible audio books while at the same time reading along? = for all intents and purposes, no
    - How easy is it to register a new/used K3 to a different owner? = easy as pie

    10/23/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you change out the battery yourself? = no
    - Can you share your documents with other kindle users? = legally only if both devices are under the same user account

    12/7/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can a color document show up as color on the kindle? = No, doc will be converted to greyscale
    - Able to support textbooks? = Yes, if in a supported document type
    - Should I pay the extra $50 for 3G in order to more easily access websites? = Up to you...many sites have mobile versions that load great on wi-fi. NOTE: still doesn't support sites that use Java
    - Will I have 3G coverage in my rural area? = Amazon gives a disclaimer in their FAQ that 3G connection is not guaranteed in some areas
    - Should I get the K3 for my 10 year old? = I personally feel this is a great device for any age reader. . .and gives the parent control/visibility to what is being read

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle vs. Nook (updated 12/1/2010), August 28, 2010
    If you're trying to choose between a Nook and a Kindle, perhaps I can help. My wife and I have owned a Nook (the original one, not the new Nook Color), a Kindle 2, and a Kindle DX. When Amazon announced the Kindle 3 this summer, we pre-ordered two Kindle 3's: the wi-fi only model in graphite, and the wi-fi + 3G model in white. They arrived in late August and we have used them very regularly since then. For us, Kindle is better than Nook, but Nook is a good device with its own advantages that I will discuss below. I'll end this review with a few words about the Nook Color.

    First, reasons why we prefer the Kindle:

    * Speed

    In our experience, the Kindle is very zippy compared to the Nook. Page refresh speed (the time it takes a new page to appear after you push the page-turn button) was WAY quicker on Kindle 2 than on Nook, and it's quicker yet on Kindle 3. Yet, I read a whole book on the Nook and didn't find the slower page refresh to be annoying - you get used to it, and it's not a problem.

    For me, the more important speed difference concerns navigation - moving the cursor around the screen, for example to pick a book from your library, or to jump to a chapter by selecting it in the table of contents. On Kindle, you do this by pushing a 5-way rocker button, and the cursor moves very quickly. On Nook, you do this by activating the color LCD touchscreen (which normally shuts off when not in use, to conserve battery). A "virtual rocker button" appears on the screen, and you touch it to move the cursor. Unfortunately, the Nook cursor moves very sluggishly. This might not be a big deal to you, but it really got annoying to me, especially since my wife's Kindle was so quick and responsive.

    In November 2010, Nook got a software upgrade that increases page refresh speed and makes navigation more responsive. I returned my Nook months ago, so I cannot tell you if the Nook's performance is now equal to the Kindle's, but Nook owners in the comments section have convinced me that the software update improves the experience of using the Nook. If performance is a big factor in your decision, visit a Best Buy and compare Kindle and Nook side by side.

    * Screen contrast

    You've seen Amazon's claims that the Kindle 3 e-ink has 50% better contrast than Kindle 2 or other e-ink devices. I have no way of precisely measuring the improvement in contrast, but I can tell you that the Kindle 3 display definitely has more contrast than Kindle 2 or Nook. The difference is noticeable, and important: more screen contrast means less eyestrain when reading in poorly lit rooms.

    In well-lit rooms, the Nook and Kindle 2 have enough contrast to allow for comfortable reading. But I often read in low-light conditions, like in bed at night, or in a poorly lit room. In these situations, reading on Nook or Kindle 2 was a bit uncomfortable and often gave me a mild headache. When I got the Kindle 3, the extra contrast was immediately noticeable, and made it more comfortable to read under less-than-ideal lighting conditions. (If you go with a Nook, just make sure you have a good reading lamp nearby.)

    * Battery life

    The Nook's color LCD touch screen drains its battery quickly - I could never get more than 5 days out of a charge. The Kindle 2 had longer battery life than the Nook, and Kindle 3 has even longer life: in the 3 months since we received our Kindle 3's, we typically get 3 weeks of battery life between charges. (We keep wireless off about half the time to save battery power.)

    * Weight

    Nook weighs about 3 ounces more than the new Kindle, and you can really feel the difference. Without a case, Nook is still light enough to hold in one hand for long reading sessions without fatigue. But in a case, Nook is a heavy sucker. The new Kindle 3 is so light, even in a case, we find it comfortable holding in one hand for long reading sessions.

    Reasons some people might prefer the Nook:

    * In-store experience

    If you need help with your nook, you can take it to any barnes and noble and get a real human to help. You can take your nook into the coffee shop section of your local B&N store and read any book for free for up to one hour per day. When you take your nook to B&N, some in-store special deals and the occasional free book pop up on your screen.

    * User-replaceable battery

    Rechargeable batteries eventually lose their ability to hold a charge. Nook's battery is user-replaceable and relatively inexpensive. To replace Kindle's battery, Amazon wants you to ship your Kindle to Amazon, and they will ship you back a DIFFERENT Kindle than the one you sent (it's the same model, for example if you send a white Kindle 3, you get a white Kindle 3 back, but you get a "refurbished" one, NOT the exact one you sent them). I don't like this at all.

    However, several people have posted comments here that have eased my concerns. Someone looked up statistics on the Kindle's battery and did some simple calculations to show that it should last for 3 or more years. Before that happens, I will surely have upgraded to a newer Kindle model by then. Also, someone found some companies that sell Kindle batteries at reasonable cost and have how-to videos that demonstrate how we can replace the battery ourselves. Doing this would void the Kindle's warranty, but the battery will probably not fail until long after the warranty expires.

    * ePub

    Nook uses the ePub format, a widely used open format. Amazon uses a proprietary ebook format. Many libraries will "lend" ebooks in the ePub format, which works with nook but not kindle. However, a free and reputable program called Calibre allows you to translate ebooks from one format to another - it supports many formats, including ePub and Kindle. The only catch is that it doesn't work with copy-protected ebooks, so you can't, for example, buy a Kindle book (which is copy protected) and translate it to ePub so you can read it on a Nook.

    * lending e-books to friends

    Nook owners can "loan" ebooks they purchased to other nook owners for up to two weeks. You can't do this with kindle - yet. Amazon has announced it will soon add this lending feature to all kindles (via a software update that will be available to people who already own kindles).

    * Nook's color LCD touchscreen

    This could be a pro or con, depending on your preferences. It makes nook hipper and less drab than kindle. Some people enjoy using the color LCD to view their library or navigate. I did, at first. But after two weeks of use, and comparisons with my wife's kindle, I found the dedicated buttons of the kindle easier and far quicker to use than the nook's color touchscreen. I also found the bright light from the color screen distracting when I was trying to read a book or newspaper (though when not in use, it shuts off after a minute or so to conserve battery).

    * expandable capacity

    Nook comes with 2GB of internal memory. If you need more capacity, you can insert a microSD card to add up to 16GB more memory. Kindle comes with 4GB of internal memory - twice as much as Nook - but there's no way to expand that. Kindle doesn't accept memory cards of any type. If you mainly use your device to read ebooks and newspapers, this shouldn't be an issue. I have over 100 books on my Kindle, and I've used only a tiny fraction of the memory. Once Kindle's memory fills up, just delete books you don't need immediate access to; you can always restore them later, in seconds, for free.

    A few other notes:

    Kindle and Nook have other features, such as an MP3 player and a web browser, but I caution you to have low expectations for these features. The MP3 player on the Kindle is like the first-generation iPod shuffle - you can't see what song is playing, and you can't navigate to other songs on your device. I don't like the browser on either device; e-ink is just not a good technology for surfing the web; it's slower and clunkier than LCD screen technology, so even the browser on an Android phone or iPod touch is more enjoyable to use. However, some commenters have more favorable views of either device's browser, and you might, too.

    * PDF support

    Kindle and Nook both handle PDF files, but in different ways. When you put a PDF file on your nook, nook converts it into an ebook-like file, then you can adjust the font size, and the text and pagination will adjust just like with any ebook. But you cannot see the original PDF file in the native format in which it was created. Kindle 3 and Kindle DX have native support for PDF files. You can see PDF files just as they would appear on your computer. You can also convert PDF files to an ebook-like format, and then Kindle handles them just the way the Nook handles them - text and pagination adjust when you change the font size. Unfortunately, some symbols, equations, and graphics get lost or mangled in the translation - even when viewing PDF files in their native format on the Kindle. Moreover, the small screen size of the Kindle 3 and the Nook is not great for PDF files, most of which are designed for a larger page size. You can zoom and pan, but this is cumbersome and tiresome. Thanks to commenters who suggested viewing PDF files in landscape mode on the Kindle (I don't know if you can do this on Nook); this way, you can see the entire top half of the page without panning, and then scroll down to the bottom half. This works a little better.

    SUMMARY:

    Nook and Kindle each offer their own advantages. We like the nook's user-replaceable battery, compatibility with ePub format, and in-store experience. But we strongly prefer Kindle 3 because its performance is zippier, its higher-contrast screen is easier to read, and it's smaller and lighter so it is more portable and more comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    * Nook Color

    Everything I wrote about the Nook in this review applies to the original Nook (which continues to be available), not the new Nook Color. To me, the Nook Color is in a different product category than the Kindle or original Nook. Nook Color has an LCD screen, like an iPad or most computer monitors. Reading on a computer screen for long periods of time is not comfortable for me - it causes fatigue and headaches. The e-ink Kindle is very comfortable for long reading sessions. So I'll take a pass on the Nook Color. But it will probably be great for others, especially people who want to watch movies, surf the web and play games on their e-reader, and don't mind the extra cost, weight, or lack of 3G. I've seen and played with a Nook Color at my local B&N, and it is a very attractive device. I'm looking forward to reading user reviews of the Nook Color when people start getting them. If you get one, please post a comment to let us know how you like it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Worth the money. Not perfect, but very very good for start to finish novels in good light, August 31, 2010
    The Kindle is my first e-ink reader. I own an iPad, an iPhone, and have owned a Windows-based phone in the past that I used as an ereader.

    My overall impression of the device is good.

    The good:
    I'd honestly rather read linear (read from page one to the end, one page at a time) fiction from it than a book, because I can't always get comfortable with a book. Hardcovers are sometimes a bit heavy, and paperbacks don't always lie open easily. The Kindle is incredibly light and thin. I can hold it in one hand easily. The page turn buttons are conveniently located. Page-turns aren't instant, but they're probably quicker than turning a physical page in a printed book (there are just a lot more page-turns unless you choose a small font). The contrast is better than other ereaders I've seen. There is zero eye strain in good light. My eyesight isn't the greatest and I like being able to increase the font size and read without glasses. I love being able to browse the Kindle store and read samples before deciding to purchase. The "experimental" browser is surprisingly usable, but isn't great. It is useful for browsing wikipedia and blogs. The biggest drawback to the browser is the awkward pointer navigation, using the 5-way pad. It syncs your furthest read page over the internet so you can pick up where you left off using your iPhone or iPad.

    The so-so:
    The kindle store could use more categories and sorting options. You can't sort by "top rated," and there is no category for "alternate histories," for example. Finding a very-specific type of fiction relies on keyword searches, which don't do a great job. The wifi sometimes doesn't connect before it times-out. You rarely need the wifi, but it is annoying if you change a setting, answer "OK" to the prompt to connect, and the thing tells you it failed to connect two seconds later (the exact moment it indicates that it did finally connect, then you need to go back to update the setting again). Most settings don't require a connection, but it is a minor annoyance. Most of your time will be spent reading, and of course your books are stored on the device and a connection is not required. Part of me wishes I'd bought the 3G model, because the browser is good enough that having lifetime free 3G wireless would be worth the extra money. Magazines don't look very good and are not very easy to navigate. There is minor glare in some lighting conditions, mostly when a lamp is positioned behind the reader's head.

    The bad:
    The contrast is fair to poor in dim light. It is much easier to read a printed page in dim light. In good light, contrast is on par with a pulp paperback. In dim light it feels almost like reading from an old Palm Pilot (resolution is better than an old Palm, but contrast is bad in dim light). The screen is small enough that the frequency of page turns is pretty high. Even in good light, the light gray background is less pleasant than the eggshell background of a printed page. You must tell it to sync before you switch it off, if you expect the feature allowing you to pick up where you left off using other devices to work correctly. The copy protection prevents you from using the files on anything other than Kindle software or devices.

    Vs iPad:
    IPad is a lot better for magazines, reference materials, and illustrated materials. Kindle is worlds better for reading novels. IPad is pretty heavy, making it more difficult to hold in your hand or carry with you everywhere. Kindle is much more portable and easier to hold. IPad has some amazing children's books and magazines, which take advantage of its multimedia features. IPad is unreadable in sunlight and glare is bad in bright light. Kindle is as good as a printed page in bright light. Ipad serves as a creative tool, a computing tool, a gaming tool, and a communication tool. Kindle is only a novel machine. I don't regret buying either one of them. An iPad won't replace books, but a Kindle can, if the book is text-only.

    I highly recommend this device at its new low price if you are a frequent reader of novels. I love my kindle. Just don't expect it to be more than it is. Leave the magazines and such to the tablet computers.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I Wanted a Dedicated E-Reader, and That's What I Got, September 7, 2010
    I'm a first-time Kindle owner, so I have nothing to "compare" the latest Kindle to. I don't own a Nook. I don't own an iPad (and, in any case, that's comparing apples to oranges). I don't have a Sony e-reader. '

    This will be a short, simple review.

    I received my Kindle about a week ago and haven't been able to put it down.

    Things I like about my Kindle?
    1. The e-ink display is amazing.
    2. Using the 5-way controller is simple and effective.
    3. Page turn speeds are faster than I thought they would be.
    4. It's lightweight, even with the attached cover (I have an Amazon cover with a built-in light)
    5. Page-turning buttons are quiet and well-placed.
    6. Recharge time is fast.
    7. I can order a book and start reading it in less than 60 seconds. Nice!
    8. Portability... I can take 3,000 books with me when I travel for work and not require additional suitcases or baggage fees.

    Things I'm not too keen on?
    1. Buttons are too close together and are laid out oddly.
    2. Lack of individual number buttons is frustrating.
    3. Power button on the bottom? Not a bad thing. Just an odd thing. (Same for the headphone input). I usually rest the "bottom" of a book on my lap when I read.

    Things I hope change in the future?
    1. How books are organized... When I put a book in a collection (which is actually a "tag"), it still appears in the main list. It's not actually "moved", it's merely associated.
    2. The look of the main screen. I'd like "folders" or some other way to display "collections".
    3. Ability to create personal "screen savers."
    4. E-book pricing, though Amazon has little control over this. Still, most titles are the same price as or less than their hardback/paperback counterparts. (And I'm not opposed to paying more for convenience and portability).

    Things that don't bother me regarding other reviews?
    1. The browser is experimental. Amazon has created a dedicated e-reader, and it's meant to be used to read. Period. Not browse the web. If you want to browse the web, get a computer -- not an e-reader.
    2. The Kindle is not an mP3 player, either. Yes, it's nice to have some classical music playing in the background while I read, but I don't need to see the title of the song, album art, etc. (And you can skip from track to track on the Kindle using shortcut keys).
    3. Lack of a "color" or "touch" screen.

    In summary, for $139, I'm quite thrilled with my purchase and have arleady read multiple books on it. In fact, I think I've read more in the past week than I've read in the past month.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not the perfect "do-it-all" device, but very close to being the perfect e-reading device!, August 26, 2010
    I woke up to a nice surprise this morning: a new kindle as a gift. I have an iPad and a Kindle DX, but I guess someone heard my complaints of them being too heavy and difficult to do extended-reading on. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love my iPad and DX, but this new generation of Kindle is perfect for reading outside and for long periods of time. The iPad gets completely washed out in sunlight and often irritates my eyes staring at it for more than a couple of hours. The DX was my go-to device for those extended/outdoor reading periods, but now I have a new friend for reading novels. Instead of a replacement, this one seems more like a companion to the other devices and is a different class. The iPad works great for web browsing, shopping, productivity, games, etc while the Kindle falls short in those areas. The Kindle works great for reading novels, where the iPad falls short. For those that love to do extended-reading of magazines, newspapers, research articles, etc, I find that the DX is the go-to device.

    Without a doubt, the size and weight of the new kindle is the biggest draw for me. It's smaller than the last edition by a significant margin. I've played around with the Kindle 2 and was impressed, but now looking at the size of the new Kindle, I'm blown away. It's the absolute perfect size. Smaller would be unmanageable and larger wouldn't feel nearly as good. This is a device that you can hold up, read, and just forget that it's there. Compared to other e-readers I've tried, it's much smaller and much lighter.

    One of my biggest complaints about the previous generation Kindles and the DX is the speed. It sometimes takes a while after you push `next page' for it to actually change. In addition, the web browsing feature was so slow and clunky that it is really unusable in my opinion. Two additions to the new Kindle have helped attenuate these issues. First, the pages do flip quicker (albeit, still slow in my opinion), and the addition of wifi has allowed faster connection for wireless activities (much better than only relying on 3G). I still can't see myself using the Kindle as an internet browsing tool or really doing much online aside from purchasing reading material, but the faster connection at least opens up the possibility - something that would only frustrate me on previous editions.

    The new Kindle also offers a better contrast than previous editions and it looks fantastic compared to every other e-reader I have seen. I have no trouble seeing the screen in dim light or in bright sunlight - it really opens up the ability to read almost anywhere you are. Of course, you'll still need a separate light for extremely dark areas.

    Another big addition to the Kindle 3 is that it offers double the storage compared to Kindle 2. I've never had a problem with the amount of storage since I can't possibly see myself filling up that much space (I don't put mp3's on it), but perhaps in the future, if certain applications or media files are put on the kindle, it could have been a problem. The additional space in the new model is definitely a welcome addition, but bringing back the memory card slot that was included on Kindle 1 would have been an even more welcome addition in my opinion.

    Among e-readers, I definitely recommend the Kindle 3 if not just because it has a better size/form-factor, contrast, battery life, and speed compared to every other e-reader I have tried. On top of that, you get the wonderful amazon buying experience and selection for all your literature and can keep your kindle library intact between whatever other device you want to download a Kindle application onto.

    The question of whether you need a Kindle vs another type of device for reading becomes a little more tricky and really comes down to what you want to use it for.

    Do you want a device to read novels on, perhaps read outside, and have something very light that you almost forget it's there? Buy the Kindle.

    Do you want something to lie in bed with for short periods of time while surfing the web? I might suggest going with the iPad, a different tablet, or a netbook.

    Do you already have a Kindle 1 or 2? That's a tough one.... I don't think the new edition has enough `new' to it to warrant the upgrade in my mind, but some might value the new size and wifi capabilities even more-so than I do. For me, the new Kindle was a welcome addition to my family of devices since I didn't have anything anywhere near its form factor and convenience.

    Should you get 3G + Wifi or just Wifi? I think this question can be answered simply by asking yourself if you travel a lot. Being able to buy books and access wireless content on the road is an indispensable option and well worth the extra money in my mind. Keeping the device mainly at home or near wifi hotspots really negates the need for 3G though.

    Overall, I have to give the Kindle a 5 star rating because it does what it was designed to do very well, and in my opinion better than any of the competition. While the new features and capabilities aren't game-changing and truly outstanding, it is smaller, more capable, and better than any other e-reader out there. If you want `one device to handle it all', this isn't the place to look, but If you want a fantastic device solely for reading books, this is what you want.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A hesistant buyer rejoices on his choice, September 2, 2010
    I researched the purchase of a Kindle for a long time. I couldn't decide whether or not it was worth buying a dedicated e-reader. Boy am I glad I made this purchase. The downside to Amazon's online selling of Kindle 3 is that the customers don't get to see it in person. It is much better in person. This may sound stupid, but when I got my new Kindle, I thought there was a stuck-on overlay on the screen containing a diagram of the unit's buttons, etc. I actually tried to peel it off. Doh! The e-ink on this unit is THAT good. I didn't realize that I was staring at the actual display. I also didn't realize that no power is required until the display changes. (thus the great battery life) I do a lot of reading, but was facing the prospect of reading less or buying large type books because of my variable and deteriorating eyesight. The new Kindle has been a godsend. Now, I can decide the size of type I need depending on my level of fatigue among other things. The weight and ergonomics are very good. For someone, like me, with neuropathy in his hands, it is extremely easy to manage and enjoyable to own. To me, it is easier to read than print books. The ease of navigation is great as is the speed. The battery life, so far, has been extraordinary. It easily connected to our home Wi-Fi, which by design does not broadcast an SSID. It downloads books so fast that I almost thought they were not completely received. I did not buy the 3G version because of the price difference and the fact that there is no coverage where I live. If you are not constantly traveling, I don't see the need to spend the extra bucks, but that is a matter of personal choice. For those who have no Wi-Fi at home, remember that you can always download the material to your computer and transfer it via USB. Just today I was watching an interview with Tony Blair on TV. He was talking about his new book, which sounded interesting. I picked up the Kindle and downloaded a free sample before the interview was over. I have only read the preface so far, but will probably buy the book. Now THAT is a great way to buy a book! I haven't used online browsing extensively yet, but find it reasonable for what the device is. This is primarily a book reader, not a laptop or notebook. They are great for what they do, but can't match the e-ink display, or the light weight. For those of you worrying about the wait for the new Kindle, let me end with, "It is worth the wait" This new Kindle is all about the quality of experience. There are many format choices for electronic reading. If you want the best experience, go with the Kindle.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Solid Improvements! Check out my video review!, August 27, 2010
    I just received my new Kindle, and my early impressions are very positive - it's definitely a solid step up from the previous generation Kindle. Check out my video review to see/hear more!

    UPDATE 9/7/2010: Hey guys - based on the comments received there are definitely some questions that people are interested in that I didn't touch on in my video review - so I wanted to take some time to answer some of those questions here. Hopefully this is helpful!

    Q: Is the Kindle 3 backlit? If not, then how do you see it at night?

    A: The Kindle 3 is not backlit. For the Kindle 2 I used a leather case with a reading light clipped to it. For the Kindle 3 Amazon produced a leather case that has a built-in reading light. I've been using it since day 1 and I love it. I made a video review for that also if you want to check it out:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R27V1SXQSI9M86/

    Q: How well does the new joystick control work?

    A: The new Kindle replaces the old five-way navigation joystick with a center button surrounded by a thin 4-way directional control. After messing around with both of these approaches, I don't really have a strong personal preference one way or another - they both work fine for me.

    If you have big hands then I can definitely see having a bit of trouble getting used to the new joystick. The directional control is very thin, and if you're going to have trouble with any button on the Kindle... that's definitely going to be the one.

    Q: How is viewing PDFs on the Kindle 3? Are they easy to upload onto the Kindle?

    A: Uploading PDFs to the Kindle is very easy. You just connect your Kindle to your computer via USB cable and then drag and drop the PDFs. Totally simple. Viewing them is pretty decent, but the major problem is that most PDFs aren't designed for a 6 inch screen. You might have to do a lot of zooming and panning to see the content you want. If you plan on viewing a ton of PDFs, then you may want to check out the Kindle DX Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G, 9.7" Display, Graphite, 3G Works Globally  Latest Generation.

    Q: How well does the text-to-speech work?

    A: It's ok. You definitely won't mistake it for a professionally produced audiobook, but it doesn't sound as bad as you may think it will. Also note that text-to-speech is not available for every book. You can see on the product page for each Kindle book if text-to-speech is enabled or not.

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 is perfect, August 28, 2010
    When I first unboxed the new K3, I was slightly disappointed. The new 5-way appeared to be harder to used than the little joystick of the K2. I have to say, though, two days later, I'm liking it much better. Since I'm getting used to it so quickly, I think in another day I won't know the difference.

    The size is absolutely perfect. In the Amazon cover, it is exactly like reading from a paperback book. It's noticeably lighter and easier to hold for reading, even with arthritis in my hands. The page turn buttons are wonderful. Almost no noise, and you don't have to push them as hard. It should make it much easier for those with weak or disabled hands. I also like have next page and previous buttons on both sides. I didn't think it would make a difference to me, but it really does.

    I tried a couple of times to connect the WiFi, but didn't get it to work. Today I had more time so I thought I'd try to puzzle through it. But when I navigated to the wireless menu, it had somehow figured out how to connect on its own. The browser is MUCH faster, and it made buying a book a breeze.

    I haven't had it long enough to comment on the extended battery life. But I was honestly fine with the more than 10 days I always got with K2.

    And the FONTS! My word what a difference! I can practically read in the dark! I've been able to reduce the font size from 4 to 2. Combine sharper contrast with better fonts and it's an unbeatable combo.

    The ONLY thing I would change if I could is to move the Menu button, and especially the Back button. I'm having a little trouble navigating with the down arrow because I hit Back. But I'm starting to get the hang of it.

    All in all, I think Amazon hit it out of the park with the K3!

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 Even Better than its Predecessor, August 28, 2010
    It's no longer necessary to write about how desirable the Kindle is (or, for that matter, e-readers generally). Books and text and reading are with us to stay; only paper is becoming unnecessary. What we can discuss is how well a device performs its intended task(s), and how it compares to its competition on an absolute basis and for the price.

    My wife and I share a last gen 6" Kindle and just received a new 6" display K3. I know, Amazon doesn't call it that, but how else can users refer to it? In twenty words or less, it is an improvement over an already excellent product. Smaller, but not too small to be held comfortably. Same size display, but sharper and crisper, better contrast. Easy to use, somewhat smaller keyboard that takes a little, but very little, getting used to. It took me a few hours to stop accidentally pressing some neighboring keys, but now using the keyboard is second nature. And the page turning buttons are silent, but have sufficient tactile feedback, excellent feel.

    I found it very easy to duplicate our library from our older Kindle to our new K3, and to activate our home wifi. I don't like to say I "transferred" our books because that could be understood to mean they were taken from our old Kindle to our new one. I say "duplicate" because they reside on both Kindles. The instruction manual is detailed and somewhat lengthy, but very understandable. (It's 200 pages, but don't let that scare you; it's easy to find the parts you need, and you will never need more than a few pages at one time.) The manual is published on the device, as in the past, and can also be downloaded to your computer as a pdf file so you can read the instructions from your computer as you apply them to the K3.

    If you have wifi at home, which we do, when you are in range of a wifi that you have activated in your K3, it automatically uses that wifi, instead of connecting to the 3G AT&T network, assuming, of course, you have a 3G+wifi K3. It works faster on my home wifi than on the 3G network, so much so that if I had really thought it through before I bought it, or if I were to buy another, I would probably go wifi only and save $50. The only reasons to get the 3G+wifi model would seem to be if you don't have reliable access to wifi or if you travel a good deal to places that don't have a lot of wifi access, but do have AT&T connectivity AND you have need to download books or periodicals on a regular basis or without delay while you are away from home or office. If you can plan ahead and stock up on a few good books, and you have reliable access to wifi, such as at home/office, McDonalds or Starbucks, I suggest you think twice about whether you want the 3G+wifi K3, or the wifi only.

    Each K3 has its own email address and you can send documents to it, including Word and pdf docs, and photos. Of course, the photos are B&W, but very detailed and clear. The K3 permits surfing the web, although I haven't used it much for that purpose and, other than saying it works, I hesitate to pass judgment on how well I think someone who uses it for web browsing would like it.

    I can't compare it to other dedicated e-readers because I haven't used them. People seem to be interested in how I think it compares to the iPad, which I don't own but have "played with" somewhat extensively at the Apple Store. My assessment is that there is no comparison. The iPad will do much more, but as an e-reader I think the K3 is superior. I don't need color for reading text, the K3 is a fraction of the cost, and its smaller size makes it much more convenient to tote around. However, what kills the iPad as an e-reader, as far as I am concerned, is its weight. I suspect most of us are the same in this regard, but I tend to read for an hour or two at a stretch. A pound and a half doesn't sound too heavy, but I held an iPad for five minutes, literally, and my hands ached. It is simply too heavy to use as a book reading device, while the K3 is light as a feather. For reading, a cheaper and significantly lighter K3 as a dedicated e-reader is, IMHO, the way to go (compared to an iPad). BTW, a recent (in Aug. 2010) report from Taiwan said Apple in making a 6" iPod, which, depending on size and weight, could change the equation. It will be interesting to see how the e-reader market develops. I said I can't compare the K3 to other competitors, and I won't, but I can say I am completely satisfied with Amazon as an e-book seller. I've only had a few occasions to need support (on my old Kindle), but that has also been entirely satisfactory.

    Bottom line: my wife and I both like the K3 very much and recommend it to anyone considering buying an e-reader. I don't think you will regret buying one, with or without the free 3G.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Quality control problems, September 7, 2010
    First, the good stuff. Kindle 3 has a very readable high contrast screen. The form factor is small and light enough to be a book replacement. Purchasing and downloading content is simple and convenient.

    However, I had a series of problems which eventually led me to return my Kindle.

    After unpacking and charging my Kindle 3, it refused to connect to my wireless network. I have a variety of other devices ranging from a Nintendo Wii to an iPod Touch and two computers that work just fine on my wireless network, but the Kindle couldn't connect after many attempts. I eventually gave up and turned it off. When I turned it back on several hours later, it had mysteriously connected to my WiFi network with the exact same settings that did not work earlier. I have noticed that several other users have ran into the same problem.

    The next problem I noticed was that something was rolling around inside the casing. This is obviously not a good sign. Then, my Kindle 3 started freezing. The first freeze happened while using the experimental browser. As this is an "experimental" application, I wasn't too concerned. After a power reset, the Kindle came back up. The second freeze happened while playing Shuffled Row, which is a good game. After this freeze, my Kindle refused to reboot after many power reset attempts. (Yes, I did try keeping the power switch in the "turn-on" position for up to 30 seconds as suggested by the manual.) I eventually gave up and put it down. However, after a few minutes, the Kindle started to reboot itself. The was another freeze while reading a book, which was fixed with a power reset. I tried to contact Amazon for service, but it looks like the only way to get Kindle customer service is through a phone call.

    And then my Kindle froze again while reading a book. This time, nothing would reset the kindle. When this last freeze happened, the battery was charged about 75%. At this point, there was no option but to return the kindle. There are some comments among the negative reviews here that the usual Amazon.com return process does not work. In my case, I was able to follow the regular Amazon return process and print a return label. So my Kindle is back to Amazon after less than a week of use.

    Judging from other reviews that had similar experiences as mine, Amazon appears to have a specific quality control problem with this latest version of the Kindle. People may be more tolerant of the reliability other electronic gadgets, however, it is unacceptable for a product that is primarily intended to replace paper books to have issues like freezing and/or rebooting. After all, I never had a "paper" book freeze or reboot on me so far. Receiving a product with defects that should have been caught during testing before shipping pretty much destroys the "Kindle experience".

    UPDATE (October 31, 2010): Since I do like the Kindle concept, after reading about the improvement in stability with the latest software upgrades, I purchased another Kindle WiFi. Everything was great for almost two weeks, no crashes. However, yesterday, the second Kindle also ended up with a frozen screen. After following through the instructions on Amazon's Kindle troubleshooting page and talking to the customer service, there was no way to get the Kindle out of the frozen state, so this one is also going back. The fact that this situation can happen to the same customer twice in a matter of few months indicates either a serious quality control problem or component reliability problem.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Details on working with PDF, Wi-fi vs 3G, Starbucks, Audio books, MP3 and other things, August 27, 2010
    NOTE: Amazon limits the video size and duration, so I targeted what I thought were some key points.
    I check comments, so leave one if you have any questions not covered in the video or below and I'll try and answer.

    First off I love this device!!
    Like ipods are the king of MP3 players, this is the king of ebook readers in my opinion.

    I've been looking at this thing for at least 7+ hrs today and my eyes don't feel tired at all.

    If you want. . .
    * a low cost eBook reader
    * that allows you to read books
    * looks great
    * easy to setup
    * easy to hold/carry
    * easy on the eyes (no getting tired eyes from a glaring screen)
    . . . then look no further than this product!



    **Adding updates as I find other feature behaviors**

    - The comic I converted to PDF when emailed to my kindle email address the conversion process didn't like it too much. Better to not use the conversion process for those types of PDFs. Other PDF's converted just fine.
    - Emailing PDF = the conversion process seems to cut off the cover page each time
    - Emailing and having amazon convert is fast. I like it!
    - You can plug the kindle into the USB, then "eject" it from the OS. This allows you to continue to charge the kindle and read it at the same time. You could also just plug it into an electrical socket and read from it too.
    - If you stop/pause your MP3 music it will start all the way back at track #1. This is not an MP3 player. It also plays the most recently added track first
    - 10 minutes it goes into sleep mode, but if you leave Wi-fi on = drains your battery quicker. Better to turn Wi-fi off when not using it
    - Buy a case to protect it and get yourself a light for times when you don't have enough light to read by. This is not a cell-phone screen, meaning you can't read it in the dark. The screen very much simulates paper in this case.
    - Manual even states...you cannot connect the Wi-fi to a corporate wi-fi. Most companies require VPN of some sort, which is not supported here.
    - Loaded a 25Mb PDF and when when trying to search I get the following error message, ""your search can not be completed as this item has not been indexed. Please try again later." Found forum posts that said give the Kindle at least 10 minutes to complete indexing the file. . .longer if file if big. Sure enough, about 30 minutes later I tried again and was able to search this large PDF.

    8/29/10 update:
    - Just got back from Starbucks
    * Turned wi-fi on
    * Menu > Settings > Wifi Settings and selected the attwifi network option
    * Home > Menu > Experimental > Launch browser
    * zoom in on the terms & agreement checkbox and use the spacebar to check the box
    * click continue button and you are on the internet at the coffee shop!!

    9/3/10 update:
    - A week later, I haven't charged the unit nor shut it down, I've only put it into sleep mode. Battery indicator is still more than 80% full. Nice!
    - Someone pointed me towards "Calibre" a free conversion utility. Totally supports the Kindle 3 and converts to PDF, ePub, Mobi, etc. Works great and you can have the program send the converted document directly to your device via USB or email. The program also acts as your own "backup" by creating a document library on your hard drive that can be sorted, metadata updated, etc. It's very cool!

    9/5/10 update:
    - I kept getting unconverted PDFs (PDFs copied directly to unit via USB vs. sending to email for conversion) would result in the unit restarting when trying to access the PDF. Found forums that said you need to reset the unit. Slide & hold the power button for 15 seconds. Let it take the 20 seconds to reboot. This worked for me.

    9/10/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Annotating PDFs, then accessing these notes for later review on a laptop/desktop
    - Is there an auto-scrolling for PDFs? = No
    - What its like to have the kindle "read" back to you? = robotic voice that ignores punctuation
    - More info on document conversion, including sending emails to the kindle for conversion?
    - The ability to access Gmail from the kindle? = yes, works fine though a bit slow on wi-fi

    9/19/10 update:
    - Check out the comments for my answer to, "Should I buy 3G or is wifi good enough?" = need to buy a book on the run, then get 3G. If you can wait till you get home or a coffee shop, then wi-fi works fine.

    9/24/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Exactly how does an Audible audio book work with the Kindle?
    - Possible causes for why MP3 music is not recognized by the device?

    10/2/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you play Audible audio books while at the same time reading along? = for all intents and purposes, no
    - How easy is it to register a new/used K3 to a different owner? = easy as pie

    10/23/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you change out the battery yourself? = no
    - Can you share your documents with other kindle users? = legally only if both devices are under the same user account

    12/7/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can a color document show up as color on the kindle? = No, doc will be converted to greyscale
    - Able to support textbooks? = Yes, if in a supported document type
    - Should I pay the extra $50 for 3G in order to more easily access websites? = Up to you...many sites have mobile versions that load great on wi-fi. NOTE: still doesn't support sites that use Java
    - Will I have 3G coverage in my rural area? = Amazon gives a disclaimer in their FAQ that 3G connection is not guaranteed in some areas
    - Should I get the K3 for my 10 year old? = I personally feel this is a great device for any age reader. . .and gives the parent control/visibility to what is being read
    ... Read more


    3. Kindle Leather Cover, Black (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle)
    Accessory
    -- our price: $34.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B003DZ163E
    Manufacturer: Amazon Digital Services, Inc
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Amazon.com Amazon's Kindle Leather Cover

    This leather cover offers optimal protection for your Kindle. Contoured, pebble-grain leather keeps your Kindle safe and secure, while the soft, charcoal-gray, microfiber interior protects the screen from scratches.

    Lightweight, this cover is perfect for taking Kindle wherever you go, and is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand.


    Secure Your Kindle

    Our patent-pending hinge system secures Kindle in place. An elastic strap keeps the cover firmly closed for maximum screen protection. Simply attach Kindle to the hinge, apply the strap, and rest assured it will stay securely in place even when you're on the go.


    Secure your Kindle in four easy steps
    Secure your Kindle in four easy steps


    Read Comfortably with One Hand


    Reading with the cover on, you can easily access Kindle's navigation features and power switch, while the rounded edges offer a perfect fit in your hands. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand.


    On the Go

    This lightweight, compact cover is perfect for taking Kindle wherever you go. The sleek leather ensures the ultimate fit and protection, without adding bulk or weight.



    Amazon’s official Kindle cover features contoured, pebble-grain leather available in 7 different colors.

     

     

    Read comfortably with Amazon’s protective leather Kindle cover.




    Read easily with one hand.



    Protect your Kindle on the go.

     

    ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Cover Band, August 28, 2010
    Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

    Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
    Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
    Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
    Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

    The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
    Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
    Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
    Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
    Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
    Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
    Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover for my first kindle, August 26, 2010
    After reading the reviews I was concerned that the light might be an issue since several folks commented that it doesn't shine evenly on the page. But I wanted something that would allow me to read in bed without disturbing my husband and the clip on lights are a pain to fuss with and are way too bright I think. Anyway, the light on the cover is just fine. Yes, it is a little dimmer at the bottom of the page but still quite readable. It is not one of those intensely bright lights that you have to kind of avert your gaze from. And it will not disturb anyone else trying to sleep.It kind of reminds me of my childhood days of reading a book under the covers with a flashlight except that you don't feel like you're going to suffocate.

    The second thing that some people didn't like was the added weight of this cover. The added weight is what I really like. The Kindle itself is so thin and light....for me TOO light. It feels so fragile and un-book-like. The cover gives it that little bit of heft that turns it into a book. I especially like to bend the cover all the way back and hold it either in both hands or in my left hand while I eat popcorn and drink champagne cocktails with my right.

    This is just one woman's opinion but I think can assure you that the light is adequate and very handy. And the weight is not a burden and may make it more of a normal reading experience for you as it does for me. Hope this helps if you are on the fence.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I'm returning my Cole Haan cover for this one, but..., September 2, 2010
    I'll admit it - I'm a bit of an accessories snob. I had the Cole Haan Hand-Stained Pebble Grain Leather Kindle Cover with Hinge (Fits 6" Display, 2nd Generation Kindle), Saddle Tan for my K2, and I originally purchased the Cole Haan Hand-Woven Leather Kindle Cover with Hinge (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle), Whiskey for my new K3. The new Cole Haan case is not meeting my needs, so I decided to give the Amazon cover a try.

    My new red cover just arrived today. The color is very nice - more brick red than burgundy. I immediately noticed that it was much smaller and sleeker than the Cole Haan cover. The Kindle fits just inside the cover, and there is not a lot of excess around the edges. I noticed that many reviewers are complaining about the weight/bulk, but for me this was an improvement over the Cole Haan covers. The strap is a nice feature as well, although I'm wondering how long it will hold up after reading some of the other negative reviews.

    The biggest con for me is that the leather doesn't feel as nice as I would like it to. Perhaps I shouldn't be comparing it to the incredibly buttery-soft leather that Cole Haan uses, but it's hard to ignore the difference. This leather is harder and reminds me of a plastic substance. I'm not saying it's bad, it's just not super lush. If I had never seen the Cole Haan cover, I would likely not even be commenting on this in such detail!

    Overall, this cover is perfectly fine. If you're super picky about the quality of the leather, you may not like it. If you can get over that detail, I think this cover will do the trick.


    1-0 out of 5 stars Lovely looking product that doesn't hold up, September 28, 2010
    I am very pleased with this cover. It is very protective, a nice shade of blue and very compact. It does fold over. I know some people don't realize this. The leather is stiff at first but it will fold over and soften after a few days. I had the official cover for kindle 2 and they have made some improvements. The leather is a better quality, they now offer a choice of colors and the spine doesn't feel like it will fall apart. Overall having the elastic is nice as well as it makes it more secure. I like that it makes the kindle feel more like a book and the hinge system is really nice. I like the clean look and won't be buying any cover that puts corner straps on the device. My one con is it weighs 5.7 ounces and while that is not heavy it really could be more like 4 ounces as they probably make the cover heavier than it really needs to be and still be protective.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Kindle 3 Cover - Video Review, August 27, 2010
    Video review of Kindle 3 cover. The app on the iPad is "Cheez Pro Clock" showing FAILblog - I thought it rather appropriate given the UPS FAILure to deliver on a weekend leaving me without a Kindle 3 to use with the case!

    Overall 4 stars. It feels slightly more sturdy and a little less cheap than the Kindle 2 cover. I took one star off because it still has the potential flaw of having nothing to keep the kindle in place at the right, and because I'd prefer a slightly more soft feel to the outside.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Cover Band, August 28, 2010
    I have to hand it to the designers at Amazon. If nothing else, they listen to our comments and react.

    The cover is fabulous. It's a piece of nice leather lined with quality padding and soft felt. It folds all the way back without any difficulty, making reading with one hand a breeze. The band helps to show which way the Kindle inside is facing, and keeps the reader from opening the cover the wrong way, which damaged many K2's. The corners are softly rounded, adding to the comfort and ease of use.

    The patent-pending hinge is a work of genius. None of the Kindle is obstructed by bands or elastic straps. It securely locks the Kindle in place, leaving the whole device exposed.

    I have to remark on the quality leather. Even my wife, who over-criticizes almost everyting, was very impressed with the fine-grade pebble-grain leather and actually had nice things to say after opening and inspecting it. If you knew my wife, you would know the value of this comment.

    Unlike some other readers out there, Kindle makes available a custom-designed cover that works in concert with the device. I'm satisfied with the cover (and the Kindle3) and give it my highest recommendation.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Objective info that may be helpful - light or not, colors, September 4, 2010
    Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

    Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
    Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
    Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
    Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

    The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
    Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
    Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
    Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
    Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
    Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
    Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover for my first kindle, August 26, 2010
    I ended up going with the black leather cover to match the Kindle Wireless Reading Device, Wi-Fi, 6" Display, Graphite - Latest Generation that I bought. The cover itself feels like it's made out of decent leather and gives me the impression that it will protect my Kindle while it's in my backpack or being casually tossed around the house.

    The cover itself is easy to install. It took under a minute and once it was on, it wasn't really noticeable, more so than a hardcover bookcover is noticeable after a while when you read a book. It folds over fine behind the Kindle.

    I'm happy with this cover. Sure, I could have bought a cheaper neoprene one but I wanted something that made me feel good about an e-reader. It may sound weird, but I like it from an aesthetics standpoint. It makes me feel like I've got a proper book in my hands instead of a toy or a gadget.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Well designed, provides good protective padding, August 26, 2010
    My Kindle 3 and cover arrived today. The cover is fairly similar to the Kindle 2 cover design, but with an elastic strap that can be used to hold the cover closed, or to hold the cover behind the Kindle when you are reading.

    I bought the cover mostly to protect my Kindle when I'm traveling. The cover front and back are both tough and well padded, with a soft felt lining and look like they should provide good protection. The overall appearance is reasonably elegant.

    The cover clips on easily and securely. The Kindle 3 has two small slots on the left side and two clips on the cover latch into these slots. You can slide the top clip down to unlatch and release the Kindle.

    I have somewhat mixed feelings about the elastic strap. I know some people like to be able to securely close the cover, but for me it's mostly an unnecessary extra step. I will try it for a while: it looks easy enough to snip off if it becomes a nuisance. (Update in October: I'm getting used to it. I use the strap to hold the cover folded back when I am reading and I find that sliding my hand under the strap is a very comfortable way to hold the Kindle.)

    The Kindle 3 + cover total around 0.7" thickness. So the cover is roughly doubling the Kindle's natural 0.335" thickness. But since I want protective padding, this seems like a price I need to pay!

    The cover weighs 5.5 ounces. (The Kindle 3 by itself is 8.5 ounces.)

    Overall, I'm very happy with the cover.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Rather shoddy material and construction for the price, August 31, 2010
    On the first day of use, after only using the securing band a couple of times, the band suddenly snapped from the top of the cover. It turns out that it was only flimsily glued to a slot on the top edge. Some superglue fixed this, but it really should not have been necessary.

    The cover holds the Kindle snugly, however, it's a bit misaligned: the lower right side of the Kindle is more exposed than the upper right side.

    All in all, I'd still have purchased it (though perhaps in a different color -- black was the only one available when the pre-order process began), but had third party covers been updated for the 3rd generation Kindle (e.g. the Moleskine) this product would probably have been priced more affordably.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Glad I went ahead and got it...., September 4, 2010
    After reading the reviews I was concerned that the light might be an issue since several folks commented that it doesn't shine evenly on the page. But I wanted something that would allow me to read in bed without disturbing my husband and the clip on lights are a pain to fuss with and are way too bright I think. Anyway, the light on the cover is just fine. Yes, it is a little dimmer at the bottom of the page but still quite readable. It is not one of those intensely bright lights that you have to kind of avert your gaze from. And it will not disturb anyone else trying to sleep.It kind of reminds me of my childhood days of reading a book under the covers with a flashlight except that you don't feel like you're going to suffocate.

    The second thing that some people didn't like was the added weight of this cover. The added weight is what I really like. The Kindle itself is so thin and light....for me TOO light. It feels so fragile and un-book-like. The cover gives it that little bit of heft that turns it into a book. I especially like to bend the cover all the way back and hold it either in both hands or in my left hand while I eat popcorn and drink champagne cocktails with my right.

    This is just one woman's opinion but I think can assure you that the light is adequate and very handy. And the weight is not a burden and may make it more of a normal reading experience for you as it does for me. Hope this helps if you are on the fence.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I'm returning my Cole Haan cover for this one, but..., September 2, 2010
    I'll admit it - I'm a bit of an accessories snob. I had the Cole Haan Hand-Stained Pebble Grain Leather Kindle Cover with Hinge (Fits 6" Display, 2nd Generation Kindle), Saddle Tan for my K2, and I originally purchased the Cole Haan Hand-Woven Leather Kindle Cover with Hinge (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle), Whiskey for my new K3. The new Cole Haan case is not meeting my needs, so I decided to give the Amazon cover a try.

    My new red cover just arrived today. The color is very nice - more brick red than burgundy. I immediately noticed that it was much smaller and sleeker than the Cole Haan cover. The Kindle fits just inside the cover, and there is not a lot of excess around the edges. I noticed that many reviewers are complaining about the weight/bulk, but for me this was an improvement over the Cole Haan covers. The strap is a nice feature as well, although I'm wondering how long it will hold up after reading some of the other negative reviews.

    The biggest con for me is that the leather doesn't feel as nice as I would like it to. Perhaps I shouldn't be comparing it to the incredibly buttery-soft leather that Cole Haan uses, but it's hard to ignore the difference. This leather is harder and reminds me of a plastic substance. I'm not saying it's bad, it's just not super lush. If I had never seen the Cole Haan cover, I would likely not even be commenting on this in such detail!

    Overall, this cover is perfectly fine. If you're super picky about the quality of the leather, you may not like it. If you can get over that detail, I think this cover will do the trick.


    1-0 out of 5 stars Lovely looking product that doesn't hold up, September 28, 2010
    I got this on Saturday. It broke today (Tuesday). The tabs that hold the kindle in the cover are not very sturdy. I don't think I put undue pressure on the kindle. But the top tab broke off, requiring the use of needle nose pliers to extract the broken piece from the kindle. I expect a product I pay $35 for to last longer than three days. I'm very disappointed.

    In looking at it, perhaps it is really a design issue and not a quality issue.

    Honestly, I did find the cover cumbersome when using the keypad. If you are using the keypad frequently, you might want to consider a sleeve. I will not replace this with another book type cover.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover, September 3, 2010
    I am very pleased with this cover. It is very protective, a nice shade of blue and very compact. It does fold over. I know some people don't realize this. The leather is stiff at first but it will fold over and soften after a few days. I had the official cover for kindle 2 and they have made some improvements. The leather is a better quality, they now offer a choice of colors and the spine doesn't feel like it will fall apart. Overall having the elastic is nice as well as it makes it more secure. I like that it makes the kindle feel more like a book and the hinge system is really nice. I like the clean look and won't be buying any cover that puts corner straps on the device. My one con is it weighs 5.7 ounces and while that is not heavy it really could be more like 4 ounces as they probably make the cover heavier than it really needs to be and still be protective.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Kindle 3 Cover - Video Review, August 27, 2010
    Video review of Kindle 3 cover. The app on the iPad is "Cheez Pro Clock" showing FAILblog - I thought it rather appropriate given the UPS FAILure to deliver on a weekend leaving me without a Kindle 3 to use with the case!

    Overall 4 stars. It feels slightly more sturdy and a little less cheap than the Kindle 2 cover. I took one star off because it still has the potential flaw of having nothing to keep the kindle in place at the right, and because I'd prefer a slightly more soft feel to the outside. ... Read more


    4. Kindle Lighted Leather Cover, Black (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle)
    Accessory
    -- our price: $59.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B003DZ165W
    Manufacturer: Amazon Digital Services, Inc
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Amazon.comAmazon's Kindle Lighted Leather Cover

    Our new design seamlessly incorporates a reading light into the cover, so you can carry your Kindle wherever you go and always have a reading light with you. Simply pull the light out to illuminate Kindle when you need it, and slide it away to be invisible when you don't. And since the light draws its power from Kindle, no batteries are needed.

    The contoured, pebble-grain leather (available in 7 different colors) keeps your Kindle safe and secure, while the soft charcoal microfiber interior protects the screen from scratches. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand.


    The built-in, retractable LED light pulls out to illuminate Kindle, and slides away when not in use.


    Never Be Without a Light

    Our all-new Kindle cover features an integrated, retractable LED reading light that lets you read comfortably anytime, anywhere. The high-quality LED light illuminates Kindle's paper-like display, adding brightness without adding glare.

    A permanent part of the cover, the reading light is located in the top right-hand corner of the back cover. When needed, simply pull the light out and it automatically illuminates, eliminating the need for a separate power switch. To turn the light off, slide it back in to the corner of the cover.

    Since the light is powered by Kindle's battery, no batteries are needed.

     

    How It Works

    In addition to securing Kindle in place, our new hinge system conducts electricity from Kindle's battery to the reading light - when Kindle is attached to the hinge, an electrical connection is formed that powers the light.

    The cover's hinge points are gold-plated, to ensure a reliable electrical connection. Gold is used because of its ability to make good electrical contact even with low force, and for its corrosion resistance.


    Secure Your Kindle in Four Easy Steps


    Read Comfortably with One Hand


    Reading with the cover on, you can easily access Kindle's navigation features and power switch, while the rounded edges offer a perfect fit in your hands. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand. And the retractable reading light is easily accessible with the cover open or folded back.


    On the Go

    This compact cover is perfect for taking Kindle wherever you go. The sleek leather ensures the ultimate fit and protection, without adding bulk or weight. Our patent-pending hinge system secures Kindle in place, and an elastic strap keeps the cover firmly closed for maximum screen protection. Simply attach Kindle to the hinge, apply the strap, and rest assured it will stay securely in place even when you're on the go.

    You'll never be without a reading light, and since the light draws its power from Kindle, no batteries are needed.



    Amazon’s official Kindle lighted cover features contoured, pebble-grain leather available in 7 different colors.

     

     

    Read Kindle easily in the dark with Amazon's revolutionary, all-new lighted leather cover.



    The hinge points are gold-plated to ensure a reliable electrical connection. No batteries required.


    Read easily with one hand, with or without the light on.


    Protect your Kindle on the go, and never be without a reading light

     

    ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good Quality K3 Cover with Handy Light, August 26, 2010
    I bought the burnt orange color cover so I can spot my Kindle where ever I leave it easily--and hopefully not misplace it! The cover is good quality leather, and even with the cover on, I can slip the K3 into my small purse without squeezing it in--something I could not do with my coverless Kindle 2.

    I think for an easy purchase without having to buy a separate book light, the Kindle 3 lighted cover is a good choice. The light worked _great_ reading in bed last night. I could see all of the lighted screen just fine with the upper right corner a bit brighter. See the pics I loaded to customer images for the lighted cover to see the light in action in a dark room, and what the cover looks light from the back.

    Pluses: Built in light that slips securely out of the way, no batteries to replace, better clips/fit than past covers that connect to Kindle, adequate to light the entire screen, no looking for a booklight, no clipping a booklight to my Kindle and scratching or damaging it, the book light LEDs point down towards the screen, so no bright lights in your eyes.

    Minuses: The cover's weight doubles the weight of the Kindle 3 in your hand, the book light stays in one corner and doesn't move around the Kindle, uses more Kindle battery life (it's powered by the Kindle 3 -- and I noticed a definite drain on the battery from using the light)

    UPDATE: I used the Kindle light for a couple days now, and the battery life goes down noticeably as you use the light (esp. if you keep the wireless "On"). Last night I read with the light for about 2 hours after a full charge and today the battery looks down about 15%. At that rate of use (with no wireless constantly "On" and regular reading in the daylight), I estimate the battery will need charging after approx. 1 week.

    If the overall cover+Kindle weight is an issue for you--more than protecting your Kindle and the handy light--then this cover is not for you.

    Kindle Lighted Leather Cover alone = 233 grams or 8.2 oz

    Kindle Lighted Leather Cover + Kindle 3 = 447 grams or 15.75 oz. (almost 1 lb.)

    Thickness: Kindle cover + Kindle 3 = 3/4 inch

    Cover Measurements (with Kindle inside):

    Front: 7 3/4" x 5 1/8" (closer to 3/16")
    Back: SAME as front
    Spine: 7/8"
    Open side (to the right) with Kindle inside: 3/4"

    I have to say I'm getting used to the weight with the cover as I use it. The piece of mind of extra Kindle protection, plus a handy light whenever you need it, is worth the trade off for me. '

    November 20th UPDATE:

    **Still love the cover** and having the light handy without having to think about needing a light _is better than ever_. One thing however, is that the hooks to connect the cover are not sturdy enough, IMO, to take the cover on and off often. The Kindle "wiggles" a bit on the connectors, and be careful not to pull the Kindle forward or up off the back of the cover to avoid bending or breaking the metal connectors. Despite this, I am very happy with this cover after using it almost 3 months now.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Lighted Leather Case - Two Important Concerns, August 31, 2010
    Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

    Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
    Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
    Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
    Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

    The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
    Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
    Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
    Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
    Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
    Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
    Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good Quality K3 Cover with Handy Light, August 26, 2010
    I bought the burnt orange color cover so I can spot my Kindle where ever I leave it easily--and hopefully not misplace it! The cover is good quality leather, and even with the cover on, I can slip the K3 into my small purse without squeezing it in--something I could not do with my coverless Kindle 2.

    I think for an easy purchase without having to buy a separate book light, the Kindle 3 lighted cover is a good choice. The light worked _great_ reading in bed last night. I could see all of the lighted screen just fine with the upper right corner a bit brighter. See the pics I loaded to customer images for the lighted cover to see the light in action in a dark room, and what the cover looks light from the back.

    Pluses: Built in light that slips securely out of the way, no batteries to replace, better clips/fit than past covers that connect to Kindle, adequate to light the entire screen, no looking for a booklight, no clipping a booklight to my Kindle and scratching or damaging it, the book light LEDs point down towards the screen, so no bright lights in your eyes.

    Minuses: The cover's weight doubles the weight of the Kindle 3 in your hand, the book light stays in one corner and doesn't move around the Kindle, uses more Kindle battery life (it's powered by the Kindle 3 -- and I noticed a definite drain on the battery from using the light)

    UPDATE: I used the Kindle light for a couple days now, and the battery life goes down noticeably as you use the light (esp. if you keep the wireless "On"). Last night I read with the light for about 2 hours after a full charge and today the battery looks down about 15%. At that rate of use (with no wireless constantly "On" and regular reading in the daylight), I estimate the battery will need charging after approx. 1 week.

    If the overall cover+Kindle weight is an issue for you--more than protecting your Kindle and the handy light--then this cover is not for you.

    Kindle Lighted Leather Cover alone = 233 grams or 8.2 oz

    Kindle Lighted Leather Cover + Kindle 3 = 447 grams or 15.75 oz. (almost 1 lb.)

    Thickness: Kindle cover + Kindle 3 = 3/4 inch

    Cover Measurements (with Kindle inside):

    Front: 7 3/4" x 5 1/8" (closer to 3/16")
    Back: SAME as front
    Spine: 7/8"
    Open side (to the right) with Kindle inside: 3/4"

    I have to say I'm getting used to the weight with the cover as I use it. The piece of mind of extra Kindle protection, plus a handy light whenever you need it, is worth the trade off for me. '

    November 20th UPDATE:

    **Still love the cover** and having the light handy without having to think about needing a light _is better than ever_. One thing however, is that the hooks to connect the cover are not sturdy enough, IMO, to take the cover on and off often. The Kindle "wiggles" a bit on the connectors, and be careful not to pull the Kindle forward or up off the back of the cover to avoid bending or breaking the metal connectors. Despite this, I am very happy with this cover after using it almost 3 months now.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Lighted Leather Case - Two Important Concerns, August 31, 2010
    I've noticed that like myself customers have been concerned primarily with two things regarding the new lighted case from amazon. These are: 1)The weight and 2) The uneven lighting. My review will briefly discuss these two things.

    1)The Weight - The lighted leather case is a nice weight, sturdy and comfortable to hold. In ounces it is about the weight of the kindle itself however don't let that concern you. With the case on it feels like a medium sized paperback, however it is far much more comfortable to hold. It's easy to hold the case open like a book (nice for couch and table type reading) or to fold the front back and close it with the bungee so that the bungee doesn't hang around (this is good for bedtime reading).Closing the front back with bungee keeps the case folded in position and you don't have to worry about it bothering you. BTW THIS CASE FOLDS BACK 100% - Very comfortable. In sum very comfortable to read with the case and very sturdy.

    2) The uneven lighting - Amazon's pictures don't do this case justice. The light hits the ENTIRE screen. Yes if you look closely it's brighter in the top right corner then in the bottom left but Amazon's pics make it look the top is lighted while the bottom is dark. There is good light all over the screen. Trust me I'm fussy about these things - the lighting will not bother you, your entire screen will be lighted and it is extremely pleasant to read in the dark.

    *Final Thoughts - Great case, good quality, works well, kindle feels very secure and protected (I would feel comfortable slipping this case into my backpack or suitcase and I think it would sustain some mild impact). Lastly hinges are a non-issue, casing of the kindle will not get damaged with normal or even slightly aggressive use. You could damage the kindle by trying to pull the back of the case but you'd have to really force it to cause any sort of damage to your kindle. The hinges work fine and should not be a concern to any case user.

    Update 1st December 2010:

    Have now been using the case for 3 months. Leather still looks impeccable. Some people expressed concern that the bungee cord might loosen with use. I have not experienced any loosening so far. Quality of the product has proven outstanding. I've occasionally spilled or messed the cover, just a wipe with a damp cloth has cleaned it up, and the case looks like new. Have to admit I enjoy the feel of the case in my hand, there's just something great about taking your kindle to a coffee shop in this case, it just looks and feels so classy. Also with regard to the hinges: I have had no scratches on my kindle or any other issues, so I remain convinced that the hinges are a non issue.

    5-0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Kindle Case Yet, September 2, 2010
    I read in bed every single night, so having my Kindle be able to read in the dark is very important to me. With my Kindle 2 I used a mighty bright light, and with my Kindle 3 I've been using this Lighted Leather cover - and I love it!

    Check out my video review for a size comparison of this case against my Kindle 2 and also an actual hardcover and softcover book, and then a lights out comparison of the Mighty Bright vs Lighted Leather cover.

    Sorry for the shaky camera, it's the best I could do with one hand!

    If you're interested in seeing a video review of the Kindle 3 itself, check out the one I did one here:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R21YU59NMOGKUR

    3-0 out of 5 stars For those that REALLY care, it's not worth the money., August 28, 2010
    I've been an avid Kindle user since Kindle 1, and I take my lights VERY seriously.

    The problem is that the new Kindle 3 cover+light does not evenly light the screen. This results in a very bright top right corner, including the top right of the frame of the Kindle 3. And while the light doesn't glare off the screen, it does glare off my graphite Kindle 3's top right corner, making for constant distraction while reading. The light then gets fainter and fainter in a diagonal line from the top right to bottom left. It's not very fun, unfortunately.

    Now, for convenience, this new cover is fantastic. I have the non-lighted one and the one with the light, and the weight difference isn't very much, and the bulk difference is truly negligible, so kudos to Amazon for this.

    That said, I simply cannot recommend this cover unless you don't mind an incredibly uneven light. I will stick to my Mighty Bright. Yes, it's an addition to the Kindle, but I know that when I sit down to read, I want the pages to "disappear" as I become immersed in my reading. It's very hard for them to do so when the light is so incredibly awkward and uneven, constantly distracting. I'm happy to spend a few extra seconds clipping my light to the back of my Kindle so I can spend hours enjoying my book. That simply wasn't possible with the Kindle Lighted Leather Cover.

    3 stars out of 5.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Compact and well made, August 27, 2010
    For a folio type case, this looks and feels great and works very well. It does add significantly to the weight but that seems a predictable consequence of using leather, making it stiff enough to offer real protection, and building in a light.

    Attaching Kindle is very simple using the directions on the product page. Make sure you heed the warning to work at it until ALL the gold is covered, which tells you Kindle is securely attached. Removing is quite simple: Slide down the top hook and rotate Kindle right off. I'm using a fingertip to do it rather than a fingernail. It's quick and easy enough to attach and detach Kindle that I won't have any difficulty switching to "naked" reading at will.

    The cord seems to me strong enough for its purpose, but only time will tell. When the cover is closed, the cord is buried in a "channel" in the front cover so should not normally be subjected to much stress and strain. I did remove the little "flag" attached to the cord. Even without using fingernails, it's easy to open the cord up. Others have posted about the cord being in the way during reading, especially when holding Kindle and case in "open book" form. I put the cord between Kindle and the back cover, solving the issue to my own satisfaction. YMMV.

    I don't think I'll use the "book style" reading position much. I'll "break the spine" as I did with my K2's case and read with the front cover folded flat against the back. It feels good like that, but when I have good light and will be reading a while I expect I'll do as I did with my K2: Remove Kindle from the case and read "naked." Still, even brand new, the leather folds flat easily and it's comfortable to hold and read.

    The light seems to me to be well placed. I don't get any glare in any of my normal reading positions, so don't have a practical issue with its lack of adjustability. One very nice feature, particularly since it's powered by Kindle's battery, is that it turns off when Kindle turns off. So if you fall asleep reading, your light won't just keep running. I find it a bit stiff to pull out, but I expect it will ease in time. Also maybe stiff is good, as you don't want it just lolling out on its own while you've got it stowed away. Still, folks with difficulty applying much force with their fingers could find this an issue.

    I bought this unseen, intending to return it if it didn't work well. It won't be going back. I may in fact buy another case for travel, as by design this folio style case is open on three sides. In some situations I would want more dust and bang protection, but I still give five stars because this is an unavoidable consequence of this style of design.

    5-0 out of 5 stars well worth it, August 27, 2010
    This is a comparison between mighty bright and the kindle cover light. NOTE: the bottom left of the kindle is the part that receives the less light because it is the farthest away. The light still shines well enough to read the bottom left of the kindle , but the light distribution is not even.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Exceeded my expectations, August 27, 2010
    I was hesitant to buy this cover mostly due to the pictures in its listing, which seem to show a light that doesn't even extend to the opposite corner. The fact that I have not been impressed with the Amazon's Kindle covers in the past didn't help. I went ahead and purchased it because the cover I wanted isn't available yet and I don't like to take my Kindle out and about without a cover. Now I am glad that I went ahead and bought it.

    PROS:

    1. The light is much better than I thought it would be. Using it in a darkened room I found that the light did the job very well. In a pitch black room, it performs even better. While the screen corner opposite the light is a bit dimmer than other areas, there is no problem reading the page at all.

    2. The light gets its power from the Kindle itself, through the gold-plated hinges which attach it to the cover, so batteries are a thing of the past. When your Kindle goes to sleep, the light will go out as well. It will also turn off when you slide it back into the case.

    3. The cover is slim, well-fitted and very easy to attach and detach using the hinges. The inside has good padding. The leather outer surface has a nice pebbled texture with the exception of a smooth area along the edge of the front. While stiff enough to protect the reader, the cover is slight flexible and the front easily folds behind when reading so you can hold your Kindle with one hand if you like.

    4. A great plus is that the cover has an elastic cord that fits into a groove on the front of it. This holds your cover closed (unlike the original Kindle 2 cover that would flop open in your purse & let things slide into it) and easily distinguishes the front from the back--important as many owners of the Kindle 2 cover accidentally opened it from the back, which could cause cracking along the Kindle's spine.


    CONS:

    I haven't found any, really. The light Is a bit hard (stiff) to pull out of the cover, but then you wouldn't want it to be flopping out when you don't want to use it so that is more of a Pro than a Con.

    The one concern I do have is about pulling the light in and out--I wonder if whatever wiring or conductor that is used to get the power from the hinges to the light will eventually break. But that is something to find out down the road. Right now, the more I use this cover, the more I like it.

    4-0 out of 5 stars From the bungee cord thingy to the pull-out light, a solid choice for the Kindle, September 4, 2010
    I ordered this cover because it was the only real game in town at the time. To let you know where I come from with this review... I purchased the 2nd generation Kindle back in March of 2009 with the Amazon cover. Didn't like that one, it actually cracked my mother's Kindle that I purchased shortly thereafter (Amazon replaced it, although it was probably from her opening the wrong side, doesn't matter, this isn't about Amazon great customer service). When that happened, we immediately went looking for a new cover and fell in love with the M-Edge Prodigy with light. Unfortunately, M-Edge isn't offering that for the 3rd generation Kindle, they changed it to have a nylon strap instead of leather and aren't utilizing the hinge technology for the light, which I think is genius and a terrible error on their part. I'm telling you this so you know that I ordered this new Amazon Lighted Cover with a WHOLE LOT of trepidation.

    When deciding on the color, I didn't want black (I wanted purple, but Amazon doesn't offer that *boo*hiss*) and the green was backordered slightly, didn't like the other colors so I decided to get the orange. It looked interesting and since I live in Austin, some UT fan would buy it off me if I hated it, I was sure. It came in and it's the perfect burnt orange color. It might be slightly too tan colored, but it's not vibrant orange by any means. A great almost pumpkin pie color actually.

    So... what did I think of the cover itself?

    I slid the Kindle in there and pulled the light out and... nothing happened. I spent a good 3 to 5 minutes pulling the light out and pushing it back in, looking for a switch, something, anything. I finally gave up and turned the Kindle on and... yeah, the light came on. DUH! It works only if the Kindle is on. This is actually GREAT because I fall asleep reading a good deal and the light will go off when the Kindle goes to sleep after 15 minutes or so. I felt stupid, but at least I didn't call customer service and have them giggle in the background and the stupid lady that can't work the cover, eh?

    ANYWAY... the Kindle slides in easily and the light works great. There is no glare at all because the LED lights are directed down the arm of the light so there's no "direct" light hitting the screen, it just flows down. It is brighter in the upper right than in the lower left because of that, but it's more than adequate. The light is NOT adjustable but you shouldn't need to adjust it either. I have found it really is a genius way of handling it.

    The case itself is not too thick. In fact when I first picked up the case, I thought I had the wrong one because it looked too slim to have a light in there, but it's there. It is a little hard to pull the light out, but I guess the alternative is having it be too easy, right? I really wish they had included corner straps though. I read laying in bed and I worry it's going to flop open and crack the Kindle. I do realize this is probably unfounded and they fixed that flaw, but because I'm paranoid, I did put two small circles of velcro to the back of the Kindle and the cover so it couldn't accidentally bend the hinge system or crack the case. I'm aware this is insane overkill type stuff, so feel free to snicker... I'll wait... done? Okay, onward...

    Now, back to reality... the chance of you opening the Kindle from the wrong side is basically zero. You have to unwrap it using this bungee cord thingy (yes, that's the technical term here, folks). It has a little leather tag on it that says "Amazon Kindle". The tag is a little annoying because I fold the cover back and use the cord to hold it and keep hitting the tag with my hand no matter where I put. I'm thinking of cutting it off. *shrug*

    It does, of course, add some weight to the Kindle. The case, with Kindle and velcro circles weighs 15.5 oz on my postal scale. There's been some discussion if this is "too heavy" but I must say that I don't think so. I read with it folded back and the bungee cord thingy wrapped around the back. I have weak hands that keep me from reading hard backs and large paperback books. I think it's more of the force of holding the book open than the weight, so it's not been an issue at all for me. I also read with it propped up somewhere usually.

    My favorite part is that with the new slim and sleek design of the Kindle and this slim and sleek cover (with a light, no less!) it really is a great size to grab and go, toss in my purse, in the car or my bedside. My other favorite (it's a tie) is the light. It runs off power from the Kindle itself so I'm never without a light. I don't have to find a battery somewhere when it burns out. Amazon knocked it out of the park as far as I'm concerned. I'm taking off a star just for the few little niggle things I mentioned before. After over a week of use though, this is the cover I'm recommending to friends/family at this time.

    Well worth it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Data to compare colors and weights, with and without light, September 4, 2010
    Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

    Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
    Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
    Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
    Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

    The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
    Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
    Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
    Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
    Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
    Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
    Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

    4-0 out of 5 stars (4.5 stars) Very good, and not THAT heavy!, August 28, 2010
    I bought two of these (burgundy for my wife's graphite kindle and green for my white kindle).

    The colors are gorgeous, and exactly as shown in the pictures Amazon has here.

    The look and feel of the leather is very good and should more than satisfy most folks. If you're willing to spend more for even better leather, you'll soon be able to get high-end leather cases from designers like Cole-Haan. (If you're interested, look up their Kindle 2 cases here at Amazon and you're get an idea of what they're likely to offer for Kindle 3).

    We love the design. We've had no trouble hooking our kindles in and out of the case. We love that the light is built in and we will never need to replace its battery. The cover folds completely flat around the back, and the elastic band keeps it there, then it's easy and quite comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    A few reviews here complain about the weight of this case. I disagree. It is not heavy compared to other cases of this type (folio-style hard shell leather cases). My wife and I were up reading for hours last night, holding our kindles, cases on, in one hand, with no fatigue. (We're such an old married couple, that's how exciting our Friday nights are!) I used to have a nook with the same type of case (minus the light), and it was noticeably heavier. If you want something lighter, consider a neoprene sleeve or cloth case.

    My only qualm about the Amazon lighted case is the uneven distribution of light on the screen - very bright in the upper right corner, dim in the lower left corner. It seems this doesn't bother most people here, but it bothers me a bit, enough to knock half a star off my review, but not enough to make me hesitate to recommend this case.

    Some folks complain about the price. It is high, to be sure. But, you'd pay about the same if you bought a good leather case and a separate light. Then you'd have to worry about remembering to pack the light when you travel, making sure it has fresh batteries, making sure you don't lose it, etc etc. For me, the convenience of the built-in light is well worth the price.

    And there's something intangible but very very nice about keeping our kindles in these gorgeous, almost luxuriously nice cases. They are definitely eye-catching and lust-worthy. ... Read more


    5. Apple iPod touch 32 GB (4th Generation) NEWEST MODEL
    Electronics
    list price: $299.00 -- our price: $279.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B001FA1O18
    Manufacturer: Apple Computer
    Sales Rank: 5
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Amazon.com Product Description

    See friends while you talk to them with FaceTime. Shoot, edit, and share stunning HD video. Play games against friends, or unknown foes, with the new Game Center. And do it all on the Retina display--the highest-resolution screen on any mobile device. It makes graphics and text look even more amazing. The new iPod touch. It's state-of-the-art fun.

    Introducing the new iPod touch. Now with FaceTime, Retina display, HD video recording, and Game Center. Click to enlarge.

    Advanced engineering at play.

    Pioneering technology built into iPod touch is how you're able to flick, tap, and pinch. It's what makes a racing game feel so real. It's why you're able to see a friend crack up at your jokes from across the globe. And it's the reason iPod touch is the most incredible iPod you'll ever own.

    Looks can be amazing.
    iPod touch has an all-new design that makes it the thinnest, lightest, most amazing iPod touch ever. Holding one is all the proof you need. With its curved design, iPod touch is now a mere 7.2 millimeters thin. Its engineered-glass front and stainless steel back feel sleek and smooth in your hand. Turn it on, and you're instantly blown away by the brilliant Retina display. iPod touch is the perfect combination of stunning design and revolutionary technology--brilliant from the outside in.

    Retina display. A blast from the future.
    There are lots of reasons you won't want to take your eyes off the new iPod touch. The 960-by-640 backlit LCD display, for one. It packs 326 pixels per inch, making it the highest-resolution iPod screen ever. To achieve this, Apple engineers developed pixels so small--a mere 78 micrometers across--that the human eye can't distinguish individual pixels. Even though you can't see them, you'll definitely notice the difference. Text is remarkably sharp, and graphics are incredibly vivid.

    Apple A4 processor. More power to you.
    The Apple A4 chip is behind, or rather underneath, all the fun you can have on iPod touch. Apple engineers designed the A4 chip to be a remarkably powerful yet remarkably power-efficient mobile processor. With it, iPod touch can easily perform complex jobs such as multitasking, editing video, and placing FaceTime calls. All while maximizing battery life. And fun.

    Gyro + Accelerometer. Smooth moves.
    iPod touch just learned some new moves. It now includes a built-in three-axis gyroscope. When paired with the accelerometer, the gyro makes iPod touch capable of advanced motion sensing such as user acceleration, full 3D attitude, and rotation rate. Translation: more motion gestures and greater precision for an even better gaming experience.

    Two cameras. Double the fun.
    iPod touch captures video with two built-in cameras. It shoots amazing HD 720p video from the back camera. And with its advanced backside illumination sensor, it captures beautiful footage even in low-light settings. All while the built-in microphone records conversations, music, or any audio at the same time. And on the front of the iPod touch, the built-in camera is perfect for making FaceTime calls and shooting self-portraits. It's surprising how much fun can fit into something so small.

    Multi-Touch. Control at your fingertips.
    When you put your finger on the iPod touch, how does it just start doing what you want it to do? It's a chain reaction, really. The Multi-Touch display layers a protective shield over a capacitive panel that senses your touch using electrical fields. It then transmits that information to the Retina display below it. So you can glide through albums with Cover Flow, flick through photos and enlarge them with a pinch, zoom in and out on a section of a web page, and control game elements precisely.

    FaceTime comes to iPod touch. Don't just say hello. Smile.

    Tap for a more instant instant message.
    Take "LOL" to the next level and actually see friends laughing out loud. Or bring "XOXO" to life when you blow someone a kiss from miles away. FaceTime on iPod touch makes it possible. FaceTime works right out of the box--just enter your Apple ID and email address. Or create a new email account just for FaceTime. Using FaceTime is as easy as it gets. Say you want to start a video call with your best friend over Wi-Fi. Just tap the FaceTime app and find her entry to start the call. An invitation pops up on her iPod touch or iPhone 4 screen asking if she wants to join you. When she accepts, FaceTime begins. It's all perfectly seamless. And it works in both portrait and landscape. See how much fun you can have.

    See friends while you talk with FaceTime, or play games against friends or unknown foes with Game Center.

    Two cameras make either side its fun side.
    iPod touch has two built-in cameras, one on the front above the display and one on the back. The front camera has been tuned for FaceTime. It has just the right field of view and focal length to focus on your face at arm's length. So it always presents you in the best possible light. Which is particularly handy when you're talking to someone who's more than just a friend.

    The back camera. See and share.
    So your roommate had to work late and couldn't make it to the concert. You can share the encore with a FaceTime call. As the band takes the stage and starts playing one of her all-time favorite songs, just tap a button. And before the lead singer can belt out his first note, iPod touch switches to the back camera and to the sure-to-be-legendary performance. Another tap switches to the front camera and to you. Simple, fast, and fun.

    HD video recording comes to iPod touch. Ready, and action.

    Built-in editing gives video a fun-tuning.
    No need to wait until you're back at your computer to edit video. With basic editing built into iPod touch, you can get right down to business. Just drag to select start and end points on a filmstrip. Keep only the parts of the video you want, and turn it into something you and your friends will watch again and again.

    Make mini blockbusters in just a few taps with iMovie on iPod touch. Say you're on an amazing road trip, and you want to create a video postcard of everything you've seen and done. Just use the iMovie app--pick it up in the App Store for just $4.99. Built for iPod touch, iMovie lets you combine and edit video clips, give them that extra something with dynamic themes and transitions, add music and photos, and share your finished movies with the world.

    Make a movie. Starring you.
    The next time you venture out on, say, an amazing hike, don't just tell your friends about it. Show them. In addition to the high-definition camera on the back, iPod touch has a VGA-quality camera on the front--above the display--that lets you see yourself on the display while you record. It's perfect for turning the camera on yourself. No more guessing if you're in the frame or accidentally cropping yourself out altogether. So get ready for your close-up.

    Shoot what you want. Share where you want. Ever find yourself in the middle of typing an email when you see something that words just can't describe? Just launch the camera and record on the fly. Then upload your HD movie directly to YouTube. Or select some video from the Camera Roll and attach it to a new email message, ready to send. Posting to your Facebook page or blog is also just a tap away. And you can easily sync all the video you shoot on iPod touch back to your Mac or PC.

    Point and shoot.
    An awesome view. A decked-out cupcake. Your dog looking unbearably cute. If you want to take a quick photo to upload to your Facebook page, either camera on iPod touch can also capture stills. Just tap on the screen to adjust exposure. Then post to Facebook and let the comments begin.

    The new Game Center app on iPod touch lets you expand your social gaming network--exponentially.

    Game Center. Way more than two can play that game.

    Gamers rejoice. Game Center is here.
    The new Game Center app on iPod touch lets you expand your social gaming network. Exponentially. All anyone needs to play is an iPod touch or iPhone running iOS 4.1. With iOS 4.1, you'll see a Game Center app on your Home screen. Just tap it and sign in with your Apple ID, and you're good to go. You can create a different nickname that will be visible to friends and the gaming community. You can also assign several email addresses to the Game Center app, making it easy for more friends to find you. Download any games you see by tapping links in Game Center. Games can be started right in the Game Center app. And the best part: Once you sign in to Game Center, you're always connected. Until you decide to sign out.

    Friends. Soon to be opponents.
    Bring your friends along for the ride. Or match. Or mission. Once you're signed in to the Game Center app, you can invite someone by sending a friend request using their nickname or email address. Your friends show up in a separate Friends list in the Game Center app. Tap on a friend's name, and you can see what games they've been playing. You can also check out pending friend requests you receive, and add as you see fit.

    Leaderboards and achievements. Score some bragging rights.
    Take a look at leaderboards and see how your score ranks against your friends, as well as all players of each game. You can also compare game achievements with your friends. Check out leaderboards and achievements in the Game Center app and in each individual game app. Let the smack talk begin.

    Meet your match.
    Say you want to get a multiplayer game going. Auto-match will prioritize your friends if they happen to be looking for an auto-match, too. Otherwise, it will set you up with a soon-to-be-friend from anywhere around the world. You can also choose to invite friends and have auto-match fill the number of players needed for a game.

    Music. Let your fingers do the rocking.

    Cover Flow. A work of album art.
    What a song does for your ears, Cover Flow on iPod touch does for your eyes and fingers. Turn iPod touch on its side and glide through your music by album art with the flick of your finger. Tap an album cover to flip it over and display a track list. Tap again to start the music.

    Genius playlists. From one great song comes an even greater playlist.
    Say you're listening to a song you really love and want to hear other tracks that go great with it. Genius uses that song to find other songs in your library and makes a Genius playlist for you. Listen to the playlist right away, save it for later, or even refresh it and give it another go. Count on Genius to create a playlist you wouldn't have thought of yourself.

    Genius Mixes. The ultimate mix-master.
    Genius acts as your personal DJ. All you do is sync iPod touch to iTunes, and Genius automatically searches your library to find songs that sound great together. Then it creates multiple mixes you'll love. These mixes are like channels programmed entirely with your music. It's a great way to rediscover songs you haven't heard in forever--and some you even forgot you had.

    Let your fingers do the rocking.

    Shake to Shuffle. And rock 'n' roll with it.
    Shake things up a bit. Musically speaking, that is. The next time you're listening to your tunes, turn on Shake to Shuffle, then give iPod touch a shake to shuffle to a different song in your music library. It's just another way iPod touch keeps your music feeling fresh.

    iTunes. That's entertainment.
    Feed your iPod touch songs and music videos from your iTunes library on your computer. Or buy and download new music on your iPod touch when you access iTunes over Wi-Fi. Songs you purchase on iPod touch transfer to your Mac or PC the next time you connect iPod touch to your computer. And now with iTunes Ping, you can follow friends to find out what music they're listening to, buying, and recommending. Or catch up with your favorite artists and see if they're playing near you.

    Bluetooth. No strings attached.
    iPod touch includes support for Bluetooth wireless technology. So you can pair wireless stereo headphones with it. Keep your iPod in your bag or charging on your desk across the room and still listen to your music.

    Movies + TV shows. Take the show, or movie, on the road.

    The big screen. On the small screen.
    With iPod touch, movie nights can happen anytime of day, anywhere you are. Carry hours of video with you and watch them on the amazing 3.5-inch color widescreen Retina display. Shop the iTunes Store and choose from thousands of movies, TV shows, and video podcasts to fill your iPod touch. From Hollywood blockbusters to indie favorites, there's something for everyone. Download and watch movies with a few taps. Prefer TV shows? Get a single episode or an entire season's worth all at once. With iPod touch, you can travel far and widescreen.

    Control how you watch.
    While watching your video, tap the display to bring up onscreen controls. You can play or pause, view by chapter, and adjust the volume. Or use the volume controls on the left side of the iPod touch. Want to switch between widescreen and full screen? Simply tap the display twice. It's just like your TV remote. Except you never have to fight over it.

    iTunes. Keep yourself entertained.
    Need some entertainment for your next flight or road trip? With iTunes on your iPod touch and a Wi-Fi connection, you can buy movies and TV shows on the fly. You can also rent shows for just $0.99 an episode, in case you're not sure if one is a keeper. And of course, you can also purchase movies and TV shows on your Mac or PC, then sync them to your iPod touch. Popcorn not included.

    Visit your favorite websites. All you need is your iPod touch and Wi-Fi.

    Available as a free download, iBooks is an amazing eBook reader and a great place to buy books.

    And plenty more ...

    • App Store
      Download apps directly to iPod touch.

    • iTunes
      Create an iTunes Store account and shop over Wi-Fi anytime.

    • iBooks
      Available as a free download, iBooks is an amazing eBook reader and a great place to buy books.

    • iMovie
      Edit video, add themes and music, and share your movies. Available in the App Store for just $4.99.

    • Mail
      Send email and view attachments from your Gmail, MobileMe, or other email account.

    • Safari Web Browser
      Visit your favorite websites. All you need is your iPod touch and Wi-Fi.

    • Photos
      Take your photos with you. Share them in an email. Make your favorite your wallpaper.

    • Home Screen
      Customize the arrangement of your apps across multiple Home screens in iTunes.

    • Voice Control
      Control music playback on iPod touch using spoken commands.

    • Maps
      Find restaurants, concert venues, or any place you need to go, and see how to get there with Maps.

    • YouTube
      Watch the latest viral video sensation and access your favorite videos.

    • Nike + iPod
      Achieve your fitness goals with built-in Nike + iPod support on iPod touch.

    • Voice Memos
      Record notes, random thoughts, a friend's impersonation, or any audio you want.

    • Accessibility
      iPod touch comes with screen-reading technology and other accessibility features.

    What's in the Box

    32 GB iPod touch, earphones, dock connector to USB cable, and quick start guide.

    1 ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Lines Between iPod Touch and iPhone Have Started to Blur, September 7, 2010
    Can you get by with an 8gb Touch?

    Yep, based on my experience with a 3rd gen 32 gb, and on my recent local purchase of the 4th gen (this current model) in 8 gb capacity.

    When using the old 32 gb, I found out that I barely used its greater storage capacity. (I don't haul around a lot of music or videos - I just transfer what I want to listen to/watch for each road trip or listening/viewing cycle using iTunes). Apps, I discovered, don't take up much space, even games and books don't take up much space, unless you want to haul substantially more of your whole collection with you. Amazon's Kindle app is esp. device friendly, since you can archive books you've finished back to Amazon instead of keeping them on the device. iTunes is a great way to manage what content you want to store on your home computer - which becomes a sort of large "docking device" - and what you want "to go."

    As a netbook substitute, storage isn't even that important. I can check my bank balance, transfer funds and execute orders on a brokerage account, listen to radio on Pandora or Slacker, watch music videos (and a lot more ) on YouTube, Skype, stream Netflix, and do a whole lot of other stuff on the 8 gb just fine.

    In fact in hindsight the only real reason for me getting the 32 gb version in the older edition was to get the faster processor. But in the current generation, all the hardware on the 8 gb edition matches the hardware on the larger versions, save the the "hard disk" space.

    The Touch was initially marketed as a music player with a cool touch screen. It is now marketed as a game machine, but the truth is, with the new higher resolution screen, it is a mini-iPad. Yes, you have to zoom to read some web content, but reading a book is MUCH crisper on this unit than on the last generation, thanks to the better screen, and watching videos is MUCH better, esp. Netflix streaming videos. It's a toss up as to whether watching videos on this, with no stutter and perfectly crisp, is better than watching an occasionally stuttering, less crisp, but much larger video on a netbook.

    The 8gb makes a nice intersection on my personal "cheapness" and "minimalist" curves. The price doesn't get into nose-bleed territory where I start to wonder whether a netbook would makes more sense, and it's inexpensive enough to subject to the toils of daily wear and tear - keeping it handy in an outside day pack pocket, instead of more safely stowed deep inside the pack.

    Plus, if I ever DO get a hankering to carry more than two or three lossless encoded albums and more than two to three hours of video at a time, I can turn this over to my kids for game and Netflix streaming use.

    ***Best accessory ever: ClassicReader Three-pair Valu-Pac, +3.00

    The screen on this new generation of iPod Touches is very, very sharp, but in order to enjoy all that sharpness, you need to bring the screen really close to your eyes (assuming you don't have presbyopia and can focus close) OR simply carry a pair of cheap reading glasses as an "accessory" to the super sharp 4th generation screens. This lets you actually read the tiny type on the NY Times website, actually see the richness of colors and depth of detail on a video. So even if you don't need reading glasses for magazine reading, CONSIDER trying a pair of STRONG reading glasses (2.0 or 3.0) to magnify the 3.5" display screen. It's so good for videos you might be able to get by without an iPad (which has the same resolution, NOT more) for personal video viewing. Strong reading glasses make high-def YouTube videos POP for me.


    ******Update on usage: I broke down and bought a 32 gb for the extra storage, loaded it up with videos (training videos) to watch, and then discovered I hardly ever need them. I carry the 8gb (this one) around all the time, keeping the more expensive 32 gb at home, and my main road uses via all the modern hotspots are checking email, Facebook, reading websites and, oddly enough, reading BOOKS. The video playback capability was the "driving factor" in getting this, but in real life the "connected" web aspect turns out to be much more important to me. Apps like Skype, Simple Note etc. take up very little "drive" space. So the main reason for getting larger capacity is if you want a serious music or video player. If I am on the road and want some video to watch, the YouTube app on the Touch is superb; I also added Netflix and Hulu+ (plus I keep an hour or two of training videos on this unit and a couple of gigs of music). For music, I added the Slacker and Pandora apps. // For a while I was using my older 3rd gen Touch to read books too, so save the battery on the 8gb 4th gen. I thought there wasn't much difference in screen sharpness. Turns out Kindle wasn't (apparently) optimized for the new Retina screen. I have been trying iBooks and currently it seems much sharper. Also even at a (possibly) lower rez, the crispness of this 4th gen is much easier on my eyes. YES the Touch makes a GREAT e-book reader! // Finally, if you love gaming on a Touch - and this is really taking off! - the 8gb is more than up to the task, gaming apps don't eat up a lot of the Touch's memory.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Actual Owner of iPod Touch 4G, September 8, 2010
    I've been using an old Iphone 2.5g as my "ipod touch" for about the last year or so. I switched to Sprint for the cheaper rates so no more iphone coverage. Well, since the old phone is not compatible with IOS4.0 and since this new device is seemed truly "next-generation," I decided to take the plunge. I hate the lack of space on my old iphone (8Gb) so I splurged for the 64. Here's a few things I noticed right out of the gate:

    1) The screen resolution is phenomenal. The lighting sucks. It has a nasty angle of view. If you look dead at the center of the screen with a black screen "on," you can see slight brightness variances from corner to corner. Not terrible, but I had expected better. After researching it a bit, this is apparently because Apple "cheaped-out" and did not include the IPS style of lighting that they used on the Iphone 4. Oh well, still a great screen though.

    2) Size: The device is amazingly thin. This is both good and bad. The buttons are kind of hard to mash as they are located on the heavily beveled edges of the device. It's not bad, but, you do need to have a good grip on the device when screwing around with volume or power. It is super light and fits well in my hand though. But, as weird as it seems, i do hate how the apple logo feels under my finger. Feels like I have super glue or something on my finger tips... strange

    3) Speed: The speed of the device is great. This is comparing it directly to my old iPhone though. It blows it out of the water. I don't have to really wait on anything. I do wish the browser was better though. On my old phone, when I'd scroll too fast on a large page, i'd get the checkerboard effect. I hoped this was no longer an issue with the new A4 chip. Again, after researching it, I found that the iPod touch has half the RAM of the new iPhone 4. Guess that would explain it.

    4) Camera: The camera is crap. It's low res and has poor low light performance. It's cool for impressing Grandma with the Face Time app, but that's about it. Don't leave home without a good cell phone camera (or a Nikon/Canon!)

    5) Minor quibbles: I miss my vibrate/loudness switch. Sucks not being able to instantly mute the device when i want it quiet. I also wish the speaker were more full. I am glad that Apple included a speaker at least, but, for it to be useful as a Face Time device for Grandma, the speaker really needs to be made louder/fuller.

    in a nutshell, it's a great device, but it is the Kmart special of the new Iphone 4 in pretty much every way. Why did I give it 4 stars when I'm so harsh on it? Because, no other device even comes close. Apple has managed to make the Ipod Touch feel magic in every way.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Lines Between iPod Touch and iPhone Have Started to Blur, September 7, 2010
    Having had a chance to spend a little time with a review model gives me a chance to share the experience with you a bit early (before my own arrives). I'll take you hands-on with the new model, plus I'll share from my past two years of iPod touch ownership altogether, especially for those who haven't yet owned (or been owned by) one of these mobile gems.

    I've also hidden a treasure trove of info on how you can legitimately download tons of quality apps for free. First though, let's quickly cover what's new.

    + Faster 1GHz A4 Processor - to keep up with the high demands of multitasking
    + Ultra high resolution "Retina display" - packs a 960 x 640 resolution at 326 pixels per inch
    + 15% larger battery - 3.44 Whr/930 mAh plays 7 hrs of video & 40 hrs of audio
    + Rear-facing camera - supports 960 x 720 sized photos (0.6 megapixels), plus 720p HD videos
    + Front-facing VGA-quality camera - VGA-quality is a resolution of 640 x 480 (0.3 megapixels)
    + 3-Axis Gyroscope - allows for higher precision and more motion gestures
    + Wireless N - Connect faster and go farther than ever, with this WiFi device (requires a router with 802.11n)
    + Built in microphone - but Apple reverted back to using the remote- and mic-less earphones
    + Game Center - Apple's own social gaming platform
    + Sleep/Power Button - it's been moved to the right, but not improved beyond that
    + Thinner, lighter than ever
    * Note - Memory remains at the same 256MB despite several unconfirmed sources touting 512MB. There's also no vibrate module.

    Unlike last year's iPod touch update, this one's a complete overhaul to the entire line. Last year, the new models didn't change in appearance. On the inside, faster processors and double-memory were added to the 32GB & 64GB models, but the 8GB got left out. Not this time. Buying the new 8GB iPod touch indeed gets you all the new goodies. You'll also pay thirty bucks more than before, so consider buying the 32GB model instead. You'll get 400% of the storage capacity for only 23% more coin!


    ===== Background =====

    I'm a mobile app developer who's created a few apps and games for the iPhone, iPod Touch and now iPad. I was initially drawn to the iPod touch because of the popularity and capabilities of its mobile Web browsing--I was primarily a Web developer at the time and no other device could surf the Web so well. After I got one, I was hooked. I racked up over a hundred bucks in app purchases within the first month, and before long, I found myself learning how do develop native apps for the device.

    Indeed, if you have never had an iPod touch before, you're in for a real treat. Of course, if you have, then you know first hand: it's is worth its weight in gold--no, in platinum. And now, with the latest generation, it may even be worth its weight rare gem stones! I digress.


    ===== Out With the Old =====

    The iPod touch is frequently called an iPhone without the phone. However, until now there have been several other features also missing in the iPod touch besides the phone: a camera, GPS, magnetometer (compass), and some newer amenities from the iPhone 4: front-facing camera, high resolution "Retina display" as it has been dubbed, and the powerful 1GHz A4 processor--indeed a necessity to keep up with multitasking.

    That all changes, now. The 4th gen iPod touch brings with it some new features and amenities, some of which have been anticipated by iPod touch fans and developers alike, including myself, for several generations of the device. From a developer's perspective, the more hardware features we can get our hands on, the better and more innovative apps we can create, and the more users that can download, use and enjoy them.


    ===== In With the New =====

    The striking new design of the latest iPod touch is definitely a looker. Apple has made it even thinner (and I thought it was already too thin before) complete with a beautiful chrome back. While the super thin design is certainly attractive, I've found it slightly difficult to keep it well-gripped in your hands. The usual chrome back looks great too, but it's scratch-insistent. Yes, it's incredibly easy to scratch it all up, even after the first few days. For these two reasons, definitely get yourself a silicone skin (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0042GVG5G?tag=1pod-20&ie=UTF8) alongside your new touch!

    For ages, the feature topping everyone's wishlist for the iPod touch has been a camera. Check! It handles HD video too--bonus! Granted, its not the 5 megapixel camera that the iPhone 4 sports, but again, the new iPod touch is thinner than ever, making it a miracle that we even got a camera in the first place, let alone two! Yes, Apple went the extra mile so we could make video calls with our iPhone toting friends, via their FaceTime app. Brilliant! So, having not had any camera on the iPod touch before, and now having TWO cameras on it, we can't really complain can we? Nah.

    I'll have details on the quality both cameras later, but what excites me even moreso is the new much-higher resolution screen--dubbed "Retina display". You may not think much of it if you haven't used an iPhone or iPod touch before, nor have an older model nearby to compare it to, but for those that have and/or do, the difference is clear! (pun intended)

    Where this really comes in handy is in browsing the Web and reading non-mobile-formatted PDF e-books. Now, I can see things so much clearer at the default zoom level (which shows the full width of a Web page or document). My vision isn't spectacular by any means, I just don't mind seeing things smaller on the screen. It allows me to see more content without having to scroll. Indeed, the Retina display was the #1 feature I never knew I wanted (until I saw it in the iPhone 4 that is).

    Other newness includes: 15% larger battery, HD video recording and editing, built-in mic, wireless-n for nearly double the WiFi connection speed and distance, Game Center: Apple's new social gaming platform (which seems to be Apple's attempt to kill-off third party social gaming platforms like OpenFeint and Plus+), 3-axis gyroscope sensor, which complements the existing accelerometer sensor, both of which handle the rotating, swinging and other motion gestures of the device (previously, rotation were roughly calculated from accelerometer data), and new placement of the sleep/power button on the right (but still as difficult as ever to press).

    Features still missing include: 512MB of memory, vibration, 5 MP quality camera + flash (iPhone apps now support using LED flash as a flashlight, like Android does), magnetometer (compass), and the GPS. I'd happily trade the thinness of the latest iPod touch to have the GPS. WiFi based location is often inaccurate, and the GPS doesn't need a WiFi or cellular connection, it just needs to see the satellites in the sky.


    ===== iOS vs Android =====

    So far, Apple has cornered the market of multitouch mobile devices that aren't phones, but things are slowly changing. Currently, the two hottest mobile and smartphone operating systems out there right now are Apple's iOS (formerly: iPhone OS) and Google's Android. Of course, iOS is popular because it runs on not only the iPhone, but also on the iPod touch and now on the ipad as well. Plus, it has garnered support from scores of app developers who've gotten behind Apple's slew of high-demand devices.

    The iPod touch has really made iOS what it is today. It does a lot of what the iPhone does, without a contract, or carrier exclusivity, as is the case with the iPhone and the iPad (WiFi+3G models). So if it weren't for the iPod touch, a lot of the market share Apple now has in the industry would have been stifled by their carrier exclusivity. I think Apple will see the light soon, but that's another discussion.

    Enter Android. Google has held a different stance on their mobile OS. It isn't tied to a select few devices, and it's open source, so it can be further developed by manufacturers who use it. Indeed, several mobile device manufacturers have now latched onto Android as a foundation for numerous devices. Wireless carriers that have been unable to carry the iPhone have also taken a liking to it. Now, tons of Android devices have been released, and there's no end in sight. Manufacturers have also seen the iPad's potential and now they want a piece of that pie, too. So, expect to see a lot more Android tablets and media-centric non-phone devices soon. The competition is heating up.

    But not everything with Android, nor with iOS, is perfect. I own an EVO 4G, one of the most popular Android devices currently available. I've also used an iPod touch almost every day for nearly two years, so I'm pretty qualified to share my experience with each platform. Both certainly have their share of unique offerings, and neither of them are without flaws. For this reason, and because of the increasing competition between the two, I plan to dispel some of their key differences for you at various points in this review.


    ===== So What Can the iPod Touch Actually Do? =====

    Well, what can't it do?

    The iPod touch is like a magical little box, only it's flat. While it cannot cook your breakfast, yet (I'm sure someone is already working on that), it can indeed do some pretty extraordinary things. It's an amazing catch-all device that can provide hours of entertainment, give you the power of the Web in your hand, and it can even replicate the functionality of countless one-off products. Developers have been creating apps that take advantage of special hardware of the iPod touch to emulate some other product for less, and sometimes even for free.

    Even expensive products have seen cheap iOS based clone apps. For just 99 cents, you can snag a special alarm clock app that monitors your sleep cycle and wakes you up when you're in an ideal state of wakefulness. I spent 350 bucks on an aXbo
    (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0014RDSSY?tag=1pod-20&ie=UTF8) a few years ago, who's functionality is easily replicated by several "sleep phase" alarm clock apps in the app store. When you do the math there, you see that it's easily a no brainer: buy yourself an iPod touch now!

    I've listed more apps like this in the comments!

    Plus, with the support of such a strong community of app and game developers, there's never a drought of fresh new apps and games. There's always something to do with the iPod touch, and I guarantee you'll never be bored with it. I honestly cannot say the same thing about Android, though I also tote my EVO 4G around with me. I do admit that the EVO's mobile hotspot comes in incredibly handy for providing the iPod touch with a WiFi connection while I'm on the go).

    Now, with the proper resources, you can legitimately download thousands of high quality apps for free. I do it all the time and it is perfectly legal. See, Apple allows developers to temporarily put their apps on sale (and even drop the price to free). Usually they do this to get you to write some rave reviews for their apps. The secret to success is having the resources to help you spot these special app sales--so you know when and where to get them during their sometimes extremely-limited-time promotions.

    In hopes of making this the most helpful review on Amazon for the iPod touch, here's how to obtain these special promotional-sale apps:

    There are several resources you can use, both on the Web and on the iPod touch itself. I prefer to use the app called BargainBin that lists all apps that recently went on sale or dropped to free. It also supports watch lists with push notifications, and can alert you whenever an app you're interested in goes on sale. It's a phenomenal little gem, and it has gotten me a ton of apps and saved me a fortune! It also has a companion website that lists the same apps (Google: App Advice). There's also a website called AppShopper (Google it) that lists apps with recent price drops and new apps as well, and you can filter just the free products or just the sale products. The two sites don't always list the same apps. Sometimes one will miss something that the other will catch, so it's good to keep track of them both. Check them daily if possible. Several apps are duds, but you'll come across some really great ones from time to time. They'll all add up!


    ===== Web Browsing =====

    Alongside spending lots of money on all those wonderful apps in the App Store, Web browsing is one of the most popular uses for the iPod touch. Browsing the Web with mobile Safari was my original attraction to the device. The experience hasn't changed too drastically in the past two years (since the days of iOS 2), and while it's still very powerful, there are some definite flaws. And no, I'm not talking about Flash. Just minor usability issues I'd like to see overcome, but first let's look at the positives.

    Mobile Safari has a smart approach to zooming in on content. Double-tap on a paragraph of text or an image to cinch that content right up to the edges of the screen. The downside: some sites aren't mobile-friendly, so zooming in on a really wide block of text can leave you with tiny text. You can zoom further manually, by using the "unpinch" multi-touch gesture, but because the browser doesn't have an option to reflow the text to the screen width, you have to scroll left and right, as well as up and down, just to read the text. Android's browser doesn't feature smart zoom, but it does reflow the text to fit the screen when zoomed in. It's a nice feature, and Apple should add it as a preference for Safari.

    Browser history can also vanish after a few days, and browser windows get overwritten by links from other pages sometimes (usually when I've hit the maximum of eight windows). Also yet to be seen is support for doing common things like searching for text on a page, or bookmarking a link by tapping and holding. That would be invaluable for adding bookmarklets--bookmark based scripts that help overcome browser shortcomings.

    Flash is also a great debate, one I won't get into. I will just say that all is not as it seems with the Flash-support-touting Android platform. Flash does work, but it is buggy because Flash doesn't play well with touch interfaces. Flash based video players don't work right, and I even run Android 2.2, which is supposed to have the "full Flash experience". It doesn't, trust me. So you're not missing much by not having Flash on the iPod touch!

    Indeed, we can just hope and pray that Web developers and Flash-fiends see the light and start replacing Flash content with technologies like HTML5's canvas element, which is poised to take on a lot of Flash's most popular abilities.


    ===== Media =====

    Despite all the incredible things the iPod touch can do, audio and video are still one of the iPod touch's greatest strengths. And with the incredible resolution of the new iPod touch's retina display, to say that videos now appear much sharper, more vivid and highly-defined is definitely an understatement. Yes, videos were great before, but now they frickin' rock!

    Just make sure your videos are at least 960 x 640. If you've owned an older iPod touch and used video conversion software to scale down your media to fit the old 320 x 480 screen resolution, definitely change your conversion settings, or look for a software update to support the new higher-resolution display.

    For those interested in watching live TV on the go (over WiFi), Sling Media's SlingPlayer app, paired with one of their Slingbox devices is a phenomenal and freeing experience, especially considering your alternate choices for watching live TV on the go are pretty much nil up to this point.

    On top of that, Netflix's recently released iPod touch version of their media streaming app has also been a much-welcomed addition to my ever-growing collection of apps. Netflix videos stream quickly, and even moving the play position back and forth in the timeline, the movie starts playing very quickly without much time rebuffering the video.


    ===== Photos =====

    The latest iPod touch is also a game-changer for photography and video recording on an iPod touch. It's not mind-blowing by any means, but we went from having no camera right to having two cameras on the device. I probably would not be so thrilled with just a new back camera. I merely would have sighed, mumbling "finally" under my my breath (unless it were 5 megapixels). But despite the less-than-one megapixel quality of the rear-facing camera, I was taken aback by the rather decent quality, especially in low-light environments. Check the comments for links to sample photos!

    Between that and the ability to connect with other iPhone and iPod touch toting friends via Apple's FaceTime app, yes... it's a game changer. Granted, I have been wanting front facing cameras on mobile devices ever since mobile devices started having cameras period. I got the first of such devices when my EVO 4G arrived in June, but as they say: the more the merrier. Friends, welcome to the future we've been dreaming of. Video killed the audio call!

    The quality of my test calls were pretty good. Of course, it was over WiFi, but it proves the cameras are decent. You can switch from using the front camera to using the rear camera, too, in case something was going on in front of you that you wanted to share. Just tap the "camera swap" button in the bottom right corner of the screen. FaceTime also rotates along with the iPod when flipped on its side, nice.

    HD video recording is the other half of the aforementioned game-changing equation. I didn't expect to see ANY video recording, considering the original iPhone camera was originally just a camera. But it's here, complete with HD quality (yes, the quality is indeed desirable), plus basic video editing support, as well as support for Apple's brilliant "iMovie" app: an advanced video editing studio right on your iPod touch. It's just five bucks on the App Store.


    ===== E-Reading =====

    The iPad has been making waves in the genre of media reading for several months now, but that hasn't exactly been the same story for any generation of the iPod touch so far. Granted, it's not exactly marketed as an eReader like its iPad counterpart, but there are some really great apps out there for media reading on it, so there's no reason not to use it to read digital media. The obstacle to doing that, for me at least, has been the limited screen resolution, and so that may all potentially start to change, now that Apple has brought the Retina display to the iPod touch.

    The 163 pixels per inch screens of past iPod touches were still pretty great, just not ideal for tiny text. For comparison, LCD monitors typically only have 96 pixels per inch, and CRT monitors only have 72 pixels per inch. TV's are even worse than that. What this means for you is that the iPod touch display has always been sharper than your own computer monitor.

    However, despite being able to display content at a higher quality, I still found that in a lot of eBooks, especially PDFs that weren't mobile-formatted, the text was just not clear enough to be readable when zoomed out. However, zooming in meant having to constantly scroll side-to-side while reading. The app "Good Reader" helped ease that pain by doing the left-right & vertical scrolling for you with just a tap of the screen, as well as offering an additional view that re-flows the text to fit on the screen at a large enough size.

    However, with the Retina display, all text and content in the aforementioned "zoomed out" state now appears extremely clear. That is a wonderful thing, so long as you don't mind reading tiny text.

    Could you still benefit from having an iPad too? Perhaps. After all, it does have unique qualities that set it apart from the iPod touch, as my in depth iPad review portrays (http://www.amazon.com/review/R16U71KO7POLA2?tag=1pod-20&ie=UTF8). But unless you specifically see the need for one of those unique qualities, then no, you probably don't need both.


    ===== Gaming =====

    If you're like me, you probably don't have time for games. Regardless, it may still be high-time to let the kid within you roam free from time to time, as I do. The iPod touch has made it possible. In fact, it is so easy, there's no excuse not to enjoy yourself. My favorite games are the racing games and, when I have a bit more time, strategy games.

    With the iPhone and iPod Touch having taken on a clear role as a gaming console that has been as revolutionary for mobile gaming as the Wii was for living-room gaming, it goes without saying that the iPod touch is, and will continue to be, one of the best platforms for gaming. It's simple, convenient, and pretty much instant. Whenever you have a few moments of free time, wherever you're, just turn it on, find your game, and bam! You're gaming. Simple as that.


    ===== Productivity =====

    Productivity carries numerous definitions. Usually its "getting something done" though some people tend to believe that it's the ability to focus without being distracted, which I see as one of the iPod touch's strengths, at least for me, primarily because the screen is small enough to force you to focus on the task at hand.

    In the context of software though, Apple's own suite of productivity apps for the office, collectively called "iWork", has been further refined for the iPhone and iPod touch. Because of the aforementioned "focus factor" of the iPod touch, I have found myself to be surprisingly productive when working on documents with it. There are three apps in all: Pages allows you to work on word processing documents. Numbers allows you to work on spreadsheets. Keynote lets you work on presentations and slideshows (including PowerPoint files).

    So far, I've found these apps to be highly useful when I have work to do, but don't feel like being at the computer to do it. Another great app for that is "iTeleport" which let's me at my computer remotely, when iWork won't work (meaning I'm not working on office documents). Log Me In Ignition is another similar app that is slightly easier to set up, but a bit slower than iTeleport, when you're just working over the same WiFi connection as the remote computer.

    Furthermore, there's a whole category of iPod touch apps in the App Store specifically dedicated to productivity. Some of my favorite productivity apps include: Bento (info management), Things (project management), iTeleport (remote computing), and GoodReader (best PDF reader around). Search for them in the App Store.


    ===== Email, IM and Social Networking =====

    The iPod touch has been, and continues to be an exceptional communication-machine. Whether it's reading or composing email, keeping in touch via instant messenger, or managing your life via social networks, you've got plenty of options here.

    Instant messaging is easy with platforms such as AIM, Yahoo, Gtalk, MSN, Skype and apps that handle multiple platforms: IM+, Fring, Nimbuzz, BeejiveIM and Fuse Messenger. Finally, multitasking means you can truly remain connected to your IM platforms of choice, instead of relying on apps to keep you signed remotely, then push new-message notifications to your device. This is a much welcome addition to the new iPod touch.

    As well, there are plenty of apps to help you browse and update your status on social networks like Facebook, Twitter, etc. Within the iOS development community, Twitter apps have often been a laughing stock, simply because there are so many out there on the App Store. They're almost as rampant as "fart" apps. So to say you've got countless options as far as social networking apps are concerned is probably a pretty accurate statement.

    For email, you need not look any further than Apple's native "Mail" app. Even if you're using Gmail, Yahoo, AOL, or Apple's own MobileMe, setup is a snap. It even supports Microsoft Exchange, often useful for corporate email setups. As well, any other email accounts that support POP3 or IMAP connection types will work with the Mail app too. Plus, new to the iPod touch with iOS 4 is the option to use a unified inbox--handy for those already used to that behavior on Mac OS X.


    ===== Downloading Apps and Games =====

    Downloading apps on your iPod touch couldn't be easier. Once you set up your iTunes account with a credit card, all you need to do is find the app you want, tap the download button (usually it says the price rather than "download", which then changes to "buy" after you tap it), then tap again to confirm. Voila, you just bought an app. Behind the scenes, Apple then charges your card the amount of the app plus tax, while you're already off enjoying your new purchase. This ease of access is a blessing and a curse, because you can easily empty your wallet if you're not carefully considering each purchase.

    All apps in the App Store range in price from Free and 99 cents on up, always incrementing in whole dollar amounts (1.99, 2.99, 3.99, etc). The maximum price for an app is set to $999.99, of which there are only eight currently priced so outrageously. And don't even think of toying with them. Apple does not allow refunds on apps you have purchased--all sales are final!

    Contrast that with Android's more complex Android Market, and you'll find several more steps, especially for paid apps. For one, there're no fixed pricing tiers, and secondly, they allow multiple currency pricing, which only confuses its users. The good developers do keep their pricing similar to iOS apps, with the 99 cent base plus $1 increments, but I often see apps priced at �0.55 or 0.79 or $1 or �2.95 ...it's quite disorienting and unstructured. They have also set their price cap at $200, so you can't accidentally run up a $1000 charge on just one app--you'll need at least 5 apps for that. ;)

    Meanwhile, to actually buy an app on Android, you must tap the BUY button, confirm that you want to buy the app, then get redirected to a Google Checkout link, where you must setup your Google Checkout account or choose an existing payment method if you already have an account set up. Once you confirm the purchase yet again, THEN you can finally download the app.

    Google also makes selling apps a bit more complicated for developers than Apple, but I won't get into that. I'm just stressing how absolutely simple Apple makes the app buying and selling process. Contrary to Apple however, Google does allow users to "return" purchased Android apps within 24 hours for a full refund. That's nice.


    ===== Technical Specifications =====

    Since Amazon's product descriptions tend to be lacking, I like to include all the technical jargon geeks have come to expect when researching new gadgets. Feel free to breeze on through!

    In the box
    + iPod touch
    + Earphones
    + Dock Connector to USB Cable (for sync and charging)
    + Quick Start guide

    Size and weight
    + Height: 4.4 inches (111.0 mm)
    + Width: 2.3 inches (58.9 mm)
    + Depth: 0.28 inch (7.2 mm)
    + Weight: 3.56 ounces (101 grams)

    Capacity
    + 8GB, 32GB or 64GB flash drive/SSD

    Wireless
    + 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi (802.11n 2.4GHz only)
    + Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR
    + Maps-location based service
    + Nike + iPod support built in

    Display
    + Multi-Touch display
    + 3.5-inch (diagonal) widescreen
    + 960-by-640-pixel resolution at 326 pixels per inch

    Cameras, photos, and video
    + Video recording, HD (720p) up to 30 frames per second with audio; still photos (960 x 720) with back camera
    + VGA-quality photos and video up to 30 frames per second with the front camera
    + Tap to control exposure for video or stills
    + Photo and video geo tagging over Wi-Fi

    TV and video
    + H.264 video up to 720p, 30 frames per second, Main Profile level 3.1 with AAC-LC audio up to 160 Kbps, 48kHz, stereo audio in .m4v, .mp4, and .mov file formats
    + MPEG-4 video, up to 2.5 Mbps, 640 by 480 pixels, 30 frames per second, Simple Profile with AAC-LC audio up to 160 Kbps per channel, 48kHz, stereo audio in .m4v, .mp4, and .mov file formats
    + Motion JPEG (M-JPEG) up to 35 Mbps, 1280 by 720 pixels, 30 frames per second, audio in ulaw, PCM stereo audio in .avi file format
    + Support for 1024 by 768 pixels with Dock Connector to VGA Adapter; 576p and 480p with Apple Component AV Cable; 576i and 480i with Apple Composite AV Cable (cables sold separately)

    Audio
    + Frequency response: 20Hz to 20,000Hz
    + Audio formats supported: AAC (8 to 320 Kbps), Protected AAC (from iTunes Store), HE-AAC, MP3 (8 to 320 Kbps), MP3 VBR, Audible (formats 2, 3, 4, Audible Enhanced Audio, AAX, and AAX+), Apple Lossless, AIFF, and WAV
    + User-configurable maximum volume limit with parental lock
    + Earbud headphones included in box

    Earphones
    + Frequency response: 20Hz to 20,000Hz
    + Impedance: 32 ohms

    Input and output
    + 30-pin dock connector
    + 3.5-mm stereo headphone minijack
    + Built-in speaker
    + Microphone
    + External buttons and controls

    Sensors
    + Three-axis gyro
    + Accelerometer
    + Ambient light sensor (for proximity detection)

    Battery, power and playback time
    + Built-in rechargeable lithium-ion battery
    + USB sync cable is also used for charging
    + Fast charge in about 2 hours (80% capacity)
    + Full charge in about 4 hours.
    + Music playback time: Up to 40 hours when fully charged
    + Video playback time: Up to 7 hours when fully charged

    System requirements
    + USB 2.0
    + iTunes 10 or later
    + Mac: Mac OS X v10.5.8 or later
    + PC: Windows 7, Vista, or XP (SP3 or later)


    ===== Praise =====

    + Apple continues its trend of creating the best multi-touch experience around. Android doesn't even come close.
    + The Retina Display - Phenomenal! Kudos for bringing it to the iPod touch as well as the iPhone. Now try it with IPS technology Apple!
    + Wireless-N, finally! - Faster and farther-reaching WiFi connections (if your router supports 802.11n)
    + High performance 1GHz A4 processor - provides all the power of the iPhone 4, a win for gaming and multitasking.
    + Multitasks like a dream with iOS 4 and the powerful processor, despite the same 256MB of memory as the third generation touch.
    + Rear camera - It's not the 5 megapixel iPhone 4 camera, but I definitely can't complain here. It shoots great photos, especially in low-light without flash, plus it can do HD video.
    + Front facing camera - What a pleasant surprise! Now it just needs to work with Skype.


    ===== Dissappointments =====

    + No GPS - IP based location just doesn't cut it at times. GPS has no subscription fee or contract to use. GPS chips are costly, but tons of high cost GPS apps are in the App Store now to offset that cost for Apple.
    + 256MB memory - iFixit has confirmed this disappointing flaw, putting to rest all the rumors of 512MB still littering several reviews.
    + Still no 120GB model - Useful for higher res videos that look great on the Retina display.
    + No USB 3.0 or wireless sync - Sync'ing can be slow or inconvenient over the cable.
    + Thinner design - I was hoping for a more squared design, like the iPhone 4, as it is easier to grip, handle and press the power button.
    + Power button - Yes, it hasn't changed much. It's been moved to the right side on this model, but it's still the tiny, hard-to-press button it's has always been, and if you take lots of screenshots like I do (by pressing power+home simultaneously) half the time you end up closing your app because the power button didn't work right.


    ===== The Bottom Line =====

    It is absolutely clear: Apple has definitely blurred the lines between iPhone and iPod touch with its 4th generation of both devices. Since it has no contract or carrier exclusivity, this phenomenal device will continue to shine its light in the otherwise dark voids of the smartphone market where the iPhone cannot go, even without the phone. That's just smart!

    Given all my tips, I think you'll find the iPod touch to be an extraordinarily useful, possibly even highly addictive device, with a price tag that is well worth it, especially the 32GB model. With all the things that the iPod touch can do, it will undoubtedly enhance your life and change the way you interact with the Web. It might even make a gamer out of you if it hasn't already, it sure did for me!

    I hope you've found my hands-on review helpful. I do actively participate in any discussions via the comments, so feel free to drop me a line, or ask me any questions as well. :)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Using the 8 gb version as a netbook substitute...., September 19, 2010
    Can you get by with an 8gb Touch?

    Yep, based on my experience with a 3rd gen 32 gb, and on my recent local purchase of the 4th gen (this current model) in 8 gb capacity.

    When using the old 32 gb, I found out that I barely used its greater storage capacity. (I don't haul around a lot of music or videos - I just transfer what I want to listen to/watch for each road trip or listening/viewing cycle using iTunes). Apps, I discovered, don't take up much space, even games and books don't take up much space, unless you want to haul substantially more of your whole collection with you. Amazon's Kindle app is esp. device friendly, since you can archive books you've finished back to Amazon instead of keeping them on the device. iTunes is a great way to manage what content you want to store on your home computer - which becomes a sort of large "docking device" - and what you want "to go."

    As a netbook substitute, storage isn't even that important. I can check my bank balance, transfer funds and execute orders on a brokerage account, listen to radio on Pandora or Slacker, watch music videos (and a lot more ) on YouTube, Skype, stream Netflix, and do a whole lot of other stuff on the 8 gb just fine.

    In fact in hindsight the only real reason for me getting the 32 gb version in the older edition was to get the faster processor. But in the current generation, all the hardware on the 8 gb edition matches the hardware on the larger versions, save the the "hard disk" space.

    The Touch was initially marketed as a music player with a cool touch screen. It is now marketed as a game machine, but the truth is, with the new higher resolution screen, it is a mini-iPad. Yes, you have to zoom to read some web content, but reading a book is MUCH crisper on this unit than on the last generation, thanks to the better screen, and watching videos is MUCH better, esp. Netflix streaming videos. It's a toss up as to whether watching videos on this, with no stutter and perfectly crisp, is better than watching an occasionally stuttering, less crisp, but much larger video on a netbook.

    The 8gb makes a nice intersection on my personal "cheapness" and "minimalist" curves. The price doesn't get into nose-bleed territory where I start to wonder whether a netbook would makes more sense, and it's inexpensive enough to subject to the toils of daily wear and tear - keeping it handy in an outside day pack pocket, instead of more safely stowed deep inside the pack.

    Plus, if I ever DO get a hankering to carry more than two or three lossless encoded albums and more than two to three hours of video at a time, I can turn this over to my kids for game and Netflix streaming use.

    ***Best accessory ever: ClassicReader Three-pair Valu-Pac, +3.00

    The screen on this new generation of iPod Touches is very, very sharp, but in order to enjoy all that sharpness, you need to bring the screen really close to your eyes (assuming you don't have presbyopia and can focus close) OR simply carry a pair of cheap reading glasses as an "accessory" to the super sharp 4th generation screens. This lets you actually read the tiny type on the NY Times website, actually see the richness of colors and depth of detail on a video. So even if you don't need reading glasses for magazine reading, CONSIDER trying a pair of STRONG reading glasses (2.0 or 3.0) to magnify the 3.5" display screen. It's so good for videos you might be able to get by without an iPad (which has the same resolution, NOT more) for personal video viewing. Strong reading glasses make high-def YouTube videos POP for me.


    ******Update on usage: I broke down and bought a 32 gb for the extra storage, loaded it up with videos (training videos) to watch, and then discovered I hardly ever need them. I carry the 8gb (this one) around all the time, keeping the more expensive 32 gb at home, and my main road uses via all the modern hotspots are checking email, Facebook, reading websites and, oddly enough, reading BOOKS. The video playback capability was the "driving factor" in getting this, but in real life the "connected" web aspect turns out to be much more important to me. Apps like Skype, Simple Note etc. take up very little "drive" space. So the main reason for getting larger capacity is if you want a serious music or video player. If I am on the road and want some video to watch, the YouTube app on the Touch is superb; I also added Netflix and Hulu+ (plus I keep an hour or two of training videos on this unit and a couple of gigs of music). For music, I added the Slacker and Pandora apps. // For a while I was using my older 3rd gen Touch to read books too, so save the battery on the 8gb 4th gen. I thought there wasn't much difference in screen sharpness. Turns out Kindle wasn't (apparently) optimized for the new Retina screen. I have been trying iBooks and currently it seems much sharper. Also even at a (possibly) lower rez, the crispness of this 4th gen is much easier on my eyes. YES the Touch makes a GREAT e-book reader! // Finally, if you love gaming on a Touch - and this is really taking off! - the 8gb is more than up to the task, gaming apps don't eat up a lot of the Touch's memory.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Actual Owner of iPod Touch 4G, September 8, 2010
    Alright, so Best Buy got the 32GB iPod Touch 4G in stock so I drove an hour to go get one. I was not disappointed. I will run through the features I have come across so far.

    Body: Aside from moving the sleep button to the right and making the back of the device slimmer and more flat, not much has changed. Yes, the chrome back is still there erg! It was so pretty for the first 30 seconds.

    Ram: The Ram on the iPod Touch is only 256 MB, so do not believe the talk of 512 MB, it is simply not true.

    Wireless: Fully supports A/B/G/N

    Vibration: There is no vibration, so do not expect that.

    Multitasking: Works real well and very smooth transition

    Display: While the display on the iPod is not IPS like the iPhone do not think it suffers in anyway. This display is so beautiful and crisp to look at. I cannot even distinguish the pixels, and text on a website is like you are reading out of a book, it's so refreshing. I played a digital copy of "UP" on here and the colors practically jump off the screen, very nice. Apple's icons are so much more vivid and sharp, while 3rd party developer icons who have yet to make an upgrade for the new displays shows what a step up this new screen has to offer.

    Speaker: I am not sure of the quality of the speaker on the 3G iPod Touch, but on my 2G iPod Touch it was very tinny and I only used it for game sound. Here on the 4G there is a new spot on the bottom left for the speaker and it has risen in clarity. Music is very listenable and clear, however nothing replaces a good set of earbuds, but when you're in a jam, you won't be gritting your teeth with this speaker.

    Processor: The new Apple processor is a sure win for this device. Everything loads very fast and switching from one screen to another is very swift and smooth. Crash Bandicoot finally has a nice framerate to play with on this iPod and for once I did not regret buying that game.

    Front Camera: This is the camera that is primarily used for Facetime. It's resolution is at 640 X 480. After taking a few pictures with it, you will notice how it is really not for taking stills, but works fine for videochatting (which I have not tried, but did run some video tests with it). Obviously Facetime will work better in well lit areas, but then again, doesn't any camera?

    Rear Camera: Again stills are just so so. What really bugs me is when you go to take a picture, you see how crisp the preview is, then you take the picture and you can see it blur. The tap to focus works nice for adjusting exposure and well lit photos look very decent on the display. It's when you upload them to your computer when you notice how not so decent they actually are. While this may be a negative for many people, if you are like me, you want to just upload photos with this device to FaceBook and capture funny moments with the video camera. If I want to take a really awesome picture, I'll pull out my DSLR, but for me this iPod's capabilities are more than adequate for my quick shooting of certain events. The video captures quite nicely, while not superb like an actual HD camcorder does enough for me for again, capturing fun moments. Don't worry, you don't cringe while watching the video, it's more than adequate and produces vibrant colors and a fast framerate. Some may complain on this, and believe me those reviews will be here shortly, but then again why not buy an HD Camcorder that is made for HD content? (I'm not ignorant to HD quality either, I'm a huge fan of it. I run a 3D 65'' 1080p display with Blu-ray and Dolby Tru-HD decoding surround sound system)

    Microphone: Testing out Skype my friend told me I was coming in loud and clear. I also played back a video I made on the iPod on my computer and the microphone captures top notch audio. Very crisp and clear, I was quite pleased.

    Battery: While I haven't tested out Apple's claims of 40 hr. of music, let's be honest who really does that? I'm sure Apple's claims are quite credible in their battery life depending on how the device is used.

    One note I should also make, my iPod Touch 2G accessories, (car charger, wall charger) work with my iPod touch 4G. Apple sometimes changes stuff like the charging pin on the iPod's to make a person have to buy new accessories. Anybody remember when the iPod Video A/V cables had the Audio and Video switched around so people couldn't use their cables with the iPod? Well they could, they just had to switch the audio and video cables in the port around. Anyways, away from this funny piece of marketing history.

    Is the new iPod worth it? For me, upgrading from the 2G Touch, yes! The display is brilliant, the speed of the processor amazing, video quality is very much enjoyable and the rear camera is excellent for taking quick fun shots. If I had one word to describe this iPod, it would be fun! You can't handle one of these without feeling like a joyous kid, (I'm 22) and the business aspect is still there and quite useful. I would highly recommend this iPod Touch as a worthy upgrade to any generation of the iPod Touch you may own and if you don't own one, there has never been a more perfect time to go out and get one! Don't hesitate to leave a comment here if you have a question for an actual owner. I'll do what I can!


    5-0 out of 5 stars This thing rocks!, September 8, 2010
    *This review is from someone who never owned any Apple products before, married, healthcare professional, blackberry and palm TX owner (yeah I know, belongs in a museum), I was looking for a handheld internet browser by wifi, no monthly fees for 2 years, with camera, video, and apps that i can use for my work, and put in my pocket and it led me to this device. This is therefore a completely un-technical, layman's review.

    1. Delivery time: I was supposed to receive this September 10-14 with the regular shipping, but I got it today, maybe because I ordered it as soon as Steve Jobs finished presenting, so this deserves more than 5 stars!

    2. Dimensions/looks: I actually prefer the "handling" of the bigger and heavier 3rd gen that I borrowed, its all smudge now without any cover, but boy! this is the most beautiful handheld device that I ever held, 4 stars for being smaller and lighter and smudgy.

    3. Display: The retina display is amazing! Like reading from a glossy magazine, and yes you cannot see the pixels! 5 stars!

    4. Wifi: Sync with ATT wifi - no problem, wifi in gym - no problem, monthly fees - no problem! 5 stars!

    5. Internet Browsing: Hard to type in the addresses initially, but pages loads super fast (the longest was within thress-onethousand - all news channels), surfed the web with no problems,make pages bigger or smaller... this gets 5 stars as well.

    6. Speed (Processor): this thing is super fast, web pages load within 3 seconds, downloading apps within 30 secs, youtube in a flash, the email attachment that opened in 1 minute in my computer took only 10 seconds! 5 stars indeed!

    7. Camera: very grainy, will not use it for any important event, only for quick-I-need-a-camera moments, it will not replace my dSLR, but since it wasnt there in the previous gen, and I only use my dSLR and nothing else, this camera is still a bonus it gets 4 stars.

    8. Apps for work/"work": I already downloaded 4 very useful apps for work for free! plus 5 other free games for me and my 3 year old kid, the fact that I can now have apps without an iphone/ipad is great, the fact that its free is sweet! 5 stars!

    8. Video: 720p HD! And I bought a Vado HD that does nothing else! Quality is up to par! 5 stars!

    Overall, I have a device that surfs the net very very fast, manages my email, has a camera, great HD videocam, great free apps for work, that looks beautiful, and is great to look at, that I got 1 week early, what more can I ask for?!!! Worth every penny and deserves 5 stars!

    And it stores and plays music too?! And has facetime?! And maps?! I feel like I paid for a Toyota and got a Lexus!

    Will buy another one for my kid so she doesnt have to borrow mine!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A definite improvement over the previous generation., October 11, 2010
    I know what you're thinking while looking at these reviews: "Should I save fifty bucks and get the 3rd Generation iPod touch, or is the 4th Gen really worth the new price?"

    I am happy to report that the improvements made from 3rd to 4th generation are worth your attention.

    * Size/Shape: The new model is thinner and more narrow, but slightly taller/longer. What this translates to in real-world usage is that the device is slightly less bulky in your pocket once you put a case on it, but that it's a tiny bit harder to grip without a case, if you have big hands. Of course, since Apple continues to put that scratch-magnet shiny back on the iPod touch (PLEASE, Apple, STOP IT! Give us brushed aluminum or something!) you will probably need a case, so the thinness is a good thing.

    * Microphone: No, you don't get the headphones with the in-line microphone anymore, but you do get a microphone built into the iPod touch. While most people focus on the Face Time, Skype, or other social uses for a microphone and lament the loss of one on the headphones, as someone who doesn't care about VOIP, I find the built-in microphone a lot better for my purposes. I use it for voice commands in the iPod ("Play artist 'The Beatles'") and for dictation (Dragon's free app is awesome) and voice memos. It also functions well for video recording. I don't miss the in-line earbud microphone at all.

    * Video Recording/Photos: While the iPod touch won't replace a top-line video camera, and most definitely won't replace a decent digital camera, it works as a "I happen to have it in my pocket" substitute on both counts. I don't take a lot of photos, so the lower resolution on the camera doesn't bother me. The video, however, is quite nice, and replaces my Flip Mino HD without a hitch. Just remember to reserve some storage space if you intend to record videos.

    * Retina Display: Wow. You have to see it to understand why it's a big deal. You don't notice it as much in the main screen, but when you get into text displays you really see the difference. Everything is crisp, there's almost no pixelization and nothing is "fuzzy". Games that support it look gorgeous. It really is worth it if you intend to use the iPod touch to do any reading, web browsing, or gaming.

    * iOS 4: I love the OS changes they made since I owned a 3rd generation iPod touch. The ability to group apps into folders/groups is about the best thing they did since the iPod touch debuted. The ability to do multitasking is very handy, too. The Gmail integration is much better now that it supports IMAP, and the contacts are much more friendly to Windows users since they started providing decent support for Google Contacts. WiFi signals seem to be stronger, and the battery life is excellent. All told, the little changes make a big difference.

    * Video Playback: Now that they've increased the screen resolution to 960x640, videos are not as limited. This means that if you have a collection of 720p m4v/mp4 videos already, they'll work with the iPod touch. You won't need to downscale them to make them work. This also means that if you choose to output to a HDTV screen, you'll get your full 720p video in all its glory. This is a great feature for media hounds like myself. If only Apple made a 1TB iPod touch..!

    * Improved buttons: While the buttons are no longer metal (they're now plastic or polycarbonate), they are much better-designed in terms of placement. The volume toggle has been turned into two separate buttons for up and down, and they work quite well when you're not looking at the device (like when it's in your pocket). The standby/power button is smaller and to the right of the top of the device, and it, too is easy to find and use when the device is out of view. Response from the buttons is nice, with a good clicky tactile feedback. They seem sturdy and yet they're small enough to be unobtrusive and not be pressed accidentally.

    * Speaker: They went from using the whole back panel as a speaker board to putting in a little speaker in the device at the bottom. This has the effect of making things sound a little better, but not without some problems (see below).

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    THE CONS

    * The new size means you will probably need a new case and screen protector. Old ones won't fit. Some exceptions exist (some slip-cases, for example) but anything that was an exact fit for the previous models is too big for the current model.

    * No in-line microphone on the earbuds. This is not a problem for me, but for social networking types, this will be something they miss.

    * Speed is, at this point, no better than the previous model in most cases, and sometimes slower in apps that have yet to update some features. This will no doubt change, but right now expect no major boost in speed or power with the upgrade to 4th Gen.

    * Still camera is low resolution. As I noted above, it's not a crippling issue for me, as I don't take lots of photos and the video camera is so nice, but if you're a shutterbug looking for an alternate digital camera, you may be a little let-down by the current generation. You're probably better off with an iPhone 4 or waiting for the 5th Gen iPod touch and crossing your fingers.

    * Dock connector doesn't sit flush with the device. It looks weird at first, but when you connect to the docking cable, the connector doesn't seem to go in all the way if you look at it from the back of the iPod touch. This is, apparently, by design. I can't say I like it, but this is the sacrifice you get with thinner devices. Apple didn't want to give up the tapered design, but they didn't want to redesign the dock connection, either. The compromise was to make the connector do what it currently does. This is not really a big deal, as it works fine and feels secure, but it does make you wonder how some third-party docks and devices will work with the current generation.

    * Speaker gets blocked easily. I know this is more of a critique of App design than iPod design, but the iPod touch's speaker being in the bottom corner causes me to end up covering the speaker when I turn the device sideways (to the left) to play a game. Smart Apps make it possible to tilt the screen any direction, but some are set on making you tilt to the left, which leads to the speaker blockage. Again, no big deal, but it makes me wonder why Apple doesn't just put the speaker on the side of the device instead of on the bottom. There's little chance you'd block it on a sideways/widescreen App in that case.

    * Stupid shiny back: I mentioned this earlier, but WHY, Apple? Why do you keep putting this horrible shiny back on the iPod touch? It was terrible back on the classics, and it's terrible now. Give us something that doesn't get scratched from the slightest touch, and something that isn't slippery! Brushed aluminum, rubberized metal, or anything else would be preferable to this stupid shiny back-plate. This, for me, is the iPod touch's #1 bad feature.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    SUMMARY

    In my opinion the newer model is worth the new price. You get a lot of extra features and the best screen on any iPod to date, and the microphone being built-in becomes a must-have feature after you realize how convenient it is to not have to hook up the earbuds in order to record something. So here's the rundown on whether or not you should upgrade from 3rd Gen to 4th Gen:

    * If you're a reader: YES. The Retina Display makes reading books and comics much easier on the eyes (although I still prefer e-ink for long stretches or reading outdoors).

    * If you're a gamer: YES. The Retina Display, better speaker, and new gyroscope/accelerometer make gaming better.

    * If you're a social networking freak: YES. The video camera, still camera, built-in microphone, and Face Time are a social networking fan's wet dream.

    * If you're looking for a PDA: NO. It doesn't really matter unless you want to take advantage of the video camera for business meetings, or have bad eyes and want your address book to look more crisp. You could probably get by with the 3rd Gen, but honestly, you're probably already using iPhone 4 so this is a non-issue.

    * If you're looking for a portable web browser and mail client: YES. If you're on the Internet a lot, you'll appreciate the Retina Display and better WiFi reception from 802.11n.

    * If you just want to play music: NO. Don't bother to upgrade because the music/iPod functions aren't all that different from the previous generation, unless you want the convenience of the built-in microphone for voice commands.

    * If you just want to play videos: YES. The higher resolution and Retina Diplay make videos much better, and the ability to output 720p is a great feature for videophiles.


    Final verdict: For most users, the newer model is a much better value. Apple improved the iPod touch enough this time around to make it worth grabbing the 4th Gen, even if you do end up paying a little more for it than a clearance-model 3rd Gen.

    4-0 out of 5 stars A joy to use, September 14, 2010
    I wanted an iPhone 4 as soon as it came out; I already had a 2G iPod Touch and loved it. But I can't commit to the contract right now and the full price (outside of contract) version is really beyond my budget. So I made a conscious decision to wait for the iPod Touch, aware that it would probably be a compromise. I pre-ordered it from Apple before it came out in stores. I was expecting to be less happy about some aspects (such as the camera), but knew I'd get used to those, and would probably love the improvements compared to the 2G iPod Touch. I wasn't disappointed. After only a couple of days use I definitely like it a lot.

    The screen is glorious. It's so much easier on the eye than the old display. Yes it's not IPS (although this not obvious outside of steep viewing angles). It seems darker than the old display; this is probably because of the higher pixel density. It also has more of a blue tint (a cooler color temperature) but I've heard this is also true of the iPhone. But I got used to these things and it's a joy to look at every time. In spite of the better battery, I think the display sucks more juice, since you have to have it at a brighter setting than before to get the same perceived brightness.

    General performance is very smooth. It's definitely faster than previous versions. Things still crash occasionally but that's true of any computer. The bugs from my 2G Touch that appeared after I upgraded to iOS 4.1, that caused Pandora and other audio apps to be unusable, are thankfully gone, as far as I can tell (I since seem to have resolved this issue on the 2G Touch by restoring to factory settings and upgrading to iOS 4.2). Heavy content (such as pdfs and large web pages) can slow it down but this is also true of the iPad.

    You have to be careful to get good battery life. The battery has been upgraded so you supposedly get 40 hours of audio rather than 30 h. But if you're new to multitasking, you have to realise that you're going to pay for it in battery life unless you're careful. For example, you can have Skype running in the background and it will receive calls and messages, even if the iPod is locked in your pocket, which is great. However, this makes use of the 'Voice over IP' iOS service, which Skype is constantly running in the background. I think Pandora might do something similar (albeit with a different service). So your battery will drain noticeably (I saw 5-10% drain per hour using iStat with Skype and Pandora backgrounded and the iPod locked). Most apps you see in the multitasking bar do not use these services; Apple calls them 'recently used' apps for a reason; they mostly aren't running.

    The volume and power buttons take a bit of getting used to but I ended up preferring them. They feel more solid and have a more definite click to them.

    Seriously, for what it is, the back camera is not that bad in spite of the 0.7 MP resolution. In bright daylight it's surprisingly good. It just gets more grainy at night. But they're still quite possible; in a fancier camera you might have to manually increase the exposure time. Don't knock it just because of the pixel count, it's a pretty good camera; my 2 MP camera phone is not that much better. And for taking pics as a record of a fun moment that you can then upload directly to Facebook, I love it, and I use it a lot. That functionality is a big step up from the old iPod Touch, so I'm OK with the low resolution; it's a lot better than no camera at all. And I've managed to get it to read barcodes with apps like the AT&T code scanner. Also, Apple's HDR is not available but I think there are 3rd party apps that will do that.

    The speaker is nicer than the old iPod Touch but it could definitely be louder. I tried using it like a phone (with Skype) and it's not really practical; you really need headphones unless there's minimal background noise. But if you're on your own in a room, it's actually fine. Listening to the radio (with ooTunes), it could easily get to a similar level to my clock radio so it was fine.

    So, as a pocket computer the 4G Touch rocks. With the retina display and cameras, this feels like a mature product. You might like to wait for possible improvements (such as the camera) in the next version, but as it stands it's still a joy to use. And given you'd have to pay at least another $400 to get the extra features on the iPhone, I think it's a pretty good deal.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Better In Every Way, September 2, 2010
    ---------------------------------Overview------------------------------------------------

    The latest iPod Touch from Apple improves on the previous generation in nearly every single way. It does all this without increasing the price one cent (except the 8GB version which increased in price by $30 and is now no longer a hardware generation behind). Bottom line, the iPod Touch continues to be an irresistible device that has no peer on the market right now. Think back even three years and people would simply be amazed at everything the latest iPod Touch can do for only $229. Games in every category, some of which have graphics superior to the PSP or Nintendo DS, news and weather apps, streaming video from your computer or from services like Netflix and Hulu, exercise and weight loss apps, the list goes on and on (and on). While we are starting to see some Android based tablets enter the market, there is nothing in the portable market that comes close to what the iPod can do.

    If you really have some problems with some of the iPod Touch's shortcomings (like the camera) and you want access to the Apple App store, you may want to consider just buckling down and getting an iPhone 4 (if you can afford it). However, once you consider the value proposition of the iPhone 4 (total cost of ownership over two year contract $75-85 x 24 + $299) vs. the iPod Touch at $299, you start to understand that some of these drawbacks are not so bad.

    ---------------------------------CHANGES-------------------------------------------------

    Compared to the previous (and well loved) iPod Touch this device:

    - replaces the previous processor with the more powerful A4 processor. Expect smooth and fast operation with support for even the most graphically intense iPod Touch games. All other applications will run at top speed, although not dramatically faster than the previous generation.
    - is now even thinner. The Ipod Touch is now shockingly thin.
    - added a microphone so you don't need a headset to talk to people or use voice control
    - doubled the amount of ram so multi-tasking should be a breeze
    - has longer battery life | extended audio life by 10 hours (from 30 to 40 hours) and video by 1 hour (from 6 to 7 hours).
    - weighs less
    - has TWO additional cameras (front facing for video and self-portraits and back for HD video) - the front camera is VGA quality (640x480) and the back camera is a 720P (1280x720) sensor (when used to take pictures that resolution is reduced to 960x720). Samples of the HD video show that this feature was not just "tacked on" and actually looks very good compared to some HD video available on other pocket devices (like the EVO 4G).
    - 4 times as many pixels on the screen - Apple is calling this a "retina display" because it has the same dpi (dots per inch) as the iPhone 4. However, the iPod Touch is not using the same IPS display found in the iPhone 4 which means the viewing angles aren't as good. I doubt most users will notice the difference here.
    - adds the gyroscope for extra precision with motion based apps (mostly gaming)
    - adds support for the faster Wireless "N" standard, which should help when streaming video to your phone or using Facetime to make a video call
    - adds a vibrator for alerts, force feedback in gaming, and notifications for voice calling

    Cons:

    - speaker still sucks - I let my two year watch videos on my iPhone. Thus a crappy speaker is a deal breaker for me because she is too small to use headphones. You can blame the extreme thinness on this one. There simply isn't enough depth to put an iPhone quality speaker in. If I didn't have a two year old I wouldn't consider this a big deal because I rarely use this function otherwise.
    - no 5MP camera or LED flash - This is going to be a deal breaker for some who saw the iPhone 4 and started salivating at the thought of the possibility of the same high quality sensor in the iPod Touch. Read my thoughts below for more on this one.
    - No GPS chip - you're still stuck with using WiFi signals to determine location, a la the original iPhone. Maybe Garmin or Tom Tom paid them money not to include this feature.


    ---------------------------Thoughts and Conclusions------------------------------------

    Yes, I wanted the camera sensor from the iPhone 4 as well, but the unfortunate reality is that sensor wouldn't fit in the old iPod Touch body and this one is even slimmer! In order to fit the iPhone 4 camera sensor into the iPod Touch, Apple would have had to make this device significantly thicker, which loses one of the big advantages the Touch has had over the iPhone, its size. I might have been willing to make the tradeoff, but obviously Apple wasn't.

    Keep in mind that the larger sensor (and LED Flash) adds to the cost of the device as well. Apple added a significant number of features to the iPod Touch and kept the price exactly the same. Something's gotta give here. The 32GB iPhone 4 sells for $700! (AT&T pays Apple the difference when you buy one on contract). I'm sure if people were willing to spend $400 more than the $299 the 32GB iPod Touch sells for they would have a mind blowing sensor in there. I'm actually surprised at how much of the functionality of the iPhone the iPod Touch now replicates, given the huge gap in cost.

    Appreciate the fact that you can now record HD video and do video calling over WiFi for the same price as the last model. Or don't buy it. Consider how much you can do on this device compared to other portable gadgets, like the pocket sized Flip Video Camera, which costs more than $100+ and does nothing other than video, or even the ZUNE HD, which is a great device, but lacks compatibility with the hundreds of thousands of Apps that turn the iPod Touch into a pocket computer.

    I'm waiting for something to come along to blow away the iPod Touch, but that device just doesn't exist. All things considered, this device is a 4.5/5, which I round up to 5 because Amazon doesn't do half stars. This device won't be for everyone, but then again, no device is. For a great majority of users, this is product is nothing short of gadget heaven.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Great display but terrible rear camera, September 1, 2010
    My wife and I have the 3rd generation iPod Touch and are very happy with them. The one thing that I have been missing/wanting is having a built in camera. I recently saw the photos taken by a friend's iPhone and was blown away by how good they were. Almost all reviews have said the iPhone built in 5MP camera is excellent. Like many others I watched Steve Jobs present the new iPod line today and was very excited to hear that it had all the features I was looking for. Retina display - awesome. Front and rear cameras - yes! Finally.

    I was all set to order 2 from Amazon the minute Amazon had them listed. But .. while looking thru the Apple website I came across the specs for the rear facing camera. It is only .7 megapixels. Less than 1 megapixel. What? I thought that can't be right. I contacted Apple and the rep, who had gotten many such calls it seemed, confirmed that the iPod touch has a very different camera (.7 MP vs the iPhone's 5 MP) . Bummer. I looked around and found a hands on review of it .... and they said the sensor itself, besides being lower MP, is also not nearly as good as the one in the iPhone. Not terrible but certainly not good and no where in the same league as the one in the iPhone.

    The camera was one of the 2 main things people asked for. The other being the Retina display. My assumption is that Apple didn't want to affect iPhone sales and purposely dummied down the camera. Shame on them. They want us to pay $240 to $400 for an iPod with a terrible camera.

    I first predicted that w/ the Retina display and the camera that this would be a smashing success, a huge seller coming into the holiday season. I suspect when people get them and see how bad the photos are, they'll be returning them to Apple. Or like myself, not upgrading.

    I realize this review should be for a product I own, but I felt it was important for people to know about the camera before they ordered it. If photos aren't a big deal, and you'll only email them or post them on facebook, then .7 MP is probably fine. If you want to print any of the photos you take, or even have room to crop the photo, you won't get enough resolution to do that.

    That being said, the Retina display does look awesome, but is it worth the extra dollars over the price of the 3G model? Only you can decide that.

    I hope this helps all of you make a wise decision about your purchase.

    08 Sept 2010 Update
    Hello everyone. First, I am glad that my raising the above issues helped many of you. Second, for those who lashed out at me, perhaps you should take a look at why you get so angry at a stranger who simply encouraged you to look and think before you buy.

    Here's an update.[...] has posted a hands on review of the new iPod Touch. You may want to google it or go to their site to read it.

    In summary:
    1. Retina display is darker and not nearly as good as the one in the iPhone. "Definitely not an iPhone w/o the contract".
    2. HD Video is actually pretty good
    3. Size is a lot smaller than the 3g, bad if you have normal or large hands, ok for teens and those w/ small hands.
    4. Photo quality is much worse than the iPhone. And their posted photos show how much worse. Forget trying to print them and I'd argue not even good for the web based on their samples. No focus or zoom capability either, you can only adjust brightness.

    There you go. We are staying w/ our 3g models, there isn't enough here to justify taking a huge loss selling them and buying these new models. And given that the camera and retina display aren't nearly the quality of the iPhone, this is certainly a release we'll sit out.

    I hope this has helped.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great device, screen is not what you think, almost too thin, September 12, 2010
    I've been using an old Iphone 2.5g as my "ipod touch" for about the last year or so. I switched to Sprint for the cheaper rates so no more iphone coverage. Well, since the old phone is not compatible with IOS4.0 and since this new device is seemed truly "next-generation," I decided to take the plunge. I hate the lack of space on my old iphone (8Gb) so I splurged for the 64. Here's a few things I noticed right out of the gate:

    1) The screen resolution is phenomenal. The lighting sucks. It has a nasty angle of view. If you look dead at the center of the screen with a black screen "on," you can see slight brightness variances from corner to corner. Not terrible, but I had expected better. After researching it a bit, this is apparently because Apple "cheaped-out" and did not include the IPS style of lighting that they used on the Iphone 4. Oh well, still a great screen though.

    2) Size: The device is amazingly thin. This is both good and bad. The buttons are kind of hard to mash as they are located on the heavily beveled edges of the device. It's not bad, but, you do need to have a good grip on the device when screwing around with volume or power. It is super light and fits well in my hand though. But, as weird as it seems, i do hate how the apple logo feels under my finger. Feels like I have super glue or something on my finger tips... strange

    3) Speed: The speed of the device is great. This is comparing it directly to my old iPhone though. It blows it out of the water. I don't have to really wait on anything. I do wish the browser was better though. On my old phone, when I'd scroll too fast on a large page, i'd get the checkerboard effect. I hoped this was no longer an issue with the new A4 chip. Again, after researching it, I found that the iPod touch has half the RAM of the new iPhone 4. Guess that would explain it.

    4) Camera: The camera is crap. It's low res and has poor low light performance. It's cool for impressing Grandma with the Face Time app, but that's about it. Don't leave home without a good cell phone camera (or a Nikon/Canon!)

    5) Minor quibbles: I miss my vibrate/loudness switch. Sucks not being able to instantly mute the device when i want it quiet. I also wish the speaker were more full. I am glad that Apple included a speaker at least, but, for it to be useful as a Face Time device for Grandma, the speaker really needs to be made louder/fuller.

    in a nutshell, it's a great device, but it is the Kmart special of the new Iphone 4 in pretty much every way. Why did I give it 4 stars when I'm so harsh on it? Because, no other device even comes close. Apple has managed to make the Ipod Touch feel magic in every way.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Wafer thin, 2 Cameras, better Wifi and better sound!, September 18, 2010
    I got my 64G Touch 4G last week -- I finally got my wish, the Touch gets not one, but two cameras! That makes up for last year's disappointing 3G release.

    First impressions: wow, this is so thin and small -- makes my 3rd gen look a bit like a bulky oaf in comparison. Second impression: hey, this doesn't look like my iPhone 4 at all!

    A bit about me: I'm an MP3 diehard fanatic, I own or have owned almost every MP3 player of note. To name a few: iPod Touch 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th gen, iPod Classic, iPod Nano, Zune HD, Archos Android, 5, 605, 604, and so forth. I have a broad basis for comparison as I write my review.

    Down to brass tacks then, what do I love about my new Touch:

    1) Retina display -- Wow! That's a lot of pixels in a small space, the crispness and clarity of text and video is simply awesome.
    2) Slim form factor -- this is thinner and narrower than last years model. Its compact, easily fits in a pocket, while still having a little weight to give that quality feel.
    3) iTunes and the App Store -- still one of Apple's strongest features. iTunes continues to be the best interface for music, video and app purchases. While Zune Marketplace and Android are strong contenders, they aren't quite there yet.
    4) Easy upgrades -- the iOS upgrade system is as smooth as it gets, just plug it into iTunes and it happens smoothly and seamlessly.
    5) Dedicated power and volume buttons.
    6) Cool user interface -- possibly the best user interface although Zune and Android are also strong.
    7) Apps -- without question the Apps are the Touch and iPhone strongest feature, the most Apps and the best Apps.
    8) Accessories, accessories -- you just can't beat the easy availability and diversity of accessories available for iPod Touch. Its good to be at the top!
    9) Multitasking (or multi-what?) -- finally we have multitasking on an MP3 player! Ok, maybe I'm just a geek and nobody else cares... just a little tip: double click your home button to see what has been running in the background and sucking up your battery!
    10) External speaker -- improved quality since 3rd gen. Nice when you don't want to put on headphones to listen to a podcast or something.
    11) Cameras -- the only MP3 player I've ever had that can do facetime, take pictures, and record videos!
    12) Improved Wifi -- connects easily to my WPA secured U-Verse router, my 3rd gen can't do it. Makes this a good "small iPad" if that's what you're looking for.
    13) Improved sound -- its getting pretty good now, still not the best available but definitely better than 3rd gen was. I would say the sound quality has moved from 3 star to 4 stars now.

    And then the things I don't love so much:
    1) Where is the Dedicated play button??? Does anybody else think that this is like the most important thing for an MP3 player? Makes it hard to pause the music when somebody comes up and wants to talk to you. The trick I found is to unplug the headphones which pauses the music automatically!
    2) Removable battery? -- I'm just going to keep saying this til somebody at Apple hears me. It costs like $100 to get the battery replaced which is ridiculous.
    3) A/V docking station? -- Again, why doesn't Apple have a decent docking station? Both Zune and Archos have very nice docks for their products.

    All in all, my issues with the iPod Touch are pretty trivial. It continues to be the best all around MP3 player type unit available today -- hence the 5 stars. With the addition of Retina display, cameras, faster CPU, better sound and wifi, and slimmer packaging the Touch is still the one to beat.

    Note: If what you really care about is sound quality I would recommend the Sony Walkman X. If you want something that sounds great on big speakers, has a bigger screen, and a high capacity hard drive, then I recommend the Archos 5 with Android. ... Read more


    6. Apple iPod touch 8 GB (4th Generation) NEWEST MODEL
    Electronics
    list price: $229.00 -- our price: $210.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B001FA1O0O
    Manufacturer: Apple Computer
    Sales Rank: 4
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Amazon.com Product Description

    See friends while you talk to them with FaceTime. Shoot, edit, and share stunning HD video. Play games against friends, or unknown foes, with the new Game Center. And do it all on the Retina display--the highest-resolution screen on any mobile device. It makes graphics and text look even more amazing. The new iPod touch. It's state-of-the-art fun.

    Introducing the new iPod touch. Now with FaceTime, Retina display, HD video recording, and Game Center. Click to enlarge.

    Advanced engineering at play.

    Pioneering technology built into iPod touch is how you're able to flick, tap, and pinch. It's what makes a racing game feel so real. It's why you're able to see a friend crack up at your jokes from across the globe. And it's the reason iPod touch is the most incredible iPod you'll ever own.

    Looks can be amazing.
    iPod touch has an all-new design that makes it the thinnest, lightest, most amazing iPod touch ever. Holding one is all the proof you need. With its curved design, iPod touch is now a mere 7.2 millimeters thin. Its engineered-glass front and stainless steel back feel sleek and smooth in your hand. Turn it on, and you're instantly blown away by the brilliant Retina display. iPod touch is the perfect combination of stunning design and revolutionary technology--brilliant from the outside in.

    Retina display. A blast from the future.
    There are lots of reasons you won't want to take your eyes off the new iPod touch. The 960-by-640 backlit LCD display, for one. It packs 326 pixels per inch, making it the highest-resolution iPod screen ever. To achieve this, Apple engineers developed pixels so small--a mere 78 micrometers across--that the human eye can't distinguish individual pixels. Even though you can't see them, you'll definitely notice the difference. Text is remarkably sharp, and graphics are incredibly vivid.

    Apple A4 processor. More power to you.
    The Apple A4 chip is behind, or rather underneath, all the fun you can have on iPod touch. Apple engineers designed the A4 chip to be a remarkably powerful yet remarkably power-efficient mobile processor. With it, iPod touch can easily perform complex jobs such as multitasking, editing video, and placing FaceTime calls. All while maximizing battery life. And fun.

    Gyro + Accelerometer. Smooth moves.
    iPod touch just learned some new moves. It now includes a built-in three-axis gyroscope. When paired with the accelerometer, the gyro makes iPod touch capable of advanced motion sensing such as user acceleration, full 3D attitude, and rotation rate. Translation: more motion gestures and greater precision for an even better gaming experience.

    Two cameras. Double the fun.
    iPod touch captures video with two built-in cameras. It shoots amazing HD 720p video from the back camera. And with its advanced backside illumination sensor, it captures beautiful footage even in low-light settings. All while the built-in microphone records conversations, music, or any audio at the same time. And on the front of the iPod touch, the built-in camera is perfect for making FaceTime calls and shooting self-portraits. It's surprising how much fun can fit into something so small.

    Multi-Touch. Control at your fingertips.
    When you put your finger on the iPod touch, how does it just start doing what you want it to do? It's a chain reaction, really. The Multi-Touch display layers a protective shield over a capacitive panel that senses your touch using electrical fields. It then transmits that information to the Retina display below it. So you can glide through albums with Cover Flow, flick through photos and enlarge them with a pinch, zoom in and out on a section of a web page, and control game elements precisely.

    FaceTime comes to iPod touch. Don't just say hello. Smile.

    Tap for a more instant instant message.
    Take "LOL" to the next level and actually see friends laughing out loud. Or bring "XOXO" to life when you blow someone a kiss from miles away. FaceTime on iPod touch makes it possible. FaceTime works right out of the box--just enter your Apple ID and email address. Or create a new email account just for FaceTime. Using FaceTime is as easy as it gets. Say you want to start a video call with your best friend over Wi-Fi. Just tap the FaceTime app and find her entry to start the call. An invitation pops up on her iPod touch or iPhone 4 screen asking if she wants to join you. When she accepts, FaceTime begins. It's all perfectly seamless. And it works in both portrait and landscape. See how much fun you can have.

    See friends while you talk with FaceTime, or play games against friends or unknown foes with Game Center.

    Two cameras make either side its fun side.
    iPod touch has two built-in cameras, one on the front above the display and one on the back. The front camera has been tuned for FaceTime. It has just the right field of view and focal length to focus on your face at arm's length. So it always presents you in the best possible light. Which is particularly handy when you're talking to someone who's more than just a friend.

    The back camera. See and share.
    So your roommate had to work late and couldn't make it to the concert. You can share the encore with a FaceTime call. As the band takes the stage and starts playing one of her all-time favorite songs, just tap a button. And before the lead singer can belt out his first note, iPod touch switches to the back camera and to the sure-to-be-legendary performance. Another tap switches to the front camera and to you. Simple, fast, and fun.

    HD video recording comes to iPod touch. Ready, and action.

    Built-in editing gives video a fun-tuning.
    No need to wait until you're back at your computer to edit video. With basic editing built into iPod touch, you can get right down to business. Just drag to select start and end points on a filmstrip. Keep only the parts of the video you want, and turn it into something you and your friends will watch again and again.

    Make mini blockbusters in just a few taps with iMovie on iPod touch. Say you're on an amazing road trip, and you want to create a video postcard of everything you've seen and done. Just use the iMovie app--pick it up in the App Store for just $4.99. Built for iPod touch, iMovie lets you combine and edit video clips, give them that extra something with dynamic themes and transitions, add music and photos, and share your finished movies with the world.

    Make a movie. Starring you.
    The next time you venture out on, say, an amazing hike, don't just tell your friends about it. Show them. In addition to the high-definition camera on the back, iPod touch has a VGA-quality camera on the front--above the display--that lets you see yourself on the display while you record. It's perfect for turning the camera on yourself. No more guessing if you're in the frame or accidentally cropping yourself out altogether. So get ready for your close-up.

    Shoot what you want. Share where you want. Ever find yourself in the middle of typing an email when you see something that words just can't describe? Just launch the camera and record on the fly. Then upload your HD movie directly to YouTube. Or select some video from the Camera Roll and attach it to a new email message, ready to send. Posting to your Facebook page or blog is also just a tap away. And you can easily sync all the video you shoot on iPod touch back to your Mac or PC.

    Point and shoot.
    An awesome view. A decked-out cupcake. Your dog looking unbearably cute. If you want to take a quick photo to upload to your Facebook page, either camera on iPod touch can also capture stills. Just tap on the screen to adjust exposure. Then post to Facebook and let the comments begin.

    The new Game Center app on iPod touch lets you expand your social gaming network--exponentially.

    Game Center. Way more than two can play that game.

    Gamers rejoice. Game Center is here.
    The new Game Center app on iPod touch lets you expand your social gaming network. Exponentially. All anyone needs to play is an iPod touch or iPhone running iOS 4.1. With iOS 4.1, you'll see a Game Center app on your Home screen. Just tap it and sign in with your Apple ID, and you're good to go. You can create a different nickname that will be visible to friends and the gaming community. You can also assign several email addresses to the Game Center app, making it easy for more friends to find you. Download any games you see by tapping links in Game Center. Games can be started right in the Game Center app. And the best part: Once you sign in to Game Center, you're always connected. Until you decide to sign out.

    Friends. Soon to be opponents.
    Bring your friends along for the ride. Or match. Or mission. Once you're signed in to the Game Center app, you can invite someone by sending a friend request using their nickname or email address. Your friends show up in a separate Friends list in the Game Center app. Tap on a friend's name, and you can see what games they've been playing. You can also check out pending friend requests you receive, and add as you see fit.

    Leaderboards and achievements. Score some bragging rights.
    Take a look at leaderboards and see how your score ranks against your friends, as well as all players of each game. You can also compare game achievements with your friends. Check out leaderboards and achievements in the Game Center app and in each individual game app. Let the smack talk begin.

    Meet your match.
    Say you want to get a multiplayer game going. Auto-match will prioritize your friends if they happen to be looking for an auto-match, too. Otherwise, it will set you up with a soon-to-be-friend from anywhere around the world. You can also choose to invite friends and have auto-match fill the number of players needed for a game.

    Music. Let your fingers do the rocking.

    Cover Flow. A work of album art.
    What a song does for your ears, Cover Flow on iPod touch does for your eyes and fingers. Turn iPod touch on its side and glide through your music by album art with the flick of your finger. Tap an album cover to flip it over and display a track list. Tap again to start the music.

    Genius playlists. From one great song comes an even greater playlist.
    Say you're listening to a song you really love and want to hear other tracks that go great with it. Genius uses that song to find other songs in your library and makes a Genius playlist for you. Listen to the playlist right away, save it for later, or even refresh it and give it another go. Count on Genius to create a playlist you wouldn't have thought of yourself.

    Genius Mixes. The ultimate mix-master.
    Genius acts as your personal DJ. All you do is sync iPod touch to iTunes, and Genius automatically searches your library to find songs that sound great together. Then it creates multiple mixes you'll love. These mixes are like channels programmed entirely with your music. It's a great way to rediscover songs you haven't heard in forever--and some you even forgot you had.

    Let your fingers do the rocking.

    Shake to Shuffle. And rock 'n' roll with it.
    Shake things up a bit. Musically speaking, that is. The next time you're listening to your tunes, turn on Shake to Shuffle, then give iPod touch a shake to shuffle to a different song in your music library. It's just another way iPod touch keeps your music feeling fresh.

    iTunes. That's entertainment.
    Feed your iPod touch songs and music videos from your iTunes library on your computer. Or buy and download new music on your iPod touch when you access iTunes over Wi-Fi. Songs you purchase on iPod touch transfer to your Mac or PC the next time you connect iPod touch to your computer. And now with iTunes Ping, you can follow friends to find out what music they're listening to, buying, and recommending. Or catch up with your favorite artists and see if they're playing near you.

    Bluetooth. No strings attached.
    iPod touch includes support for Bluetooth wireless technology. So you can pair wireless stereo headphones with it. Keep your iPod in your bag or charging on your desk across the room and still listen to your music.

    Movies + TV shows. Take the show, or movie, on the road.

    The big screen. On the small screen.
    With iPod touch, movie nights can happen anytime of day, anywhere you are. Carry hours of video with you and watch them on the amazing 3.5-inch color widescreen Retina display. Shop the iTunes Store and choose from thousands of movies, TV shows, and video podcasts to fill your iPod touch. From Hollywood blockbusters to indie favorites, there's something for everyone. Download and watch movies with a few taps. Prefer TV shows? Get a single episode or an entire season's worth all at once. With iPod touch, you can travel far and widescreen.

    Control how you watch.
    While watching your video, tap the display to bring up onscreen controls. You can play or pause, view by chapter, and adjust the volume. Or use the volume controls on the left side of the iPod touch. Want to switch between widescreen and full screen? Simply tap the display twice. It's just like your TV remote. Except you never have to fight over it.

    iTunes. Keep yourself entertained.
    Need some entertainment for your next flight or road trip? With iTunes on your iPod touch and a Wi-Fi connection, you can buy movies and TV shows on the fly. You can also rent shows for just $0.99 an episode, in case you're not sure if one is a keeper. And of course, you can also purchase movies and TV shows on your Mac or PC, then sync them to your iPod touch. Popcorn not included.

    Visit your favorite websites. All you need is your iPod touch and Wi-Fi.

    Available as a free download, iBooks is an amazing eBook reader and a great place to buy books.

    And plenty more ...

    • App Store
      Download apps directly to iPod touch.

    • iTunes
      Create an iTunes Store account and shop over Wi-Fi anytime.

    • iBooks
      Available as a free download, iBooks is an amazing eBook reader and a great place to buy books.

    • iMovie
      Edit video, add themes and music, and share your movies. Available in the App Store for just $4.99.

    • Mail
      Send email and view attachments from your Gmail, MobileMe, or other email account.

    • Safari Web Browser
      Visit your favorite websites. All you need is your iPod touch and Wi-Fi.

    • Photos
      Take your photos with you. Share them in an email. Make your favorite your wallpaper.

    • Home Screen
      Customize the arrangement of your apps across multiple Home screens in iTunes.

    • Voice Control
      Control music playback on iPod touch using spoken commands.

    • Maps
      Find restaurants, concert venues, or any place you need to go, and see how to get there with Maps.

    • YouTube
      Watch the latest viral video sensation and access your favorite videos.

    • Nike + iPod
      Achieve your fitness goals with built-in Nike + iPod support on iPod touch.

    • Voice Memos
      Record notes, random thoughts, a friend's impersonation, or any audio you want.

    • Accessibility
      iPod touch comes with screen-reading technology and other accessibility features.

    What's in the Box

    8 GB iPod touch, earphones, dock connector to USB cable, and quick start guide.

    1 ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Lines Between iPod Touch and iPhone Have Started to Blur, September 7, 2010
    Having had a chance to spend a little time with a review model gives me a chance to share the experience with you a bit early (before my own arrives). I'll take you hands-on with the new model, plus I'll share from my past two years of iPod touch ownership altogether, especially for those who haven't yet owned (or been owned by) one of these mobile gems.

    I've also hidden a treasure trove of info on how you can legitimately download tons of quality apps for free. First though, let's quickly cover what's new.

    + Faster 1GHz A4 Processor - to keep up with the high demands of multitasking
    + Ultra high resolution "Retina display" - packs a 960 x 640 resolution at 326 pixels per inch
    + 15% larger battery - 3.44 Whr/930 mAh plays 7 hrs of video & 40 hrs of audio
    + Rear-facing camera - supports 960 x 720 sized photos (0.6 megapixels), plus 720p HD videos
    + Front-facing VGA-quality camera - VGA-quality is a resolution of 640 x 480 (0.3 megapixels)
    + 3-Axis Gyroscope - allows for higher precision and more motion gestures
    + Wireless N - Connect faster and go farther than ever, with this WiFi device (requires a router with 802.11n)
    + Built in microphone - but Apple reverted back to using the remote- and mic-less earphones
    + Game Center - Apple's own social gaming platform
    + Sleep/Power Button - it's been moved to the right, but not improved beyond that
    + Thinner, lighter than ever
    * Note - Memory remains at the same 256MB despite several unconfirmed sources touting 512MB. There's also no vibrate module.

    Unlike last year's iPod touch update, this one's a complete overhaul to the entire line. Last year, the new models didn't change in appearance. On the inside, faster processors and double-memory were added to the 32GB & 64GB models, but the 8GB got left out. Not this time. Buying the new 8GB iPod touch indeed gets you all the new goodies. You'll also pay thirty bucks more than before, so consider buying the 32GB model instead. You'll get 400% of the storage capacity for only 23% more coin!


    ===== Background =====

    I'm a mobile app developer who's created a few apps and games for the iPhone, iPod Touch and now iPad. I was initially drawn to the iPod touch because of the popularity and capabilities of its mobile Web browsing--I was primarily a Web developer at the time and no other device could surf the Web so well. After I got one, I was hooked. I racked up over a hundred bucks in app purchases within the first month, and before long, I found myself learning how do develop native apps for the device.

    Indeed, if you have never had an iPod touch before, you're in for a real treat. Of course, if you have, then you know first hand: it's is worth its weight in gold--no, in platinum. And now, with the latest generation, it may even be worth its weight rare gem stones! I digress.


    ===== Out With the Old =====

    The iPod touch is frequently called an iPhone without the phone. However, until now there have been several other features also missing in the iPod touch besides the phone: a camera, GPS, magnetometer (compass), and some newer amenities from the iPhone 4: front-facing camera, high resolution "Retina display" as it has been dubbed, and the powerful 1GHz A4 processor--indeed a necessity to keep up with multitasking.

    That all changes, now. The 4th gen iPod touch brings with it some new features and amenities, some of which have been anticipated by iPod touch fans and developers alike, including myself, for several generations of the device. From a developer's perspective, the more hardware features we can get our hands on, the better and more innovative apps we can create, and the more users that can download, use and enjoy them.


    ===== In With the New =====

    The striking new design of the latest iPod touch is definitely a looker. Apple has made it even thinner (and I thought it was already too thin before) complete with a beautiful chrome back. While the super thin design is certainly attractive, I've found it slightly difficult to keep it well-gripped in your hands. The usual chrome back looks great too, but it's scratch-insistent. Yes, it's incredibly easy to scratch it all up, even after the first few days. For these two reasons, definitely get yourself a silicone skin (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0042GVG5G?tag=1pod-20&ie=UTF8) alongside your new touch!

    For ages, the feature topping everyone's wishlist for the iPod touch has been a camera. Check! It handles HD video too--bonus! Granted, its not the 5 megapixel camera that the iPhone 4 sports, but again, the new iPod touch is thinner than ever, making it a miracle that we even got a camera in the first place, let alone two! Yes, Apple went the extra mile so we could make video calls with our iPhone toting friends, via their FaceTime app. Brilliant! So, having not had any camera on the iPod touch before, and now having TWO cameras on it, we can't really complain can we? Nah.

    I'll have details on the quality both cameras later, but what excites me even moreso is the new much-higher resolution screen--dubbed "Retina display". You may not think much of it if you haven't used an iPhone or iPod touch before, nor have an older model nearby to compare it to, but for those that have and/or do, the difference is clear! (pun intended)

    Where this really comes in handy is in browsing the Web and reading non-mobile-formatted PDF e-books. Now, I can see things so much clearer at the default zoom level (which shows the full width of a Web page or document). My vision isn't spectacular by any means, I just don't mind seeing things smaller on the screen. It allows me to see more content without having to scroll. Indeed, the Retina display was the #1 feature I never knew I wanted (until I saw it in the iPhone 4 that is).

    Other newness includes: 15% larger battery, HD video recording and editing, built-in mic, wireless-n for nearly double the WiFi connection speed and distance, Game Center: Apple's new social gaming platform (which seems to be Apple's attempt to kill-off third party social gaming platforms like OpenFeint and Plus+), 3-axis gyroscope sensor, which complements the existing accelerometer sensor, both of which handle the rotating, swinging and other motion gestures of the device (previously, rotation were roughly calculated from accelerometer data), and new placement of the sleep/power button on the right (but still as difficult as ever to press).

    Features still missing include: 512MB of memory, vibration, 5 MP quality camera + flash (iPhone apps now support using LED flash as a flashlight, like Android does), magnetometer (compass), and the GPS. I'd happily trade the thinness of the latest iPod touch to have the GPS. WiFi based location is often inaccurate, and the GPS doesn't need a WiFi or cellular connection, it just needs to see the satellites in the sky.


    ===== iOS vs Android =====

    So far, Apple has cornered the market of multitouch mobile devices that aren't phones, but things are slowly changing. Currently, the two hottest mobile and smartphone operating systems out there right now are Apple's iOS (formerly: iPhone OS) and Google's Android. Of course, iOS is popular because it runs on not only the iPhone, but also on the iPod touch and now on the ipad as well. Plus, it has garnered support from scores of app developers who've gotten behind Apple's slew of high-demand devices.

    The iPod touch has really made iOS what it is today. It does a lot of what the iPhone does, without a contract, or carrier exclusivity, as is the case with the iPhone and the iPad (WiFi+3G models). So if it weren't for the iPod touch, a lot of the market share Apple now has in the industry would have been stifled by their carrier exclusivity. I think Apple will see the light soon, but that's another discussion.

    Enter Android. Google has held a different stance on their mobile OS. It isn't tied to a select few devices, and it's open source, so it can be further developed by manufacturers who use it. Indeed, several mobile device manufacturers have now latched onto Android as a foundation for numerous devices. Wireless carriers that have been unable to carry the iPhone have also taken a liking to it. Now, tons of Android devices have been released, and there's no end in sight. Manufacturers have also seen the iPad's potential and now they want a piece of that pie, too. So, expect to see a lot more Android tablets and media-centric non-phone devices soon. The competition is heating up.

    But not everything with Android, nor with iOS, is perfect. I own an EVO 4G, one of the most popular Android devices currently available. I've also used an iPod touch almost every day for nearly two years, so I'm pretty qualified to share my experience with each platform. Both certainly have their share of unique offerings, and neither of them are without flaws. For this reason, and because of the increasing competition between the two, I plan to dispel some of their key differences for you at various points in this review.


    ===== So What Can the iPod Touch Actually Do? =====

    Well, what can't it do?

    The iPod touch is like a magical little box, only it's flat. While it cannot cook your breakfast, yet (I'm sure someone is already working on that), it can indeed do some pretty extraordinary things. It's an amazing catch-all device that can provide hours of entertainment, give you the power of the Web in your hand, and it can even replicate the functionality of countless one-off products. Developers have been creating apps that take advantage of special hardware of the iPod touch to emulate some other product for less, and sometimes even for free.

    Even expensive products have seen cheap iOS based clone apps. For just 99 cents, you can snag a special alarm clock app that monitors your sleep cycle and wakes you up when you're in an ideal state of wakefulness. I spent 350 bucks on an aXbo
    (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0014RDSSY?tag=1pod-20&ie=UTF8) a few years ago, who's functionality is easily replicated by several "sleep phase" alarm clock apps in the app store. When you do the math there, you see that it's easily a no brainer: buy yourself an iPod touch now!

    I've listed more apps like this in the comments!

    Plus, with the support of such a strong community of app and game developers, there's never a drought of fresh new apps and games. There's always something to do with the iPod touch, and I guarantee you'll never be bored with it. I honestly cannot say the same thing about Android, though I also tote my EVO 4G around with me. I do admit that the EVO's mobile hotspot comes in incredibly handy for providing the iPod touch with a WiFi connection while I'm on the go).

    Now, with the proper resources, you can legitimately download thousands of high quality apps for free. I do it all the time and it is perfectly legal. See, Apple allows developers to temporarily put their apps on sale (and even drop the price to free). Usually they do this to get you to write some rave reviews for their apps. The secret to success is having the resources to help you spot these special app sales--so you know when and where to get them during their sometimes extremely-limited-time promotions.

    In hopes of making this the most helpful review on Amazon for the iPod touch, here's how to obtain these special promotional-sale apps:

    There are several resources you can use, both on the Web and on the iPod touch itself. I prefer to use the app called BargainBin that lists all apps that recently went on sale or dropped to free. It also supports watch lists with push notifications, and can alert you whenever an app you're interested in goes on sale. It's a phenomenal little gem, and it has gotten me a ton of apps and saved me a fortune! It also has a companion website that lists the same apps (Google: App Advice). There's also a website called AppShopper (Google it) that lists apps with recent price drops and new apps as well, and you can filter just the free products or just the sale products. The two sites don't always list the same apps. Sometimes one will miss something that the other will catch, so it's good to keep track of them both. Check them daily if possible. Several apps are duds, but you'll come across some really great ones from time to time. They'll all add up!


    ===== Web Browsing =====

    Alongside spending lots of money on all those wonderful apps in the App Store, Web browsing is one of the most popular uses for the iPod touch. Browsing the Web with mobile Safari was my original attraction to the device. The experience hasn't changed too drastically in the past two years (since the days of iOS 2), and while it's still very powerful, there are some definite flaws. And no, I'm not talking about Flash. Just minor usability issues I'd like to see overcome, but first let's look at the positives.

    Mobile Safari has a smart approach to zooming in on content. Double-tap on a paragraph of text or an image to cinch that content right up to the edges of the screen. The downside: some sites aren't mobile-friendly, so zooming in on a really wide block of text can leave you with tiny text. You can zoom further manually, by using the "unpinch" multi-touch gesture, but because the browser doesn't have an option to reflow the text to the screen width, you have to scroll left and right, as well as up and down, just to read the text. Android's browser doesn't feature smart zoom, but it does reflow the text to fit the screen when zoomed in. It's a nice feature, and Apple should add it as a preference for Safari.

    Browser history can also vanish after a few days, and browser windows get overwritten by links from other pages sometimes (usually when I've hit the maximum of eight windows). Also yet to be seen is support for doing common things like searching for text on a page, or bookmarking a link by tapping and holding. That would be invaluable for adding bookmarklets--bookmark based scripts that help overcome browser shortcomings.

    Flash is also a great debate, one I won't get into. I will just say that all is not as it seems with the Flash-support-touting Android platform. Flash does work, but it is buggy because Flash doesn't play well with touch interfaces. Flash based video players don't work right, and I even run Android 2.2, which is supposed to have the "full Flash experience". It doesn't, trust me. So you're not missing much by not having Flash on the iPod touch!

    Indeed, we can just hope and pray that Web developers and Flash-fiends see the light and start replacing Flash content with technologies like HTML5's canvas element, which is poised to take on a lot of Flash's most popular abilities.


    ===== Media =====

    Despite all the incredible things the iPod touch can do, audio and video are still one of the iPod touch's greatest strengths. And with the incredible resolution of the new iPod touch's retina display, to say that videos now appear much sharper, more vivid and highly-defined is definitely an understatement. Yes, videos were great before, but now they frickin' rock!

    Just make sure your videos are at least 960 x 640. If you've owned an older iPod touch and used video conversion software to scale down your media to fit the old 320 x 480 screen resolution, definitely change your conversion settings, or look for a software update to support the new higher-resolution display.

    For those interested in watching live TV on the go (over WiFi), Sling Media's SlingPlayer app, paired with one of their Slingbox devices is a phenomenal and freeing experience, especially considering your alternate choices for watching live TV on the go are pretty much nil up to this point.

    On top of that, Netflix's recently released iPod touch version of their media streaming app has also been a much-welcomed addition to my ever-growing collection of apps. Netflix videos stream quickly, and even moving the play position back and forth in the timeline, the movie starts playing very quickly without much time rebuffering the video.


    ===== Photos =====

    The latest iPod touch is also a game-changer for photography and video recording on an iPod touch. It's not mind-blowing by any means, but we went from having no camera right to having two cameras on the device. I probably would not be so thrilled with just a new back camera. I merely would have sighed, mumbling "finally" under my my breath (unless it were 5 megapixels). But despite the less-than-one megapixel quality of the rear-facing camera, I was taken aback by the rather decent quality, especially in low-light environments. Check the comments for links to sample photos!

    Between that and the ability to connect with other iPhone and iPod touch toting friends via Apple's FaceTime app, yes... it's a game changer. Granted, I have been wanting front facing cameras on mobile devices ever since mobile devices started having cameras period. I got the first of such devices when my EVO 4G arrived in June, but as they say: the more the merrier. Friends, welcome to the future we've been dreaming of. Video killed the audio call!

    The quality of my test calls were pretty good. Of course, it was over WiFi, but it proves the cameras are decent. You can switch from using the front camera to using the rear camera, too, in case something was going on in front of you that you wanted to share. Just tap the "camera swap" button in the bottom right corner of the screen. FaceTime also rotates along with the iPod when flipped on its side, nice.

    HD video recording is the other half of the aforementioned game-changing equation. I didn't expect to see ANY video recording, considering the original iPhone camera was originally just a camera. But it's here, complete with HD quality (yes, the quality is indeed desirable), plus basic video editing support, as well as support for Apple's brilliant "iMovie" app: an advanced video editing studio right on your iPod touch. It's just five bucks on the App Store.


    ===== E-Reading =====

    The iPad has been making waves in the genre of media reading for several months now, but that hasn't exactly been the same story for any generation of the iPod touch so far. Granted, it's not exactly marketed as an eReader like its iPad counterpart, but there are some really great apps out there for media reading on it, so there's no reason not to use it to read digital media. The obstacle to doing that, for me at least, has been the limited screen resolution, and so that may all potentially start to change, now that Apple has brought the Retina display to the iPod touch.

    The 163 pixels per inch screens of past iPod touches were still pretty great, just not ideal for tiny text. For comparison, LCD monitors typically only have 96 pixels per inch, and CRT monitors only have 72 pixels per inch. TV's are even worse than that. What this means for you is that the iPod touch display has always been sharper than your own computer monitor.

    However, despite being able to display content at a higher quality, I still found that in a lot of eBooks, especially PDFs that weren't mobile-formatted, the text was just not clear enough to be readable when zoomed out. However, zooming in meant having to constantly scroll side-to-side while reading. The app "Good Reader" helped ease that pain by doing the left-right & vertical scrolling for you with just a tap of the screen, as well as offering an additional view that re-flows the text to fit on the screen at a large enough size.

    However, with the Retina display, all text and content in the aforementioned "zoomed out" state now appears extremely clear. That is a wonderful thing, so long as you don't mind reading tiny text.

    Could you still benefit from having an iPad too? Perhaps. After all, it does have unique qualities that set it apart from the iPod touch, as my in depth iPad review portrays (http://www.amazon.com/review/R16U71KO7POLA2?tag=1pod-20&ie=UTF8). But unless you specifically see the need for one of those unique qualities, then no, you probably don't need both.


    ===== Gaming =====

    If you're like me, you probably don't have time for games. Regardless, it may still be high-time to let the kid within you roam free from time to time, as I do. The iPod touch has made it possible. In fact, it is so easy, there's no excuse not to enjoy yourself. My favorite games are the racing games and, when I have a bit more time, strategy games.

    With the iPhone and iPod Touch having taken on a clear role as a gaming console that has been as revolutionary for mobile gaming as the Wii was for living-room gaming, it goes without saying that the iPod touch is, and will continue to be, one of the best platforms for gaming. It's simple, convenient, and pretty much instant. Whenever you have a few moments of free time, wherever you're, just turn it on, find your game, and bam! You're gaming. Simple as that.


    ===== Productivity =====

    Productivity carries numerous definitions. Usually its "getting something done" though some people tend to believe that it's the ability to focus without being distracted, which I see as one of the iPod touch's strengths, at least for me, primarily because the screen is small enough to force you to focus on the task at hand.

    In the context of software though, Apple's own suite of productivity apps for the office, collectively called "iWork", has been further refined for the iPhone and iPod touch. Because of the aforementioned "focus factor" of the iPod touch, I have found myself to be surprisingly productive when working on documents with it. There are three apps in all: Pages allows you to work on word processing documents. Numbers allows you to work on spreadsheets. Keynote lets you work on presentations and slideshows (including PowerPoint files).

    So far, I've found these apps to be highly useful when I have work to do, but don't feel like being at the computer to do it. Another great app for that is "iTeleport" which let's me at my computer remotely, when iWork won't work (meaning I'm not working on office documents). Log Me In Ignition is another similar app that is slightly easier to set up, but a bit slower than iTeleport, when you're just working over the same WiFi connection as the remote computer.

    Furthermore, there's a whole category of iPod touch apps in the App Store specifically dedicated to productivity. Some of my favorite productivity apps include: Bento (info management), Things (project management), iTeleport (remote computing), and GoodReader (best PDF reader around). Search for them in the App Store.


    ===== Email, IM and Social Networking =====

    The iPod touch has been, and continues to be an exceptional communication-machine. Whether it's reading or composing email, keeping in touch via instant messenger, or managing your life via social networks, you've got plenty of options here.

    Instant messaging is easy with platforms such as AIM, Yahoo, Gtalk, MSN, Skype and apps that handle multiple platforms: IM+, Fring, Nimbuzz, BeejiveIM and Fuse Messenger. Finally, multitasking means you can truly remain connected to your IM platforms of choice, instead of relying on apps to keep you signed remotely, then push new-message notifications to your device. This is a much welcome addition to the new iPod touch.

    As well, there are plenty of apps to help you browse and update your status on social networks like Facebook, Twitter, etc. Within the iOS development community, Twitter apps have often been a laughing stock, simply because there are so many out there on the App Store. They're almost as rampant as "fart" apps. So to say you've got countless options as far as social networking apps are concerned is probably a pretty accurate statement.

    For email, you need not look any further than Apple's native "Mail" app. Even if you're using Gmail, Yahoo, AOL, or Apple's own MobileMe, setup is a snap. It even supports Microsoft Exchange, often useful for corporate email setups. As well, any other email accounts that support POP3 or IMAP connection types will work with the Mail app too. Plus, new to the iPod touch with iOS 4 is the option to use a unified inbox--handy for those already used to that behavior on Mac OS X.


    ===== Downloading Apps and Games =====

    Downloading apps on your iPod touch couldn't be easier. Once you set up your iTunes account with a credit card, all you need to do is find the app you want, tap the download button (usually it says the price rather than "download", which then changes to "buy" after you tap it), then tap again to confirm. Voila, you just bought an app. Behind the scenes, Apple then charges your card the amount of the app plus tax, while you're already off enjoying your new purchase. This ease of access is a blessing and a curse, because you can easily empty your wallet if you're not carefully considering each purchase.

    All apps in the App Store range in price from Free and 99 cents on up, always incrementing in whole dollar amounts (1.99, 2.99, 3.99, etc). The maximum price for an app is set to $999.99, of which there are only eight currently priced so outrageously. And don't even think of toying with them. Apple does not allow refunds on apps you have purchased--all sales are final!

    Contrast that with Android's more complex Android Market, and you'll find several more steps, especially for paid apps. For one, there're no fixed pricing tiers, and secondly, they allow multiple currency pricing, which only confuses its users. The good developers do keep their pricing similar to iOS apps, with the 99 cent base plus $1 increments, but I often see apps priced at �0.55 or 0.79 or $1 or �2.95 ...it's quite disorienting and unstructured. They have also set their price cap at $200, so you can't accidentally run up a $1000 charge on just one app--you'll need at least 5 apps for that. ;)

    Meanwhile, to actually buy an app on Android, you must tap the BUY button, confirm that you want to buy the app, then get redirected to a Google Checkout link, where you must setup your Google Checkout account or choose an existing payment method if you already have an account set up. Once you confirm the purchase yet again, THEN you can finally download the app.

    Google also makes selling apps a bit more complicated for developers than Apple, but I won't get into that. I'm just stressing how absolutely simple Apple makes the app buying and selling process. Contrary to Apple however, Google does allow users to "return" purchased Android apps within 24 hours for a full refund. That's nice.


    ===== Technical Specifications =====

    Since Amazon's product descriptions tend to be lacking, I like to include all the technical jargon geeks have come to expect when researching new gadgets. Feel free to breeze on through!

    In the box
    + iPod touch
    + Earphones
    + Dock Connector to USB Cable (for sync and charging)
    + Quick Start guide

    Size and weight
    + Height: 4.4 inches (111.0 mm)
    + Width: 2.3 inches (58.9 mm)
    + Depth: 0.28 inch (7.2 mm)
    + Weight: 3.56 ounces (101 grams)

    Capacity
    + 8GB, 32GB or 64GB flash drive/SSD

    Wireless
    + 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi (802.11n 2.4GHz only)
    + Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR
    + Maps-location based service
    + Nike + iPod support built in

    Display
    + Multi-Touch display
    + 3.5-inch (diagonal) widescreen
    + 960-by-640-pixel resolution at 326 pixels per inch

    Cameras, photos, and video
    + Video recording, HD (720p) up to 30 frames per second with audio; still photos (960 x 720) with back camera
    + VGA-quality photos and video up to 30 frames per second with the front camera
    + Tap to control exposure for video or stills
    + Photo and video geo tagging over Wi-Fi

    TV and video
    + H.264 video up to 720p, 30 frames per second, Main Profile level 3.1 with AAC-LC audio up to 160 Kbps, 48kHz, stereo audio in .m4v, .mp4, and .mov file formats
    + MPEG-4 video, up to 2.5 Mbps, 640 by 480 pixels, 30 frames per second, Simple Profile with AAC-LC audio up to 160 Kbps per channel, 48kHz, stereo audio in .m4v, .mp4, and .mov file formats
    + Motion JPEG (M-JPEG) up to 35 Mbps, 1280 by 720 pixels, 30 frames per second, audio in ulaw, PCM stereo audio in .avi file format
    + Support for 1024 by 768 pixels with Dock Connector to VGA Adapter; 576p and 480p with Apple Component AV Cable; 576i and 480i with Apple Composite AV Cable (cables sold separately)

    Audio
    + Frequency response: 20Hz to 20,000Hz
    + Audio formats supported: AAC (8 to 320 Kbps), Protected AAC (from iTunes Store), HE-AAC, MP3 (8 to 320 Kbps), MP3 VBR, Audible (formats 2, 3, 4, Audible Enhanced Audio, AAX, and AAX+), Apple Lossless, AIFF, and WAV
    + User-configurable maximum volume limit with parental lock
    + Earbud headphones included in box

    Earphones
    + Frequency response: 20Hz to 20,000Hz
    + Impedance: 32 ohms

    Input and output
    + 30-pin dock connector
    + 3.5-mm stereo headphone minijack
    + Built-in speaker
    + Microphone
    + External buttons and controls

    Sensors
    + Three-axis gyro
    + Accelerometer
    + Ambient light sensor (for proximity detection)

    Battery, power and playback time
    + Built-in rechargeable lithium-ion battery
    + USB sync cable is also used for charging
    + Fast charge in about 2 hours (80% capacity)
    + Full charge in about 4 hours.
    + Music playback time: Up to 40 hours when fully charged
    + Video playback time: Up to 7 hours when fully charged

    System requirements
    + USB 2.0
    + iTunes 10 or later
    + Mac: Mac OS X v10.5.8 or later
    + PC: Windows 7, Vista, or XP (SP3 or later)


    ===== Praise =====

    + Apple continues its trend of creating the best multi-touch experience around. Android doesn't even come close.
    + The Retina Display - Phenomenal! Kudos for bringing it to the iPod touch as well as the iPhone. Now try it with IPS technology Apple!
    + Wireless-N, finally! - Faster and farther-reaching WiFi connections (if your router supports 802.11n)
    + High performance 1GHz A4 processor - provides all the power of the iPhone 4, a win for gaming and multitasking.
    + Multitasks like a dream with iOS 4 and the powerful processor, despite the same 256MB of memory as the third generation touch.
    + Rear camera - It's not the 5 megapixel iPhone 4 camera, but I definitely can't complain here. It shoots great photos, especially in low-light without flash, plus it can do HD video.
    + Front facing camera - What a pleasant surprise! Now it just needs to work with Skype.


    ===== Dissappointments =====

    + No GPS - IP based location just doesn't cut it at times. GPS has no subscription fee or contract to use. GPS chips are costly, but tons of high cost GPS apps are in the App Store now to offset that cost for Apple.
    + 256MB memory - iFixit has confirmed this disappointing flaw, putting to rest all the rumors of 512MB still littering several reviews.
    + Still no 120GB model - Useful for higher res videos that look great on the Retina display.
    + No USB 3.0 or wireless sync - Sync'ing can be slow or inconvenient over the cable.
    + Thinner design - I was hoping for a more squared design, like the iPhone 4, as it is easier to grip, handle and press the power button.
    + Power button - Yes, it hasn't changed much. It's been moved to the right side on this model, but it's still the tiny, hard-to-press button it's has always been, and if you take lots of screenshots like I do (by pressing power+home simultaneously) half the time you end up closing your app because the power button didn't work right.


    ===== The Bottom Line =====

    It is absolutely clear: Apple has definitely blurred the lines between iPhone and iPod touch with its 4th generation of both devices. Since it has no contract or carrier exclusivity, this phenomenal device will continue to shine its light in the otherwise dark voids of the smartphone market where the iPhone cannot go, even without the phone. That's just smart!

    Given all my tips, I think you'll find the iPod touch to be an extraordinarily useful, possibly even highly addictive device, with a price tag that is well worth it, especially the 32GB model. With all the things that the iPod touch can do, it will undoubtedly enhance your life and change the way you interact with the Web. It might even make a gamer out of you if it hasn't already, it sure did for me!

    I hope you've found my hands-on review helpful. I do actively participate in any discussions via the comments, so feel free to drop me a line, or ask me any questions as well. :)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Using the 8 gb version as a netbook substitute...., September 19, 2010
    Alright, so Best Buy got the 32GB iPod Touch 4G in stock so I drove an hour to go get one. I was not disappointed. I will run through the features I have come across so far.

    Body: Aside from moving the sleep button to the right and making the back of the device slimmer and more flat, not much has changed. Yes, the chrome back is still there erg! It was so pretty for the first 30 seconds.

    Ram: The Ram on the iPod Touch is only 256 MB, so do not believe the talk of 512 MB, it is simply not true.

    Wireless: Fully supports A/B/G/N

    Vibration: There is no vibration, so do not expect that.

    Multitasking: Works real well and very smooth transition

    Display: While the display on the iPod is not IPS like the iPhone do not think it suffers in anyway. This display is so beautiful and crisp to look at. I cannot even distinguish the pixels, and text on a website is like you are reading out of a book, it's so refreshing. I played a digital copy of "UP" on here and the colors practically jump off the screen, very nice. Apple's icons are so much more vivid and sharp, while 3rd party developer icons who have yet to make an upgrade for the new displays shows what a step up this new screen has to offer.

    Speaker: I am not sure of the quality of the speaker on the 3G iPod Touch, but on my 2G iPod Touch it was very tinny and I only used it for game sound. Here on the 4G there is a new spot on the bottom left for the speaker and it has risen in clarity. Music is very listenable and clear, however nothing replaces a good set of earbuds, but when you're in a jam, you won't be gritting your teeth with this speaker.

    Processor: The new Apple processor is a sure win for this device. Everything loads very fast and switching from one screen to another is very swift and smooth. Crash Bandicoot finally has a nice framerate to play with on this iPod and for once I did not regret buying that game.

    Front Camera: This is the camera that is primarily used for Facetime. It's resolution is at 640 X 480. After taking a few pictures with it, you will notice how it is really not for taking stills, but works fine for videochatting (which I have not tried, but did run some video tests with it). Obviously Facetime will work better in well lit areas, but then again, doesn't any camera?

    Rear Camera: Again stills are just so so. What really bugs me is when you go to take a picture, you see how crisp the preview is, then you take the picture and you can see it blur. The tap to focus works nice for adjusting exposure and well lit photos look very decent on the display. It's when you upload them to your computer when you notice how not so decent they actually are. While this may be a negative for many people, if you are like me, you want to just upload photos with this device to FaceBook and capture funny moments with the video camera. If I want to take a really awesome picture, I'll pull out my DSLR, but for me this iPod's capabilities are more than adequate for my quick shooting of certain events. The video captures quite nicely, while not superb like an actual HD camcorder does enough for me for again, capturing fun moments. Don't worry, you don't cringe while watching the video, it's more than adequate and produces vibrant colors and a fast framerate. Some may complain on this, and believe me those reviews will be here shortly, but then again why not buy an HD Camcorder that is made for HD content? (I'm not ignorant to HD quality either, I'm a huge fan of it. I run a 3D 65'' 1080p display with Blu-ray and Dolby Tru-HD decoding surround sound system)

    Microphone: Testing out Skype my friend told me I was coming in loud and clear. I also played back a video I made on the iPod on my computer and the microphone captures top notch audio. Very crisp and clear, I was quite pleased.

    Battery: While I haven't tested out Apple's claims of 40 hr. of music, let's be honest who really does that? I'm sure Apple's claims are quite credible in their battery life depending on how the device is used.

    One note I should also make, my iPod Touch 2G accessories, (car charger, wall charger) work with my iPod touch 4G. Apple sometimes changes stuff like the charging pin on the iPod's to make a person have to buy new accessories. Anybody remember when the iPod Video A/V cables had the Audio and Video switched around so people couldn't use their cables with the iPod? Well they could, they just had to switch the audio and video cables in the port around. Anyways, away from this funny piece of marketing history.

    Is the new iPod worth it? For me, upgrading from the 2G Touch, yes! The display is brilliant, the speed of the processor amazing, video quality is very much enjoyable and the rear camera is excellent for taking quick fun shots. If I had one word to describe this iPod, it would be fun! You can't handle one of these without feeling like a joyous kid, (I'm 22) and the business aspect is still there and quite useful. I would highly recommend this iPod Touch as a worthy upgrade to any generation of the iPod Touch you may own and if you don't own one, there has never been a more perfect time to go out and get one! Don't hesitate to leave a comment here if you have a question for an actual owner. I'll do what I can!


    5-0 out of 5 stars This thing rocks!, September 8, 2010
    *This review is from someone who never owned any Apple products before, married, healthcare professional, blackberry and palm TX owner (yeah I know, belongs in a museum), I was looking for a handheld internet browser by wifi, no monthly fees for 2 years, with camera, video, and apps that i can use for my work, and put in my pocket and it led me to this device. This is therefore a completely un-technical, layman's review.

    1. Delivery time: I was supposed to receive this September 10-14 with the regular shipping, but I got it today, maybe because I ordered it as soon as Steve Jobs finished presenting, so this deserves more than 5 stars!

    2. Dimensions/looks: I actually prefer the "handling" of the bigger and heavier 3rd gen that I borrowed, its all smudge now without any cover, but boy! this is the most beautiful handheld device that I ever held, 4 stars for being smaller and lighter and smudgy.

    3. Display: The retina display is amazing! Like reading from a glossy magazine, and yes you cannot see the pixels! 5 stars!

    4. Wifi: Sync with ATT wifi - no problem, wifi in gym - no problem, monthly fees - no problem! 5 stars!

    5. Internet Browsing: Hard to type in the addresses initially, but pages loads super fast (the longest was within thress-onethousand - all news channels), surfed the web with no problems,make pages bigger or smaller... this gets 5 stars as well.

    6. Speed (Processor): this thing is super fast, web pages load within 3 seconds, downloading apps within 30 secs, youtube in a flash, the email attachment that opened in 1 minute in my computer took only 10 seconds! 5 stars indeed!

    7. Camera: very grainy, will not use it for any important event, only for quick-I-need-a-camera moments, it will not replace my dSLR, but since it wasnt there in the previous gen, and I only use my dSLR and nothing else, this camera is still a bonus it gets 4 stars.

    8. Apps for work/"work": I already downloaded 4 very useful apps for work for free! plus 5 other free games for me and my 3 year old kid, the fact that I can now have apps without an iphone/ipad is great, the fact that its free is sweet! 5 stars!

    8. Video: 720p HD! And I bought a Vado HD that does nothing else! Quality is up to par! 5 stars!

    Overall, I have a device that surfs the net very very fast, manages my email, has a camera, great HD videocam, great free apps for work, that looks beautiful, and is great to look at, that I got 1 week early, what more can I ask for?!!! Worth every penny and deserves 5 stars!

    And it stores and plays music too?! And has facetime?! And maps?! I feel like I paid for a Toyota and got a Lexus!

    Will buy another one for my kid so she doesnt have to borrow mine!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A definite improvement over the previous generation., October 11, 2010
    I know what you're thinking while looking at these reviews: "Should I save fifty bucks and get the 3rd Generation iPod touch, or is the 4th Gen really worth the new price?"

    I am happy to report that the improvements made from 3rd to 4th generation are worth your attention.

    * Size/Shape: The new model is thinner and more narrow, but slightly taller/longer. What this translates to in real-world usage is that the device is slightly less bulky in your pocket once you put a case on it, but that it's a tiny bit harder to grip without a case, if you have big hands. Of course, since Apple continues to put that scratch-magnet shiny back on the iPod touch (PLEASE, Apple, STOP IT! Give us brushed aluminum or something!) you will probably need a case, so the thinness is a good thing.

    * Microphone: No, you don't get the headphones with the in-line microphone anymore, but you do get a microphone built into the iPod touch. While most people focus on the Face Time, Skype, or other social uses for a microphone and lament the loss of one on the headphones, as someone who doesn't care about VOIP, I find the built-in microphone a lot better for my purposes. I use it for voice commands in the iPod ("Play artist 'The Beatles'") and for dictation (Dragon's free app is awesome) and voice memos. It also functions well for video recording. I don't miss the in-line earbud microphone at all.

    * Video Recording/Photos: While the iPod touch won't replace a top-line video camera, and most definitely won't replace a decent digital camera, it works as a "I happen to have it in my pocket" substitute on both counts. I don't take a lot of photos, so the lower resolution on the camera doesn't bother me. The video, however, is quite nice, and replaces my Flip Mino HD without a hitch. Just remember to reserve some storage space if you intend to record videos.

    * Retina Display: Wow. You have to see it to understand why it's a big deal. You don't notice it as much in the main screen, but when you get into text displays you really see the difference. Everything is crisp, there's almost no pixelization and nothing is "fuzzy". Games that support it look gorgeous. It really is worth it if you intend to use the iPod touch to do any reading, web browsing, or gaming.

    * iOS 4: I love the OS changes they made since I owned a 3rd generation iPod touch. The ability to group apps into folders/groups is about the best thing they did since the iPod touch debuted. The ability to do multitasking is very handy, too. The Gmail integration is much better now that it supports IMAP, and the contacts are much more friendly to Windows users since they started providing decent support for Google Contacts. WiFi signals seem to be stronger, and the battery life is excellent. All told, the little changes make a big difference.

    * Video Playback: Now that they've increased the screen resolution to 960x640, videos are not as limited. This means that if you have a collection of 720p m4v/mp4 videos already, they'll work with the iPod touch. You won't need to downscale them to make them work. This also means that if you choose to output to a HDTV screen, you'll get your full 720p video in all its glory. This is a great feature for media hounds like myself. If only Apple made a 1TB iPod touch..!

    * Improved buttons: While the buttons are no longer metal (they're now plastic or polycarbonate), they are much better-designed in terms of placement. The volume toggle has been turned into two separate buttons for up and down, and they work quite well when you're not looking at the device (like when it's in your pocket). The standby/power button is smaller and to the right of the top of the device, and it, too is easy to find and use when the device is out of view. Response from the buttons is nice, with a good clicky tactile feedback. They seem sturdy and yet they're small enough to be unobtrusive and not be pressed accidentally.

    * Speaker: They went from using the whole back panel as a speaker board to putting in a little speaker in the device at the bottom. This has the effect of making things sound a little better, but not without some problems (see below).

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    THE CONS

    * The new size means you will probably need a new case and screen protector. Old ones won't fit. Some exceptions exist (some slip-cases, for example) but anything that was an exact fit for the previous models is too big for the current model.

    * No in-line microphone on the earbuds. This is not a problem for me, but for social networking types, this will be something they miss.

    * Speed is, at this point, no better than the previous model in most cases, and sometimes slower in apps that have yet to update some features. This will no doubt change, but right now expect no major boost in speed or power with the upgrade to 4th Gen.

    * Still camera is low resolution. As I noted above, it's not a crippling issue for me, as I don't take lots of photos and the video camera is so nice, but if you're a shutterbug looking for an alternate digital camera, you may be a little let-down by the current generation. You're probably better off with an iPhone 4 or waiting for the 5th Gen iPod touch and crossing your fingers.

    * Dock connector doesn't sit flush with the device. It looks weird at first, but when you connect to the docking cable, the connector doesn't seem to go in all the way if you look at it from the back of the iPod touch. This is, apparently, by design. I can't say I like it, but this is the sacrifice you get with thinner devices. Apple didn't want to give up the tapered design, but they didn't want to redesign the dock connection, either. The compromise was to make the connector do what it currently does. This is not really a big deal, as it works fine and feels secure, but it does make you wonder how some third-party docks and devices will work with the current generation.

    * Speaker gets blocked easily. I know this is more of a critique of App design than iPod design, but the iPod touch's speaker being in the bottom corner causes me to end up covering the speaker when I turn the device sideways (to the left) to play a game. Smart Apps make it possible to tilt the screen any direction, but some are set on making you tilt to the left, which leads to the speaker blockage. Again, no big deal, but it makes me wonder why Apple doesn't just put the speaker on the side of the device instead of on the bottom. There's little chance you'd block it on a sideways/widescreen App in that case.

    * Stupid shiny back: I mentioned this earlier, but WHY, Apple? Why do you keep putting this horrible shiny back on the iPod touch? It was terrible back on the classics, and it's terrible now. Give us something that doesn't get scratched from the slightest touch, and something that isn't slippery! Brushed aluminum, rubberized metal, or anything else would be preferable to this stupid shiny back-plate. This, for me, is the iPod touch's #1 bad feature.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    SUMMARY

    In my opinion the newer model is worth the new price. You get a lot of extra features and the best screen on any iPod to date, and the microphone being built-in becomes a must-have feature after you realize how convenient it is to not have to hook up the earbuds in order to record something. So here's the rundown on whether or not you should upgrade from 3rd Gen to 4th Gen:

    * If you're a reader: YES. The Retina Display makes reading books and comics much easier on the eyes (although I still prefer e-ink for long stretches or reading outdoors).

    * If you're a gamer: YES. The Retina Display, better speaker, and new gyroscope/accelerometer make gaming better.

    * If you're a social networking freak: YES. The video camera, still camera, built-in microphone, and Face Time are a social networking fan's wet dream.

    * If you're looking for a PDA: NO. It doesn't really matter unless you want to take advantage of the video camera for business meetings, or have bad eyes and want your address book to look more crisp. You could probably get by with the 3rd Gen, but honestly, you're probably already using iPhone 4 so this is a non-issue.

    * If you're looking for a portable web browser and mail client: YES. If you're on the Internet a lot, you'll appreciate the Retina Display and better WiFi reception from 802.11n.

    * If you just want to play music: NO. Don't bother to upgrade because the music/iPod functions aren't all that different from the previous generation, unless you want the convenience of the built-in microphone for voice commands.

    * If you just want to play videos: YES. The higher resolution and Retina Diplay make videos much better, and the ability to output 720p is a great feature for videophiles.


    Final verdict: For most users, the newer model is a much better value. Apple improved the iPod touch enough this time around to make it worth grabbing the 4th Gen, even if you do end up paying a little more for it than a clearance-model 3rd Gen.

    4-0 out of 5 stars A joy to use, September 14, 2010
    I wanted an iPhone 4 as soon as it came out; I already had a 2G iPod Touch and loved it. But I can't commit to the contract right now and the full price (outside of contract) version is really beyond my budget. So I made a conscious decision to wait for the iPod Touch, aware that it would probably be a compromise. I pre-ordered it from Apple before it came out in stores. I was expecting to be less happy about some aspects (such as the camera), but knew I'd get used to those, and would probably love the improvements compared to the 2G iPod Touch. I wasn't disappointed. After only a couple of days use I definitely like it a lot.

    The screen is glorious. It's so much easier on the eye than the old display. Yes it's not IPS (although this not obvious outside of steep viewing angles). It seems darker than the old display; this is probably because of the higher pixel density. It also has more of a blue tint (a cooler color temperature) but I've heard this is also true of the iPhone. But I got used to these things and it's a joy to look at every time. In spite of the better battery, I think the display sucks more juice, since you have to have it at a brighter setting than before to get the same perceived brightness.

    General performance is very smooth. It's definitely faster than previous versions. Things still crash occasionally but that's true of any computer. The bugs from my 2G Touch that appeared after I upgraded to iOS 4.1, that caused Pandora and other audio apps to be unusable, are thankfully gone, as far as I can tell (I since seem to have resolved this issue on the 2G Touch by restoring to factory settings and upgrading to iOS 4.2). Heavy content (such as pdfs and large web pages) can slow it down but this is also true of the iPad.

    You have to be careful to get good battery life. The battery has been upgraded so you supposedly get 40 hours of audio rather than 30 h. But if you're new to multitasking, you have to realise that you're going to pay for it in battery life unless you're careful. For example, you can have Skype running in the background and it will receive calls and messages, even if the iPod is locked in your pocket, which is great. However, this makes use of the 'Voice over IP' iOS service, which Skype is constantly running in the background. I think Pandora might do something similar (albeit with a different service). So your battery will drain noticeably (I saw 5-10% drain per hour using iStat with Skype and Pandora backgrounded and the iPod locked). Most apps you see in the multitasking bar do not use these services; Apple calls them 'recently used' apps for a reason; they mostly aren't running.

    The volume and power buttons take a bit of getting used to but I ended up preferring them. They feel more solid and have a more definite click to them.

    Seriously, for what it is, the back camera is not that bad in spite of the 0.7 MP resolution. In bright daylight it's surprisingly good. It just gets more grainy at night. But they're still quite possible; in a fancier camera you might have to manually increase the exposure time. Don't knock it just because of the pixel count, it's a pretty good camera; my 2 MP camera phone is not that much better. And for taking pics as a record of a fun moment that you can then upload directly to Facebook, I love it, and I use it a lot. That functionality is a big step up from the old iPod Touch, so I'm OK with the low resolution; it's a lot better than no camera at all. And I've managed to get it to read barcodes with apps like the AT&T code scanner. Also, Apple's HDR is not available but I think there are 3rd party apps that will do that.

    The speaker is nicer than the old iPod Touch but it could definitely be louder. I tried using it like a phone (with Skype) and it's not really practical; you really need headphones unless there's minimal background noise. But if you're on your own in a room, it's actually fine. Listening to the radio (with ooTunes), it could easily get to a similar level to my clock radio so it was fine.

    So, as a pocket computer the 4G Touch rocks. With the retina display and cameras, this feels like a mature product. You might like to wait for possible improvements (such as the camera) in the next version, but as it stands it's still a joy to use. And given you'd have to pay at least another $400 to get the extra features on the iPhone, I think it's a pretty good deal.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Better In Every Way, September 2, 2010
    ---------------------------------Overview------------------------------------------------

    The latest iPod Touch from Apple improves on the previous generation in nearly every single way. It does all this without increasing the price one cent (except the 8GB version which increased in price by $30 and is now no longer a hardware generation behind). Bottom line, the iPod Touch continues to be an irresistible device that has no peer on the market right now. Think back even three years and people would simply be amazed at everything the latest iPod Touch can do for only $229. Games in every category, some of which have graphics superior to the PSP or Nintendo DS, news and weather apps, streaming video from your computer or from services like Netflix and Hulu, exercise and weight loss apps, the list goes on and on (and on). While we are starting to see some Android based tablets enter the market, there is nothing in the portable market that comes close to what the iPod can do.

    If you really have some problems with some of the iPod Touch's shortcomings (like the camera) and you want access to the Apple App store, you may want to consider just buckling down and getting an iPhone 4 (if you can afford it). However, once you consider the value proposition of the iPhone 4 (total cost of ownership over two year contract $75-85 x 24 + $299) vs. the iPod Touch at $299, you start to understand that some of these drawbacks are not so bad.

    ---------------------------------CHANGES-------------------------------------------------

    Compared to the previous (and well loved) iPod Touch this device:

    - replaces the previous processor with the more powerful A4 processor. Expect smooth and fast operation with support for even the most graphically intense iPod Touch games. All other applications will run at top speed, although not dramatically faster than the previous generation.
    - is now even thinner. The Ipod Touch is now shockingly thin.
    - added a microphone so you don't need a headset to talk to people or use voice control
    - doubled the amount of ram so multi-tasking should be a breeze
    - has longer battery life | extended audio life by 10 hours (from 30 to 40 hours) and video by 1 hour (from 6 to 7 hours).
    - weighs less
    - has TWO additional cameras (front facing for video and self-portraits and back for HD video) - the front camera is VGA quality (640x480) and the back camera is a 720P (1280x720) sensor (when used to take pictures that resolution is reduced to 960x720). Samples of the HD video show that this feature was not just "tacked on" and actually looks very good compared to some HD video available on other pocket devices (like the EVO 4G).
    - 4 times as many pixels on the screen - Apple is calling this a "retina display" because it has the same dpi (dots per inch) as the iPhone 4. However, the iPod Touch is not using the same IPS display found in the iPhone 4 which means the viewing angles aren't as good. I doubt most users will notice the difference here.
    - adds the gyroscope for extra precision with motion based apps (mostly gaming)
    - adds support for the faster Wireless "N" standard, which should help when streaming video to your phone or using Facetime to make a video call
    - adds a vibrator for alerts, force feedback in gaming, and notifications for voice calling

    Cons:

    - speaker still sucks - I let my two year watch videos on my iPhone. Thus a crappy speaker is a deal breaker for me because she is too small to use headphones. You can blame the extreme thinness on this one. There simply isn't enough depth to put an iPhone quality speaker in. If I didn't have a two year old I wouldn't consider this a big deal because I rarely use this function otherwise.
    - no 5MP camera or LED flash - This is going to be a deal breaker for some who saw the iPhone 4 and started salivating at the thought of the possibility of the same high quality sensor in the iPod Touch. Read my thoughts below for more on this one.
    - No GPS chip - you're still stuck with using WiFi signals to determine location, a la the original iPhone. Maybe Garmin or Tom Tom paid them money not to include this feature.


    ---------------------------Thoughts and Conclusions------------------------------------

    Yes, I wanted the camera sensor from the iPhone 4 as well, but the unfortunate reality is that sensor wouldn't fit in the old iPod Touch body and this one is even slimmer! In order to fit the iPhone 4 camera sensor into the iPod Touch, Apple would have had to make this device significantly thicker, which loses one of the big advantages the Touch has had over the iPhone, its size. I might have been willing to make the tradeoff, but obviously Apple wasn't.

    Keep in mind that the larger sensor (and LED Flash) adds to the cost of the device as well. Apple added a significant number of features to the iPod Touch and kept the price exactly the same. Something's gotta give here. The 32GB iPhone 4 sells for $700! (AT&T pays Apple the difference when you buy one on contract). I'm sure if people were willing to spend $400 more than the $299 the 32GB iPod Touch sells for they would have a mind blowing sensor in there. I'm actually surprised at how much of the functionality of the iPhone the iPod Touch now replicates, given the huge gap in cost.

    Appreciate the fact that you can now record HD video and do video calling over WiFi for the same price as the last model. Or don't buy it. Consider how much you can do on this device compared to other portable gadgets, like the pocket sized Flip Video Camera, which costs more than $100+ and does nothing other than video, or even the ZUNE HD, which is a great device, but lacks compatibility with the hundreds of thousands of Apps that turn the iPod Touch into a pocket computer.

    I'm waiting for something to come along to blow away the iPod Touch, but that device just doesn't exist. All things considered, this device is a 4.5/5, which I round up to 5 because Amazon doesn't do half stars. This device won't be for everyone, but then again, no device is. For a great majority of users, this is product is nothing short of gadget heaven.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Great display but terrible rear camera, September 1, 2010
    My wife and I have the 3rd generation iPod Touch and are very happy with them. The one thing that I have been missing/wanting is having a built in camera. I recently saw the photos taken by a friend's iPhone and was blown away by how good they were. Almost all reviews have said the iPhone built in 5MP camera is excellent. Like many others I watched Steve Jobs present the new iPod line today and was very excited to hear that it had all the features I was looking for. Retina display - awesome. Front and rear cameras - yes! Finally.

    I was all set to order 2 from Amazon the minute Amazon had them listed. But .. while looking thru the Apple website I came across the specs for the rear facing camera. It is only .7 megapixels. Less than 1 megapixel. What? I thought that can't be right. I contacted Apple and the rep, who had gotten many such calls it seemed, confirmed that the iPod touch has a very different camera (.7 MP vs the iPhone's 5 MP) . Bummer. I looked around and found a hands on review of it .... and they said the sensor itself, besides being lower MP, is also not nearly as good as the one in the iPhone. Not terrible but certainly not good and no where in the same league as the one in the iPhone.

    The camera was one of the 2 main things people asked for. The other being the Retina display. My assumption is that Apple didn't want to affect iPhone sales and purposely dummied down the camera. Shame on them. They want us to pay $240 to $400 for an iPod with a terrible camera.

    I first predicted that w/ the Retina display and the camera that this would be a smashing success, a huge seller coming into the holiday season. I suspect when people get them and see how bad the photos are, they'll be returning them to Apple. Or like myself, not upgrading.

    I realize this review should be for a product I own, but I felt it was important for people to know about the camera before they ordered it. If photos aren't a big deal, and you'll only email them or post them on facebook, then .7 MP is probably fine. If you want to print any of the photos you take, or even have room to crop the photo, you won't get enough resolution to do that.

    That being said, the Retina display does look awesome, but is it worth the extra dollars over the price of the 3G model? Only you can decide that.

    I hope this helps all of you make a wise decision about your purchase.

    08 Sept 2010 Update
    Hello everyone. First, I am glad that my raising the above issues helped many of you. Second, for those who lashed out at me, perhaps you should take a look at why you get so angry at a stranger who simply encouraged you to look and think before you buy.

    Here's an update.[...] has posted a hands on review of the new iPod Touch. You may want to google it or go to their site to read it.

    In summary:
    1. Retina display is darker and not nearly as good as the one in the iPhone. "Definitely not an iPhone w/o the contract".
    2. HD Video is actually pretty good
    3. Size is a lot smaller than the 3g, bad if you have normal or large hands, ok for teens and those w/ small hands.
    4. Photo quality is much worse than the iPhone. And their posted photos show how much worse. Forget trying to print them and I'd argue not even good for the web based on their samples. No focus or zoom capability either, you can only adjust brightness.

    There you go. We are staying w/ our 3g models, there isn't enough here to justify taking a huge loss selling them and buying these new models. And given that the camera and retina display aren't nearly the quality of the iPhone, this is certainly a release we'll sit out.

    I hope this has helped.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great device, screen is not what you think, almost too thin, September 12, 2010
    I've been using an old Iphone 2.5g as my "ipod touch" for about the last year or so. I switched to Sprint for the cheaper rates so no more iphone coverage. Well, since the old phone is not compatible with IOS4.0 and since this new device is seemed truly "next-generation," I decided to take the plunge. I hate the lack of space on my old iphone (8Gb) so I splurged for the 64. Here's a few things I noticed right out of the gate:

    1) The screen resolution is phenomenal. The lighting sucks. It has a nasty angle of view. If you look dead at the center of the screen with a black screen "on," you can see slight brightness variances from corner to corner. Not terrible, but I had expected better. After researching it a bit, this is apparently because Apple "cheaped-out" and did not include the IPS style of lighting that they used on the Iphone 4. Oh well, still a great screen though.

    2) Size: The device is amazingly thin. This is both good and bad. The buttons are kind of hard to mash as they are located on the heavily beveled edges of the device. It's not bad, but, you do need to have a good grip on the device when screwing around with volume or power. It is super light and fits well in my hand though. But, as weird as it seems, i do hate how the apple logo feels under my finger. Feels like I have super glue or something on my finger tips... strange

    3) Speed: The speed of the device is great. This is comparing it directly to my old iPhone though. It blows it out of the water. I don't have to really wait on anything. I do wish the browser was better though. On my old phone, when I'd scroll too fast on a large page, i'd get the checkerboard effect. I hoped this was no longer an issue with the new A4 chip. Again, after researching it, I found that the iPod touch has half the RAM of the new iPhone 4. Guess that would explain it.

    4) Camera: The camera is crap. It's low res and has poor low light performance. It's cool for impressing Grandma with the Face Time app, but that's about it. Don't leave home without a good cell phone camera (or a Nikon/Canon!)

    5) Minor quibbles: I miss my vibrate/loudness switch. Sucks not being able to instantly mute the device when i want it quiet. I also wish the speaker were more full. I am glad that Apple included a speaker at least, but, for it to be useful as a Face Time device for Grandma, the speaker really needs to be made louder/fuller.

    in a nutshell, it's a great device, but it is the Kmart special of the new Iphone 4 in pretty much every way. Why did I give it 4 stars when I'm so harsh on it? Because, no other device even comes close. Apple has managed to make the Ipod Touch feel magic in every way.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Wafer thin, 2 Cameras, better Wifi and better sound!, September 18, 2010
    I got my 64G Touch 4G last week -- I finally got my wish, the Touch gets not one, but two cameras! That makes up for last year's disappointing 3G release.

    First impressions: wow, this is so thin and small -- makes my 3rd gen look a bit like a bulky oaf in comparison. Second impression: hey, this doesn't look like my iPhone 4 at all!

    A bit about me: I'm an MP3 diehard fanatic, I own or have owned almost every MP3 player of note. To name a few: iPod Touch 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th gen, iPod Classic, iPod Nano, Zune HD, Archos Android, 5, 605, 604, and so forth. I have a broad basis for comparison as I write my review.

    Down to brass tacks then, what do I love about my new Touch:

    1) Retina display -- Wow! That's a lot of pixels in a small space, the crispness and clarity of text and video is simply awesome.
    2) Slim form factor -- this is thinner and narrower than last years model. Its compact, easily fits in a pocket, while still having a little weight to give that quality feel.
    3) iTunes and the App Store -- still one of Apple's strongest features. iTunes continues to be the best interface for music, video and app purchases. While Zune Marketplace and Android are strong contenders, they aren't quite there yet.
    4) Easy upgrades -- the iOS upgrade system is as smooth as it gets, just plug it into iTunes and it happens smoothly and seamlessly.
    5) Dedicated power and volume buttons.
    6) Cool user interface -- possibly the best user interface although Zune and Android are also strong.
    7) Apps -- without question the Apps are the Touch and iPhone strongest feature, the most Apps and the best Apps.
    8) Accessories, accessories -- you just can't beat the easy availability and diversity of accessories available for iPod Touch. Its good to be at the top!
    9) Multitasking (or multi-what?) -- finally we have multitasking on an MP3 player! Ok, maybe I'm just a geek and nobody else cares... just a little tip: double click your home button to see what has been running in the background and sucking up your battery!
    10) External speaker -- improved quality since 3rd gen. Nice when you don't want to put on headphones to listen to a podcast or something.
    11) Cameras -- the only MP3 player I've ever had that can do facetime, take pictures, and record videos!
    12) Improved Wifi -- connects easily to my WPA secured U-Verse router, my 3rd gen can't do it. Makes this a good "small iPad" if that's what you're looking for.
    13) Improved sound -- its getting pretty good now, still not the best available but definitely better than 3rd gen was. I would say the sound quality has moved from 3 star to 4 stars now.

    And then the things I don't love so much:
    1) Where is the Dedicated play button??? Does anybody else think that this is like the most important thing for an MP3 player? Makes it hard to pause the music when somebody comes up and wants to talk to you. The trick I found is to unplug the headphones which pauses the music automatically!
    2) Removable battery? -- I'm just going to keep saying this til somebody at Apple hears me. It costs like $100 to get the battery replaced which is ridiculous.
    3) A/V docking station? -- Again, why doesn't Apple have a decent docking station? Both Zune and Archos have very nice docks for their products.

    All in all, my issues with the iPod Touch are pretty trivial. It continues to be the best all around MP3 player type unit available today -- hence the 5 stars. With the addition of Retina display, cameras, faster CPU, better sound and wifi, and slimmer packaging the Touch is still the one to beat.

    Note: If what you really care about is sound quality I would recommend the Sony Walkman X. If you want something that sounds great on big speakers, has a bigger screen, and a high capacity hard drive, then I recommend the Archos 5 with Android.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Lines Between iPod Touch and iPhone Have Started to Blur, September 7, 2010
    Having had a chance to spend a little time with a review model gives me a chance to share the experience with you a bit early (before my own arrives). I'll take you hands-on with the new model, plus I'll share from my past two years of iPod touch ownership altogether, especially for those who haven't yet owned (or been owned by) one of these mobile gems.

    I've also hidden a treasure trove of info on how you can legitimately download tons of quality apps for free. First though, let's quickly cover what's new.

    + Faster 1GHz A4 Processor - to keep up with the high demands of multitasking
    + Ultra high resolution "Retina display" - packs a 960 x 640 resolution at 326 pixels per inch
    + 15% larger battery - 3.44 Whr/930 mAh plays 7 hrs of video & 40 hrs of audio
    + Rear-facing camera - supports 960 x 720 sized photos (0.6 megapixels), plus 720p HD videos
    + Front-facing VGA-quality camera - VGA-quality is a resolution of 640 x 480 (0.3 megapixels)
    + 3-Axis Gyroscope - allows for higher precision and more motion gestures
    + Wireless N - Connect faster and go farther than ever, with this WiFi device (requires a router with 802.11n)
    + Built in microphone - but Apple reverted back to using the remote- and mic-less earphones
    + Game Center - Apple's own social gaming platform
    + Sleep/Power Button - it's been moved to the right, but not improved beyond that
    + Thinner, lighter than ever
    * Note - Memory remains at the same 256MB despite several unconfirmed sources touting 512MB. There's also no vibrate module.

    Unlike last year's iPod touch update, this one's a complete overhaul to the entire line. Last year, the new models didn't change in appearance. On the inside, faster processors and double-memory were added to the 32GB & 64GB models, but the 8GB got left out. Not this time. Buying the new 8GB iPod touch indeed gets you all the new goodies. You'll also pay thirty bucks more than before, so consider buying the 32GB model instead. You'll get 400% of the storage capacity for only 23% more coin!


    ===== Background =====

    I'm a mobile app developer who's created a few apps and games for the iPhone, iPod Touch and now iPad. I was initially drawn to the iPod touch because of the popularity and capabilities of its mobile Web browsing--I was primarily a Web developer at the time and no other device could surf the Web so well. After I got one, I was hooked. I racked up over a hundred bucks in app purchases within the first month, and before long, I found myself learning how do develop native apps for the device.

    Indeed, if you have never had an iPod touch before, you're in for a real treat. Of course, if you have, then you know first hand: it's is worth its weight in gold--no, in platinum. And now, with the latest generation, it may even be worth its weight rare gem stones! I digress.


    ===== Out With the Old =====

    The iPod touch is frequently called an iPhone without the phone. However, until now there have been several other features also missing in the iPod touch besides the phone: a camera, GPS, magnetometer (compass), and some newer amenities from the iPhone 4: front-facing camera, high resolution "Retina display" as it has been dubbed, and the powerful 1GHz A4 processor--indeed a necessity to keep up with multitasking.

    That all changes, now. The 4th gen iPod touch brings with it some new features and amenities, some of which have been anticipated by iPod touch fans and developers alike, including myself, for several generations of the device. From a developer's perspective, the more hardware features we can get our hands on, the better and more innovative apps we can create, and the more users that can download, use and enjoy them.


    ===== In With the New =====

    The striking new design of the latest iPod touch is definitely a looker. Apple has made it even thinner (and I thought it was already too thin before) complete with a beautiful chrome back. While the super thin design is certainly attractive, I've found it slightly difficult to keep it well-gripped in your hands. The usual chrome back looks great too, but it's scratch-insistent. Yes, it's incredibly easy to scratch it all up, even after the first few days. For these two reasons, definitely get yourself a silicone skin (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0042GVG5G?tag=1pod-20&ie=UTF8) alongside your new touch!

    For ages, the feature topping everyone's wishlist for the iPod touch has been a camera. Check! It handles HD video too--bonus! Granted, its not the 5 megapixel camera that the iPhone 4 sports, but again, the new iPod touch is thinner than ever, making it a miracle that we even got a camera in the first place, let alone two! Yes, Apple went the extra mile so we could make video calls with our iPhone toting friends, via their FaceTime app. Brilliant! So, having not had any camera on the iPod touch before, and now having TWO cameras on it, we can't really complain can we? Nah.

    I'll have details on the quality both cameras later, but what excites me even moreso is the new much-higher resolution screen--dubbed "Retina display". You may not think much of it if you haven't used an iPhone or iPod touch before, nor have an older model nearby to compare it to, but for those that have and/or do, the difference is clear! (pun intended)

    Where this really comes in handy is in browsing the Web and reading non-mobile-formatted PDF e-books. Now, I can see things so much clearer at the default zoom level (which shows the full width of a Web page or document). My vision isn't spectacular by any means, I just don't mind seeing things smaller on the screen. It allows me to see more content without having to scroll. Indeed, the Retina display was the #1 feature I never knew I wanted (until I saw it in the iPhone 4 that is).

    Other newness includes: 15% larger battery, HD video recording and editing, built-in mic, wireless-n for nearly double the WiFi connection speed and distance, Game Center: Apple's new social gaming platform (which seems to be Apple's attempt to kill-off third party social gaming platforms like OpenFeint and Plus+), 3-axis gyroscope sensor, which complements the existing accelerometer sensor, both of which handle the rotating, swinging and other motion gestures of the device (previously, rotation were roughly calculated from accelerometer data), and new placement of the sleep/power button on the right (but still as difficult as ever to press).

    Features still missing include: 512MB of memory, vibration, 5 MP quality camera + flash (iPhone apps now support using LED flash as a flashlight, like Android does), magnetometer (compass), and the GPS. I'd happily trade the thinness of the latest iPod touch to have the GPS. WiFi based location is often inaccurate, and the GPS doesn't need a WiFi or cellular connection, it just needs to see the satellites in the sky.


    ===== iOS vs Android =====

    So far, Apple has cornered the market of multitouch mobile devices that aren't phones, but things are slowly changing. Currently, the two hottest mobile and smartphone operating systems out there right now are Apple's iOS (formerly: iPhone OS) and Google's Android. Of course, iOS is popular because it runs on not only the iPhone, but also on the iPod touch and now on the ipad as well. Plus, it has garnered support from scores of app developers who've gotten behind Apple's slew of high-demand devices.

    The iPod touch has really made iOS what it is today. It does a lot of what the iPhone does, without a contract, or carrier exclusivity, as is the case with the iPhone and the iPad (WiFi+3G models). So if it weren't for the iPod touch, a lot of the market share Apple now has in the industry would have been stifled by their carrier exclusivity. I think Apple will see the light soon, but that's another discussion.

    Enter Android. Google has held a different stance on their mobile OS. It isn't tied to a select few devices, and it's open source, so it can be further developed by manufacturers who use it. Indeed, several mobile device manufacturers have now latched onto Android as a foundation for numerous devices. Wireless carriers that have been unable to carry the iPhone have also taken a liking to it. Now, tons of Android devices have been released, and there's no end in sight. Manufacturers have also seen the iPad's potential and now they want a piece of that pie, too. So, expect to see a lot more Android tablets and media-centric non-phone devices soon. The competition is heating up.

    But not everything with Android, nor with iOS, is perfect. I own an EVO 4G, one of the most popular Android devices currently available. I've also used an iPod touch almost every day for nearly two years, so I'm pretty qualified to share my experience with each platform. Both certainly have their share of unique offerings, and neither of them are without flaws. For this reason, and because of the increasing competition between the two, I plan to dispel some of their key differences for you at various points in this review.


    ===== So What Can the iPod Touch Actually Do? =====

    Well, what can't it do?

    The iPod touch is like a magical little box, only it's flat. While it cannot cook your breakfast, yet (I'm sure someone is already working on that), it can indeed do some pretty extraordinary things. It's an amazing catch-all device that can provide hours of entertainment, give you the power of the Web in your hand, and it can even replicate the functionality of countless one-off products. Developers have been creating apps that take advantage of special hardware of the iPod touch to emulate some other product for less, and sometimes even for free.

    Even expensive products have seen cheap iOS based clone apps. For just 99 cents, you can snag a special alarm clock app that monitors your sleep cycle and wakes you up when you're in an ideal state of wakefulness. I spent 350 bucks on an aXbo
    (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0014RDSSY?tag=1pod-20&ie=UTF8) a few years ago, who's functionality is easily replicated by several "sleep phase" alarm clock apps in the app store. When you do the math there, you see that it's easily a no brainer: buy yourself an iPod touch now!

    I've listed more apps like this in the comments!

    Plus, with the support of such a strong community of app and game developers, there's never a drought of fresh new apps and games. There's always something to do with the iPod touch, and I guarantee you'll never be bored with it. I honestly cannot say the same thing about Android, though I also tote my EVO 4G around with me. I do admit that the EVO's mobile hotspot comes in incredibly handy for providing the iPod touch with a WiFi connection while I'm on the go).

    Now, with the proper resources, you can legitimately download thousands of high quality apps for free. I do it all the time and it is perfectly legal. See, Apple allows developers to temporarily put their apps on sale (and even drop the price to free). Usually they do this to get you to write some rave reviews for their apps. The secret to success is having the resources to help you spot these special app sales--so you know when and where to get them during their sometimes extremely-limited-time promotions.

    In hopes of making this the most helpful review on Amazon for the iPod touch, here's how to obtain these special promotional-sale apps:

    There are several resources you can use, both on the Web and on the iPod touch itself. I prefer to use the app called BargainBin that lists all apps that recently went on sale or dropped to free. It also supports watch lists with push notifications, and can alert you whenever an app you're interested in goes on sale. It's a phenomenal little gem, and it has gotten me a ton of apps and saved me a fortune! It also has a companion website that lists the same apps (Google: App Advice). There's also a website called AppShopper (Google it) that lists apps with recent price drops and new apps as well, and you can filter just the free products or just the sale products. The two sites don't always list the same apps. Sometimes one will miss something that the other will catch, so it's good to keep track of them both. Check them daily if possible. Several apps are duds, but you'll come across some really great ones from time to time. They'll all add up!


    ===== Web Browsing =====

    Alongside spending lots of money on all those wonderful apps in the App Store, Web browsing is one of the most popular uses for the iPod touch. Browsing the Web with mobile Safari was my original attraction to the device. The experience hasn't changed too drastically in the past two years (since the days of iOS 2), and while it's still very powerful, there are some definite flaws. And no, I'm not talking about Flash. Just minor usability issues I'd like to see overcome, but first let's look at the positives.

    Mobile Safari has a smart approach to zooming in on content. Double-tap on a paragraph of text or an image to cinch that content right up to the edges of the screen. The downside: some sites aren't mobile-friendly, so zooming in on a really wide block of text can leave you with tiny text. You can zoom further manually, by using the "unpinch" multi-touch gesture, but because the browser doesn't have an option to reflow the text to the screen width, you have to scroll left and right, as well as up and down, just to read the text. Android's browser doesn't feature smart zoom, but it does reflow the text to fit the screen when zoomed in. It's a nice feature, and Apple should add it as a preference for Safari.

    Browser history can also vanish after a few days, and browser windows get overwritten by links from other pages sometimes (usually when I've hit the maximum of eight windows). Also yet to be seen is support for doing common things like searching for text on a page, or bookmarking a link by tapping and holding. That would be invaluable for adding bookmarklets--bookmark based scripts that help overcome browser shortcomings.

    Flash is also a great debate, one I won't get into. I will just say that all is not as it seems with the Flash-support-touting Android platform. Flash does work, but it is buggy because Flash doesn't play well with touch interfaces. Flash based video players don't work right, and I even run Android 2.2, which is supposed to have the "full Flash experience". It doesn't, trust me. So you're not missing much by not having Flash on the iPod touch!

    Indeed, we can just hope and pray that Web developers and Flash-fiends see the light and start replacing Flash content with technologies like HTML5's canvas element, which is poised to take on a lot of Flash's most popular abilities.


    ===== Media =====

    Despite all the incredible things the iPod touch can do, audio and video are still one of the iPod touch's greatest strengths. And with the incredible resolution of the new iPod touch's retina display, to say that videos now appear much sharper, more vivid and highly-defined is definitely an understatement. Yes, videos were great before, but now they frickin' rock!

    Just make sure your videos are at least 960 x 640. If you've owned an older iPod touch and used video conversion software to scale down your media to fit the old 320 x 480 screen resolution, definitely change your conversion settings, or look for a software update to support the new higher-resolution display.

    For those interested in watching live TV on the go (over WiFi), Sling Media's SlingPlayer app, paired with one of their Slingbox devices is a phenomenal and freeing experience, especially considering your alternate choices for watching live TV on the go are pretty much nil up to this point.

    On top of that, Netflix's recently released iPod touch version of their media streaming app has also been a much-welcomed addition to my ever-growing collection of apps. Netflix videos stream quickly, and even moving the play position back and forth in the timeline, the movie starts playing very quickly without much time rebuffering the video.


    ===== Photos =====

    The latest iPod touch is also a game-changer for photography and video recording on an iPod touch. It's not mind-blowing by any means, but we went from having no camera right to having two cameras on the device. I probably would not be so thrilled with just a new back camera. I merely would have sighed, mumbling "finally" under my my breath (unless it were 5 megapixels). But despite the less-than-one megapixel quality of the rear-facing camera, I was taken aback by the rather decent quality, especially in low-light environments. Check the comments for links to sample photos!

    Between that and the ability to connect with other iPhone and iPod touch toting friends via Apple's FaceTime app, yes... it's a game changer. Granted, I have been wanting front facing cameras on mobile devices ever since mobile devices started having cameras period. I got the first of such devices when my EVO 4G arrived in June, but as they say: the more the merrier. Friends, welcome to the future we've been dreaming of. Video killed the audio call!

    The quality of my test calls were pretty good. Of course, it was over WiFi, but it proves the cameras are decent. You can switch from using the front camera to using the rear camera, too, in case something was going on in front of you that you wanted to share. Just tap the "camera swap" button in the bottom right corner of the screen. FaceTime also rotates along with the iPod when flipped on its side, nice.

    HD video recording is the other half of the aforementioned game-changing equation. I didn't expect to see ANY video recording, considering the original iPhone camera was originally just a camera. But it's here, complete with HD quality (yes, the quality is indeed desirable), plus basic video editing support, as well as support for Apple's brilliant "iMovie" app: an advanced video editing studio right on your iPod touch. It's just five bucks on the App Store.


    ===== E-Reading =====

    The iPad has been making waves in the genre of media reading for several months now, but that hasn't exactly been the same story for any generation of the iPod touch so far. Granted, it's not exactly marketed as an eReader like its iPad counterpart, but there are some really great apps out there for media reading on it, so there's no reason not to use it to read digital media. The obstacle to doing that, for me at least, has been the limited screen resolution, and so that may all potentially start to change, now that Apple has brought the Retina display to the iPod touch.

    The 163 pixels per inch screens of past iPod touches were still pretty great, just not ideal for tiny text. For comparison, LCD monitors typically only have 96 pixels per inch, and CRT monitors only have 72 pixels per inch. TV's are even worse than that. What this means for you is that the iPod touch display has always been sharper than your own computer monitor.

    However, despite being able to display content at a higher quality, I still found that in a lot of eBooks, especially PDFs that weren't mobile-formatted, the text was just not clear enough to be readable when zoomed out. However, zooming in meant having to constantly scroll side-to-side while reading. The app "Good Reader" helped ease that pain by doing the left-right & vertical scrolling for you with just a tap of the screen, as well as offering an additional view that re-flows the text to fit on the screen at a large enough size.

    However, with the Retina display, all text and content in the aforementioned "zoomed out" state now appears extremely clear. That is a wonderful thing, so long as you don't mind reading tiny text.

    Could you still benefit from having an iPad too? Perhaps. After all, it does have unique qualities that set it apart from the iPod touch, as my in depth iPad review portrays (http://www.amazon.com/review/R16U71KO7POLA2?tag=1pod-20&ie=UTF8). But unless you specifically see the need for one of those unique qualities, then no, you probably don't need both.


    ===== Gaming =====

    If you're like me, you probably don't have time for games. Regardless, it may still be high-time to let the kid within you roam free from time to time, as I do. The iPod touch has made it possible. In fact, it is so easy, there's no excuse not to enjoy yourself. My favorite games are the racing games and, when I have a bit more time, strategy games.

    With the iPhone and iPod Touch having taken on a clear role as a gaming console that has been as revolutionary for mobile gaming as the Wii was for living-room gaming, it goes without saying that the iPod touch is, and will continue to be, one of the best platforms for gaming. It's simple, convenient, and pretty much instant. Whenever you have a few moments of free time, wherever you're, just turn it on, find your game, and bam! You're gaming. Simple as that.


    ===== Productivity =====

    Productivity carries numerous definitions. Usually its "getting something done" though some people tend to believe that it's the ability to focus without being distracted, which I see as one of the iPod touch's strengths, at least for me, primarily because the screen is small enough to force you to focus on the task at hand.

    In the context of software though, Apple's own suite of productivity apps for the office, collectively called "iWork", has been further refined for the iPhone and iPod touch. Because of the aforementioned "focus factor" of the iPod touch, I have found myself to be surprisingly productive when working on documents with it. There are three apps in all: Pages allows you to work on word processing documents. Numbers allows you to work on spreadsheets. Keynote lets you work on presentations and slideshows (including PowerPoint files).

    So far, I've found these apps to be highly useful when I have work to do, but don't feel like being at the computer to do it. Another great app for that is "iTeleport" which let's me at my computer remotely, when iWork won't work (meaning I'm not working on office documents). Log Me In Ignition is another similar app that is slightly easier to set up, but a bit slower than iTeleport, when you're just working over the same WiFi connection as the remote computer.

    Furthermore, there's a whole category of iPod touch apps in the App Store specifically dedicated to productivity. Some of my favorite productivity apps include: Bento (info management), Things (project management), iTeleport (remote computing), and GoodReader (best PDF reader around). Search for them in the App Store.


    ===== Email, IM and Social Networking =====

    The iPod touch has been, and continues to be an exceptional communication-machine. Whether it's reading or composing email, keeping in touch via instant messenger, or managing your life via social networks, you've got plenty of options here.

    Instant messaging is easy with platforms such as AIM, Yahoo, Gtalk, MSN, Skype and apps that handle multiple platforms: IM+, Fring, Nimbuzz, BeejiveIM and Fuse Messenger. Finally, multitasking means you can truly remain connected to your IM platforms of choice, instead of relying on apps to keep you signed remotely, then push new-message notifications to your device. This is a much welcome addition to the new iPod touch.

    As well, there are plenty of apps to help you browse and update your status on social networks like Facebook, Twitter, etc. Within the iOS development community, Twitter apps have often been a laughing stock, simply because there are so many out there on the App Store. They're almost as rampant as "fart" apps. So to say you've got countless options as far as social networking apps are concerned is probably a pretty accurate statement.

    For email, you need not look any further than Apple's native "Mail" app. Even if you're using Gmail, Yahoo, AOL, or Apple's own MobileMe, setup is a snap. It even supports Microsoft Exchange, often useful for corporate email setups. As well, any other email accounts that support POP3 or IMAP connection types will work with the Mail app too. Plus, new to the iPod touch with iOS 4 is the option to use a unified inbox--handy for those already used to that behavior on Mac OS X.


    ===== Downloading Apps and Games =====

    Downloading apps on your iPod touch couldn't be easier. Once you set up your iTunes account with a credit card, all you need to do is find the app you want, tap the download button (usually it says the price rather than "download", which then changes to "buy" after you tap it), then tap again to confirm. Voila, you just bought an app. Behind the scenes, Apple then charges your card the amount of the app plus tax, while you're already off enjoying your new purchase. This ease of access is a blessing and a curse, because you can easily empty your wallet if you're not carefully considering each purchase.

    All apps in the App Store range in price from Free and 99 cents on up, always incrementing in whole dollar amounts (1.99, 2.99, 3.99, etc). The maximum price for an app is set to $999.99, of which there are only eight currently priced so outrageously. And don't even think of toying with them. Apple does not allow refunds on apps you have purchased--all sales are final!

    Contrast that with Android's more complex Android Market, and you'll find several more steps, especially for paid apps. For one, there're no fixed pricing tiers, and secondly, they allow multiple currency pricing, which only confuses its users. The good developers do keep their pricing similar to iOS apps, with the 99 cent base plus $1 increments, but I often see apps priced at �0.55 or 0.79 or $1 or �2.95 ...it's quite disorienting and unstructured. They have also set their price cap at $200, so you can't accidentally run up a $1000 charge on just one app--you'll need at least 5 apps for that. ;)

    Meanwhile, to actually buy an app on Android, you must tap the BUY button, confirm that you want to buy the app, then get redirected to a Google Checkout link, where you must setup your Google Checkout account or choose an existing payment method if you already have an account set up. Once you confirm the purchase yet again, THEN you can finally download the app.

    Google also makes selling apps a bit more complicated for developers than Apple, but I won't get into that. I'm just stressing how absolutely simple Apple makes the app buying and selling process. Contrary to Apple however, Google does allow users to "return" purchased Android apps within 24 hours for a full refund. That's nice.


    ===== Technical Specifications =====

    Since Amazon's product descriptions tend to be lacking, I like to include all the technical jargon geeks have come to expect when researching new gadgets. Feel free to breeze on through!

    In the box
    + iPod touch
    + Earphones
    + Dock Connector to USB Cable (for sync and charging)
    + Quick Start guide

    Size and weight
    + Height: 4.4 inches (111.0 mm)
    + Width: 2.3 inches (58.9 mm)
    + Depth: 0.28 inch (7.2 mm)
    + Weight: 3.56 ounces (101 grams)

    Capacity
    + 8GB, 32GB or 64GB flash drive/SSD

    Wireless
    + 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi (802.11n 2.4GHz only)
    + Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR
    + Maps-location based service
    + Nike + iPod support built in

    Display
    + Multi-Touch display
    + 3.5-inch (diagonal) widescreen
    + 960-by-640-pixel resolution at 326 pixels per inch

    Cameras, photos, and video
    + Video recording, HD (720p) up to 30 frames per second with audio; still photos (960 x 720) with back camera
    + VGA-quality photos and video up to 30 frames per second with the front camera
    + Tap to control exposure for video or stills
    + Photo and video geo tagging over Wi-Fi

    TV and video
    + H.264 video up to 720p, 30 frames per second, Main Profile level 3.1 with AAC-LC audio up to 160 Kbps, 48kHz, stereo audio in .m4v, .mp4, and .mov file formats
    + MPEG-4 video, up to 2.5 Mbps, 640 by 480 pixels, 30 frames per second, Simple Profile with AAC-LC audio up to 160 Kbps per channel, 48kHz, stereo audio in .m4v, .mp4, and .mov file formats
    + Motion JPEG (M-JPEG) up to 35 Mbps, 1280 by 720 pixels, 30 frames per second, audio in ulaw, PCM stereo audio in .avi file format
    + Support for 1024 by 768 pixels with Dock Connector to VGA Adapter; 576p and 480p with Apple Component AV Cable; 576i and 480i with Apple Composite AV Cable (cables sold separately)

    Audio
    + Frequency response: 20Hz to 20,000Hz
    + Audio formats supported: AAC (8 to 320 Kbps), Protected AAC (from iTunes Store), HE-AAC, MP3 (8 to 320 Kbps), MP3 VBR, Audible (formats 2, 3, 4, Audible Enhanced Audio, AAX, and AAX+), Apple Lossless, AIFF, and WAV
    + User-configurable maximum volume limit with parental lock
    + Earbud headphones included in box

    Earphones
    + Frequency response: 20Hz to 20,000Hz
    + Impedance: 32 ohms

    Input and output
    + 30-pin dock connector
    + 3.5-mm stereo headphone minijack
    + Built-in speaker
    + Microphone
    + External buttons and controls

    Sensors
    + Three-axis gyro
    + Accelerometer
    + Ambient light sensor (for proximity detection)

    Battery, power and playback time
    + Built-in rechargeable lithium-ion battery
    + USB sync cable is also used for charging
    + Fast charge in about 2 hours (80% capacity)
    + Full charge in about 4 hours.
    + Music playback time: Up to 40 hours when fully charged
    + Video playback time: Up to 7 hours when fully charged

    System requirements
    + USB 2.0
    + iTunes 10 or later
    + Mac: Mac OS X v10.5.8 or later
    + PC: Windows 7, Vista, or XP (SP3 or later)


    ===== Praise =====

    + Apple continues its trend of creating the best multi-touch experience around. Android doesn't even come close.
    + The Retina Display - Phenomenal! Kudos for bringing it to the iPod touch as well as the iPhone. Now try it with IPS technology Apple!
    + Wireless-N, finally! - Faster and farther-reaching WiFi connections (if your router supports 802.11n)
    + High performance 1GHz A4 processor - provides all the power of the iPhone 4, a win for gaming and multitasking.
    + Multitasks like a dream with iOS 4 and the powerful processor, despite the same 256MB of memory as the third generation touch.
    + Rear camera - It's not the 5 megapixel iPhone 4 camera, but I definitely can't complain here. It shoots great photos, especially in low-light without flash, plus it can do HD video.
    + Front facing camera - What a pleasant surprise! Now it just needs to work with Skype.


    ===== Dissappointments =====

    + No GPS - IP based location just doesn't cut it at times. GPS has no subscription fee or contract to use. GPS chips are costly, but tons of high cost GPS apps are in the App Store now to offset that cost for Apple.
    + 256MB memory - iFixit has confirmed this disappointing flaw, putting to rest all the rumors of 512MB still littering several reviews.
    + Still no 120GB model - Useful for higher res videos that look great on the Retina display.
    + No USB 3.0 or wireless sync - Sync'ing can be slow or inconvenient over the cable.
    + Thinner design - I was hoping for a more squared design, like the iPhone 4, as it is easier to grip, handle and press the power button.
    + Power button - Yes, it hasn't changed much. It's been moved to the right side on this model, but it's still the tiny, hard-to-press button it's has always been, and if you take lots of screenshots like I do (by pressing power+home simultaneously) half the time you end up closing your app because the power button didn't work right.


    ===== The Bottom Line =====

    It is absolutely clear: Apple has definitely blurred the lines between iPhone and iPod touch with its 4th generation of both devices. Since it has no contract or carrier exclusivity, this phenomenal device will continue to shine its light in the otherwise dark voids of the smartphone market where the iPhone cannot go, even without the phone. That's just smart!

    Given all my tips, I think you'll find the iPod touch to be an extraordinarily useful, possibly even highly addictive device, with a price tag that is well worth it, especially the 32GB model. With all the things that the iPod touch can do, it will undoubtedly enhance your life and change the way you interact with the Web. It might even make a gamer out of you if it hasn't already, it sure did for me!

    I hope you've found my hands-on review helpful. I do actively participate in any discussions via the comments, so feel free to drop me a line, or ask me any questions as well. :)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Using the 8 gb version as a netbook substitute...., September 19, 2010
    Can you get by with an 8gb Touch?

    Yep, based on my experience with a 3rd gen 32 gb, and on my recent local purchase of the 4th gen (this current model) in 8 gb capacity.

    When using the old 32 gb, I found out that I barely used its greater storage capacity. (I don't haul around a lot of music or videos - I just transfer what I want to listen to/watch for each road trip or listening/viewing cycle using iTunes). Apps, I discovered, don't take up much space, even games and books don't take up much space, unless you want to haul substantially more of your whole collection with you. Amazon's Kindle app is esp. device friendly, since you can archive books you've finished back to Amazon instead of keeping them on the device. iTunes is a great way to manage what content you want to store on your home computer - which becomes a sort of large "docking device" - and what you want "to go."

    As a netbook substitute, storage isn't even that important. I can check my bank balance, transfer funds and execute orders on a brokerage account, listen to radio on Pandora or Slacker, watch music videos (and a lot more ) on YouTube, Skype, stream Netflix, and do a whole lot of other stuff on the 8 gb just fine.

    In fact in hindsight the only real reason for me getting the 32 gb version in the older edition was to get the faster processor. But in the current generation, all the hardware on the 8 gb edition matches the hardware on the larger versions, save the the "hard disk" space.

    The Touch was initially marketed as a music player with a cool touch screen. It is now marketed as a game machine, but the truth is, with the new higher resolution screen, it is a mini-iPad. Yes, you have to zoom to read some web content, but reading a book is MUCH crisper on this unit than on the last generation, thanks to the better screen, and watching videos is MUCH better, esp. Netflix streaming videos. It's a toss up as to whether watching videos on this, with no stutter and perfectly crisp, is better than watching an occasionally stuttering, less crisp, but much larger video on a netbook.

    The 8gb makes a nice intersection on my personal "cheapness" and "minimalist" curves. The price doesn't get into nose-bleed territory where I start to wonder whether a netbook would makes more sense, and it's inexpensive enough to subject to the toils of daily wear and tear - keeping it handy in an outside day pack pocket, instead of more safely stowed deep inside the pack.

    Plus, if I ever DO get a hankering to carry more than two or three lossless encoded albums and more than two to three hours of video at a time, I can turn this over to my kids for game and Netflix streaming use.

    ***Best accessory ever: ClassicReader Three-pair Valu-Pac, +3.00

    The screen on this new generation of iPod Touches is very, very sharp, but in order to enjoy all that sharpness, you need to bring the screen really close to your eyes (assuming you don't have presbyopia and can focus close) OR simply carry a pair of cheap reading glasses as an "accessory" to the super sharp 4th generation screens. This lets you actually read the tiny type on the NY Times website, actually see the richness of colors and depth of detail on a video. So even if you don't need reading glasses for magazine reading, CONSIDER trying a pair of STRONG reading glasses (2.0 or 3.0) to magnify the 3.5" display screen. It's so good for videos you might be able to get by without an iPad (which has the same resolution, NOT more) for personal video viewing. Strong reading glasses make high-def YouTube videos POP for me.


    ******Update on usage: I broke down and bought a 32 gb for the extra storage, loaded it up with videos (training videos) to watch, and then discovered I hardly ever need them. I carry the 8gb (this one) around all the time, keeping the more expensive 32 gb at home, and my main road uses via all the modern hotspots are checking email, Facebook, reading websites and, oddly enough, reading BOOKS. The video playback capability was the "driving factor" in getting this, but in real life the "connected" web aspect turns out to be much more important to me. Apps like Skype, Simple Note etc. take up very little "drive" space. So the main reason for getting larger capacity is if you want a serious music or video player. If I am on the road and want some video to watch, the YouTube app on the Touch is superb; I also added Netflix and Hulu+ (plus I keep an hour or two of training videos on this unit and a couple of gigs of music). For music, I added the Slacker and Pandora apps. // For a while I was using my older 3rd gen Touch to read books too, so save the battery on the 8gb 4th gen. I thought there wasn't much difference in screen sharpness. Turns out Kindle wasn't (apparently) optimized for the new Retina screen. I have been trying iBooks and currently it seems much sharper. Also even at a (possibly) lower rez, the crispness of this 4th gen is much easier on my eyes. YES the Touch makes a GREAT e-book reader! // Finally, if you love gaming on a Touch - and this is really taking off! - the 8gb is more than up to the task, gaming apps don't eat up a lot of the Touch's memory.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Actual Owner of iPod Touch 4G, September 8, 2010
    Alright, so Best Buy got the 32GB iPod Touch 4G in stock so I drove an hour to go get one. I was not disappointed. I will run through the features I have come across so far.

    Body: Aside from moving the sleep button to the right and making the back of the device slimmer and more flat, not much has changed. Yes, the chrome back is still there erg! It was so pretty for the first 30 seconds.

    Ram: The Ram on the iPod Touch is only 256 MB, so do not believe the talk of 512 MB, it is simply not true.

    Wireless: Fully supports A/B/G/N

    Vibration: There is no vibration, so do not expect that.

    Multitasking: Works real well and very smooth transition

    Display: While the display on the iPod is not IPS like the iPhone do not think it suffers in anyway. This display is so beautiful and crisp to look at. I cannot even distinguish the pixels, and text on a website is like you are reading out of a book, it's so refreshing. I played a digital copy of "UP" on here and the colors practically jump off the screen, very nice. Apple's icons are so much more vivid and sharp, while 3rd party developer icons who have yet to make an upgrade for the new displays shows what a step up this new screen has to offer.

    Speaker: I am not sure of the quality of the speaker on the 3G iPod Touch, but on my 2G iPod Touch it was very tinny and I only used it for game sound. Here on the 4G there is a new spot on the bottom left for the speaker and it has risen in clarity. Music is very listenable and clear, however nothing replaces a good set of earbuds, but when you're in a jam, you won't be gritting your teeth with this speaker.

    Processor: The new Apple processor is a sure win for this device. Everything loads very fast and switching from one screen to another is very swift and smooth. Crash Bandicoot finally has a nice framerate to play with on this iPod and for once I did not regret buying that game.

    Front Camera: This is the camera that is primarily used for Facetime. It's resolution is at 640 X 480. After taking a few pictures with it, you will notice how it is really not for taking stills, but works fine for videochatting (which I have not tried, but did run some video tests with it). Obviously Facetime will work better in well lit areas, but then again, doesn't any camera?

    Rear Camera: Again stills are just so so. What really bugs me is when you go to take a picture, you see how crisp the preview is, then you take the picture and you can see it blur. The tap to focus works nice for adjusting exposure and well lit photos look very decent on the display. It's when you upload them to your computer when you notice how not so decent they actually are. While this may be a negative for many people, if you are like me, you want to just upload photos with this device to FaceBook and capture funny moments with the video camera. If I want to take a really awesome picture, I'll pull out my DSLR, but for me this iPod's capabilities are more than adequate for my quick shooting of certain events. The video captures quite nicely, while not superb like an actual HD camcorder does enough for me for again, capturing fun moments. Don't worry, you don't cringe while watching the video, it's more than adequate and produces vibrant colors and a fast framerate. Some may complain on this, and believe me those reviews will be here shortly, but then again why not buy an HD Camcorder that is made for HD content? (I'm not ignorant to HD quality either, I'm a huge fan of it. I run a 3D 65'' 1080p display with Blu-ray and Dolby Tru-HD decoding surround sound system)

    Microphone: Testing out Skype my friend told me I was coming in loud and clear. I also played back a video I made on the iPod on my computer and the microphone captures top notch audio. Very crisp and clear, I was quite pleased.

    Battery: While I haven't tested out Apple's claims of 40 hr. of music, let's be honest who really does that? I'm sure Apple's claims are quite credible in their battery life depending on how the device is used.

    One note I should also make, my iPod Touch 2G accessories, (car charger, wall charger) work with my iPod touch 4G. Apple sometimes changes stuff like the charging pin on the iPod's to make a person have to buy new accessories. Anybody remember when the iPod Video A/V cables had the Audio and Video switched around so people couldn't use their cables with the iPod? Well they could, they just had to switch the audio and video cables in the port around. Anyways, away from this funny piece of marketing history.

    Is the new iPod worth it? For me, upgrading from the 2G Touch, yes! The display is brilliant, the speed of the processor amazing, video quality is very much enjoyable and the rear camera is excellent for taking quick fun shots. If I had one word to describe this iPod, it would be fun! You can't handle one of these without feeling like a joyous kid, (I'm 22) and the business aspect is still there and quite useful. I would highly recommend this iPod Touch as a worthy upgrade to any generation of the iPod Touch you may own and if you don't own one, there has never been a more perfect time to go out and get one! Don't hesitate to leave a comment here if you have a question for an actual owner. I'll do what I can!


    5-0 out of 5 stars This thing rocks!, September 8, 2010
    *This review is from someone who never owned any Apple products before, married, healthcare professional, blackberry and palm TX owner (yeah I know, belongs in a museum), I was looking for a handheld internet browser by wifi, no monthly fees for 2 years, with camera, video, and apps that i can use for my work, and put in my pocket and it led me to this device. This is therefore a completely un-technical, layman's review.

    1. Delivery time: I was supposed to receive this September 10-14 with the regular shipping, but I got it today, maybe because I ordered it as soon as Steve Jobs finished presenting, so this deserves more than 5 stars!

    2. Dimensions/looks: I actually prefer the "handling" of the bigger and heavier 3rd gen that I borrowed, its all smudge now without any cover, but boy! this is the most beautiful handheld device that I ever held, 4 stars for being smaller and lighter and smudgy.

    3. Display: The retina display is amazing! Like reading from a glossy magazine, and yes you cannot see the pixels! 5 stars!

    4. Wifi: Sync with ATT wifi - no problem, wifi in gym - no problem, monthly fees - no problem! 5 stars!

    5. Internet Browsing: Hard to type in the addresses initially, but pages loads super fast (the longest was within thress-onethousand - all news channels), surfed the web with no problems,make pages bigger or smaller... this gets 5 stars as well.

    6. Speed (Processor): this thing is super fast, web pages load within 3 seconds, downloading apps within 30 secs, youtube in a flash, the email attachment that opened in 1 minute in my computer took only 10 seconds! 5 stars indeed!

    7. Camera: very grainy, will not use it for any important event, only for quick-I-need-a-camera moments, it will not replace my dSLR, but since it wasnt there in the previous gen, and I only use my dSLR and nothing else, this camera is still a bonus it gets 4 stars.

    8. Apps for work/"work": I already downloaded 4 very useful apps for work for free! plus 5 other free games for me and my 3 year old kid, the fact that I can now have apps without an iphone/ipad is great, the fact that its free is sweet! 5 stars!

    8. Video: 720p HD! And I bought a Vado HD that does nothing else! Quality is up to par! 5 stars!

    Overall, I have a device that surfs the net very very fast, manages my email, has a camera, great HD videocam, great free apps for work, that looks beautiful, and is great to look at, that I got 1 week early, what more can I ask for?!!! Worth every penny and deserves 5 stars!

    And it stores and plays music too?! And has facetime?! And maps?! I feel like I paid for a Toyota and got a Lexus!

    Will buy another one for my kid so she doesnt have to borrow mine!

    5-0 out of 5 stars A definite improvement over the previous generation., October 11, 2010
    I know what you're thinking while looking at these reviews: "Should I save fifty bucks and get the 3rd Generation iPod touch, or is the 4th Gen really worth the new price?"

    I am happy to report that the improvements made from 3rd to 4th generation are worth your attention.

    * Size/Shape: The new model is thinner and more narrow, but slightly taller/longer. What this translates to in real-world usage is that the device is slightly less bulky in your pocket once you put a case on it, but that it's a tiny bit harder to grip without a case, if you have big hands. Of course, since Apple continues to put that scratch-magnet shiny back on the iPod touch (PLEASE, Apple, STOP IT! Give us brushed aluminum or something!) you will probably need a case, so the thinness is a good thing.

    * Microphone: No, you don't get the headphones with the in-line microphone anymore, but you do get a microphone built into the iPod touch. While most people focus on the Face Time, Skype, or other social uses for a microphone and lament the loss of one on the headphones, as someone who doesn't care about VOIP, I find the built-in microphone a lot better for my purposes. I use it for voice commands in the iPod ("Play artist 'The Beatles'") and for dictation (Dragon's free app is awesome) and voice memos. It also functions well for video recording. I don't miss the in-line earbud microphone at all.

    * Video Recording/Photos: While the iPod touch won't replace a top-line video camera, and most definitely won't replace a decent digital camera, it works as a "I happen to have it in my pocket" substitute on both counts. I don't take a lot of photos, so the lower resolution on the camera doesn't bother me. The video, however, is quite nice, and replaces my Flip Mino HD without a hitch. Just remember to reserve some storage space if you intend to record videos.

    * Retina Display: Wow. You have to see it to understand why it's a big deal. You don't notice it as much in the main screen, but when you get into text displays you really see the difference. Everything is crisp, there's almost no pixelization and nothing is "fuzzy". Games that support it look gorgeous. It really is worth it if you intend to use the iPod touch to do any reading, web browsing, or gaming.

    * iOS 4: I love the OS changes they made since I owned a 3rd generation iPod touch. The ability to group apps into folders/groups is about the best thing they did since the iPod touch debuted. The ability to do multitasking is very handy, too. The Gmail integration is much better now that it supports IMAP, and the contacts are much more friendly to Windows users since they started providing decent support for Google Contacts. WiFi signals seem to be stronger, and the battery life is excellent. All told, the little changes make a big difference.

    * Video Playback: Now that they've increased the screen resolution to 960x640, videos are not as limited. This means that if you have a collection of 720p m4v/mp4 videos already, they'll work with the iPod touch. You won't need to downscale them to make them work. This also means that if you choose to output to a HDTV screen, you'll get your full 720p video in all its glory. This is a great feature for media hounds like myself. If only Apple made a 1TB iPod touch..!

    * Improved buttons: While the buttons are no longer metal (they're now plastic or polycarbonate), they are much better-designed in terms of placement. The volume toggle has been turned into two separate buttons for up and down, and they work quite well when you're not looking at the device (like when it's in your pocket). The standby/power button is smaller and to the right of the top of the device, and it, too is easy to find and use when the device is out of view. Response from the buttons is nice, with a good clicky tactile feedback. They seem sturdy and yet they're small enough to be unobtrusive and not be pressed accidentally.

    * Speaker: They went from using the whole back panel as a speaker board to putting in a little speaker in the device at the bottom. This has the effect of making things sound a little better, but not without some problems (see below).

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    THE CONS

    * The new size means you will probably need a new case and screen protector. Old ones won't fit. Some exceptions exist (some slip-cases, for example) but anything that was an exact fit for the previous models is too big for the current model.

    * No in-line microphone on the earbuds. This is not a problem for me, but for social networking types, this will be something they miss.

    * Speed is, at this point, no better than the previous model in most cases, and sometimes slower in apps that have yet to update some features. This will no doubt change, but right now expect no major boost in speed or power with the upgrade to 4th Gen.

    * Still camera is low resolution. As I noted above, it's not a crippling issue for me, as I don't take lots of photos and the video camera is so nice, but if you're a shutterbug looking for an alternate digital camera, you may be a little let-down by the current generation. You're probably better off with an iPhone 4 or waiting for the 5th Gen iPod touch and crossing your fingers.

    * Dock connector doesn't sit flush with the device. It looks weird at first, but when you connect to the docking cable, the connector doesn't seem to go in all the way if you look at it from the back of the iPod touch. This is, apparently, by design. I can't say I like it, but this is the sacrifice you get with thinner devices. Apple didn't want to give up the tapered design, but they didn't want to redesign the dock connection, either. The compromise was to make the connector do what it currently does. This is not really a big deal, as it works fine and feels secure, but it does make you wonder how some third-party docks and devices will work with the current generation.

    * Speaker gets blocked easily. I know this is more of a critique of App design than iPod design, but the iPod touch's speaker being in the bottom corner causes me to end up covering the speaker when I turn the device sideways (to the left) to play a game. Smart Apps make it possible to tilt the screen any direction, but some are set on making you tilt to the left, which leads to the speaker blockage. Again, no big deal, but it makes me wonder why Apple doesn't just put the speaker on the side of the device instead of on the bottom. There's little chance you'd block it on a sideways/widescreen App in that case.

    * Stupid shiny back: I mentioned this earlier, but WHY, Apple? Why do you keep putting this horrible shiny back on the iPod touch? It was terrible back on the classics, and it's terrible now. Give us something that doesn't get scratched from the slightest touch, and something that isn't slippery! Brushed aluminum, rubberized metal, or anything else would be preferable to this stupid shiny back-plate. This, for me, is the iPod touch's #1 bad feature.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    SUMMARY

    In my opinion the newer model is worth the new price. You get a lot of extra features and the best screen on any iPod to date, and the microphone being built-in becomes a must-have feature after you realize how convenient it is to not have to hook up the earbuds in order to record something. So here's the rundown on whether or not you should upgrade from 3rd Gen to 4th Gen:

    * If you're a reader: YES. The Retina Display makes reading books and comics much easier on the eyes (although I still prefer e-ink for long stretches or reading outdoors).

    * If you're a gamer: YES. The Retina Display, better speaker, and new gyroscope/accelerometer make gaming better.

    * If you're a social networking freak: YES. The video camera, still camera, built-in microphone, and Face Time are a social networking fan's wet dream.

    * If you're looking for a PDA: NO. It doesn't really matter unless you want to take advantage of the video camera for business meetings, or have bad eyes and want your address book to look more crisp. You could probably get by with the 3rd Gen, but honestly, you're probably already using iPhone 4 so this is a non-issue.

    * If you're looking for a portable web browser and mail client: YES. If you're on the Internet a lot, you'll appreciate the Retina Display and better WiFi reception from 802.11n.

    * If you just want to play music: NO. Don't bother to upgrade because the music/iPod functions aren't all that different from the previous generation, unless you want the convenience of the built-in microphone for voice commands.

    * If you just want to play videos: YES. The higher resolution and Retina Diplay make videos much better, and the ability to output 720p is a great feature for videophiles.


    Final verdict: For most users, the newer model is a much better value. Apple improved the iPod touch enough this time around to make it worth grabbing the 4th Gen, even if you do end up paying a little more for it than a clearance-model 3rd Gen.

    4-0 out of 5 stars A joy to use, September 14, 2010
    I wanted an iPhone 4 as soon as it came out; I already had a 2G iPod Touch and loved it. But I can't commit to the contract right now and the full price (outside of contract) version is really beyond my budget. So I made a conscious decision to wait for the iPod Touch, aware that it would probably be a compromise. I pre-ordered it from Apple before it came out in stores. I was expecting to be less happy about some aspects (such as the camera), but knew I'd get used to those, and would probably love the improvements compared to the 2G iPod Touch. I wasn't disappointed. After only a couple of days use I definitely like it a lot.

    The screen is glorious. It's so much easier on the eye than the old display. Yes it's not IPS (although this not obvious outside of steep viewing angles). It seems darker than the old display; this is probably because of the higher pixel density. It also has more of a blue tint (a cooler color temperature) but I've heard this is also true of the iPhone. But I got used to these things and it's a joy to look at every time. In spite of the better battery, I think the display sucks more juice, since you have to have it at a brighter setting than before to get the same perceived brightness.

    General performance is very smooth. It's definitely faster than previous versions. Things still crash occasionally but that's true of any computer. The bugs from my 2G Touch that appeared after I upgraded to iOS 4.1, that caused Pandora and other audio apps to be unusable, are thankfully gone, as far as I can tell (I since seem to have resolved this issue on the 2G Touch by restoring to factory settings and upgrading to iOS 4.2). Heavy content (such as pdfs and large web pages) can slow it down but this is also true of the iPad.

    You have to be careful to get good battery life. The battery has been upgraded so you supposedly get 40 hours of audio rather than 30 h. But if you're new to multitasking, you have to realise that you're going to pay for it in battery life unless you're careful. For example, you can have Skype running in the background and it will receive calls and messages, even if the iPod is locked in your pocket, which is great. However, this makes use of the 'Voice over IP' iOS service, which Skype is constantly running in the background. I think Pandora might do something similar (albeit with a different service). So your battery will drain noticeably (I saw 5-10% drain per hour using iStat with Skype and Pandora backgrounded and the iPod locked). Most apps you see in the multitasking bar do not use these services; Apple calls them 'recently used' apps for a reason; they mostly aren't running.

    The volume and power buttons take a bit of getting used to but I ended up preferring them. They feel more solid and have a more definite click to them.

    Seriously, for what it is, the back camera is not that bad in spite of the 0.7 MP resolution. In bright daylight it's surprisingly good. It just gets more grainy at night. But they're still quite possible; in a fancier camera you might have to manually increase the exposure time. Don't knock it just because of the pixel count, it's a pretty good camera; my 2 MP camera phone is not that much better. And for taking pics as a record of a fun moment that you can then upload directly to Facebook, I love it, and I use it a lot. That functionality is a big step up from the old iPod Touch, so I'm OK with the low resolution; it's a lot better than no camera at all. And I've managed to get it to read barcodes with apps like the AT&T code scanner. Also, Apple's HDR is not available but I think there are 3rd party apps that will do that.

    The speaker is nicer than the old iPod Touch but it could definitely be louder. I tried using it like a phone (with Skype) and it's not really practical; you really need headphones unless there's minimal background noise. But if you're on your own in a room, it's actually fine. Listening to the radio (with ooTunes), it could easily get to a similar level to my clock radio so it was fine.

    So, as a pocket computer the 4G Touch rocks. With the retina display and cameras, this feels like a mature product. You might like to wait for possible improvements (such as the camera) in the next version, but as it stands it's still a joy to use. And given you'd have to pay at least another $400 to get the extra features on the iPhone, I think it's a pretty good deal.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Better In Every Way, September 2, 2010
    ---------------------------------Overview------------------------------------------------

    The latest iPod Touch from Apple improves on the previous generation in nearly every single way. It does all this without increasing the price one cent (except the 8GB version which increased in price by $30 and is now no longer a hardware generation behind). Bottom line, the iPod Touch continues to be an irresistible device that has no peer on the market right now. Think back even three years and people would simply be amazed at everything the latest iPod Touch can do for only $229. Games in every category, some of which have graphics superior to the PSP or Nintendo DS, news and weather apps, streaming video from your computer or from services like Netflix and Hulu, exercise and weight loss apps, the list goes on and on (and on). While we are starting to see some Android based tablets enter the market, there is nothing in the portable market that comes close to what the iPod can do.

    If you really have some problems with some of the iPod Touch's shortcomings (like the camera) and you want access to the Apple App store, you may want to consider just buckling down and getting an iPhone 4 (if you can afford it). However, once you consider the value proposition of the iPhone 4 (total cost of ownership over two year contract $75-85 x 24 + $299) vs. the iPod Touch at $299, you start to understand that some of these drawbacks are not so bad.

    ---------------------------------CHANGES-------------------------------------------------

    Compared to the previous (and well loved) iPod Touch this device:

    - replaces the previous processor with the more powerful A4 processor. Expect smooth and fast operation with support for even the most graphically intense iPod Touch games. All other applications will run at top speed, although not dramatically faster than the previous generation.
    - is now even thinner. The Ipod Touch is now shockingly thin.
    - added a microphone so you don't need a headset to talk to people or use voice control
    - doubled the amount of ram so multi-tasking should be a breeze
    - has longer battery life | extended audio life by 10 hours (from 30 to 40 hours) and video by 1 hour (from 6 to 7 hours).
    - weighs less
    - has TWO additional cameras (front facing for video and self-portraits and back for HD video) - the front camera is VGA quality (640x480) and the back camera is a 720P (1280x720) sensor (when used to take pictures that resolution is reduced to 960x720). Samples of the HD video show that this feature was not just "tacked on" and actually looks very good compared to some HD video available on other pocket devices (like the EVO 4G).
    - 4 times as many pixels on the screen - Apple is calling this a "retina display" because it has the same dpi (dots per inch) as the iPhone 4. However, the iPod Touch is not using the same IPS display found in the iPhone 4 which means the viewing angles aren't as good. I doubt most users will notice the difference here.
    - adds the gyroscope for extra precision with motion based apps (mostly gaming)
    - adds support for the faster Wireless "N" standard, which should help when streaming video to your phone or using Facetime to make a video call
    - adds a vibrator for alerts, force feedback in gaming, and notifications for voice calling

    Cons:

    - speaker still sucks - I let my two year watch videos on my iPhone. Thus a crappy speaker is a deal breaker for me because she is too small to use headphones. You can blame the extreme thinness on this one. There simply isn't enough depth to put an iPhone quality speaker in. If I didn't have a two year old I wouldn't consider this a big deal because I rarely use this function otherwise.
    - no 5MP camera or LED flash - This is going to be a deal breaker for some who saw the iPhone 4 and started salivating at the thought of the possibility of the same high quality sensor in the iPod Touch. Read my thoughts below for more on this one.
    - No GPS chip - you're still stuck with using WiFi signals to determine location, a la the original iPhone. Maybe Garmin or Tom Tom paid them money not to include this feature.


    ---------------------------Thoughts and Conclusions------------------------------------

    Yes, I wanted the camera sensor from the iPhone 4 as well, but the unfortunate reality is that sensor wouldn't fit in the old iPod Touch body and this one is even slimmer! In order to fit the iPhone 4 camera sensor into the iPod Touch, Apple would have had to make this device significantly thicker, which loses one of the big advantages the Touch has had over the iPhone, its size. I might have been willing to make the tradeoff, but obviously Apple wasn't.

    Keep in mind that the larger sensor (and LED Flash) adds to the cost of the device as well. Apple added a significant number of features to the iPod Touch and kept the price exactly the same. Something's gotta give here. The 32GB iPhone 4 sells for $700! (AT&T pays Apple the difference when you buy one on contract). I'm sure if people were willing to spend $400 more than the $299 the 32GB iPod Touch sells for they would have a mind blowing sensor in there. I'm actually surprised at how much of the functionality of the iPhone the iPod Touch now replicates, given the huge gap in cost.

    Appreciate the fact that you can now record HD video and do video calling over WiFi for the same price as the last model. Or don't buy it. Consider how much you can do on this device compared to other portable gadgets, like the pocket sized Flip Video Camera, which costs more than $100+ and does nothing other than video, or even the ZUNE HD, which is a great device, but lacks compatibility with the hundreds of thousands of Apps that turn the iPod Touch into a pocket computer.

    I'm waiting for something to come along to blow away the iPod Touch, but that device just doesn't exist. All things considered, this device is a 4.5/5, which I round up to 5 because Amazon doesn't do half stars. This device won't be for everyone, but then again, no device is. For a great majority of users, this is product is nothing short of gadget heaven.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Great display but terrible rear camera, September 1, 2010
    My wife and I have the 3rd generation iPod Touch and are very happy with them. The one thing that I have been missing/wanting is having a built in camera. I recently saw the photos taken by a friend's iPhone and was blown away by how good they were. Almost all reviews have said the iPhone built in 5MP camera is excellent. Like many others I watched Steve Jobs present the new iPod line today and was very excited to hear that it had all the features I was looking for. Retina display - awesome. Front and rear cameras - yes! Finally.

    I was all set to order 2 from Amazon the minute Amazon had them listed. But .. while looking thru the Apple website I came across the specs for the rear facing camera. It is only .7 megapixels. Less than 1 megapixel. What? I thought that can't be right. I contacted Apple and the rep, who had gotten many such calls it seemed, confirmed that the iPod touch has a very different camera (.7 MP vs the iPhone's 5 MP) . Bummer. I looked around and found a hands on review of it .... and they said the sensor itself, besides being lower MP, is also not nearly as good as the one in the iPhone. Not terrible but certainly not good and no where in the same league as the one in the iPhone.

    The camera was one of the 2 main things people asked for. The other being the Retina display. My assumption is that Apple didn't want to affect iPhone sales and purposely dummied down the camera. Shame on them. They want us to pay $240 to $400 for an iPod with a terrible camera.

    I first predicted that w/ the Retina display and the camera that this would be a smashing success, a huge seller coming into the holiday season. I suspect when people get them and see how bad the photos are, they'll be returning them to Apple. Or like myself, not upgrading.

    I realize this review should be for a product I own, but I felt it was important for people to know about the camera before they ordered it. If photos aren't a big deal, and you'll only email them or post them on facebook, then .7 MP is probably fine. If you want to print any of the photos you take, or even have room to crop the photo, you won't get enough resolution to do that.

    That being said, the Retina display does look awesome, but is it worth the extra dollars over the price of the 3G model? Only you can decide that.

    I hope this helps all of you make a wise decision about your purchase.

    08 Sept 2010 Update
    Hello everyone. First, I am glad that my raising the above issues helped many of you. Second, for those who lashed out at me, perhaps you should take a look at why you get so angry at a stranger who simply encouraged you to look and think before you buy.

    Here's an update.[...] has posted a hands on review of the new iPod Touch. You may want to google it or go to their site to read it.

    In summary:
    1. Retina display is darker and not nearly as good as the one in the iPhone. "Definitely not an iPhone w/o the contract".
    2. HD Video is actually pretty good
    3. Size is a lot smaller than the 3g, bad if you have normal or large hands, ok for teens and those w/ small hands.
    4. Photo quality is much worse than the iPhone. And their posted photos show how much worse. Forget trying to print them and I'd argue not even good for the web based on their samples. No focus or zoom capability either, you can only adjust brightness.

    There you go. We are staying w/ our 3g models, there isn't enough here to justify taking a huge loss selling them and buying these new models. And given that the camera and retina display aren't nearly the quality of the iPhone, this is certainly a release we'll sit out.

    I hope this has helped.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great device, screen is not what you think, almost too thin, September 12, 2010
    I've been using an old Iphone 2.5g as my "ipod touch" for about the last year or so. I switched to Sprint for the cheaper rates so no more iphone coverage. Well, since the old phone is not compatible with IOS4.0 and since this new device is seemed truly "next-generation," I decided to take the plunge. I hate the lack of space on my old iphone (8Gb) so I splurged for the 64. Here's a few things I noticed right out of the gate:

    1) The screen resolution is phenomenal. The lighting sucks. It has a nasty angle of view. If you look dead at the center of the screen with a black screen "on," you can see slight brightness variances from corner to corner. Not terrible, but I had expected better. After researching it a bit, this is apparently because Apple "cheaped-out" and did not include the IPS style of lighting that they used on the Iphone 4. Oh well, still a great screen though.

    2) Size: The device is amazingly thin. This is both good and bad. The buttons are kind of hard to mash as they are located on the heavily beveled edges of the device. It's not bad, but, you do need to have a good grip on the device when screwing around with volume or power. It is super light and fits well in my hand though. But, as weird as it seems, i do hate how the apple logo feels under my finger. Feels like I have super glue or something on my finger tips... strange

    3) Speed: The speed of the device is great. This is comparing it directly to my old iPhone though. It blows it out of the water. I don't have to really wait on anything. I do wish the browser was better though. On my old phone, when I'd scroll too fast on a large page, i'd get the checkerboard effect. I hoped this was no longer an issue with the new A4 chip. Again, after researching it, I found that the iPod touch has half the RAM of the new iPhone 4. Guess that would explain it.

    4) Camera: The camera is crap. It's low res and has poor low light performance. It's cool for impressing Grandma with the Face Time app, but that's about it. Don't leave home without a good cell phone camera (or a Nikon/Canon!)

    5) Minor quibbles: I miss my vibrate/loudness switch. Sucks not being able to instantly mute the device when i want it quiet. I also wish the speaker were more full. I am glad that Apple included a speaker at least, but, for it to be useful as a Face Time device for Grandma, the speaker really needs to be made louder/fuller.

    in a nutshell, it's a great device, but it is the Kmart special of the new Iphone 4 in pretty much every way. Why did I give it 4 stars when I'm so harsh on it? Because, no other device even comes close. Apple has managed to make the Ipod Touch feel magic in every way.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Wafer thin, 2 Cameras, better Wifi and better sound!, September 18, 2010
    I got my 64G Touch 4G last week -- I finally got my wish, the Touch gets not one, but two cameras! That makes up for last year's disappointing 3G release.

    First impressions: wow, this is so thin and small -- makes my 3rd gen look a bit like a bulky oaf in comparison. Second impression: hey, this doesn't look like my iPhone 4 at all!

    A bit about me: I'm an MP3 diehard fanatic, I own or have owned almost every MP3 player of note. To name a few: iPod Touch 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th gen, iPod Classic, iPod Nano, Zune HD, Archos Android, 5, 605, 604, and so forth. I have a broad basis for comparison as I write my review.

    Down to brass tacks then, what do I love about my new Touch:

    1) Retina display -- Wow! That's a lot of pixels in a small space, the crispness and clarity of text and video is simply awesome.
    2) Slim form factor -- this is thinner and narrower than last years model. Its compact, easily fits in a pocket, while still having a little weight to give that quality feel.
    3) iTunes and the App Store -- still one of Apple's strongest features. iTunes continues to be the best interface for music, video and app purchases. While Zune Marketplace and Android are strong contenders, they aren't quite there yet.
    4) Easy upgrades -- the iOS upgrade system is as smooth as it gets, just plug it into iTunes and it happens smoothly and seamlessly.
    5) Dedicated power and volume buttons.
    6) Cool user interface -- possibly the best user interface although Zune and Android are also strong.
    7) Apps -- without question the Apps are the Touch and iPhone strongest feature, the most Apps and the best Apps.
    8) Accessories, accessories -- you just can't beat the easy availability and diversity of accessories available for iPod Touch. Its good to be at the top!
    9) Multitasking (or multi-what?) -- finally we have multitasking on an MP3 player! Ok, maybe I'm just a geek and nobody else cares... just a little tip: double click your home button to see what has been running in the background and sucking up your battery!
    10) External speaker -- improved quality since 3rd gen. Nice when you don't want to put on headphones to listen to a podcast or something.
    11) Cameras -- the only MP3 player I've ever had that can do facetime, take pictures, and record videos!
    12) Improved Wifi -- connects easily to my WPA secured U-Verse router, my 3rd gen can't do it. Makes this a good "small iPad" if that's what you're looking for.
    13) Improved sound -- its getting pretty good now, still not the best available but definitely better than 3rd gen was. I would say the sound quality has moved from 3 star to 4 stars now.

    And then the things I don't love so much:
    1) Where is the Dedicated play button??? Does anybody else think that this is like the most important thing for an MP3 player? Makes it hard to pause the music when somebody comes up and wants to talk to you. The trick I found is to unplug the headphones which pauses the music automatically!
    2) Removable battery? -- I'm just going to keep saying this til somebody at Apple hears me. It costs like $100 to get the battery replaced which is ridiculous.
    3) A/V docking station? -- Again, why doesn't Apple have a decent docking station? Both Zune and Archos have very nice docks for their products.

    All in all, my issues with the iPod Touch are pretty trivial. It continues to be the best all around MP3 player type unit available today -- hence the 5 stars. With the addition of Retina display, cameras, faster CPU, better sound and wifi, and slimmer packaging the Touch is still the one to beat.

    Note: If what you really care about is sound quality I would recommend the Sony Walkman X. If you want something that sounds great on big speakers, has a bigger screen, and a high capacity hard drive, then I recommend the Archos 5 with Android. ... Read more


    7. Kindle 3G Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G + Wi-Fi, 3G Works Globally, White, 6" Display with New E Ink Pearl Technology
    Electronics
    list price: $189.00 -- our price: $189.00
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B002LVUX1W
    Manufacturer: Amazon.com
    Sales Rank: 3
    Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    The all-new Kindle has a new electronic-ink screen with 50 percent better contrast than any other e-reader, a new sleek design with a 21 percent smaller body while still keeping the same 6-inch-size reading area, and a 15 percent lighter weight at just 8.7 ounces.  The new Kindle also offers 20 percent faster page turns, up to one month of battery life, double the storage to 3,500 books, built-in Wi-Fi, a graphite color option and more—all for only $189, and still with free 3G wireless—no monthly bills or annual contracts.

    ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle vs. Nook (updated 12/1/2010), August 28, 2010
    If you're trying to choose between a Nook and a Kindle, perhaps I can help. My wife and I have owned a Nook (the original one, not the new Nook Color), a Kindle 2, and a Kindle DX. When Amazon announced the Kindle 3 this summer, we pre-ordered two Kindle 3's: the wi-fi only model in graphite, and the wi-fi + 3G model in white. They arrived in late August and we have used them very regularly since then. For us, Kindle is better than Nook, but Nook is a good device with its own advantages that I will discuss below. I'll end this review with a few words about the Nook Color.

    First, reasons why we prefer the Kindle:

    * Speed

    In our experience, the Kindle is very zippy compared to the Nook. Page refresh speed (the time it takes a new page to appear after you push the page-turn button) was WAY quicker on Kindle 2 than on Nook, and it's quicker yet on Kindle 3. Yet, I read a whole book on the Nook and didn't find the slower page refresh to be annoying - you get used to it, and it's not a problem.

    For me, the more important speed difference concerns navigation - moving the cursor around the screen, for example to pick a book from your library, or to jump to a chapter by selecting it in the table of contents. On Kindle, you do this by pushing a 5-way rocker button, and the cursor moves very quickly. On Nook, you do this by activating the color LCD touchscreen (which normally shuts off when not in use, to conserve battery). A "virtual rocker button" appears on the screen, and you touch it to move the cursor. Unfortunately, the Nook cursor moves very sluggishly. This might not be a big deal to you, but it really got annoying to me, especially since my wife's Kindle was so quick and responsive.

    In November 2010, Nook got a software upgrade that increases page refresh speed and makes navigation more responsive. I returned my Nook months ago, so I cannot tell you if the Nook's performance is now equal to the Kindle's, but Nook owners in the comments section have convinced me that the software update improves the experience of using the Nook. If performance is a big factor in your decision, visit a Best Buy and compare Kindle and Nook side by side.

    * Screen contrast

    You've seen Amazon's claims that the Kindle 3 e-ink has 50% better contrast than Kindle 2 or other e-ink devices. I have no way of precisely measuring the improvement in contrast, but I can tell you that the Kindle 3 display definitely has more contrast than Kindle 2 or Nook. The difference is noticeable, and important: more screen contrast means less eyestrain when reading in poorly lit rooms.

    In well-lit rooms, the Nook and Kindle 2 have enough contrast to allow for comfortable reading. But I often read in low-light conditions, like in bed at night, or in a poorly lit room. In these situations, reading on Nook or Kindle 2 was a bit uncomfortable and often gave me a mild headache. When I got the Kindle 3, the extra contrast was immediately noticeable, and made it more comfortable to read under less-than-ideal lighting conditions. (If you go with a Nook, just make sure you have a good reading lamp nearby.)

    * Battery life

    The Nook's color LCD touch screen drains its battery quickly - I could never get more than 5 days out of a charge. The Kindle 2 had longer battery life than the Nook, and Kindle 3 has even longer life: in the 3 months since we received our Kindle 3's, we typically get 3 weeks of battery life between charges. (We keep wireless off about half the time to save battery power.)

    * Weight

    Nook weighs about 3 ounces more than the new Kindle, and you can really feel the difference. Without a case, Nook is still light enough to hold in one hand for long reading sessions without fatigue. But in a case, Nook is a heavy sucker. The new Kindle 3 is so light, even in a case, we find it comfortable holding in one hand for long reading sessions.

    Reasons some people might prefer the Nook:

    * In-store experience

    If you need help with your nook, you can take it to any barnes and noble and get a real human to help. You can take your nook into the coffee shop section of your local B&N store and read any book for free for up to one hour per day. When you take your nook to B&N, some in-store special deals and the occasional free book pop up on your screen.

    * User-replaceable battery

    Rechargeable batteries eventually lose their ability to hold a charge. Nook's battery is user-replaceable and relatively inexpensive. To replace Kindle's battery, Amazon wants you to ship your Kindle to Amazon, and they will ship you back a DIFFERENT Kindle than the one you sent (it's the same model, for example if you send a white Kindle 3, you get a white Kindle 3 back, but you get a "refurbished" one, NOT the exact one you sent them). I don't like this at all.

    However, several people have posted comments here that have eased my concerns. Someone looked up statistics on the Kindle's battery and did some simple calculations to show that it should last for 3 or more years. Before that happens, I will surely have upgraded to a newer Kindle model by then. Also, someone found some companies that sell Kindle batteries at reasonable cost and have how-to videos that demonstrate how we can replace the battery ourselves. Doing this would void the Kindle's warranty, but the battery will probably not fail until long after the warranty expires.

    * ePub

    Nook uses the ePub format, a widely used open format. Amazon uses a proprietary ebook format. Many libraries will "lend" ebooks in the ePub format, which works with nook but not kindle. However, a free and reputable program called Calibre allows you to translate ebooks from one format to another - it supports many formats, including ePub and Kindle. The only catch is that it doesn't work with copy-protected ebooks, so you can't, for example, buy a Kindle book (which is copy protected) and translate it to ePub so you can read it on a Nook.

    * lending e-books to friends

    Nook owners can "loan" ebooks they purchased to other nook owners for up to two weeks. You can't do this with kindle - yet. Amazon has announced it will soon add this lending feature to all kindles (via a software update that will be available to people who already own kindles).

    * Nook's color LCD touchscreen

    This could be a pro or con, depending on your preferences. It makes nook hipper and less drab than kindle. Some people enjoy using the color LCD to view their library or navigate. I did, at first. But after two weeks of use, and comparisons with my wife's kindle, I found the dedicated buttons of the kindle easier and far quicker to use than the nook's color touchscreen. I also found the bright light from the color screen distracting when I was trying to read a book or newspaper (though when not in use, it shuts off after a minute or so to conserve battery).

    * expandable capacity

    Nook comes with 2GB of internal memory. If you need more capacity, you can insert a microSD card to add up to 16GB more memory. Kindle comes with 4GB of internal memory - twice as much as Nook - but there's no way to expand that. Kindle doesn't accept memory cards of any type. If you mainly use your device to read ebooks and newspapers, this shouldn't be an issue. I have over 100 books on my Kindle, and I've used only a tiny fraction of the memory. Once Kindle's memory fills up, just delete books you don't need immediate access to; you can always restore them later, in seconds, for free.

    A few other notes:

    Kindle and Nook have other features, such as an MP3 player and a web browser, but I caution you to have low expectations for these features. The MP3 player on the Kindle is like the first-generation iPod shuffle - you can't see what song is playing, and you can't navigate to other songs on your device. I don't like the browser on either device; e-ink is just not a good technology for surfing the web; it's slower and clunkier than LCD screen technology, so even the browser on an Android phone or iPod touch is more enjoyable to use. However, some commenters have more favorable views of either device's browser, and you might, too.

    * PDF support

    Kindle and Nook both handle PDF files, but in different ways. When you put a PDF file on your nook, nook converts it into an ebook-like file, then you can adjust the font size, and the text and pagination will adjust just like with any ebook. But you cannot see the original PDF file in the native format in which it was created. Kindle 3 and Kindle DX have native support for PDF files. You can see PDF files just as they would appear on your computer. You can also convert PDF files to an ebook-like format, and then Kindle handles them just the way the Nook handles them - text and pagination adjust when you change the font size. Unfortunately, some symbols, equations, and graphics get lost or mangled in the translation - even when viewing PDF files in their native format on the Kindle. Moreover, the small screen size of the Kindle 3 and the Nook is not great for PDF files, most of which are designed for a larger page size. You can zoom and pan, but this is cumbersome and tiresome. Thanks to commenters who suggested viewing PDF files in landscape mode on the Kindle (I don't know if you can do this on Nook); this way, you can see the entire top half of the page without panning, and then scroll down to the bottom half. This works a little better.

    SUMMARY:

    Nook and Kindle each offer their own advantages. We like the nook's user-replaceable battery, compatibility with ePub format, and in-store experience. But we strongly prefer Kindle 3 because its performance is zippier, its higher-contrast screen is easier to read, and it's smaller and lighter so it is more portable and more comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    * Nook Color

    Everything I wrote about the Nook in this review applies to the original Nook (which continues to be available), not the new Nook Color. To me, the Nook Color is in a different product category than the Kindle or original Nook. Nook Color has an LCD screen, like an iPad or most computer monitors. Reading on a computer screen for long periods of time is not comfortable for me - it causes fatigue and headaches. The e-ink Kindle is very comfortable for long reading sessions. So I'll take a pass on the Nook Color. But it will probably be great for others, especially people who want to watch movies, surf the web and play games on their e-reader, and don't mind the extra cost, weight, or lack of 3G. I've seen and played with a Nook Color at my local B&N, and it is a very attractive device. I'm looking forward to reading user reviews of the Nook Color when people start getting them. If you get one, please post a comment to let us know how you like it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Worth the money. Not perfect, but very very good for start to finish novels in good light, August 31, 2010
    The Kindle is my first e-ink reader. I own an iPad, an iPhone, and have owned a Windows-based phone in the past that I used as an ereader.

    My overall impression of the device is good.

    The good:
    I'd honestly rather read linear (read from page one to the end, one page at a time) fiction from it than a book, because I can't always get comfortable with a book. Hardcovers are sometimes a bit heavy, and paperbacks don't always lie open easily. The Kindle is incredibly light and thin. I can hold it in one hand easily. The page turn buttons are conveniently located. Page-turns aren't instant, but they're probably quicker than turning a physical page in a printed book (there are just a lot more page-turns unless you choose a small font). The contrast is better than other ereaders I've seen. There is zero eye strain in good light. My eyesight isn't the greatest and I like being able to increase the font size and read without glasses. I love being able to browse the Kindle store and read samples before deciding to purchase. The "experimental" browser is surprisingly usable, but isn't great. It is useful for browsing wikipedia and blogs. The biggest drawback to the browser is the awkward pointer navigation, using the 5-way pad. It syncs your furthest read page over the internet so you can pick up where you left off using your iPhone or iPad.

    The so-so:
    The kindle store could use more categories and sorting options. You can't sort by "top rated," and there is no category for "alternate histories," for example. Finding a very-specific type of fiction relies on keyword searches, which don't do a great job. The wifi sometimes doesn't connect before it times-out. You rarely need the wifi, but it is annoying if you change a setting, answer "OK" to the prompt to connect, and the thing tells you it failed to connect two seconds later (the exact moment it indicates that it did finally connect, then you need to go back to update the setting again). Most settings don't require a connection, but it is a minor annoyance. Most of your time will be spent reading, and of course your books are stored on the device and a connection is not required. Part of me wishes I'd bought the 3G model, because the browser is good enough that having lifetime free 3G wireless would be worth the extra money. Magazines don't look very good and are not very easy to navigate. There is minor glare in some lighting conditions, mostly when a lamp is positioned behind the reader's head.

    The bad:
    The contrast is fair to poor in dim light. It is much easier to read a printed page in dim light. In good light, contrast is on par with a pulp paperback. In dim light it feels almost like reading from an old Palm Pilot (resolution is better than an old Palm, but contrast is bad in dim light). The screen is small enough that the frequency of page turns is pretty high. Even in good light, the light gray background is less pleasant than the eggshell background of a printed page. You must tell it to sync before you switch it off, if you expect the feature allowing you to pick up where you left off using other devices to work correctly. The copy protection prevents you from using the files on anything other than Kindle software or devices.

    Vs iPad:
    IPad is a lot better for magazines, reference materials, and illustrated materials. Kindle is worlds better for reading novels. IPad is pretty heavy, making it more difficult to hold in your hand or carry with you everywhere. Kindle is much more portable and easier to hold. IPad has some amazing children's books and magazines, which take advantage of its multimedia features. IPad is unreadable in sunlight and glare is bad in bright light. Kindle is as good as a printed page in bright light. Ipad serves as a creative tool, a computing tool, a gaming tool, and a communication tool. Kindle is only a novel machine. I don't regret buying either one of them. An iPad won't replace books, but a Kindle can, if the book is text-only.

    I highly recommend this device at its new low price if you are a frequent reader of novels. I love my kindle. Just don't expect it to be more than it is. Leave the magazines and such to the tablet computers.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I Wanted a Dedicated E-Reader, and That's What I Got, September 7, 2010
    I'm a first-time Kindle owner, so I have nothing to "compare" the latest Kindle to. I don't own a Nook. I don't own an iPad (and, in any case, that's comparing apples to oranges). I don't have a Sony e-reader. '

    This will be a short, simple review.

    I received my Kindle about a week ago and haven't been able to put it down.

    Things I like about my Kindle?
    1. The e-ink display is amazing.
    2. Using the 5-way controller is simple and effective.
    3. Page turn speeds are faster than I thought they would be.
    4. It's lightweight, even with the attached cover (I have an Amazon cover with a built-in light)
    5. Page-turning buttons are quiet and well-placed.
    6. Recharge time is fast.
    7. I can order a book and start reading it in less than 60 seconds. Nice!
    8. Portability... I can take 3,000 books with me when I travel for work and not require additional suitcases or baggage fees.

    Things I'm not too keen on?
    1. Buttons are too close together and are laid out oddly.
    2. Lack of individual number buttons is frustrating.
    3. Power button on the bottom? Not a bad thing. Just an odd thing. (Same for the headphone input). I usually rest the "bottom" of a book on my lap when I read.

    Things I hope change in the future?
    1. How books are organized... When I put a book in a collection (which is actually a "tag"), it still appears in the main list. It's not actually "moved", it's merely associated.
    2. The look of the main screen. I'd like "folders" or some other way to display "collections".
    3. Ability to create personal "screen savers."
    4. E-book pricing, though Amazon has little control over this. Still, most titles are the same price as or less than their hardback/paperback counterparts. (And I'm not opposed to paying more for convenience and portability).

    Things that don't bother me regarding other reviews?
    1. The browser is experimental. Amazon has created a dedicated e-reader, and it's meant to be used to read. Period. Not browse the web. If you want to browse the web, get a computer -- not an e-reader.
    2. The Kindle is not an mP3 player, either. Yes, it's nice to have some classical music playing in the background while I read, but I don't need to see the title of the song, album art, etc. (And you can skip from track to track on the Kindle using shortcut keys).
    3. Lack of a "color" or "touch" screen.

    In summary, for $139, I'm quite thrilled with my purchase and have arleady read multiple books on it. In fact, I think I've read more in the past week than I've read in the past month.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not the perfect "do-it-all" device, but very close to being the perfect e-reading device!, August 26, 2010
    I woke up to a nice surprise this morning: a new kindle as a gift. I have an iPad and a Kindle DX, but I guess someone heard my complaints of them being too heavy and difficult to do extended-reading on. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love my iPad and DX, but this new generation of Kindle is perfect for reading outside and for long periods of time. The iPad gets completely washed out in sunlight and often irritates my eyes staring at it for more than a couple of hours. The DX was my go-to device for those extended/outdoor reading periods, but now I have a new friend for reading novels. Instead of a replacement, this one seems more like a companion to the other devices and is a different class. The iPad works great for web browsing, shopping, productivity, games, etc while the Kindle falls short in those areas. The Kindle works great for reading novels, where the iPad falls short. For those that love to do extended-reading of magazines, newspapers, research articles, etc, I find that the DX is the go-to device.

    Without a doubt, the size and weight of the new kindle is the biggest draw for me. It's smaller than the last edition by a significant margin. I've played around with the Kindle 2 and was impressed, but now looking at the size of the new Kindle, I'm blown away. It's the absolute perfect size. Smaller would be unmanageable and larger wouldn't feel nearly as good. This is a device that you can hold up, read, and just forget that it's there. Compared to other e-readers I've tried, it's much smaller and much lighter.

    One of my biggest complaints about the previous generation Kindles and the DX is the speed. It sometimes takes a while after you push `next page' for it to actually change. In addition, the web browsing feature was so slow and clunky that it is really unusable in my opinion. Two additions to the new Kindle have helped attenuate these issues. First, the pages do flip quicker (albeit, still slow in my opinion), and the addition of wifi has allowed faster connection for wireless activities (much better than only relying on 3G). I still can't see myself using the Kindle as an internet browsing tool or really doing much online aside from purchasing reading material, but the faster connection at least opens up the possibility - something that would only frustrate me on previous editions.

    The new Kindle also offers a better contrast than previous editions and it looks fantastic compared to every other e-reader I have seen. I have no trouble seeing the screen in dim light or in bright sunlight - it really opens up the ability to read almost anywhere you are. Of course, you'll still need a separate light for extremely dark areas.

    Another big addition to the Kindle 3 is that it offers double the storage compared to Kindle 2. I've never had a problem with the amount of storage since I can't possibly see myself filling up that much space (I don't put mp3's on it), but perhaps in the future, if certain applications or media files are put on the kindle, it could have been a problem. The additional space in the new model is definitely a welcome addition, but bringing back the memory card slot that was included on Kindle 1 would have been an even more welcome addition in my opinion.

    Among e-readers, I definitely recommend the Kindle 3 if not just because it has a better size/form-factor, contrast, battery life, and speed compared to every other e-reader I have tried. On top of that, you get the wonderful amazon buying experience and selection for all your literature and can keep your kindle library intact between whatever other device you want to download a Kindle application onto.

    The question of whether you need a Kindle vs another type of device for reading becomes a little more tricky and really comes down to what you want to use it for.

    Do you want a device to read novels on, perhaps read outside, and have something very light that you almost forget it's there? Buy the Kindle.

    Do you want something to lie in bed with for short periods of time while surfing the web? I might suggest going with the iPad, a different tablet, or a netbook.

    Do you already have a Kindle 1 or 2? That's a tough one.... I don't think the new edition has enough `new' to it to warrant the upgrade in my mind, but some might value the new size and wifi capabilities even more-so than I do. For me, the new Kindle was a welcome addition to my family of devices since I didn't have anything anywhere near its form factor and convenience.

    Should you get 3G + Wifi or just Wifi? I think this question can be answered simply by asking yourself if you travel a lot. Being able to buy books and access wireless content on the road is an indispensable option and well worth the extra money in my mind. Keeping the device mainly at home or near wifi hotspots really negates the need for 3G though.

    Overall, I have to give the Kindle a 5 star rating because it does what it was designed to do very well, and in my opinion better than any of the competition. While the new features and capabilities aren't game-changing and truly outstanding, it is smaller, more capable, and better than any other e-reader out there. If you want `one device to handle it all', this isn't the place to look, but If you want a fantastic device solely for reading books, this is what you want.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A hesistant buyer rejoices on his choice, September 2, 2010
    I researched the purchase of a Kindle for a long time. I couldn't decide whether or not it was worth buying a dedicated e-reader. Boy am I glad I made this purchase. The downside to Amazon's online selling of Kindle 3 is that the customers don't get to see it in person. It is much better in person. This may sound stupid, but when I got my new Kindle, I thought there was a stuck-on overlay on the screen containing a diagram of the unit's buttons, etc. I actually tried to peel it off. Doh! The e-ink on this unit is THAT good. I didn't realize that I was staring at the actual display. I also didn't realize that no power is required until the display changes. (thus the great battery life) I do a lot of reading, but was facing the prospect of reading less or buying large type books because of my variable and deteriorating eyesight. The new Kindle has been a godsend. Now, I can decide the size of type I need depending on my level of fatigue among other things. The weight and ergonomics are very good. For someone, like me, with neuropathy in his hands, it is extremely easy to manage and enjoyable to own. To me, it is easier to read than print books. The ease of navigation is great as is the speed. The battery life, so far, has been extraordinary. It easily connected to our home Wi-Fi, which by design does not broadcast an SSID. It downloads books so fast that I almost thought they were not completely received. I did not buy the 3G version because of the price difference and the fact that there is no coverage where I live. If you are not constantly traveling, I don't see the need to spend the extra bucks, but that is a matter of personal choice. For those who have no Wi-Fi at home, remember that you can always download the material to your computer and transfer it via USB. Just today I was watching an interview with Tony Blair on TV. He was talking about his new book, which sounded interesting. I picked up the Kindle and downloaded a free sample before the interview was over. I have only read the preface so far, but will probably buy the book. Now THAT is a great way to buy a book! I haven't used online browsing extensively yet, but find it reasonable for what the device is. This is primarily a book reader, not a laptop or notebook. They are great for what they do, but can't match the e-ink display, or the light weight. For those of you worrying about the wait for the new Kindle, let me end with, "It is worth the wait" This new Kindle is all about the quality of experience. There are many format choices for electronic reading. If you want the best experience, go with the Kindle.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Solid Improvements! Check out my video review!, August 27, 2010
    I just received my new Kindle, and my early impressions are very positive - it's definitely a solid step up from the previous generation Kindle. Check out my video review to see/hear more!

    UPDATE 9/7/2010: Hey guys - based on the comments received there are definitely some questions that people are interested in that I didn't touch on in my video review - so I wanted to take some time to answer some of those questions here. Hopefully this is helpful!

    Q: Is the Kindle 3 backlit? If not, then how do you see it at night?

    A: The Kindle 3 is not backlit. For the Kindle 2 I used a leather case with a reading light clipped to it. For the Kindle 3 Amazon produced a leather case that has a built-in reading light. I've been using it since day 1 and I love it. I made a video review for that also if you want to check it out:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R27V1SXQSI9M86/

    Q: How well does the new joystick control work?

    A: The new Kindle replaces the old five-way navigation joystick with a center button surrounded by a thin 4-way directional control. After messing around with both of these approaches, I don't really have a strong personal preference one way or another - they both work fine for me.

    If you have big hands then I can definitely see having a bit of trouble getting used to the new joystick. The directional control is very thin, and if you're going to have trouble with any button on the Kindle... that's definitely going to be the one.

    Q: How is viewing PDFs on the Kindle 3? Are they easy to upload onto the Kindle?

    A: Uploading PDFs to the Kindle is very easy. You just connect your Kindle to your computer via USB cable and then drag and drop the PDFs. Totally simple. Viewing them is pretty decent, but the major problem is that most PDFs aren't designed for a 6 inch screen. You might have to do a lot of zooming and panning to see the content you want. If you plan on viewing a ton of PDFs, then you may want to check out the Kindle DX Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G, 9.7" Display, Graphite, 3G Works Globally  Latest Generation.

    Q: How well does the text-to-speech work?

    A: It's ok. You definitely won't mistake it for a professionally produced audiobook, but it doesn't sound as bad as you may think it will. Also note that text-to-speech is not available for every book. You can see on the product page for each Kindle book if text-to-speech is enabled or not.

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 is perfect, August 28, 2010
    When I first unboxed the new K3, I was slightly disappointed. The new 5-way appeared to be harder to used than the little joystick of the K2. I have to say, though, two days later, I'm liking it much better. Since I'm getting used to it so quickly, I think in another day I won't know the difference.

    The size is absolutely perfect. In the Amazon cover, it is exactly like reading from a paperback book. It's noticeably lighter and easier to hold for reading, even with arthritis in my hands. The page turn buttons are wonderful. Almost no noise, and you don't have to push them as hard. It should make it much easier for those with weak or disabled hands. I also like have next page and previous buttons on both sides. I didn't think it would make a difference to me, but it really does.

    I tried a couple of times to connect the WiFi, but didn't get it to work. Today I had more time so I thought I'd try to puzzle through it. But when I navigated to the wireless menu, it had somehow figured out how to connect on its own. The browser is MUCH faster, and it made buying a book a breeze.

    I haven't had it long enough to comment on the extended battery life. But I was honestly fine with the more than 10 days I always got with K2.

    And the FONTS! My word what a difference! I can practically read in the dark! I've been able to reduce the font size from 4 to 2. Combine sharper contrast with better fonts and it's an unbeatable combo.

    The ONLY thing I would change if I could is to move the Menu button, and especially the Back button. I'm having a little trouble navigating with the down arrow because I hit Back. But I'm starting to get the hang of it.

    All in all, I think Amazon hit it out of the park with the K3!

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 Even Better than its Predecessor, August 28, 2010
    It's no longer necessary to write about how desirable the Kindle is (or, for that matter, e-readers generally). Books and text and reading are with us to stay; only paper is becoming unnecessary. What we can discuss is how well a device performs its intended task(s), and how it compares to its competition on an absolute basis and for the price.

    My wife and I share a last gen 6" Kindle and just received a new 6" display K3. I know, Amazon doesn't call it that, but how else can users refer to it? In twenty words or less, it is an improvement over an already excellent product. Smaller, but not too small to be held comfortably. Same size display, but sharper and crisper, better contrast. Easy to use, somewhat smaller keyboard that takes a little, but very little, getting used to. It took me a few hours to stop accidentally pressing some neighboring keys, but now using the keyboard is second nature. And the page turning buttons are silent, but have sufficient tactile feedback, excellent feel.

    I found it very easy to duplicate our library from our older Kindle to our new K3, and to activate our home wifi. I don't like to say I "transferred" our books because that could be understood to mean they were taken from our old Kindle to our new one. I say "duplicate" because they reside on both Kindles. The instruction manual is detailed and somewhat lengthy, but very understandable. (It's 200 pages, but don't let that scare you; it's easy to find the parts you need, and you will never need more than a few pages at one time.) The manual is published on the device, as in the past, and can also be downloaded to your computer as a pdf file so you can read the instructions from your computer as you apply them to the K3.

    If you have wifi at home, which we do, when you are in range of a wifi that you have activated in your K3, it automatically uses that wifi, instead of connecting to the 3G AT&T network, assuming, of course, you have a 3G+wifi K3. It works faster on my home wifi than on the 3G network, so much so that if I had really thought it through before I bought it, or if I were to buy another, I would probably go wifi only and save $50. The only reasons to get the 3G+wifi model would seem to be if you don't have reliable access to wifi or if you travel a good deal to places that don't have a lot of wifi access, but do have AT&T connectivity AND you have need to download books or periodicals on a regular basis or without delay while you are away from home or office. If you can plan ahead and stock up on a few good books, and you have reliable access to wifi, such as at home/office, McDonalds or Starbucks, I suggest you think twice about whether you want the 3G+wifi K3, or the wifi only.

    Each K3 has its own email address and you can send documents to it, including Word and pdf docs, and photos. Of course, the photos are B&W, but very detailed and clear. The K3 permits surfing the web, although I haven't used it much for that purpose and, other than saying it works, I hesitate to pass judgment on how well I think someone who uses it for web browsing would like it.

    I can't compare it to other dedicated e-readers because I haven't used them. People seem to be interested in how I think it compares to the iPad, which I don't own but have "played with" somewhat extensively at the Apple Store. My assessment is that there is no comparison. The iPad will do much more, but as an e-reader I think the K3 is superior. I don't need color for reading text, the K3 is a fraction of the cost, and its smaller size makes it much more convenient to tote around. However, what kills the iPad as an e-reader, as far as I am concerned, is its weight. I suspect most of us are the same in this regard, but I tend to read for an hour or two at a stretch. A pound and a half doesn't sound too heavy, but I held an iPad for five minutes, literally, and my hands ached. It is simply too heavy to use as a book reading device, while the K3 is light as a feather. For reading, a cheaper and significantly lighter K3 as a dedicated e-reader is, IMHO, the way to go (compared to an iPad). BTW, a recent (in Aug. 2010) report from Taiwan said Apple in making a 6" iPod, which, depending on size and weight, could change the equation. It will be interesting to see how the e-reader market develops. I said I can't compare the K3 to other competitors, and I won't, but I can say I am completely satisfied with Amazon as an e-book seller. I've only had a few occasions to need support (on my old Kindle), but that has also been entirely satisfactory.

    Bottom line: my wife and I both like the K3 very much and recommend it to anyone considering buying an e-reader. I don't think you will regret buying one, with or without the free 3G.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Quality control problems, September 7, 2010
    First, the good stuff. Kindle 3 has a very readable high contrast screen. The form factor is small and light enough to be a book replacement. Purchasing and downloading content is simple and convenient.

    However, I had a series of problems which eventually led me to return my Kindle.

    After unpacking and charging my Kindle 3, it refused to connect to my wireless network. I have a variety of other devices ranging from a Nintendo Wii to an iPod Touch and two computers that work just fine on my wireless network, but the Kindle couldn't connect after many attempts. I eventually gave up and turned it off. When I turned it back on several hours later, it had mysteriously connected to my WiFi network with the exact same settings that did not work earlier. I have noticed that several other users have ran into the same problem.

    The next problem I noticed was that something was rolling around inside the casing. This is obviously not a good sign. Then, my Kindle 3 started freezing. The first freeze happened while using the experimental browser. As this is an "experimental" application, I wasn't too concerned. After a power reset, the Kindle came back up. The second freeze happened while playing Shuffled Row, which is a good game. After this freeze, my Kindle refused to reboot after many power reset attempts. (Yes, I did try keeping the power switch in the "turn-on" position for up to 30 seconds as suggested by the manual.) I eventually gave up and put it down. However, after a few minutes, the Kindle started to reboot itself. The was another freeze while reading a book, which was fixed with a power reset. I tried to contact Amazon for service, but it looks like the only way to get Kindle customer service is through a phone call.

    And then my Kindle froze again while reading a book. This time, nothing would reset the kindle. When this last freeze happened, the battery was charged about 75%. At this point, there was no option but to return the kindle. There are some comments among the negative reviews here that the usual Amazon.com return process does not work. In my case, I was able to follow the regular Amazon return process and print a return label. So my Kindle is back to Amazon after less than a week of use.

    Judging from other reviews that had similar experiences as mine, Amazon appears to have a specific quality control problem with this latest version of the Kindle. People may be more tolerant of the reliability other electronic gadgets, however, it is unacceptable for a product that is primarily intended to replace paper books to have issues like freezing and/or rebooting. After all, I never had a "paper" book freeze or reboot on me so far. Receiving a product with defects that should have been caught during testing before shipping pretty much destroys the "Kindle experience".

    UPDATE (October 31, 2010): Since I do like the Kindle concept, after reading about the improvement in stability with the latest software upgrades, I purchased another Kindle WiFi. Everything was great for almost two weeks, no crashes. However, yesterday, the second Kindle also ended up with a frozen screen. After following through the instructions on Amazon's Kindle troubleshooting page and talking to the customer service, there was no way to get the Kindle out of the frozen state, so this one is also going back. The fact that this situation can happen to the same customer twice in a matter of few months indicates either a serious quality control problem or component reliability problem.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Details on working with PDF, Wi-fi vs 3G, Starbucks, Audio books, MP3 and other things, August 27, 2010
    NOTE: Amazon limits the video size and duration, so I targeted what I thought were some key points.
    I check comments, so leave one if you have any questions not covered in the video or below and I'll try and answer.

    First off I love this device!!
    Like ipods are the king of MP3 players, this is the king of ebook readers in my opinion.

    I've been looking at this thing for at least 7+ hrs today and my eyes don't feel tired at all.

    If you want. . .
    * a low cost eBook reader
    * that allows you to read books
    * looks great
    * easy to setup
    * easy to hold/carry
    * easy on the eyes (no getting tired eyes from a glaring screen)
    . . . then look no further than this product!



    **Adding updates as I find other feature behaviors**

    - The comic I converted to PDF when emailed to my kindle email address the conversion process didn't like it too much. Better to not use the conversion process for those types of PDFs. Other PDF's converted just fine.
    - Emailing PDF = the conversion process seems to cut off the cover page each time
    - Emailing and having amazon convert is fast. I like it!
    - You can plug the kindle into the USB, then "eject" it from the OS. This allows you to continue to charge the kindle and read it at the same time. You could also just plug it into an electrical socket and read from it too.
    - If you stop/pause your MP3 music it will start all the way back at track #1. This is not an MP3 player. It also plays the most recently added track first
    - 10 minutes it goes into sleep mode, but if you leave Wi-fi on = drains your battery quicker. Better to turn Wi-fi off when not using it
    - Buy a case to protect it and get yourself a light for times when you don't have enough light to read by. This is not a cell-phone screen, meaning you can't read it in the dark. The screen very much simulates paper in this case.
    - Manual even states...you cannot connect the Wi-fi to a corporate wi-fi. Most companies require VPN of some sort, which is not supported here.
    - Loaded a 25Mb PDF and when when trying to search I get the following error message, ""your search can not be completed as this item has not been indexed. Please try again later." Found forum posts that said give the Kindle at least 10 minutes to complete indexing the file. . .longer if file if big. Sure enough, about 30 minutes later I tried again and was able to search this large PDF.

    8/29/10 update:
    - Just got back from Starbucks
    * Turned wi-fi on
    * Menu > Settings > Wifi Settings and selected the attwifi network option
    * Home > Menu > Experimental > Launch browser
    * zoom in on the terms & agreement checkbox and use the spacebar to check the box
    * click continue button and you are on the internet at the coffee shop!!

    9/3/10 update:
    - A week later, I haven't charged the unit nor shut it down, I've only put it into sleep mode. Battery indicator is still more than 80% full. Nice!
    - Someone pointed me towards "Calibre" a free conversion utility. Totally supports the Kindle 3 and converts to PDF, ePub, Mobi, etc. Works great and you can have the program send the converted document directly to your device via USB or email. The program also acts as your own "backup" by creating a document library on your hard drive that can be sorted, metadata updated, etc. It's very cool!

    9/5/10 update:
    - I kept getting unconverted PDFs (PDFs copied directly to unit via USB vs. sending to email for conversion) would result in the unit restarting when trying to access the PDF. Found forums that said you need to reset the unit. Slide & hold the power button for 15 seconds. Let it take the 20 seconds to reboot. This worked for me.

    9/10/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Annotating PDFs, then accessing these notes for later review on a laptop/desktop
    - Is there an auto-scrolling for PDFs? = No
    - What its like to have the kindle "read" back to you? = robotic voice that ignores punctuation
    - More info on document conversion, including sending emails to the kindle for conversion?
    - The ability to access Gmail from the kindle? = yes, works fine though a bit slow on wi-fi

    9/19/10 update:
    - Check out the comments for my answer to, "Should I buy 3G or is wifi good enough?" = need to buy a book on the run, then get 3G. If you can wait till you get home or a coffee shop, then wi-fi works fine.

    9/24/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Exactly how does an Audible audio book work with the Kindle?
    - Possible causes for why MP3 music is not recognized by the device?

    10/2/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you play Audible audio books while at the same time reading along? = for all intents and purposes, no
    - How easy is it to register a new/used K3 to a different owner? = easy as pie

    10/23/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you change out the battery yourself? = no
    - Can you share your documents with other kindle users? = legally only if both devices are under the same user account

    12/7/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can a color document show up as color on the kindle? = No, doc will be converted to greyscale
    - Able to support textbooks? = Yes, if in a supported document type
    - Should I pay the extra $50 for 3G in order to more easily access websites? = Up to you...many sites have mobile versions that load great on wi-fi. NOTE: still doesn't support sites that use Java
    - Will I have 3G coverage in my rural area? = Amazon gives a disclaimer in their FAQ that 3G connection is not guaranteed in some areas
    - Should I get the K3 for my 10 year old? = I personally feel this is a great device for any age reader. . .and gives the parent control/visibility to what is being read

    5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle vs. Nook (updated 12/1/2010), August 28, 2010
    If you're trying to choose between a Nook and a Kindle, perhaps I can help. My wife and I have owned a Nook (the original one, not the new Nook Color), a Kindle 2, and a Kindle DX. When Amazon announced the Kindle 3 this summer, we pre-ordered two Kindle 3's: the wi-fi only model in graphite, and the wi-fi + 3G model in white. They arrived in late August and we have used them very regularly since then. For us, Kindle is better than Nook, but Nook is a good device with its own advantages that I will discuss below. I'll end this review with a few words about the Nook Color.

    First, reasons why we prefer the Kindle:

    * Speed

    In our experience, the Kindle is very zippy compared to the Nook. Page refresh speed (the time it takes a new page to appear after you push the page-turn button) was WAY quicker on Kindle 2 than on Nook, and it's quicker yet on Kindle 3. Yet, I read a whole book on the Nook and didn't find the slower page refresh to be annoying - you get used to it, and it's not a problem.

    For me, the more important speed difference concerns navigation - moving the cursor around the screen, for example to pick a book from your library, or to jump to a chapter by selecting it in the table of contents. On Kindle, you do this by pushing a 5-way rocker button, and the cursor moves very quickly. On Nook, you do this by activating the color LCD touchscreen (which normally shuts off when not in use, to conserve battery). A "virtual rocker button" appears on the screen, and you touch it to move the cursor. Unfortunately, the Nook cursor moves very sluggishly. This might not be a big deal to you, but it really got annoying to me, especially since my wife's Kindle was so quick and responsive.

    In November 2010, Nook got a software upgrade that increases page refresh speed and makes navigation more responsive. I returned my Nook months ago, so I cannot tell you if the Nook's performance is now equal to the Kindle's, but Nook owners in the comments section have convinced me that the software update improves the experience of using the Nook. If performance is a big factor in your decision, visit a Best Buy and compare Kindle and Nook side by side.

    * Screen contrast

    You've seen Amazon's claims that the Kindle 3 e-ink has 50% better contrast than Kindle 2 or other e-ink devices. I have no way of precisely measuring the improvement in contrast, but I can tell you that the Kindle 3 display definitely has more contrast than Kindle 2 or Nook. The difference is noticeable, and important: more screen contrast means less eyestrain when reading in poorly lit rooms.

    In well-lit rooms, the Nook and Kindle 2 have enough contrast to allow for comfortable reading. But I often read in low-light conditions, like in bed at night, or in a poorly lit room. In these situations, reading on Nook or Kindle 2 was a bit uncomfortable and often gave me a mild headache. When I got the Kindle 3, the extra contrast was immediately noticeable, and made it more comfortable to read under less-than-ideal lighting conditions. (If you go with a Nook, just make sure you have a good reading lamp nearby.)

    * Battery life

    The Nook's color LCD touch screen drains its battery quickly - I could never get more than 5 days out of a charge. The Kindle 2 had longer battery life than the Nook, and Kindle 3 has even longer life: in the 3 months since we received our Kindle 3's, we typically get 3 weeks of battery life between charges. (We keep wireless off about half the time to save battery power.)

    * Weight

    Nook weighs about 3 ounces more than the new Kindle, and you can really feel the difference. Without a case, Nook is still light enough to hold in one hand for long reading sessions without fatigue. But in a case, Nook is a heavy sucker. The new Kindle 3 is so light, even in a case, we find it comfortable holding in one hand for long reading sessions.

    Reasons some people might prefer the Nook:

    * In-store experience

    If you need help with your nook, you can take it to any barnes and noble and get a real human to help. You can take your nook into the coffee shop section of your local B&N store and read any book for free for up to one hour per day. When you take your nook to B&N, some in-store special deals and the occasional free book pop up on your screen.

    * User-replaceable battery

    Rechargeable batteries eventually lose their ability to hold a charge. Nook's battery is user-replaceable and relatively inexpensive. To replace Kindle's battery, Amazon wants you to ship your Kindle to Amazon, and they will ship you back a DIFFERENT Kindle than the one you sent (it's the same model, for example if you send a white Kindle 3, you get a white Kindle 3 back, but you get a "refurbished" one, NOT the exact one you sent them). I don't like this at all.

    However, several people have posted comments here that have eased my concerns. Someone looked up statistics on the Kindle's battery and did some simple calculations to show that it should last for 3 or more years. Before that happens, I will surely have upgraded to a newer Kindle model by then. Also, someone found some companies that sell Kindle batteries at reasonable cost and have how-to videos that demonstrate how we can replace the battery ourselves. Doing this would void the Kindle's warranty, but the battery will probably not fail until long after the warranty expires.

    * ePub

    Nook uses the ePub format, a widely used open format. Amazon uses a proprietary ebook format. Many libraries will "lend" ebooks in the ePub format, which works with nook but not kindle. However, a free and reputable program called Calibre allows you to translate ebooks from one format to another - it supports many formats, including ePub and Kindle. The only catch is that it doesn't work with copy-protected ebooks, so you can't, for example, buy a Kindle book (which is copy protected) and translate it to ePub so you can read it on a Nook.

    * lending e-books to friends

    Nook owners can "loan" ebooks they purchased to other nook owners for up to two weeks. You can't do this with kindle - yet. Amazon has announced it will soon add this lending feature to all kindles (via a software update that will be available to people who already own kindles).

    * Nook's color LCD touchscreen

    This could be a pro or con, depending on your preferences. It makes nook hipper and less drab than kindle. Some people enjoy using the color LCD to view their library or navigate. I did, at first. But after two weeks of use, and comparisons with my wife's kindle, I found the dedicated buttons of the kindle easier and far quicker to use than the nook's color touchscreen. I also found the bright light from the color screen distracting when I was trying to read a book or newspaper (though when not in use, it shuts off after a minute or so to conserve battery).

    * expandable capacity

    Nook comes with 2GB of internal memory. If you need more capacity, you can insert a microSD card to add up to 16GB more memory. Kindle comes with 4GB of internal memory - twice as much as Nook - but there's no way to expand that. Kindle doesn't accept memory cards of any type. If you mainly use your device to read ebooks and newspapers, this shouldn't be an issue. I have over 100 books on my Kindle, and I've used only a tiny fraction of the memory. Once Kindle's memory fills up, just delete books you don't need immediate access to; you can always restore them later, in seconds, for free.

    A few other notes:

    Kindle and Nook have other features, such as an MP3 player and a web browser, but I caution you to have low expectations for these features. The MP3 player on the Kindle is like the first-generation iPod shuffle - you can't see what song is playing, and you can't navigate to other songs on your device. I don't like the browser on either device; e-ink is just not a good technology for surfing the web; it's slower and clunkier than LCD screen technology, so even the browser on an Android phone or iPod touch is more enjoyable to use. However, some commenters have more favorable views of either device's browser, and you might, too.

    * PDF support

    Kindle and Nook both handle PDF files, but in different ways. When you put a PDF file on your nook, nook converts it into an ebook-like file, then you can adjust the font size, and the text and pagination will adjust just like with any ebook. But you cannot see the original PDF file in the native format in which it was created. Kindle 3 and Kindle DX have native support for PDF files. You can see PDF files just as they would appear on your computer. You can also convert PDF files to an ebook-like format, and then Kindle handles them just the way the Nook handles them - text and pagination adjust when you change the font size. Unfortunately, some symbols, equations, and graphics get lost or mangled in the translation - even when viewing PDF files in their native format on the Kindle. Moreover, the small screen size of the Kindle 3 and the Nook is not great for PDF files, most of which are designed for a larger page size. You can zoom and pan, but this is cumbersome and tiresome. Thanks to commenters who suggested viewing PDF files in landscape mode on the Kindle (I don't know if you can do this on Nook); this way, you can see the entire top half of the page without panning, and then scroll down to the bottom half. This works a little better.

    SUMMARY:

    Nook and Kindle each offer their own advantages. We like the nook's user-replaceable battery, compatibility with ePub format, and in-store experience. But we strongly prefer Kindle 3 because its performance is zippier, its higher-contrast screen is easier to read, and it's smaller and lighter so it is more portable and more comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    * Nook Color

    Everything I wrote about the Nook in this review applies to the original Nook (which continues to be available), not the new Nook Color. To me, the Nook Color is in a different product category than the Kindle or original Nook. Nook Color has an LCD screen, like an iPad or most computer monitors. Reading on a computer screen for long periods of time is not comfortable for me - it causes fatigue and headaches. The e-ink Kindle is very comfortable for long reading sessions. So I'll take a pass on the Nook Color. But it will probably be great for others, especially people who want to watch movies, surf the web and play games on their e-reader, and don't mind the extra cost, weight, or lack of 3G. I've seen and played with a Nook Color at my local B&N, and it is a very attractive device. I'm looking forward to reading user reviews of the Nook Color when people start getting them. If you get one, please post a comment to let us know how you like it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Worth the money. Not perfect, but very very good for start to finish novels in good light, August 31, 2010
    The Kindle is my first e-ink reader. I own an iPad, an iPhone, and have owned a Windows-based phone in the past that I used as an ereader.

    My overall impression of the device is good.

    The good:
    I'd honestly rather read linear (read from page one to the end, one page at a time) fiction from it than a book, because I can't always get comfortable with a book. Hardcovers are sometimes a bit heavy, and paperbacks don't always lie open easily. The Kindle is incredibly light and thin. I can hold it in one hand easily. The page turn buttons are conveniently located. Page-turns aren't instant, but they're probably quicker than turning a physical page in a printed book (there are just a lot more page-turns unless you choose a small font). The contrast is better than other ereaders I've seen. There is zero eye strain in good light. My eyesight isn't the greatest and I like being able to increase the font size and read without glasses. I love being able to browse the Kindle store and read samples before deciding to purchase. The "experimental" browser is surprisingly usable, but isn't great. It is useful for browsing wikipedia and blogs. The biggest drawback to the browser is the awkward pointer navigation, using the 5-way pad. It syncs your furthest read page over the internet so you can pick up where you left off using your iPhone or iPad.

    The so-so:
    The kindle store could use more categories and sorting options. You can't sort by "top rated," and there is no category for "alternate histories," for example. Finding a very-specific type of fiction relies on keyword searches, which don't do a great job. The wifi sometimes doesn't connect before it times-out. You rarely need the wifi, but it is annoying if you change a setting, answer "OK" to the prompt to connect, and the thing tells you it failed to connect two seconds later (the exact moment it indicates that it did finally connect, then you need to go back to update the setting again). Most settings don't require a connection, but it is a minor annoyance. Most of your time will be spent reading, and of course your books are stored on the device and a connection is not required. Part of me wishes I'd bought the 3G model, because the browser is good enough that having lifetime free 3G wireless would be worth the extra money. Magazines don't look very good and are not very easy to navigate. There is minor glare in some lighting conditions, mostly when a lamp is positioned behind the reader's head.

    The bad:
    The contrast is fair to poor in dim light. It is much easier to read a printed page in dim light. In good light, contrast is on par with a pulp paperback. In dim light it feels almost like reading from an old Palm Pilot (resolution is better than an old Palm, but contrast is bad in dim light). The screen is small enough that the frequency of page turns is pretty high. Even in good light, the light gray background is less pleasant than the eggshell background of a printed page. You must tell it to sync before you switch it off, if you expect the feature allowing you to pick up where you left off using other devices to work correctly. The copy protection prevents you from using the files on anything other than Kindle software or devices.

    Vs iPad:
    IPad is a lot better for magazines, reference materials, and illustrated materials. Kindle is worlds better for reading novels. IPad is pretty heavy, making it more difficult to hold in your hand or carry with you everywhere. Kindle is much more portable and easier to hold. IPad has some amazing children's books and magazines, which take advantage of its multimedia features. IPad is unreadable in sunlight and glare is bad in bright light. Kindle is as good as a printed page in bright light. Ipad serves as a creative tool, a computing tool, a gaming tool, and a communication tool. Kindle is only a novel machine. I don't regret buying either one of them. An iPad won't replace books, but a Kindle can, if the book is text-only.

    I highly recommend this device at its new low price if you are a frequent reader of novels. I love my kindle. Just don't expect it to be more than it is. Leave the magazines and such to the tablet computers.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I Wanted a Dedicated E-Reader, and That's What I Got, September 7, 2010
    I'm a first-time Kindle owner, so I have nothing to "compare" the latest Kindle to. I don't own a Nook. I don't own an iPad (and, in any case, that's comparing apples to oranges). I don't have a Sony e-reader. '

    This will be a short, simple review.

    I received my Kindle about a week ago and haven't been able to put it down.

    Things I like about my Kindle?
    1. The e-ink display is amazing.
    2. Using the 5-way controller is simple and effective.
    3. Page turn speeds are faster than I thought they would be.
    4. It's lightweight, even with the attached cover (I have an Amazon cover with a built-in light)
    5. Page-turning buttons are quiet and well-placed.
    6. Recharge time is fast.
    7. I can order a book and start reading it in less than 60 seconds. Nice!
    8. Portability... I can take 3,000 books with me when I travel for work and not require additional suitcases or baggage fees.

    Things I'm not too keen on?
    1. Buttons are too close together and are laid out oddly.
    2. Lack of individual number buttons is frustrating.
    3. Power button on the bottom? Not a bad thing. Just an odd thing. (Same for the headphone input). I usually rest the "bottom" of a book on my lap when I read.

    Things I hope change in the future?
    1. How books are organized... When I put a book in a collection (which is actually a "tag"), it still appears in the main list. It's not actually "moved", it's merely associated.
    2. The look of the main screen. I'd like "folders" or some other way to display "collections".
    3. Ability to create personal "screen savers."
    4. E-book pricing, though Amazon has little control over this. Still, most titles are the same price as or less than their hardback/paperback counterparts. (And I'm not opposed to paying more for convenience and portability).

    Things that don't bother me regarding other reviews?
    1. The browser is experimental. Amazon has created a dedicated e-reader, and it's meant to be used to read. Period. Not browse the web. If you want to browse the web, get a computer -- not an e-reader.
    2. The Kindle is not an mP3 player, either. Yes, it's nice to have some classical music playing in the background while I read, but I don't need to see the title of the song, album art, etc. (And you can skip from track to track on the Kindle using shortcut keys).
    3. Lack of a "color" or "touch" screen.

    In summary, for $139, I'm quite thrilled with my purchase and have arleady read multiple books on it. In fact, I think I've read more in the past week than I've read in the past month.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Not the perfect "do-it-all" device, but very close to being the perfect e-reading device!, August 26, 2010
    I woke up to a nice surprise this morning: a new kindle as a gift. I have an iPad and a Kindle DX, but I guess someone heard my complaints of them being too heavy and difficult to do extended-reading on. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love my iPad and DX, but this new generation of Kindle is perfect for reading outside and for long periods of time. The iPad gets completely washed out in sunlight and often irritates my eyes staring at it for more than a couple of hours. The DX was my go-to device for those extended/outdoor reading periods, but now I have a new friend for reading novels. Instead of a replacement, this one seems more like a companion to the other devices and is a different class. The iPad works great for web browsing, shopping, productivity, games, etc while the Kindle falls short in those areas. The Kindle works great for reading novels, where the iPad falls short. For those that love to do extended-reading of magazines, newspapers, research articles, etc, I find that the DX is the go-to device.

    Without a doubt, the size and weight of the new kindle is the biggest draw for me. It's smaller than the last edition by a significant margin. I've played around with the Kindle 2 and was impressed, but now looking at the size of the new Kindle, I'm blown away. It's the absolute perfect size. Smaller would be unmanageable and larger wouldn't feel nearly as good. This is a device that you can hold up, read, and just forget that it's there. Compared to other e-readers I've tried, it's much smaller and much lighter.

    One of my biggest complaints about the previous generation Kindles and the DX is the speed. It sometimes takes a while after you push `next page' for it to actually change. In addition, the web browsing feature was so slow and clunky that it is really unusable in my opinion. Two additions to the new Kindle have helped attenuate these issues. First, the pages do flip quicker (albeit, still slow in my opinion), and the addition of wifi has allowed faster connection for wireless activities (much better than only relying on 3G). I still can't see myself using the Kindle as an internet browsing tool or really doing much online aside from purchasing reading material, but the faster connection at least opens up the possibility - something that would only frustrate me on previous editions.

    The new Kindle also offers a better contrast than previous editions and it looks fantastic compared to every other e-reader I have seen. I have no trouble seeing the screen in dim light or in bright sunlight - it really opens up the ability to read almost anywhere you are. Of course, you'll still need a separate light for extremely dark areas.

    Another big addition to the Kindle 3 is that it offers double the storage compared to Kindle 2. I've never had a problem with the amount of storage since I can't possibly see myself filling up that much space (I don't put mp3's on it), but perhaps in the future, if certain applications or media files are put on the kindle, it could have been a problem. The additional space in the new model is definitely a welcome addition, but bringing back the memory card slot that was included on Kindle 1 would have been an even more welcome addition in my opinion.

    Among e-readers, I definitely recommend the Kindle 3 if not just because it has a better size/form-factor, contrast, battery life, and speed compared to every other e-reader I have tried. On top of that, you get the wonderful amazon buying experience and selection for all your literature and can keep your kindle library intact between whatever other device you want to download a Kindle application onto.

    The question of whether you need a Kindle vs another type of device for reading becomes a little more tricky and really comes down to what you want to use it for.

    Do you want a device to read novels on, perhaps read outside, and have something very light that you almost forget it's there? Buy the Kindle.

    Do you want something to lie in bed with for short periods of time while surfing the web? I might suggest going with the iPad, a different tablet, or a netbook.

    Do you already have a Kindle 1 or 2? That's a tough one.... I don't think the new edition has enough `new' to it to warrant the upgrade in my mind, but some might value the new size and wifi capabilities even more-so than I do. For me, the new Kindle was a welcome addition to my family of devices since I didn't have anything anywhere near its form factor and convenience.

    Should you get 3G + Wifi or just Wifi? I think this question can be answered simply by asking yourself if you travel a lot. Being able to buy books and access wireless content on the road is an indispensable option and well worth the extra money in my mind. Keeping the device mainly at home or near wifi hotspots really negates the need for 3G though.

    Overall, I have to give the Kindle a 5 star rating because it does what it was designed to do very well, and in my opinion better than any of the competition. While the new features and capabilities aren't game-changing and truly outstanding, it is smaller, more capable, and better than any other e-reader out there. If you want `one device to handle it all', this isn't the place to look, but If you want a fantastic device solely for reading books, this is what you want.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A hesistant buyer rejoices on his choice, September 2, 2010
    I researched the purchase of a Kindle for a long time. I couldn't decide whether or not it was worth buying a dedicated e-reader. Boy am I glad I made this purchase. The downside to Amazon's online selling of Kindle 3 is that the customers don't get to see it in person. It is much better in person. This may sound stupid, but when I got my new Kindle, I thought there was a stuck-on overlay on the screen containing a diagram of the unit's buttons, etc. I actually tried to peel it off. Doh! The e-ink on this unit is THAT good. I didn't realize that I was staring at the actual display. I also didn't realize that no power is required until the display changes. (thus the great battery life) I do a lot of reading, but was facing the prospect of reading less or buying large type books because of my variable and deteriorating eyesight. The new Kindle has been a godsend. Now, I can decide the size of type I need depending on my level of fatigue among other things. The weight and ergonomics are very good. For someone, like me, with neuropathy in his hands, it is extremely easy to manage and enjoyable to own. To me, it is easier to read than print books. The ease of navigation is great as is the speed. The battery life, so far, has been extraordinary. It easily connected to our home Wi-Fi, which by design does not broadcast an SSID. It downloads books so fast that I almost thought they were not completely received. I did not buy the 3G version because of the price difference and the fact that there is no coverage where I live. If you are not constantly traveling, I don't see the need to spend the extra bucks, but that is a matter of personal choice. For those who have no Wi-Fi at home, remember that you can always download the material to your computer and transfer it via USB. Just today I was watching an interview with Tony Blair on TV. He was talking about his new book, which sounded interesting. I picked up the Kindle and downloaded a free sample before the interview was over. I have only read the preface so far, but will probably buy the book. Now THAT is a great way to buy a book! I haven't used online browsing extensively yet, but find it reasonable for what the device is. This is primarily a book reader, not a laptop or notebook. They are great for what they do, but can't match the e-ink display, or the light weight. For those of you worrying about the wait for the new Kindle, let me end with, "It is worth the wait" This new Kindle is all about the quality of experience. There are many format choices for electronic reading. If you want the best experience, go with the Kindle.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Solid Improvements! Check out my video review!, August 27, 2010
    I just received my new Kindle, and my early impressions are very positive - it's definitely a solid step up from the previous generation Kindle. Check out my video review to see/hear more!

    UPDATE 9/7/2010: Hey guys - based on the comments received there are definitely some questions that people are interested in that I didn't touch on in my video review - so I wanted to take some time to answer some of those questions here. Hopefully this is helpful!

    Q: Is the Kindle 3 backlit? If not, then how do you see it at night?

    A: The Kindle 3 is not backlit. For the Kindle 2 I used a leather case with a reading light clipped to it. For the Kindle 3 Amazon produced a leather case that has a built-in reading light. I've been using it since day 1 and I love it. I made a video review for that also if you want to check it out:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R27V1SXQSI9M86/

    Q: How well does the new joystick control work?

    A: The new Kindle replaces the old five-way navigation joystick with a center button surrounded by a thin 4-way directional control. After messing around with both of these approaches, I don't really have a strong personal preference one way or another - they both work fine for me.

    If you have big hands then I can definitely see having a bit of trouble getting used to the new joystick. The directional control is very thin, and if you're going to have trouble with any button on the Kindle... that's definitely going to be the one.

    Q: How is viewing PDFs on the Kindle 3? Are they easy to upload onto the Kindle?

    A: Uploading PDFs to the Kindle is very easy. You just connect your Kindle to your computer via USB cable and then drag and drop the PDFs. Totally simple. Viewing them is pretty decent, but the major problem is that most PDFs aren't designed for a 6 inch screen. You might have to do a lot of zooming and panning to see the content you want. If you plan on viewing a ton of PDFs, then you may want to check out the Kindle DX Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G, 9.7" Display, Graphite, 3G Works Globally  Latest Generation.

    Q: How well does the text-to-speech work?

    A: It's ok. You definitely won't mistake it for a professionally produced audiobook, but it doesn't sound as bad as you may think it will. Also note that text-to-speech is not available for every book. You can see on the product page for each Kindle book if text-to-speech is enabled or not.

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 is perfect, August 28, 2010
    When I first unboxed the new K3, I was slightly disappointed. The new 5-way appeared to be harder to used than the little joystick of the K2. I have to say, though, two days later, I'm liking it much better. Since I'm getting used to it so quickly, I think in another day I won't know the difference.

    The size is absolutely perfect. In the Amazon cover, it is exactly like reading from a paperback book. It's noticeably lighter and easier to hold for reading, even with arthritis in my hands. The page turn buttons are wonderful. Almost no noise, and you don't have to push them as hard. It should make it much easier for those with weak or disabled hands. I also like have next page and previous buttons on both sides. I didn't think it would make a difference to me, but it really does.

    I tried a couple of times to connect the WiFi, but didn't get it to work. Today I had more time so I thought I'd try to puzzle through it. But when I navigated to the wireless menu, it had somehow figured out how to connect on its own. The browser is MUCH faster, and it made buying a book a breeze.

    I haven't had it long enough to comment on the extended battery life. But I was honestly fine with the more than 10 days I always got with K2.

    And the FONTS! My word what a difference! I can practically read in the dark! I've been able to reduce the font size from 4 to 2. Combine sharper contrast with better fonts and it's an unbeatable combo.

    The ONLY thing I would change if I could is to move the Menu button, and especially the Back button. I'm having a little trouble navigating with the down arrow because I hit Back. But I'm starting to get the hang of it.

    All in all, I think Amazon hit it out of the park with the K3!

    5-0 out of 5 stars K3 Even Better than its Predecessor, August 28, 2010
    It's no longer necessary to write about how desirable the Kindle is (or, for that matter, e-readers generally). Books and text and reading are with us to stay; only paper is becoming unnecessary. What we can discuss is how well a device performs its intended task(s), and how it compares to its competition on an absolute basis and for the price.

    My wife and I share a last gen 6" Kindle and just received a new 6" display K3. I know, Amazon doesn't call it that, but how else can users refer to it? In twenty words or less, it is an improvement over an already excellent product. Smaller, but not too small to be held comfortably. Same size display, but sharper and crisper, better contrast. Easy to use, somewhat smaller keyboard that takes a little, but very little, getting used to. It took me a few hours to stop accidentally pressing some neighboring keys, but now using the keyboard is second nature. And the page turning buttons are silent, but have sufficient tactile feedback, excellent feel.

    I found it very easy to duplicate our library from our older Kindle to our new K3, and to activate our home wifi. I don't like to say I "transferred" our books because that could be understood to mean they were taken from our old Kindle to our new one. I say "duplicate" because they reside on both Kindles. The instruction manual is detailed and somewhat lengthy, but very understandable. (It's 200 pages, but don't let that scare you; it's easy to find the parts you need, and you will never need more than a few pages at one time.) The manual is published on the device, as in the past, and can also be downloaded to your computer as a pdf file so you can read the instructions from your computer as you apply them to the K3.

    If you have wifi at home, which we do, when you are in range of a wifi that you have activated in your K3, it automatically uses that wifi, instead of connecting to the 3G AT&T network, assuming, of course, you have a 3G+wifi K3. It works faster on my home wifi than on the 3G network, so much so that if I had really thought it through before I bought it, or if I were to buy another, I would probably go wifi only and save $50. The only reasons to get the 3G+wifi model would seem to be if you don't have reliable access to wifi or if you travel a good deal to places that don't have a lot of wifi access, but do have AT&T connectivity AND you have need to download books or periodicals on a regular basis or without delay while you are away from home or office. If you can plan ahead and stock up on a few good books, and you have reliable access to wifi, such as at home/office, McDonalds or Starbucks, I suggest you think twice about whether you want the 3G+wifi K3, or the wifi only.

    Each K3 has its own email address and you can send documents to it, including Word and pdf docs, and photos. Of course, the photos are B&W, but very detailed and clear. The K3 permits surfing the web, although I haven't used it much for that purpose and, other than saying it works, I hesitate to pass judgment on how well I think someone who uses it for web browsing would like it.

    I can't compare it to other dedicated e-readers because I haven't used them. People seem to be interested in how I think it compares to the iPad, which I don't own but have "played with" somewhat extensively at the Apple Store. My assessment is that there is no comparison. The iPad will do much more, but as an e-reader I think the K3 is superior. I don't need color for reading text, the K3 is a fraction of the cost, and its smaller size makes it much more convenient to tote around. However, what kills the iPad as an e-reader, as far as I am concerned, is its weight. I suspect most of us are the same in this regard, but I tend to read for an hour or two at a stretch. A pound and a half doesn't sound too heavy, but I held an iPad for five minutes, literally, and my hands ached. It is simply too heavy to use as a book reading device, while the K3 is light as a feather. For reading, a cheaper and significantly lighter K3 as a dedicated e-reader is, IMHO, the way to go (compared to an iPad). BTW, a recent (in Aug. 2010) report from Taiwan said Apple in making a 6" iPod, which, depending on size and weight, could change the equation. It will be interesting to see how the e-reader market develops. I said I can't compare the K3 to other competitors, and I won't, but I can say I am completely satisfied with Amazon as an e-book seller. I've only had a few occasions to need support (on my old Kindle), but that has also been entirely satisfactory.

    Bottom line: my wife and I both like the K3 very much and recommend it to anyone considering buying an e-reader. I don't think you will regret buying one, with or without the free 3G.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Quality control problems, September 7, 2010
    First, the good stuff. Kindle 3 has a very readable high contrast screen. The form factor is small and light enough to be a book replacement. Purchasing and downloading content is simple and convenient.

    However, I had a series of problems which eventually led me to return my Kindle.

    After unpacking and charging my Kindle 3, it refused to connect to my wireless network. I have a variety of other devices ranging from a Nintendo Wii to an iPod Touch and two computers that work just fine on my wireless network, but the Kindle couldn't connect after many attempts. I eventually gave up and turned it off. When I turned it back on several hours later, it had mysteriously connected to my WiFi network with the exact same settings that did not work earlier. I have noticed that several other users have ran into the same problem.

    The next problem I noticed was that something was rolling around inside the casing. This is obviously not a good sign. Then, my Kindle 3 started freezing. The first freeze happened while using the experimental browser. As this is an "experimental" application, I wasn't too concerned. After a power reset, the Kindle came back up. The second freeze happened while playing Shuffled Row, which is a good game. After this freeze, my Kindle refused to reboot after many power reset attempts. (Yes, I did try keeping the power switch in the "turn-on" position for up to 30 seconds as suggested by the manual.) I eventually gave up and put it down. However, after a few minutes, the Kindle started to reboot itself. The was another freeze while reading a book, which was fixed with a power reset. I tried to contact Amazon for service, but it looks like the only way to get Kindle customer service is through a phone call.

    And then my Kindle froze again while reading a book. This time, nothing would reset the kindle. When this last freeze happened, the battery was charged about 75%. At this point, there was no option but to return the kindle. There are some comments among the negative reviews here that the usual Amazon.com return process does not work. In my case, I was able to follow the regular Amazon return process and print a return label. So my Kindle is back to Amazon after less than a week of use.

    Judging from other reviews that had similar experiences as mine, Amazon appears to have a specific quality control problem with this latest version of the Kindle. People may be more tolerant of the reliability other electronic gadgets, however, it is unacceptable for a product that is primarily intended to replace paper books to have issues like freezing and/or rebooting. After all, I never had a "paper" book freeze or reboot on me so far. Receiving a product with defects that should have been caught during testing before shipping pretty much destroys the "Kindle experience".

    UPDATE (October 31, 2010): Since I do like the Kindle concept, after reading about the improvement in stability with the latest software upgrades, I purchased another Kindle WiFi. Everything was great for almost two weeks, no crashes. However, yesterday, the second Kindle also ended up with a frozen screen. After following through the instructions on Amazon's Kindle troubleshooting page and talking to the customer service, there was no way to get the Kindle out of the frozen state, so this one is also going back. The fact that this situation can happen to the same customer twice in a matter of few months indicates either a serious quality control problem or component reliability problem.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Details on working with PDF, Wi-fi vs 3G, Starbucks, Audio books, MP3 and other things, August 27, 2010
    NOTE: Amazon limits the video size and duration, so I targeted what I thought were some key points.
    I check comments, so leave one if you have any questions not covered in the video or below and I'll try and answer.

    First off I love this device!!
    Like ipods are the king of MP3 players, this is the king of ebook readers in my opinion.

    I've been looking at this thing for at least 7+ hrs today and my eyes don't feel tired at all.

    If you want. . .
    * a low cost eBook reader
    * that allows you to read books
    * looks great
    * easy to setup
    * easy to hold/carry
    * easy on the eyes (no getting tired eyes from a glaring screen)
    . . . then look no further than this product!



    **Adding updates as I find other feature behaviors**

    - The comic I converted to PDF when emailed to my kindle email address the conversion process didn't like it too much. Better to not use the conversion process for those types of PDFs. Other PDF's converted just fine.
    - Emailing PDF = the conversion process seems to cut off the cover page each time
    - Emailing and having amazon convert is fast. I like it!
    - You can plug the kindle into the USB, then "eject" it from the OS. This allows you to continue to charge the kindle and read it at the same time. You could also just plug it into an electrical socket and read from it too.
    - If you stop/pause your MP3 music it will start all the way back at track #1. This is not an MP3 player. It also plays the most recently added track first
    - 10 minutes it goes into sleep mode, but if you leave Wi-fi on = drains your battery quicker. Better to turn Wi-fi off when not using it
    - Buy a case to protect it and get yourself a light for times when you don't have enough light to read by. This is not a cell-phone screen, meaning you can't read it in the dark. The screen very much simulates paper in this case.
    - Manual even states...you cannot connect the Wi-fi to a corporate wi-fi. Most companies require VPN of some sort, which is not supported here.
    - Loaded a 25Mb PDF and when when trying to search I get the following error message, ""your search can not be completed as this item has not been indexed. Please try again later." Found forum posts that said give the Kindle at least 10 minutes to complete indexing the file. . .longer if file if big. Sure enough, about 30 minutes later I tried again and was able to search this large PDF.

    8/29/10 update:
    - Just got back from Starbucks
    * Turned wi-fi on
    * Menu > Settings > Wifi Settings and selected the attwifi network option
    * Home > Menu > Experimental > Launch browser
    * zoom in on the terms & agreement checkbox and use the spacebar to check the box
    * click continue button and you are on the internet at the coffee shop!!

    9/3/10 update:
    - A week later, I haven't charged the unit nor shut it down, I've only put it into sleep mode. Battery indicator is still more than 80% full. Nice!
    - Someone pointed me towards "Calibre" a free conversion utility. Totally supports the Kindle 3 and converts to PDF, ePub, Mobi, etc. Works great and you can have the program send the converted document directly to your device via USB or email. The program also acts as your own "backup" by creating a document library on your hard drive that can be sorted, metadata updated, etc. It's very cool!

    9/5/10 update:
    - I kept getting unconverted PDFs (PDFs copied directly to unit via USB vs. sending to email for conversion) would result in the unit restarting when trying to access the PDF. Found forums that said you need to reset the unit. Slide & hold the power button for 15 seconds. Let it take the 20 seconds to reboot. This worked for me.

    9/10/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Annotating PDFs, then accessing these notes for later review on a laptop/desktop
    - Is there an auto-scrolling for PDFs? = No
    - What its like to have the kindle "read" back to you? = robotic voice that ignores punctuation
    - More info on document conversion, including sending emails to the kindle for conversion?
    - The ability to access Gmail from the kindle? = yes, works fine though a bit slow on wi-fi

    9/19/10 update:
    - Check out the comments for my answer to, "Should I buy 3G or is wifi good enough?" = need to buy a book on the run, then get 3G. If you can wait till you get home or a coffee shop, then wi-fi works fine.

    9/24/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Exactly how does an Audible audio book work with the Kindle?
    - Possible causes for why MP3 music is not recognized by the device?

    10/2/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you play Audible audio books while at the same time reading along? = for all intents and purposes, no
    - How easy is it to register a new/used K3 to a different owner? = easy as pie

    10/23/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can you change out the battery yourself? = no
    - Can you share your documents with other kindle users? = legally only if both devices are under the same user account

    12/7/10 update:
    Comments discussion & answers on the following:
    - Can a color document show up as color on the kindle? = No, doc will be converted to greyscale
    - Able to support textbooks? = Yes, if in a supported document type
    - Should I pay the extra $50 for 3G in order to more easily access websites? = Up to you...many sites have mobile versions that load great on wi-fi. NOTE: still doesn't support sites that use Java
    - Will I have 3G coverage in my rural area? = Amazon gives a disclaimer in their FAQ that 3G connection is not guaranteed in some areas
    - Should I get the K3 for my 10 year old? = I personally feel this is a great device for any age reader. . .and gives the parent control/visibility to what is being read
    ... Read more


    8. Kindle Lighted Leather Cover, Burgundy Red (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle)
    Accessory
    -- our price: $59.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B003DZ166Q
    Manufacturer: Amazon Digital Services, Inc
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Amazon.comAmazon's Kindle Lighted Leather Cover

    Our new design seamlessly incorporates a reading light into the cover, so you can carry your Kindle wherever you go and always have a reading light with you. Simply pull the light out to illuminate Kindle when you need it, and slide it away to be invisible when you don't. And since the light draws its power from Kindle, no batteries are needed.

    The contoured, pebble-grain leather (available in 7 different colors) keeps your Kindle safe and secure, while the soft charcoal microfiber interior protects the screen from scratches. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand.


    The built-in, retractable LED light pulls out to illuminate Kindle, and slides away when not in use.


    Never Be Without a Light

    Our all-new Kindle cover features an integrated, retractable LED reading light that lets you read comfortably anytime, anywhere. The high-quality LED light illuminates Kindle's paper-like display, adding brightness without adding glare.

    A permanent part of the cover, the reading light is located in the top right-hand corner of the back cover. When needed, simply pull the light out and it automatically illuminates, eliminating the need for a separate power switch. To turn the light off, slide it back in to the corner of the cover.

    Since the light is powered by Kindle's battery, no batteries are needed.

     

    How It Works

    In addition to securing Kindle in place, our new hinge system conducts electricity from Kindle's battery to the reading light - when Kindle is attached to the hinge, an electrical connection is formed that powers the light.

    The cover's hinge points are gold-plated, to ensure a reliable electrical connection. Gold is used because of its ability to make good electrical contact even with low force, and for its corrosion resistance.


    Secure Your Kindle in Four Easy Steps


    Read Comfortably with One Hand


    Reading with the cover on, you can easily access Kindle's navigation features and power switch, while the rounded edges offer a perfect fit in your hands. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand. And the retractable reading light is easily accessible with the cover open or folded back.


    On the Go

    This compact cover is perfect for taking Kindle wherever you go. The sleek leather ensures the ultimate fit and protection, without adding bulk or weight. Our patent-pending hinge system secures Kindle in place, and an elastic strap keeps the cover firmly closed for maximum screen protection. Simply attach Kindle to the hinge, apply the strap, and rest assured it will stay securely in place even when you're on the go.

    You'll never be without a reading light, and since the light draws its power from Kindle, no batteries are needed.



    Amazon’s official Kindle lighted cover features contoured, pebble-grain leather available in 7 different colors.

     

     

    Read Kindle easily in the dark with Amazon's revolutionary, all-new lighted leather cover.



    The hinge points are gold-plated to ensure a reliable electrical connection. No batteries required.


    Read easily with one hand, with or without the light on.


    Protect your Kindle on the go, and never be without a reading light

     

    ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good Quality K3 Cover with Handy Light, August 26, 2010
    I bought the burnt orange color cover so I can spot my Kindle where ever I leave it easily--and hopefully not misplace it! The cover is good quality leather, and even with the cover on, I can slip the K3 into my small purse without squeezing it in--something I could not do with my coverless Kindle 2.

    I think for an easy purchase without having to buy a separate book light, the Kindle 3 lighted cover is a good choice. The light worked _great_ reading in bed last night. I could see all of the lighted screen just fine with the upper right corner a bit brighter. See the pics I loaded to customer images for the lighted cover to see the light in action in a dark room, and what the cover looks light from the back.

    Pluses: Built in light that slips securely out of the way, no batteries to replace, better clips/fit than past covers that connect to Kindle, adequate to light the entire screen, no looking for a booklight, no clipping a booklight to my Kindle and scratching or damaging it, the book light LEDs point down towards the screen, so no bright lights in your eyes.

    Minuses: The cover's weight doubles the weight of the Kindle 3 in your hand, the book light stays in one corner and doesn't move around the Kindle, uses more Kindle battery life (it's powered by the Kindle 3 -- and I noticed a definite drain on the battery from using the light)

    UPDATE: I used the Kindle light for a couple days now, and the battery life goes down noticeably as you use the light (esp. if you keep the wireless "On"). Last night I read with the light for about 2 hours after a full charge and today the battery looks down about 15%. At that rate of use (with no wireless constantly "On" and regular reading in the daylight), I estimate the battery will need charging after approx. 1 week.

    If the overall cover+Kindle weight is an issue for you--more than protecting your Kindle and the handy light--then this cover is not for you.

    Kindle Lighted Leather Cover alone = 233 grams or 8.2 oz

    Kindle Lighted Leather Cover + Kindle 3 = 447 grams or 15.75 oz. (almost 1 lb.)

    Thickness: Kindle cover + Kindle 3 = 3/4 inch

    Cover Measurements (with Kindle inside):

    Front: 7 3/4" x 5 1/8" (closer to 3/16")
    Back: SAME as front
    Spine: 7/8"
    Open side (to the right) with Kindle inside: 3/4"

    I have to say I'm getting used to the weight with the cover as I use it. The piece of mind of extra Kindle protection, plus a handy light whenever you need it, is worth the trade off for me. '

    November 20th UPDATE:

    **Still love the cover** and having the light handy without having to think about needing a light _is better than ever_. One thing however, is that the hooks to connect the cover are not sturdy enough, IMO, to take the cover on and off often. The Kindle "wiggles" a bit on the connectors, and be careful not to pull the Kindle forward or up off the back of the cover to avoid bending or breaking the metal connectors. Despite this, I am very happy with this cover after using it almost 3 months now.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Lighted Leather Case - Two Important Concerns, August 31, 2010
    I've noticed that like myself customers have been concerned primarily with two things regarding the new lighted case from amazon. These are: 1)The weight and 2) The uneven lighting. My review will briefly discuss these two things.

    1)The Weight - The lighted leather case is a nice weight, sturdy and comfortable to hold. In ounces it is about the weight of the kindle itself however don't let that concern you. With the case on it feels like a medium sized paperback, however it is far much more comfortable to hold. It's easy to hold the case open like a book (nice for couch and table type reading) or to fold the front back and close it with the bungee so that the bungee doesn't hang around (this is good for bedtime reading).Closing the front back with bungee keeps the case folded in position and you don't have to worry about it bothering you. BTW THIS CASE FOLDS BACK 100% - Very comfortable. In sum very comfortable to read with the case and very sturdy.

    2) The uneven lighting - Amazon's pictures don't do this case justice. The light hits the ENTIRE screen. Yes if you look closely it's brighter in the top right corner then in the bottom left but Amazon's pics make it look the top is lighted while the bottom is dark. There is good light all over the screen. Trust me I'm fussy about these things - the lighting will not bother you, your entire screen will be lighted and it is extremely pleasant to read in the dark.

    *Final Thoughts - Great case, good quality, works well, kindle feels very secure and protected (I would feel comfortable slipping this case into my backpack or suitcase and I think it would sustain some mild impact). Lastly hinges are a non-issue, casing of the kindle will not get damaged with normal or even slightly aggressive use. You could damage the kindle by trying to pull the back of the case but you'd have to really force it to cause any sort of damage to your kindle. The hinges work fine and should not be a concern to any case user.

    Update 1st December 2010:

    Have now been using the case for 3 months. Leather still looks impeccable. Some people expressed concern that the bungee cord might loosen with use. I have not experienced any loosening so far. Quality of the product has proven outstanding. I've occasionally spilled or messed the cover, just a wipe with a damp cloth has cleaned it up, and the case looks like new. Have to admit I enjoy the feel of the case in my hand, there's just something great about taking your kindle to a coffee shop in this case, it just looks and feels so classy. Also with regard to the hinges: I have had no scratches on my kindle or any other issues, so I remain convinced that the hinges are a non issue.

    5-0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Kindle Case Yet, September 2, 2010
    I read in bed every single night, so having my Kindle be able to read in the dark is very important to me. With my Kindle 2 I used a mighty bright light, and with my Kindle 3 I've been using this Lighted Leather cover - and I love it!

    Check out my video review for a size comparison of this case against my Kindle 2 and also an actual hardcover and softcover book, and then a lights out comparison of the Mighty Bright vs Lighted Leather cover.

    Sorry for the shaky camera, it's the best I could do with one hand!

    If you're interested in seeing a video review of the Kindle 3 itself, check out the one I did one here:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R21YU59NMOGKUR

    3-0 out of 5 stars For those that REALLY care, it's not worth the money., August 28, 2010
    I've been an avid Kindle user since Kindle 1, and I take my lights VERY seriously.

    The problem is that the new Kindle 3 cover+light does not evenly light the screen. This results in a very bright top right corner, including the top right of the frame of the Kindle 3. And while the light doesn't glare off the screen, it does glare off my graphite Kindle 3's top right corner, making for constant distraction while reading. The light then gets fainter and fainter in a diagonal line from the top right to bottom left. It's not very fun, unfortunately.

    Now, for convenience, this new cover is fantastic. I have the non-lighted one and the one with the light, and the weight difference isn't very much, and the bulk difference is truly negligible, so kudos to Amazon for this.

    That said, I simply cannot recommend this cover unless you don't mind an incredibly uneven light. I will stick to my Mighty Bright. Yes, it's an addition to the Kindle, but I know that when I sit down to read, I want the pages to "disappear" as I become immersed in my reading. It's very hard for them to do so when the light is so incredibly awkward and uneven, constantly distracting. I'm happy to spend a few extra seconds clipping my light to the back of my Kindle so I can spend hours enjoying my book. That simply wasn't possible with the Kindle Lighted Leather Cover.

    3 stars out of 5.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Compact and well made, August 27, 2010
    For a folio type case, this looks and feels great and works very well. It does add significantly to the weight but that seems a predictable consequence of using leather, making it stiff enough to offer real protection, and building in a light.

    Attaching Kindle is very simple using the directions on the product page. Make sure you heed the warning to work at it until ALL the gold is covered, which tells you Kindle is securely attached. Removing is quite simple: Slide down the top hook and rotate Kindle right off. I'm using a fingertip to do it rather than a fingernail. It's quick and easy enough to attach and detach Kindle that I won't have any difficulty switching to "naked" reading at will.

    The cord seems to me strong enough for its purpose, but only time will tell. When the cover is closed, the cord is buried in a "channel" in the front cover so should not normally be subjected to much stress and strain. I did remove the little "flag" attached to the cord. Even without using fingernails, it's easy to open the cord up. Others have posted about the cord being in the way during reading, especially when holding Kindle and case in "open book" form. I put the cord between Kindle and the back cover, solving the issue to my own satisfaction. YMMV.

    I don't think I'll use the "book style" reading position much. I'll "break the spine" as I did with my K2's case and read with the front cover folded flat against the back. It feels good like that, but when I have good light and will be reading a while I expect I'll do as I did with my K2: Remove Kindle from the case and read "naked." Still, even brand new, the leather folds flat easily and it's comfortable to hold and read.

    The light seems to me to be well placed. I don't get any glare in any of my normal reading positions, so don't have a practical issue with its lack of adjustability. One very nice feature, particularly since it's powered by Kindle's battery, is that it turns off when Kindle turns off. So if you fall asleep reading, your light won't just keep running. I find it a bit stiff to pull out, but I expect it will ease in time. Also maybe stiff is good, as you don't want it just lolling out on its own while you've got it stowed away. Still, folks with difficulty applying much force with their fingers could find this an issue.

    I bought this unseen, intending to return it if it didn't work well. It won't be going back. I may in fact buy another case for travel, as by design this folio style case is open on three sides. In some situations I would want more dust and bang protection, but I still give five stars because this is an unavoidable consequence of this style of design.

    5-0 out of 5 stars well worth it, August 27, 2010
    This is a comparison between mighty bright and the kindle cover light. NOTE: the bottom left of the kindle is the part that receives the less light because it is the farthest away. The light still shines well enough to read the bottom left of the kindle , but the light distribution is not even.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Exceeded my expectations, August 27, 2010
    I was hesitant to buy this cover mostly due to the pictures in its listing, which seem to show a light that doesn't even extend to the opposite corner. The fact that I have not been impressed with the Amazon's Kindle covers in the past didn't help. I went ahead and purchased it because the cover I wanted isn't available yet and I don't like to take my Kindle out and about without a cover. Now I am glad that I went ahead and bought it.

    PROS:

    1. The light is much better than I thought it would be. Using it in a darkened room I found that the light did the job very well. In a pitch black room, it performs even better. While the screen corner opposite the light is a bit dimmer than other areas, there is no problem reading the page at all.

    2. The light gets its power from the Kindle itself, through the gold-plated hinges which attach it to the cover, so batteries are a thing of the past. When your Kindle goes to sleep, the light will go out as well. It will also turn off when you slide it back into the case.

    3. The cover is slim, well-fitted and very easy to attach and detach using the hinges. The inside has good padding. The leather outer surface has a nice pebbled texture with the exception of a smooth area along the edge of the front. While stiff enough to protect the reader, the cover is slight flexible and the front easily folds behind when reading so you can hold your Kindle with one hand if you like.

    4. A great plus is that the cover has an elastic cord that fits into a groove on the front of it. This holds your cover closed (unlike the original Kindle 2 cover that would flop open in your purse & let things slide into it) and easily distinguishes the front from the back--important as many owners of the Kindle 2 cover accidentally opened it from the back, which could cause cracking along the Kindle's spine.


    CONS:

    I haven't found any, really. The light Is a bit hard (stiff) to pull out of the cover, but then you wouldn't want it to be flopping out when you don't want to use it so that is more of a Pro than a Con.

    The one concern I do have is about pulling the light in and out--I wonder if whatever wiring or conductor that is used to get the power from the hinges to the light will eventually break. But that is something to find out down the road. Right now, the more I use this cover, the more I like it.

    4-0 out of 5 stars From the bungee cord thingy to the pull-out light, a solid choice for the Kindle, September 4, 2010
    I ordered this cover because it was the only real game in town at the time. To let you know where I come from with this review... I purchased the 2nd generation Kindle back in March of 2009 with the Amazon cover. Didn't like that one, it actually cracked my mother's Kindle that I purchased shortly thereafter (Amazon replaced it, although it was probably from her opening the wrong side, doesn't matter, this isn't about Amazon great customer service). When that happened, we immediately went looking for a new cover and fell in love with the M-Edge Prodigy with light. Unfortunately, M-Edge isn't offering that for the 3rd generation Kindle, they changed it to have a nylon strap instead of leather and aren't utilizing the hinge technology for the light, which I think is genius and a terrible error on their part. I'm telling you this so you know that I ordered this new Amazon Lighted Cover with a WHOLE LOT of trepidation.

    When deciding on the color, I didn't want black (I wanted purple, but Amazon doesn't offer that *boo*hiss*) and the green was backordered slightly, didn't like the other colors so I decided to get the orange. It looked interesting and since I live in Austin, some UT fan would buy it off me if I hated it, I was sure. It came in and it's the perfect burnt orange color. It might be slightly too tan colored, but it's not vibrant orange by any means. A great almost pumpkin pie color actually.

    So... what did I think of the cover itself?

    I slid the Kindle in there and pulled the light out and... nothing happened. I spent a good 3 to 5 minutes pulling the light out and pushing it back in, looking for a switch, something, anything. I finally gave up and turned the Kindle on and... yeah, the light came on. DUH! It works only if the Kindle is on. This is actually GREAT because I fall asleep reading a good deal and the light will go off when the Kindle goes to sleep after 15 minutes or so. I felt stupid, but at least I didn't call customer service and have them giggle in the background and the stupid lady that can't work the cover, eh?

    ANYWAY... the Kindle slides in easily and the light works great. There is no glare at all because the LED lights are directed down the arm of the light so there's no "direct" light hitting the screen, it just flows down. It is brighter in the upper right than in the lower left because of that, but it's more than adequate. The light is NOT adjustable but you shouldn't need to adjust it either. I have found it really is a genius way of handling it.

    The case itself is not too thick. In fact when I first picked up the case, I thought I had the wrong one because it looked too slim to have a light in there, but it's there. It is a little hard to pull the light out, but I guess the alternative is having it be too easy, right? I really wish they had included corner straps though. I read laying in bed and I worry it's going to flop open and crack the Kindle. I do realize this is probably unfounded and they fixed that flaw, but because I'm paranoid, I did put two small circles of velcro to the back of the Kindle and the cover so it couldn't accidentally bend the hinge system or crack the case. I'm aware this is insane overkill type stuff, so feel free to snicker... I'll wait... done? Okay, onward...

    Now, back to reality... the chance of you opening the Kindle from the wrong side is basically zero. You have to unwrap it using this bungee cord thingy (yes, that's the technical term here, folks). It has a little leather tag on it that says "Amazon Kindle". The tag is a little annoying because I fold the cover back and use the cord to hold it and keep hitting the tag with my hand no matter where I put. I'm thinking of cutting it off. *shrug*

    It does, of course, add some weight to the Kindle. The case, with Kindle and velcro circles weighs 15.5 oz on my postal scale. There's been some discussion if this is "too heavy" but I must say that I don't think so. I read with it folded back and the bungee cord thingy wrapped around the back. I have weak hands that keep me from reading hard backs and large paperback books. I think it's more of the force of holding the book open than the weight, so it's not been an issue at all for me. I also read with it propped up somewhere usually.

    My favorite part is that with the new slim and sleek design of the Kindle and this slim and sleek cover (with a light, no less!) it really is a great size to grab and go, toss in my purse, in the car or my bedside. My other favorite (it's a tie) is the light. It runs off power from the Kindle itself so I'm never without a light. I don't have to find a battery somewhere when it burns out. Amazon knocked it out of the park as far as I'm concerned. I'm taking off a star just for the few little niggle things I mentioned before. After over a week of use though, this is the cover I'm recommending to friends/family at this time.

    Well worth it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Data to compare colors and weights, with and without light, September 4, 2010
    I bought two of these (burgundy for my wife's graphite kindle and green for my white kindle).

    The colors are gorgeous, and exactly as shown in the pictures Amazon has here.

    The look and feel of the leather is very good and should more than satisfy most folks. If you're willing to spend more for even better leather, you'll soon be able to get high-end leather cases from designers like Cole-Haan. (If you're interested, look up their Kindle 2 cases here at Amazon and you're get an idea of what they're likely to offer for Kindle 3).

    We love the design. We've had no trouble hooking our kindles in and out of the case. We love that the light is built in and we will never need to replace its battery. The cover folds completely flat around the back, and the elastic band keeps it there, then it's easy and quite comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    A few reviews here complain about the weight of this case. I disagree. It is not heavy compared to other cases of this type (folio-style hard shell leather cases). My wife and I were up reading for hours last night, holding our kindles, cases on, in one hand, with no fatigue. (We're such an old married couple, that's how exciting our Friday nights are!) I used to have a nook with the same type of case (minus the light), and it was noticeably heavier. If you want something lighter, consider a neoprene sleeve or cloth case.

    My only qualm about the Amazon lighted case is the uneven distribution of light on the screen - very bright in the upper right corner, dim in the lower left corner. It seems this doesn't bother most people here, but it bothers me a bit, enough to knock half a star off my review, but not enough to make me hesitate to recommend this case.

    Some folks complain about the price. It is high, to be sure. But, you'd pay about the same if you bought a good leather case and a separate light. Then you'd have to worry about remembering to pack the light when you travel, making sure it has fresh batteries, making sure you don't lose it, etc etc. For me, the convenience of the built-in light is well worth the price.

    And there's something intangible but very very nice about keeping our kindles in these gorgeous, almost luxuriously nice cases. They are definitely eye-catching and lust-worthy.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good Quality K3 Cover with Handy Light, August 26, 2010
    I bought the burnt orange color cover so I can spot my Kindle where ever I leave it easily--and hopefully not misplace it! The cover is good quality leather, and even with the cover on, I can slip the K3 into my small purse without squeezing it in--something I could not do with my coverless Kindle 2.

    I think for an easy purchase without having to buy a separate book light, the Kindle 3 lighted cover is a good choice. The light worked _great_ reading in bed last night. I could see all of the lighted screen just fine with the upper right corner a bit brighter. See the pics I loaded to customer images for the lighted cover to see the light in action in a dark room, and what the cover looks light from the back.

    Pluses: Built in light that slips securely out of the way, no batteries to replace, better clips/fit than past covers that connect to Kindle, adequate to light the entire screen, no looking for a booklight, no clipping a booklight to my Kindle and scratching or damaging it, the book light LEDs point down towards the screen, so no bright lights in your eyes.

    Minuses: The cover's weight doubles the weight of the Kindle 3 in your hand, the book light stays in one corner and doesn't move around the Kindle, uses more Kindle battery life (it's powered by the Kindle 3 -- and I noticed a definite drain on the battery from using the light)

    UPDATE: I used the Kindle light for a couple days now, and the battery life goes down noticeably as you use the light (esp. if you keep the wireless "On"). Last night I read with the light for about 2 hours after a full charge and today the battery looks down about 15%. At that rate of use (with no wireless constantly "On" and regular reading in the daylight), I estimate the battery will need charging after approx. 1 week.

    If the overall cover+Kindle weight is an issue for you--more than protecting your Kindle and the handy light--then this cover is not for you.

    Kindle Lighted Leather Cover alone = 233 grams or 8.2 oz

    Kindle Lighted Leather Cover + Kindle 3 = 447 grams or 15.75 oz. (almost 1 lb.)

    Thickness: Kindle cover + Kindle 3 = 3/4 inch

    Cover Measurements (with Kindle inside):

    Front: 7 3/4" x 5 1/8" (closer to 3/16")
    Back: SAME as front
    Spine: 7/8"
    Open side (to the right) with Kindle inside: 3/4"

    I have to say I'm getting used to the weight with the cover as I use it. The piece of mind of extra Kindle protection, plus a handy light whenever you need it, is worth the trade off for me. '

    November 20th UPDATE:

    **Still love the cover** and having the light handy without having to think about needing a light _is better than ever_. One thing however, is that the hooks to connect the cover are not sturdy enough, IMO, to take the cover on and off often. The Kindle "wiggles" a bit on the connectors, and be careful not to pull the Kindle forward or up off the back of the cover to avoid bending or breaking the metal connectors. Despite this, I am very happy with this cover after using it almost 3 months now.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Lighted Leather Case - Two Important Concerns, August 31, 2010
    I've noticed that like myself customers have been concerned primarily with two things regarding the new lighted case from amazon. These are: 1)The weight and 2) The uneven lighting. My review will briefly discuss these two things.

    1)The Weight - The lighted leather case is a nice weight, sturdy and comfortable to hold. In ounces it is about the weight of the kindle itself however don't let that concern you. With the case on it feels like a medium sized paperback, however it is far much more comfortable to hold. It's easy to hold the case open like a book (nice for couch and table type reading) or to fold the front back and close it with the bungee so that the bungee doesn't hang around (this is good for bedtime reading).Closing the front back with bungee keeps the case folded in position and you don't have to worry about it bothering you. BTW THIS CASE FOLDS BACK 100% - Very comfortable. In sum very comfortable to read with the case and very sturdy.

    2) The uneven lighting - Amazon's pictures don't do this case justice. The light hits the ENTIRE screen. Yes if you look closely it's brighter in the top right corner then in the bottom left but Amazon's pics make it look the top is lighted while the bottom is dark. There is good light all over the screen. Trust me I'm fussy about these things - the lighting will not bother you, your entire screen will be lighted and it is extremely pleasant to read in the dark.

    *Final Thoughts - Great case, good quality, works well, kindle feels very secure and protected (I would feel comfortable slipping this case into my backpack or suitcase and I think it would sustain some mild impact). Lastly hinges are a non-issue, casing of the kindle will not get damaged with normal or even slightly aggressive use. You could damage the kindle by trying to pull the back of the case but you'd have to really force it to cause any sort of damage to your kindle. The hinges work fine and should not be a concern to any case user.

    Update 1st December 2010:

    Have now been using the case for 3 months. Leather still looks impeccable. Some people expressed concern that the bungee cord might loosen with use. I have not experienced any loosening so far. Quality of the product has proven outstanding. I've occasionally spilled or messed the cover, just a wipe with a damp cloth has cleaned it up, and the case looks like new. Have to admit I enjoy the feel of the case in my hand, there's just something great about taking your kindle to a coffee shop in this case, it just looks and feels so classy. Also with regard to the hinges: I have had no scratches on my kindle or any other issues, so I remain convinced that the hinges are a non issue.

    5-0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Kindle Case Yet, September 2, 2010
    I read in bed every single night, so having my Kindle be able to read in the dark is very important to me. With my Kindle 2 I used a mighty bright light, and with my Kindle 3 I've been using this Lighted Leather cover - and I love it!

    Check out my video review for a size comparison of this case against my Kindle 2 and also an actual hardcover and softcover book, and then a lights out comparison of the Mighty Bright vs Lighted Leather cover.

    Sorry for the shaky camera, it's the best I could do with one hand!

    If you're interested in seeing a video review of the Kindle 3 itself, check out the one I did one here:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R21YU59NMOGKUR

    3-0 out of 5 stars For those that REALLY care, it's not worth the money., August 28, 2010
    I've been an avid Kindle user since Kindle 1, and I take my lights VERY seriously.

    The problem is that the new Kindle 3 cover+light does not evenly light the screen. This results in a very bright top right corner, including the top right of the frame of the Kindle 3. And while the light doesn't glare off the screen, it does glare off my graphite Kindle 3's top right corner, making for constant distraction while reading. The light then gets fainter and fainter in a diagonal line from the top right to bottom left. It's not very fun, unfortunately.

    Now, for convenience, this new cover is fantastic. I have the non-lighted one and the one with the light, and the weight difference isn't very much, and the bulk difference is truly negligible, so kudos to Amazon for this.

    That said, I simply cannot recommend this cover unless you don't mind an incredibly uneven light. I will stick to my Mighty Bright. Yes, it's an addition to the Kindle, but I know that when I sit down to read, I want the pages to "disappear" as I become immersed in my reading. It's very hard for them to do so when the light is so incredibly awkward and uneven, constantly distracting. I'm happy to spend a few extra seconds clipping my light to the back of my Kindle so I can spend hours enjoying my book. That simply wasn't possible with the Kindle Lighted Leather Cover.

    3 stars out of 5.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Compact and well made, August 27, 2010
    For a folio type case, this looks and feels great and works very well. It does add significantly to the weight but that seems a predictable consequence of using leather, making it stiff enough to offer real protection, and building in a light.

    Attaching Kindle is very simple using the directions on the product page. Make sure you heed the warning to work at it until ALL the gold is covered, which tells you Kindle is securely attached. Removing is quite simple: Slide down the top hook and rotate Kindle right off. I'm using a fingertip to do it rather than a fingernail. It's quick and easy enough to attach and detach Kindle that I won't have any difficulty switching to "naked" reading at will.

    The cord seems to me strong enough for its purpose, but only time will tell. When the cover is closed, the cord is buried in a "channel" in the front cover so should not normally be subjected to much stress and strain. I did remove the little "flag" attached to the cord. Even without using fingernails, it's easy to open the cord up. Others have posted about the cord being in the way during reading, especially when holding Kindle and case in "open book" form. I put the cord between Kindle and the back cover, solving the issue to my own satisfaction. YMMV.

    I don't think I'll use the "book style" reading position much. I'll "break the spine" as I did with my K2's case and read with the front cover folded flat against the back. It feels good like that, but when I have good light and will be reading a while I expect I'll do as I did with my K2: Remove Kindle from the case and read "naked." Still, even brand new, the leather folds flat easily and it's comfortable to hold and read.

    The light seems to me to be well placed. I don't get any glare in any of my normal reading positions, so don't have a practical issue with its lack of adjustability. One very nice feature, particularly since it's powered by Kindle's battery, is that it turns off when Kindle turns off. So if you fall asleep reading, your light won't just keep running. I find it a bit stiff to pull out, but I expect it will ease in time. Also maybe stiff is good, as you don't want it just lolling out on its own while you've got it stowed away. Still, folks with difficulty applying much force with their fingers could find this an issue.

    I bought this unseen, intending to return it if it didn't work well. It won't be going back. I may in fact buy another case for travel, as by design this folio style case is open on three sides. In some situations I would want more dust and bang protection, but I still give five stars because this is an unavoidable consequence of this style of design.

    5-0 out of 5 stars well worth it, August 27, 2010
    This is a comparison between mighty bright and the kindle cover light. NOTE: the bottom left of the kindle is the part that receives the less light because it is the farthest away. The light still shines well enough to read the bottom left of the kindle , but the light distribution is not even.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Exceeded my expectations, August 27, 2010
    I was hesitant to buy this cover mostly due to the pictures in its listing, which seem to show a light that doesn't even extend to the opposite corner. The fact that I have not been impressed with the Amazon's Kindle covers in the past didn't help. I went ahead and purchased it because the cover I wanted isn't available yet and I don't like to take my Kindle out and about without a cover. Now I am glad that I went ahead and bought it.

    PROS:

    1. The light is much better than I thought it would be. Using it in a darkened room I found that the light did the job very well. In a pitch black room, it performs even better. While the screen corner opposite the light is a bit dimmer than other areas, there is no problem reading the page at all.

    2. The light gets its power from the Kindle itself, through the gold-plated hinges which attach it to the cover, so batteries are a thing of the past. When your Kindle goes to sleep, the light will go out as well. It will also turn off when you slide it back into the case.

    3. The cover is slim, well-fitted and very easy to attach and detach using the hinges. The inside has good padding. The leather outer surface has a nice pebbled texture with the exception of a smooth area along the edge of the front. While stiff enough to protect the reader, the cover is slight flexible and the front easily folds behind when reading so you can hold your Kindle with one hand if you like.

    4. A great plus is that the cover has an elastic cord that fits into a groove on the front of it. This holds your cover closed (unlike the original Kindle 2 cover that would flop open in your purse & let things slide into it) and easily distinguishes the front from the back--important as many owners of the Kindle 2 cover accidentally opened it from the back, which could cause cracking along the Kindle's spine.


    CONS:

    I haven't found any, really. The light Is a bit hard (stiff) to pull out of the cover, but then you wouldn't want it to be flopping out when you don't want to use it so that is more of a Pro than a Con.

    The one concern I do have is about pulling the light in and out--I wonder if whatever wiring or conductor that is used to get the power from the hinges to the light will eventually break. But that is something to find out down the road. Right now, the more I use this cover, the more I like it.

    4-0 out of 5 stars From the bungee cord thingy to the pull-out light, a solid choice for the Kindle, September 4, 2010
    I ordered this cover because it was the only real game in town at the time. To let you know where I come from with this review... I purchased the 2nd generation Kindle back in March of 2009 with the Amazon cover. Didn't like that one, it actually cracked my mother's Kindle that I purchased shortly thereafter (Amazon replaced it, although it was probably from her opening the wrong side, doesn't matter, this isn't about Amazon great customer service). When that happened, we immediately went looking for a new cover and fell in love with the M-Edge Prodigy with light. Unfortunately, M-Edge isn't offering that for the 3rd generation Kindle, they changed it to have a nylon strap instead of leather and aren't utilizing the hinge technology for the light, which I think is genius and a terrible error on their part. I'm telling you this so you know that I ordered this new Amazon Lighted Cover with a WHOLE LOT of trepidation.

    When deciding on the color, I didn't want black (I wanted purple, but Amazon doesn't offer that *boo*hiss*) and the green was backordered slightly, didn't like the other colors so I decided to get the orange. It looked interesting and since I live in Austin, some UT fan would buy it off me if I hated it, I was sure. It came in and it's the perfect burnt orange color. It might be slightly too tan colored, but it's not vibrant orange by any means. A great almost pumpkin pie color actually.

    So... what did I think of the cover itself?

    I slid the Kindle in there and pulled the light out and... nothing happened. I spent a good 3 to 5 minutes pulling the light out and pushing it back in, looking for a switch, something, anything. I finally gave up and turned the Kindle on and... yeah, the light came on. DUH! It works only if the Kindle is on. This is actually GREAT because I fall asleep reading a good deal and the light will go off when the Kindle goes to sleep after 15 minutes or so. I felt stupid, but at least I didn't call customer service and have them giggle in the background and the stupid lady that can't work the cover, eh?

    ANYWAY... the Kindle slides in easily and the light works great. There is no glare at all because the LED lights are directed down the arm of the light so there's no "direct" light hitting the screen, it just flows down. It is brighter in the upper right than in the lower left because of that, but it's more than adequate. The light is NOT adjustable but you shouldn't need to adjust it either. I have found it really is a genius way of handling it.

    The case itself is not too thick. In fact when I first picked up the case, I thought I had the wrong one because it looked too slim to have a light in there, but it's there. It is a little hard to pull the light out, but I guess the alternative is having it be too easy, right? I really wish they had included corner straps though. I read laying in bed and I worry it's going to flop open and crack the Kindle. I do realize this is probably unfounded and they fixed that flaw, but because I'm paranoid, I did put two small circles of velcro to the back of the Kindle and the cover so it couldn't accidentally bend the hinge system or crack the case. I'm aware this is insane overkill type stuff, so feel free to snicker... I'll wait... done? Okay, onward...

    Now, back to reality... the chance of you opening the Kindle from the wrong side is basically zero. You have to unwrap it using this bungee cord thingy (yes, that's the technical term here, folks). It has a little leather tag on it that says "Amazon Kindle". The tag is a little annoying because I fold the cover back and use the cord to hold it and keep hitting the tag with my hand no matter where I put. I'm thinking of cutting it off. *shrug*

    It does, of course, add some weight to the Kindle. The case, with Kindle and velcro circles weighs 15.5 oz on my postal scale. There's been some discussion if this is "too heavy" but I must say that I don't think so. I read with it folded back and the bungee cord thingy wrapped around the back. I have weak hands that keep me from reading hard backs and large paperback books. I think it's more of the force of holding the book open than the weight, so it's not been an issue at all for me. I also read with it propped up somewhere usually.

    My favorite part is that with the new slim and sleek design of the Kindle and this slim and sleek cover (with a light, no less!) it really is a great size to grab and go, toss in my purse, in the car or my bedside. My other favorite (it's a tie) is the light. It runs off power from the Kindle itself so I'm never without a light. I don't have to find a battery somewhere when it burns out. Amazon knocked it out of the park as far as I'm concerned. I'm taking off a star just for the few little niggle things I mentioned before. After over a week of use though, this is the cover I'm recommending to friends/family at this time.

    Well worth it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Data to compare colors and weights, with and without light, September 4, 2010
    Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

    Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
    Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
    Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
    Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

    The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
    Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
    Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
    Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
    Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
    Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
    Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

    4-0 out of 5 stars (4.5 stars) Very good, and not THAT heavy!, August 28, 2010
    I bought two of these (burgundy for my wife's graphite kindle and green for my white kindle).

    The colors are gorgeous, and exactly as shown in the pictures Amazon has here.

    The look and feel of the leather is very good and should more than satisfy most folks. If you're willing to spend more for even better leather, you'll soon be able to get high-end leather cases from designers like Cole-Haan. (If you're interested, look up their Kindle 2 cases here at Amazon and you're get an idea of what they're likely to offer for Kindle 3).

    We love the design. We've had no trouble hooking our kindles in and out of the case. We love that the light is built in and we will never need to replace its battery. The cover folds completely flat around the back, and the elastic band keeps it there, then it's easy and quite comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    A few reviews here complain about the weight of this case. I disagree. It is not heavy compared to other cases of this type (folio-style hard shell leather cases). My wife and I were up reading for hours last night, holding our kindles, cases on, in one hand, with no fatigue. (We're such an old married couple, that's how exciting our Friday nights are!) I used to have a nook with the same type of case (minus the light), and it was noticeably heavier. If you want something lighter, consider a neoprene sleeve or cloth case.

    My only qualm about the Amazon lighted case is the uneven distribution of light on the screen - very bright in the upper right corner, dim in the lower left corner. It seems this doesn't bother most people here, but it bothers me a bit, enough to knock half a star off my review, but not enough to make me hesitate to recommend this case.

    Some folks complain about the price. It is high, to be sure. But, you'd pay about the same if you bought a good leather case and a separate light. Then you'd have to worry about remembering to pack the light when you travel, making sure it has fresh batteries, making sure you don't lose it, etc etc. For me, the convenience of the built-in light is well worth the price.

    And there's something intangible but very very nice about keeping our kindles in these gorgeous, almost luxuriously nice cases. They are definitely eye-catching and lust-worthy. ... Read more


    9. AmazonBasics High-Speed HDMI Cable (6.5 Feet/2.0 Meters)[Supports 3D + Audio Return Channel]
    Electronics
    -- our price: $7.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B001T9NUJE
    Manufacturer: AmazonBasics
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    AmazonBasics products are quality electronics accessories offered at a great value. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great inexpensive HDMI cables, December 1, 2009
    It is a relief to find HDMI cables that are inexpensive and deliver high quality video. I paid $40 for a 4ft cable at Circuit City a year ago, and less than half that price for the 10ft cable from Amazon.

    As an electrical engineer I can tell you copper is copper. Unless Monster cable has coaxial wire for each signal line, which they don't because then the cable would be 10x larger than it is, then it's just copper wire inside a shield. There's still going to be crosstalk and capacitive coupling and all that stuff. All that "gas filled" stuff doesn't matter either. If you look at the mathematical equasions for the frequency response of an unshielded wire, you'd know none of this stuff makes any major difference.

    The biggest thing to avoid, if you can, are ferrite cores on a cable. Ferrite cores are those black blob things that overmold the cable near one or both of the connectors. Ferrite cores act as high frequency filters and may cause signal degradation. They are typically used to comply with FCC laws and other regulatory bodies' radiated emissions laws. They add cost to the cable and typically degrade performance.

    Regarding expensive cables, HDMI or otherwise, what no one asks is the most fundamental question - Why? Let's assume Monster cable isn't lying and they can provide 300 GHz bandwidth or whatever they claim. Why do you need a cable that outperforms so much? It's like owning a car that can go 1000 MPH but the speed limit is 55MPH. In my field, that's called "over-engineering" which equates to unnecessary additional cost, which is exactly the problem Amazon has solved by sourcing this simple low cost HDMI cable.

    While I'm soapboxing, gold plating isn't necessary either. Silver is the best conductor, followed by Copper, and then Gold (third best). Stainless Steel isn't far behind. The only reason gold plating is "better" is Gold does not corrode (but neither does stainless steel... they actually gold plate the stainless steel, how dumb is that?). If you are using your cables in a house where the humidity & temp is relatively constant, you should never need gold. As far as I can tell, Gold is just a gimmick to charge more for cables.

    3-0 out of 5 stars HDMI 1.4 cable lacking data channel support but still OK as an HDMI 1.3x, gets full Amazon support, October 1, 2009
    I got an email from Amazon announcing their new line of AmazonBasics cables. They said that their goal was to make a high quality cable and sell it at a very reasonable price.

    They have achieved that goal.

    I ordered two of the six foot HDMI cables and on nine foot cable for about eight bucks each.

    The cable came in a simple cardboard box with nothing but a twist tie aside from the cable (which is a good thing, I hate the plastic blister packs that cut your hands and unnecessary stuff in the box to go in the landfill).

    The cable has a solid, quality feel to it. Nothing feels cheap or chintzy.

    Connecting the cable between my TV and several compontents including my brand new Samsung Blu Ray player, the connection just worked every time.

    For comparison purposes, I bought a $50 super delux, high end, will solve all the problems in your life (according to the sales guy) HDMI cable at Radio Shack. Connecting the AmazonBasics cable to the same Blu Ray player as the fancy cable I saw **NO DIFFERENCE**!

    Looking into it I found out that HDMI is a standard that is run by an organization. In order for anyone to make an HDMI cable and put the HDMI logo on it (which the AmazonBasics cable does), the cable must be made to the HDMI organizations standards. So the group basically tells the companies how the cable must be made in order to be given the HDMI logo. The long and short of it is that cheap cable or expensive cable, it must work to the same standards in order to have the HDMI logo.

    So, super fancy $50 cable gets thrown back across the counter to Radio Shack guy for return and AmazonBasics cable gets a new home in back of my entertainment center.

    I'm now going to purchase several more of these for family and friends to have as spares since they don't know any better and will get suckered by the sales guy at best buy into buying a $50 Monster Cable HDMI cable that does nothing better than this one.

    3-0 out of 5 stars cable just ok..., April 3, 2010
    I know that retail HDMI cables are priced extremely high and thought this cable was a real bargain by comparison. But, when substituted for another cable, this one gave dropouts in video and audio with the screen going to a speckled black and white pattern. Maybe I got the only bad one....maybe not.

    I have purchased many items from Amazon over the years and have always been satisfied with price, quality and service. This is the first item that has not measured up.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great inexpensive HDMI cables, December 1, 2009
    It is a relief to find HDMI cables that are inexpensive and deliver high quality video. I paid $40 for a 4ft cable at Circuit City a year ago, and less than half that price for the 10ft cable from Amazon.

    As an electrical engineer I can tell you copper is copper. Unless Monster cable has coaxial wire for each signal line, which they don't because then the cable would be 10x larger than it is, then it's just copper wire inside a shield. There's still going to be crosstalk and capacitive coupling and all that stuff. All that "gas filled" stuff doesn't matter either. If you look at the mathematical equasions for the frequency response of an unshielded wire, you'd know none of this stuff makes any major difference.

    The biggest thing to avoid, if you can, are ferrite cores on a cable. Ferrite cores are those black blob things that overmold the cable near one or both of the connectors. Ferrite cores act as high frequency filters and may cause signal degradation. They are typically used to comply with FCC laws and other regulatory bodies' radiated emissions laws. They add cost to the cable and typically degrade performance.

    Regarding expensive cables, HDMI or otherwise, what no one asks is the most fundamental question - Why? Let's assume Monster cable isn't lying and they can provide 300 GHz bandwidth or whatever they claim. Why do you need a cable that outperforms so much? It's like owning a car that can go 1000 MPH but the speed limit is 55MPH. In my field, that's called "over-engineering" which equates to unnecessary additional cost, which is exactly the problem Amazon has solved by sourcing this simple low cost HDMI cable.

    While I'm soapboxing, gold plating isn't necessary either. Silver is the best conductor, followed by Copper, and then Gold (third best). Stainless Steel isn't far behind. The only reason gold plating is "better" is Gold does not corrode (but neither does stainless steel... they actually gold plate the stainless steel, how dumb is that?). If you are using your cables in a house where the humidity & temp is relatively constant, you should never need gold. As far as I can tell, Gold is just a gimmick to charge more for cables.

    3-0 out of 5 stars HDMI 1.4 cable lacking data channel support but still OK as an HDMI 1.3x, gets full Amazon support, October 1, 2009
    WHO NEEDS IT?

    This cable will work well with anything that supports HDMI 1.3x but it's built to comply with the higher HDMI 1.4a standard of which it is a PARTIAL implementation (no Ethernet). If what you need is a true HDMI 1.4x cable, then the one to get is that which is described as "HDMI with Internet" which adds the data channel and support for higher video resolutions.

    You may consider this product if you have TWO devices that support the HDMI 1.4 standard such as TVs, receivers or Blu-ray players. For these, the cable will carry through HD images and will allow you TV to send audio data BACK to your receiver if so connected, therefore eliminating the need for one dedicated audio cable. This specific cable will probably NOT support HDMI 1.4 Ethernet feature. You may also consider this cable if you currently need an extra HDMI 1.3 cable but you are planning to to replace your existing equipment with some HDMI 1.4-ready hardware in the near future.

    Unless either of the above is true, you will not need this cable and, given that the HDMI 1.4 standards aren't set in stone yet - this cable complies with the recently released HDMI 1.4a specs for 3D - you should be better off waiting for the dust to settle. Keep in mind that BOTH connected devices need to support the HDMI 1.4 standard for this cable to make a difference and that it is NOT possible to upgrade any existing equipment (TV, Blu-ray player) to support HDMI 1.4.


    HOW GOOD IS IT?

    On my equipment, this worked as well as any older HDMI 1.3x cable. It replaced an existing 'cheap' wire at the back of my entertainment center and, nothing unexpected happened. The picture on my TV was as beautiful as before. The cable's short length (2 meters) and its 'high speed' certification make me confident that this cable will serve me well.


    Briefly, this cable:

    - Behaves as a HDMI 1.3x 'high speed' or 'category 2' cable. If all you need is HDMI 1.3x then go for it or go for any other cheap HDMI 1.3x wire.
    - As a 'high speed' HDMI 1.4 cable, it supports video resolutions of at least 1080p including in 3D.
    - The 'data channel' (Ethernet support) is missing but it that would only work with HDMI 1.4 ready equipment so I'm not sure if it would be missed for the next couple of years.
    - The advertised audio return channel is another HDMI 1.4 feature that most currently owned equipment can't take advantage of.
    - It should support all the HDMI 1.4 extra color palettes because those are implemented by the HDMI 1.4 compliant connected equipment NOT by the cable.


    WHY 3 STARS

    A 3-star rating should be fair (and I am not factoring in the price) because this cable, while working perfectly as an HDMI 1.3x, is an incomplete HDMI 1.4 implementation. Incomplete HDMI 1.4 implementations are allowed by the HDMI consortium but there I see no advantage in purchasing a feature-crippled cable when full-featured alternatives are available. 'Niche' HDMI cables make sense form a vendor's point of view because a buyer may be willing to pay more for such an item but their marketing can only confuse and annoy the buyers. It should cost a vendor about the same to manufacture a 'universal' HDMI 1.4 wire as it does to make an incomplete (niche) product. In fact there may be economies of scale in producing 'universal' HDMI 1.4 cables only so marketing seems to be the only reason we get to see these intentionally crippled products.

    My recommendation would be NOT to buy this cable. Get the 'High-Speed with Ethernet' if you want/need HDMI 1.4 or get an HDMI 1.3x otherwise.



    END OF REVIEW

    ______________________________________________________


    What follows is the byproduct of me attempting to clarify 'HDMI 1.4' for myself and understanding this specific product's features. I thought I'd share.


    WHAT'S IN A NAME? (understanding this cable's features)

    HDMI 1.4 is a new HDMI standard adopted in 2009, backward compatible with HDMI 1.3. This cable should work with your existing equipment.
    - HIGH SPEED indicates that this cable supports resolutions of 1080p or higher and 3D video (unlike the HDMI 1.4 STANDARD cables which, believe it or not, are limited to 720p/1080i - why? nobody knows).
    - ETHERNET (NOT supported by this specific product) means that a cable supports a full-duplex 100 Mb/sec Ethernet connection - if you have 2 HDMI 1.4 ready devices and they both need an network connection, this cable will carry through the Ethernet datastream to the second device, therefore saving you the need for one extra Ethernet cable.
    - Audio Return Channel (supported) would save you the need of a dedicated audio cable between 2 HDMI 1.4 compliant devices, usually a TV that might get content directly from a USB storage device or the Ethernet and an HDMI 1.4 compliant receiver.
    - HDMI 1.4a brought HDMI in line with the recently agreed upon 3D TV industry standards but, consistent with HDMI's consortium's encouraging vendors to avoid talking about the actual version their HDMI cables are implementing, we simply don't know whether this one is HDMI 1.4 or HDMI 1.4a. Since '3D' is mentioned it's probably safe to assume HDMI 1.4a.


    THE HDMI 1.4x DIFFERENCE

    HDMI 1.4 allows for the following new features:

    - Ethernet Channel - allows for the 2 connected devices to communicate with each other and share one network connection.
    - Audio Return Channel - eliminates the need of a second cable if you want to send audio from your TV back to your receiver.
    - 3D - It's supported by HDMI 1.3x but HDMI 1.4a specifically supports all the currently agreed-upon industry standards
    - 4K resolution - good to have it but there is nothing on today's market that would take advantage of this
    - Expanded support for new color spaces - by supporting sYCC601, AdobeRGB, and AdobeYCC601 it better aligns your display with the color spaces supported by digital cameras.
    - Type D connector - the 'Micro' connector is to be used by small, portable devices with supported resolutions of up to 1080p. Be aware that there are now THREE different HDMI connectors: standard, mini and micro.


    The HDMI Consortium defines 4 broad types of HDMI 1.4 cables:

    * Standard HDMI Cable
    * High Speed HDMI Cable
    * Standard HDMI Cable with Ethernet
    * High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet

    Of all of the above, only the a 'High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet' makes sense.

    Standard cables are limited to lower-resolution displays up to (approx. 720p or 1080i). High Speed cables support higher-resolution display (e.g. 1080p). They can deliver all video content currently defined for the HDMI standard (i.e. more than two 1080p/60 video streams, including 3D). HDMI cables with Ethernet are capable of sending 100/mbps over the HDMI Ethernet Channel. Since it is not likely that many HDMI 1.4 'standard' cables will be made or sold, I suspect that the crippled 'standard' type exists only to allow for calling the cables that support 1080p 'high speed' which sounds good and high-end.

    --
    >> Brush your teeth, it's the law! <<

    5-0 out of 5 stars AmazonBasics makes a very good HDMI cable, October 11, 2009
    I got an email from Amazon announcing their new line of AmazonBasics cables. They said that their goal was to make a high quality cable and sell it at a very reasonable price.

    They have achieved that goal.

    I ordered two of the six foot HDMI cables and on nine foot cable for about eight bucks each.

    The cable came in a simple cardboard box with nothing but a twist tie aside from the cable (which is a good thing, I hate the plastic blister packs that cut your hands and unnecessary stuff in the box to go in the landfill).

    The cable has a solid, quality feel to it. Nothing feels cheap or chintzy.

    Connecting the cable between my TV and several compontents including my brand new Samsung Blu Ray player, the connection just worked every time.

    For comparison purposes, I bought a $50 super delux, high end, will solve all the problems in your life (according to the sales guy) HDMI cable at Radio Shack. Connecting the AmazonBasics cable to the same Blu Ray player as the fancy cable I saw **NO DIFFERENCE**!

    Looking into it I found out that HDMI is a standard that is run by an organization. In order for anyone to make an HDMI cable and put the HDMI logo on it (which the AmazonBasics cable does), the cable must be made to the HDMI organizations standards. So the group basically tells the companies how the cable must be made in order to be given the HDMI logo. The long and short of it is that cheap cable or expensive cable, it must work to the same standards in order to have the HDMI logo.

    So, super fancy $50 cable gets thrown back across the counter to Radio Shack guy for return and AmazonBasics cable gets a new home in back of my entertainment center.

    I'm now going to purchase several more of these for family and friends to have as spares since they don't know any better and will get suckered by the sales guy at best buy into buying a $50 Monster Cable HDMI cable that does nothing better than this one.

    3-0 out of 5 stars cable just ok..., April 3, 2010
    These cables are VERY thin/provide little shielding. It worked BUT my dvd player doesnt get signal sometimes. I switched over to a quality cable and the device gets detected everytime. My conclusion is these cables will get you by but Id pay a bit more for quality cable. Go with the MediaBridge it is twice as thick/more shield. If you are baller go w/ Monster.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Poor Quality, October 9, 2010
    I purchased this "inexpensive" HDMI cable looking to save a few dollars. When the cable arrived, I tried it in every video component I have. None of them worked with this cable. The connections were loose and flimsy. I have other "inexpensive" HDMI cables that have performed flawlessly for years. Don't waste your money or time with this product. Pay a few extra dollars and get a better cable.

    I will be a little more specific:

    When connected to my PS3, the cable caused the PS3 to flicker and eventually stop video feed to the receiver all together. Same result when connected to Apple TV. I switched the cable to the video out on my media center PC. The screen had terrible video distortion and constant flickering. Same result when used with my Dish Network Receiver.

    I have never felt compelled to leave feedback on any product purchased from Amazon in the past, but I was very dissappointed with the performance of this cable.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Limited capabilities in this cable, January 19, 2010
    HDMI cables are notorious for being expensive. I assumed the prices were over inflated just because people who were plunking big bucks for a new, big,flat screen TV would be gullible enough to take the bate and overpay. Sadly, my theory was wrong. This Amazon cable cost about half of what I paid for one of similar length at Sam's Club. It is fine as long as your are not transferring fast video over a long distance. When I use the cable to connect my laptop to the Big Screen TV, surfing the 'net poses no problem. But when I try to play a DVD through the same laptop, the screen motion becomes jerky and fast moving objects "tear apart" momentarily. When I swap out the Amazon cable for the Sam's Club version, the problems disappear. There is a physical difference in the cables. The Amazon cable is pencil thin and supple. The Sam's Club cable is thick and chunky. Obviously the Sam's Club cable has more "stuff" inside. This can only be shielding. Bottom line? For SHORT distances (less than 6' and preferably 3'), the Amazon cable is fine. But if you are transferring video, you will need the costlier thicker version. I suppose the old adage "you get what you pay for" applies here.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Great Looking Cable, Poor Quality, November 11, 2009
    I purchased 3 of these HDMI cables and only 1 worked properly . 2 of them caused intermittent connectivity. When they did work, they caused display failures like bright yellow color-shift in the entire image, or horizontal green blocks in the picture. These problems were encountered using multiple HDMI inputs on a new Panasonic TV using both an Apple TV and a Roku digital video player. Swapping out these cables for known-good cables cleared the problems. Amazon, your house brand cables are a nice idea, just poorly executed.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Too Good to be True?, January 19, 2010
    I know that retail HDMI cables are priced extremely high and thought this cable was a real bargain by comparison. But, when substituted for another cable, this one gave dropouts in video and audio with the screen going to a speckled black and white pattern. Maybe I got the only bad one....maybe not.

    I have purchased many items from Amazon over the years and have always been satisfied with price, quality and service. This is the first item that has not measured up.

    5-0 out of 5 stars High Quality, Excellent Warranty, December 22, 2009
    It seems like a review of an HDMI cable can't be written without arguing the philosophy of whether it's worth it to pay exhorbitant amounts of money for an A/V cable, or if a "cheap" cable will do the trick. Rather than reinvent the wheel I'll simply say that:

    1) This cable is about $6 (and eligible for free Prime shipping)
    2) Amazon offers a one year warranty
    3) Amazon has an excellent returns policy

    Given those items, what have you got to lose by giving this cable a try? If you aren't satisfied, return it and then spend the big bucks.

    Having said that, I use it to connect my PS3 (i.e. my BluRay player) to my HDTV and my personal experience with this cable has been positive. The cable is sturdy and feels well-made, unlike some other $6 cables I have used in the past. The picture/sound quality meets my expectations and I could discern no problems whatsoever. Overall I am pleased enough that I will purchase the same cable again in the future. I also plan to give other Amazon branded cables a try as needed.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Intermittent problems, June 19, 2010
    I bought one of these cables as part of a Christmas present, which included a Sony Blu-Ray player, for friends. Immediately they had problems with the signal. The movie would play and then the picture would go "black and white" or just fritz out. They called Sony support who suggested reversing the cable. This works better but there are still times when the cable 'needs' moved because the connections just are solid enough. I will not buy another AmazonBasics cable. It's Monster cables for me. ... Read more


    10. Scotch Thermal Laminator 15.5 Inches x 6.75 Inches x 3.75 Inches, 2 Roller System (TL901)
    Office Product
    list price: $80.49 -- our price: $19.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0010JEJPC
    Manufacturer: 3M Office Products
    Sales Rank: 1
    Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Scotch(TM) Thermal Laminator TL901 will laminate items up to 9 inches wide. It features a two roller system that has two temperature settings. It can be used for photographs, documents, recipes and much more.This laminator will laminate items up to 5mil thick, including popular 3mil and 5mil pouches. Businesses and families can always find a use for a laminator that is built with 3M quality and durable, intelligent construction. The Scotch(TM) TL901 laminating system laminates letter-size, legal-size, business-card size, photo-size and other papers up to 9 inches wide, your photographs and important documents along with dozens of other projects and crafts. Practical and fun, you can set it up anywhere and anytime. Protect your licenses, make luggage tags, preserve invitations, and create reusable menus, bookmarks, and gifts--you're limited only by your imagination. Plus, the Scotch(TM) TL901 laminating system is portable and lightweight (only 5.4 pounds), taking up just 9 inches of your valuable desk surface. Includes a jam release lever. What's in the Box: Laminator, two 11" x 9.4" double-sided lamination pouches, instructions, warranty information. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great home laminator, April 1, 2009
    I purchased this laminating machine in a store, but wanted to give a definite positive review! I have had this machine running since I got it, and just love it! It's simple to use, works wonderfully and doesnt' take up a ton of space. I have a special needs toddler, who uses picture cards to communicate her needs, and this has made over 100 PECS cards for her book, and now she's even taking them to Pre-k to use them as well! Wonderful machine that is making my little one's life so much better! I am also having tons of fun using it for my small business for price lists and advertising! Great little machine!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good Laminator, September 19, 2008
    Good all-purpose laminator for the price. Needed to run through a couple of times for thicker sheets. But I am happy with the product. I laminated 75 schedule cards in a row without a breakdown. A good deal.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent customer service - great product, June 21, 2010
    This is a great little laminator, and I've used it even more than expected. But during a momentary lapse of reason, I tried to use a partial pouch - one that was not sealed on the bottom. They tell you not to do it, but I did anyway. Everything disappeared into the machine, and didn't come back out. It didn't look like I could open it up without destroying it, so I called their 800 number. They were so nice, and they sent me a mailing label to ship it back for free. They said that if they could fix it, they would do so and send it back. If they couldn't, they would send me a new one. All free of charge - which is incredible since it was my own fault for doing what they said not to do. I just got a new one in the mail. I only paid $30 for this, yet they replaced it free of charge when I messed it up. You just can't do any better than that!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good little home machine!, December 31, 2008
    I've been using a small card size thermal laminator to make cards, bookmarks and jewelry with for a few years now. A friend of mine gave me this one for my birthday as an upgrade.
    I love it. It takes about 10 minutes to be ready and has an indicator light to show it's hot enough. A double roller system sends your document through the laminator smoothly at the right speed.
    It's built for 3mm and 5mm lamination pouches which is fine for home and home office use.
    If you do get a jam, the unit has a release button to pull out the document and unjam the machine.
    It's very simple to use, intuitive but it also is illustrated with how to feed your document in as well. You put whatever your laminating into a sleeve then put it into the paper feed in the back of the machine.
    There are 2 heat settings. One for 3mm and one for 5. It handles US Letter sized items easily.
    Possible craft uses:
    I use mine for jewelry, cutting out small images and sealing them into small pouches for less waste. After lamination, cut around the image leaving a margin of the clear laminate, use a small punch to make a hole and attach to jump ring
    bookmarks- pressed flowers make wonderful mementos of special days out
    recipe cards
    dry erase boards
    use in duct tape crafts with nice images. A couple comic book pages laminated can be taped together to make a very unique purse.
    It's a good home laminator for home office and craft use.
    Because of the 10 minute warm up time, I recommend having a few projects ready to go at a time so you can just do them all at once after the unit is heated.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Works just as expected, December 4, 2008
    This is a great laminator, works well for my use, which is occasional. I think I've used this about 3 times a week since I purchased it, and it works just as I expected it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Buy!, August 4, 2010
    I snagged this bad boy on a Lightning Deal for 20 bucks this weekend. It arrived yesterday (thank you Amazon Prime!). As soon as I got it, I set it up and used it a few times and I must say, I'm very, very impressed. This is easily worth the full price, so even more excited I got it for 20 bucks. Setup took less than a minute ... just take it out of the box and snap the feeder tray into place. That's it! Heating up took appx 5 minutes. I fed a couple items through and it is absolutely silent. I mean NO noise whatsoever when it's laminating. It autofeeds the item through and takes less than 30 seconds to spit it out the other side. The laminating looked very professional. I could not be happier with this purchase. Highly recommend!

    5-0 out of 5 stars LOVE IT!, March 24, 2009
    I did not buy this from this seller. However, I love this laminator. Most are far more costly than this one. This one is great for personal use. I laminate pictures, my daughter's art projects, etc. It does take about 3 minutes to be "ready" but for the price that is fine with me.

    5-0 out of 5 stars very good and fun, easy to use and operate, recommended, November 7, 2008
    I use it to laminate my kids art works and all those certificates, it is very to use and operate and it's fun too.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Very good little laminator, October 8, 2009
    I needed a laminator to make some ID cards for a club. After looking at a few models here and reading comments, this one looked like a good pick. So far, so good. I have only used it a couple of weeks for about 25 cards, in conjuction with the Fellowes 7 mil business card pouches. This model has a switch for 3 or 5 mil, so of course I used the 5 mil setting and it's working fine. It takes a minute or two to warm up fully, and then the cards run through in just a few seconds. I did have to prop it up a bit to give a little "gravity assist" so that the cards would drop out. I haven't run anything bigger throught it either, so can't speak to that. But for small projects this looks like a very handy device that works well. ... Read more


    11. Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS4GSDHC6E
    Electronics
    -- our price: $6.75
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B001ECRZJM
    Manufacturer: TRANSCEND
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Fully Compatible with SDA 2.0 specification. Suitable for SDHC compliant devices, MLC flash chip with High Speed transfer rate. Perfect for highend digital devices. Please make sure your device can support SDHC format before you purchase! SDHC host devices can use both SD and SDHC memory cards. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great affordable SDHC card, March 28, 2008
    In the past, I bought a Transcend 8GB SDHC card for my Canon SD1000 camera. I recently bought the Transcend 16GB SDHC for my new Canon SX20IS. Both cards work very well and I've had no problems with it so far. I wanted to take this opportunity to update my review since my original review was also posted (by Amazon) for the 16GB card. This is because the only difference between these two cards is the different capacity. So, if you're in the market for an affordable high quality SDHC card, this may be the one for you. Sorry, I kind of sounded like a used car salesman right there, didn't I? I assure you that I don't work for Transcend. But, here's why I think this card is awesome:

    Pros:

    -Affordable!

    -Large capacity

    -Class 6 read/write speed (which is very fast... but is no longer the fastest class available)

    -Lifetime warranty (at least that's what the package says :)

    -Transcend is a reputable company that's been making memory products for a very long time. ( I swear to the tech Gods that I don't work for them!) Other reputable and reliable memory card companies include Kingston and PNY. All three of these companies have been making memory chips for many, many years.


    Cons:

    - I can' really think of any "Cons" about this card. But here's the 2 closest things I can come up with right now: (1) "Class 6" is no longer the fastest speed available and (2) This card does NOT make coffee for you in the morning, do your dishes for you, give you compliments when you're having a bad day, or magically improve your photography skills.




    IMPORTANT SPECIAL NOTES ABOUT SDHC MEMORY CARDS:

    -SDHC cards are not compatible with most older SD cameras, SD devices, or SD card readers.

    -SDHC cards are rated by speed using different "classes". There are currently 4 data transfer speed classes available for SDHC cards. These classes are "class 2, class 4, and class 6, and the new class 10. For example, "Class 2" would have the slowest read/write speed while "Class 6" has the fastest read/write speed. So if you have a device in which speed may play a crucial role, make sure you buy a higher "class" SDHC card. Please note that this SDHC card no longer has the fastest read/write speed available. There is now a new class, called "Class 10". Class 6 has a minimum read/write speed of 6MB/sec... while Class 2 has minimum speed rating of 2MB/sec, and Class 4 is 4MB/sec. Starting to see the pattern?


    SO WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "SD CARDS" AND "SDHC CARDS?

    SDHC is basically an upgrade to the older SD cards. The reason they upgraded it was to achieve greater data transfer speeds AND capacity than previously possible with normal SD cards... and to do this, they had to redesign the card (which is why it's not compatible with normal SD devices). This was necessary because digital cameras and digital video cameras these days have higher resolutions, which equate to larger file sizes and faster data transfer needs.

    Now that many digital cameras also can record HD video, you may consider getting a larger capacity card because video takes much more space than photos. The size of the video varies from camera to camera depending on what resolution and video compression the camera uses. If you plan on taking lots of video (especially HD video), I would consider getting at least a 16GB card. Check your camera specifications to see how many minutes per Gig of memory your camera can capture ...to gauge how big of a memory card you'll want to get to meet your needs.

    Special Note on regular SD Cards:
    If you primarily take casual photos and don't need a exceptionally fast read/write capable card, you should know that newer cameras that take "SDHC" cards will also work with older normal "SD" cards. These older cards are cheaper than the new SDHC cards, so this may be something to consider. So to sum things up, newer cameras will take SDHC and regular SD cards, but older cameras that use SD cards may not be able to use SDHC cards. This is because newer technology is usually made to be compatible with older technology (the technical term used to describe this is "backwards compatibility") ... but older technology may not have the hardware necessary to run newer tech (technical term used is "obsolete"... just kidding! ;)

    I hope I haven't confused everybody by going into this much detail, but I can't help being the nerd that I am. If you are confused, don't hesitate to comment on this post and I will try my best to answer your questions. Also, any feedback is always welcome!

    Conclusion: Buy the card if you have a new device that uses SDHC. It rocks! (This message has been approved by the "Duke of New Mexico")


    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Card - Good Card for SDHC Compatible Devices, May 10, 2008
    UPDATE - March 2, 2010: This review was originally written for the 4 GB class 6 SDHC card, but the reviews have been grouped for all class 6 SDHC cards in the 4, 8, 16 and 32 GB sizes. All the cards should perform similarly since they are all class 6 and all made by Transcend. However, I will have to check which cards I have used hands on. I believe I only own the 4GB and 8GB cards. I will update the review further. If you have concerns regarding the 16GB or 32GB sizes, you should seek out the reviews tagged with the product links from those cards.


    The Transcend 4GB SDHC CARD (Class 6) is a great card for the price. I was at first a little skeptical about the brand, but I buy way too many memory cards to ignore a good price when I see one. And I'm happy to report that I've experienced decent performance and reliability issues with this card. That's as compared to other cards I own including SanDisk, PNY and Kingston.

    As long as your devices are compatible with the SDHC format, this card is a good buy. 4 GB is a nice size though I do prefer 8 GB capacity for high capacity storage.

    The class 6 speed is the fastest speed available in mass market SDHC cards. Class 6 guarantees minimum transfer speeds of 6 MBs, but I've gotten speeds up to 20Mbs! That makes this card perfect for storing pictures in RAW image formats.

    The Class 6 speed is on par with the Sandisk Extreme III cards that on average are about $15 to $20 more per card. If you don't have an SDHC reader, you may opt to get the package with a reader included to download your pics. If not you can just transfer your pics directly from your camera with your card still inserted. An SDHC card reader can be bought separately if your PC doesn't have a compatible slot.

    General SDHC and SD Card Tips

    There are a few tips that I've learned the hard way through buying TOO MANY different memory cards.
    1. Make sure your device is compatible with the card! Even in regular SD cards, some older electronics aren't compatible with that large of a size (2 GB). In terms of SDHC cards, make sure your camera or other device is SDHC compatible. SDHC is different from regular SD and only newer devices tend to have built-in compatibility
    2. Once you install this in your camera or device, you will generally want to format the card with your compatible device's interface. That is because the standard formats for certain devices, particularly Canon, are different from the factory installed format
    3. Just like your devices, most computer SD card readers are not compatible with the SDHC format. So use a card reader or download the pictures via USB connection to the camera with the card still installed.
    4. For some reason, placing the card in the locked position allows some older laptops to still read it. This is just to be used in a pinch however, and it won't apply to all systems
    5. If you did not properly format your card, you may be able to save things to it and then have them "disappear." If this happens to you, make sure you use the software recovery tools BEFORE you try to save anything else to your card. That way, you can retrieve your images without over-writing them.
    6. Make sure you know what you are going to use this card for. Once you have set up everything and ensured it's all compatible, you still have to decide on speed. If you are using this for storing RAW images instead of JPEGs or HD video, step up to the faster class 6 speed format if you can afford it.
    7. If you are going to pay more for a faster speed, make sure your device can benefit from it. I've read, for example, that Kodak cameras are set to a fixed voltage and cannot go faster than standard speed. So the extra cash spent on Class 4, 5, or 6 is basically wasted.

    Conclusion

    It's great to have several extra cards on hand just in case. This 4 GB card is a nice performer. If you have a high capacity camera (10 Megapixels or more) and are storing videos or RAW images, the extra cash for the 8GB card is worth it. Or you may want to step up to the larger 16 GB size that is now available.

    Enjoy!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 32 GB SDHC Review, May 25, 2009
    Before you drop 120~$ for a SD card ask yourself, Do you really need 32GB card? because the card itself with same specs costs only 35$ for the 16GB version, anyway here is info that might help you

    Pros :
    1- Class 6 Card the(guaranteed minimum Read/write speed of 6MB/s)
    2- My Test Results 18.2-18.5MB/S Read - 11.6-11.8 Write (very stable)
    3- Faster than average cards and almost close to top speed SDHC cards
    4- 32GB in a single small chip is awesome(You can use it as a portable HD once in a while, i share some stuff with my friends with it sometimes


    Cons :
    1- Expensive
    2- You can get two 16GB cards for around only 70$ and save yourself 50$~
    3- Slow write speeds for a 32GB card (Takes forever to fill it with DATA from PC, its not the card fault though , its just the SDHC technology is getting old and slow for 2009 standards , time for newer Tech)

    * Important Info

    Avoid the Sandisk Ultra Series they never reach the true marketed speed "15MB-20MB/S" its just in theory speed like how everybody knows that USB2 is much slower than its specs, and they are only Class 2 for the 32GB version which will drop frames from your HD video (Plus Class 4 is minimum requirement for shooting in HD ) if you plan to get San disk Card then get the Extreme III Series (but again from my own Tests there read speed is about 20MB not 30MB and the write speed is 14MB/s~ instead of the transcend 11MB/s write speed (Unless you spam shooting pictures with your DSLR you don't "need" faster speed)

    I bought This card because i plan to take videos with my HD camcorder that last more 2 Hours, if you do not plan to shoot for longtime then you are better with getting the 16GB card HOWEVER, if you are lazy like my mom and do not plan to transfer DATA from the card to Your computer HD after every trip, then get the 32GB card.or you gonna end up on a trip and a message pops "No memory"

    If you plan to shoot for longer time, check your camcorder battery too does it even last that long? so be sure about that before you drop over 100$ for this card

    1-0 out of 5 stars product failed., July 26, 2009
    Well, it was great while it lasted. Unfortunately, it did not last long.

    Like other reviewers, after <20 use cycles the device failed and I got a "lock" error when, in fact, the write-protection lock was not engaged. Oddly, by engaging the lock (i.e. entering read-only mode) I was able to remove the picture files from the card. Obviously, further use in the camera was impossible; I was also unable to reformat the card (either with my camera or with the SD Associations free software [..]).

    This card has a high average rating but I would urge customers to consider the number of 1-star ratings due to complete product failure before they purchase this item.



    5-0 out of 5 stars My Canon loves the 8 GB SDHC card, January 15, 2008
    I recently purchased a Canon Powershot A720IS digital camera that is capable of recognizing and using up to 2 TERRABYTES of memory card (in the future) so I wanted to get the largest memory card I could install for now. I wanted to use the camera both on dry land and with an underwater housing for shooting stills and video on dive trips. Camera specs said an 8 GB SDHC card would record one hour of hi res video at 30 fps. Or nearly 2300 hi res stills at 8 megapixels.

    A test of the Transcend 8GB SDHC card in the camera ended up shooting 70 minutes of full screen, 30fps digital video that could not be distinguished from my DV camcorder video quality. Playback from the memory card to the TV was so fast & efficient there was never a single "stutter" on the screen. The card speed is genuinely FAST as advertised. Low level formatting of the card allowed for very acceptable rapid-fire sequential still photo shooting speeds when light levels were bright enough that the flash was not needed/used. Something like 2 photos every 3 seconds. Files were flawless in display, both for stills and video.

    This product was significantly lower in price than the Kingston 8GB SDHC card I originally bought with the camera. I've used both interchangeably and cannot see any different in the speed or capacity and quality of imagery is identical. For the money I'll stick with Transcend and am looking forward to getting their 16GB card once the price drops substantially below the $100 mark. That would provide nearly 2 1/2 hours of video on my still camera or 4600 highest quality stills. I'm afraid my camcorder will be collecting dust much of the time. A big advantage to video on the card is there are NO MOVING PARTS, e.g. a mini DV tape cassette and camcorder or VCR playback unit needed to dump the video and stills to my Mac for editing and burning DVDs. I just stick the card in the MicroMate USB card reader, plug it in the computer and bingo, ready to sort thru and dump to the hard drive. Since the card is formatted by a Canon camera it automatically boots up the Canon Viewer software too. That should work the same for other brands of still cameras formatting this chip.

    3-0 out of 5 stars The Fastest Card at This Price But..., June 26, 2007
    This SDHC card is the fastest one in its price range but it may cause your images to be lost.

    I use two of this in a Canon SD750. After the first use, all of the images were lost. (But thank God, I could rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue 2, a program better than its competitors) Then I formated the card(s) in the camera(s) with "low level format" option several times and there has been no problem after that so far.

    I can suggest these points to potential owners of this card:
    1- Use it very carefully, make backups if possible.
    2- Format it several times before the first use with "low level format" option.
    3- If you loose your images, don't panic. At this situation, It is very important not to take anymore pictures. If you take pictures after this point, you can overwrite your lost images and there can be no chance to get them back. Connect your card to your computer with a card reader (SDHC Compatible) and rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Mini Hard Drive equivalent, December 11, 2007
    This card is able to hold a complete DVD movie, thousands of songs/photos, or just serve as a backup device for one's files.

    It operates very well - I now have purchased 3 and with each use its value becomes more apparent.

    One word of caution - even though most laptops and systems have an SD card slot, older computers may not be able to recognize or write to this card. Make sure your system has the ability to read SDHC configured products.

    If you do not have an SD slot you can purchase an tiny SD reader (very inexpensive) that plugs into your USB port.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great value, just be careful..., January 2, 2009
    I recently ordered this card as an accessory for my Acer Aspire One netbook PC. The card took a little while to ship, about 8 days, but that wasn't a big deal. The card has lots of space, and the read speeds are quite impressive. I mostly use it to run and store portable software, and it does a very good job at that.

    My only complaint is that when I first inserted the card into my PC it attempted to install some adware. The program was from a company called RelevantKnowledge, and they gather your information for market research purposes. Luckily my spyware software picked it up immediately,so I was able to delete it. Afterward I formatted the card, and now I'm happy as can be.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Reliable card, good speeds!, December 4, 2008
    Transcend 16 GB SDHC SD Class 6 Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]
    I have 4 of these cards that I use in my Panasonic HMC-150, a professional grade video camera. I've run read/write tests on all of them and they get about 14 MB/s write speeds and 17.5 MB/s read speeds. Never encountered any errors! These cards are the best bang for your buck, and the frustration free packaging is awesome.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Don't Let This Happen to You....., August 3, 2008
    It's great to have 8GB of memory but it is a double edged sword. Today after using this card for only the second time, it failed on me. I lost almost 200 precious images - gone forever. I am what you would call an enthusiast or hobbyist. I love photography and spend every spare minute, which is very seldom these days, pursuing my passion. So I do a fair amount of experimentation. These cards are great when they work - but if they fail you even once - the results can be catastrophic. Maybe I am the unlucky 1 of 250 reviewers with a bad experience with this product, but I feel it is my responsibility to report this to everyone. I hope it never happens to you. It is human nature for me to wonder, if I had spent a few more dollars for a better brand name, would my photos be intact today?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great affordable SDHC card, March 28, 2008
    In the past, I bought a Transcend 8GB SDHC card for my Canon SD1000 camera. I recently bought the Transcend 16GB SDHC for my new Canon SX20IS. Both cards work very well and I've had no problems with it so far. I wanted to take this opportunity to update my review since my original review was also posted (by Amazon) for the 16GB card. This is because the only difference between these two cards is the different capacity. So, if you're in the market for an affordable high quality SDHC card, this may be the one for you. Sorry, I kind of sounded like a used car salesman right there, didn't I? I assure you that I don't work for Transcend. But, here's why I think this card is awesome:

    Pros:

    -Affordable!

    -Large capacity

    -Class 6 read/write speed (which is very fast... but is no longer the fastest class available)

    -Lifetime warranty (at least that's what the package says :)

    -Transcend is a reputable company that's been making memory products for a very long time. ( I swear to the tech Gods that I don't work for them!) Other reputable and reliable memory card companies include Kingston and PNY. All three of these companies have been making memory chips for many, many years.


    Cons:

    - I can' really think of any "Cons" about this card. But here's the 2 closest things I can come up with right now: (1) "Class 6" is no longer the fastest speed available and (2) This card does NOT make coffee for you in the morning, do your dishes for you, give you compliments when you're having a bad day, or magically improve your photography skills.




    IMPORTANT SPECIAL NOTES ABOUT SDHC MEMORY CARDS:

    -SDHC cards are not compatible with most older SD cameras, SD devices, or SD card readers.

    -SDHC cards are rated by speed using different "classes". There are currently 4 data transfer speed classes available for SDHC cards. These classes are "class 2, class 4, and class 6, and the new class 10. For example, "Class 2" would have the slowest read/write speed while "Class 6" has the fastest read/write speed. So if you have a device in which speed may play a crucial role, make sure you buy a higher "class" SDHC card. Please note that this SDHC card no longer has the fastest read/write speed available. There is now a new class, called "Class 10". Class 6 has a minimum read/write speed of 6MB/sec... while Class 2 has minimum speed rating of 2MB/sec, and Class 4 is 4MB/sec. Starting to see the pattern?


    SO WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "SD CARDS" AND "SDHC CARDS?

    SDHC is basically an upgrade to the older SD cards. The reason they upgraded it was to achieve greater data transfer speeds AND capacity than previously possible with normal SD cards... and to do this, they had to redesign the card (which is why it's not compatible with normal SD devices). This was necessary because digital cameras and digital video cameras these days have higher resolutions, which equate to larger file sizes and faster data transfer needs.

    Now that many digital cameras also can record HD video, you may consider getting a larger capacity card because video takes much more space than photos. The size of the video varies from camera to camera depending on what resolution and video compression the camera uses. If you plan on taking lots of video (especially HD video), I would consider getting at least a 16GB card. Check your camera specifications to see how many minutes per Gig of memory your camera can capture ...to gauge how big of a memory card you'll want to get to meet your needs.

    Special Note on regular SD Cards:
    If you primarily take casual photos and don't need a exceptionally fast read/write capable card, you should know that newer cameras that take "SDHC" cards will also work with older normal "SD" cards. These older cards are cheaper than the new SDHC cards, so this may be something to consider. So to sum things up, newer cameras will take SDHC and regular SD cards, but older cameras that use SD cards may not be able to use SDHC cards. This is because newer technology is usually made to be compatible with older technology (the technical term used to describe this is "backwards compatibility") ... but older technology may not have the hardware necessary to run newer tech (technical term used is "obsolete"... just kidding! ;)

    I hope I haven't confused everybody by going into this much detail, but I can't help being the nerd that I am. If you are confused, don't hesitate to comment on this post and I will try my best to answer your questions. Also, any feedback is always welcome!

    Conclusion: Buy the card if you have a new device that uses SDHC. It rocks! (This message has been approved by the "Duke of New Mexico")


    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Card - Good Card for SDHC Compatible Devices, May 10, 2008
    UPDATE - March 2, 2010: This review was originally written for the 4 GB class 6 SDHC card, but the reviews have been grouped for all class 6 SDHC cards in the 4, 8, 16 and 32 GB sizes. All the cards should perform similarly since they are all class 6 and all made by Transcend. However, I will have to check which cards I have used hands on. I believe I only own the 4GB and 8GB cards. I will update the review further. If you have concerns regarding the 16GB or 32GB sizes, you should seek out the reviews tagged with the product links from those cards.


    The Transcend 4GB SDHC CARD (Class 6) is a great card for the price. I was at first a little skeptical about the brand, but I buy way too many memory cards to ignore a good price when I see one. And I'm happy to report that I've experienced decent performance and reliability issues with this card. That's as compared to other cards I own including SanDisk, PNY and Kingston.

    As long as your devices are compatible with the SDHC format, this card is a good buy. 4 GB is a nice size though I do prefer 8 GB capacity for high capacity storage.

    The class 6 speed is the fastest speed available in mass market SDHC cards. Class 6 guarantees minimum transfer speeds of 6 MBs, but I've gotten speeds up to 20Mbs! That makes this card perfect for storing pictures in RAW image formats.

    The Class 6 speed is on par with the Sandisk Extreme III cards that on average are about $15 to $20 more per card. If you don't have an SDHC reader, you may opt to get the package with a reader included to download your pics. If not you can just transfer your pics directly from your camera with your card still inserted. An SDHC card reader can be bought separately if your PC doesn't have a compatible slot.

    General SDHC and SD Card Tips

    There are a few tips that I've learned the hard way through buying TOO MANY different memory cards.
    1. Make sure your device is compatible with the card! Even in regular SD cards, some older electronics aren't compatible with that large of a size (2 GB). In terms of SDHC cards, make sure your camera or other device is SDHC compatible. SDHC is different from regular SD and only newer devices tend to have built-in compatibility
    2. Once you install this in your camera or device, you will generally want to format the card with your compatible device's interface. That is because the standard formats for certain devices, particularly Canon, are different from the factory installed format
    3. Just like your devices, most computer SD card readers are not compatible with the SDHC format. So use a card reader or download the pictures via USB connection to the camera with the card still installed.
    4. For some reason, placing the card in the locked position allows some older laptops to still read it. This is just to be used in a pinch however, and it won't apply to all systems
    5. If you did not properly format your card, you may be able to save things to it and then have them "disappear." If this happens to you, make sure you use the software recovery tools BEFORE you try to save anything else to your card. That way, you can retrieve your images without over-writing them.
    6. Make sure you know what you are going to use this card for. Once you have set up everything and ensured it's all compatible, you still have to decide on speed. If you are using this for storing RAW images instead of JPEGs or HD video, step up to the faster class 6 speed format if you can afford it.
    7. If you are going to pay more for a faster speed, make sure your device can benefit from it. I've read, for example, that Kodak cameras are set to a fixed voltage and cannot go faster than standard speed. So the extra cash spent on Class 4, 5, or 6 is basically wasted.

    Conclusion

    It's great to have several extra cards on hand just in case. This 4 GB card is a nice performer. If you have a high capacity camera (10 Megapixels or more) and are storing videos or RAW images, the extra cash for the 8GB card is worth it. Or you may want to step up to the larger 16 GB size that is now available.

    Enjoy!

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 32 GB SDHC Review, May 25, 2009
    Before you drop 120~$ for a SD card ask yourself, Do you really need 32GB card? because the card itself with same specs costs only 35$ for the 16GB version, anyway here is info that might help you

    Pros :
    1- Class 6 Card the(guaranteed minimum Read/write speed of 6MB/s)
    2- My Test Results 18.2-18.5MB/S Read - 11.6-11.8 Write (very stable)
    3- Faster than average cards and almost close to top speed SDHC cards
    4- 32GB in a single small chip is awesome(You can use it as a portable HD once in a while, i share some stuff with my friends with it sometimes


    Cons :
    1- Expensive
    2- You can get two 16GB cards for around only 70$ and save yourself 50$~
    3- Slow write speeds for a 32GB card (Takes forever to fill it with DATA from PC, its not the card fault though , its just the SDHC technology is getting old and slow for 2009 standards , time for newer Tech)

    * Important Info

    Avoid the Sandisk Ultra Series they never reach the true marketed speed "15MB-20MB/S" its just in theory speed like how everybody knows that USB2 is much slower than its specs, and they are only Class 2 for the 32GB version which will drop frames from your HD video (Plus Class 4 is minimum requirement for shooting in HD ) if you plan to get San disk Card then get the Extreme III Series (but again from my own Tests there read speed is about 20MB not 30MB and the write speed is 14MB/s~ instead of the transcend 11MB/s write speed (Unless you spam shooting pictures with your DSLR you don't "need" faster speed)

    I bought This card because i plan to take videos with my HD camcorder that last more 2 Hours, if you do not plan to shoot for longtime then you are better with getting the 16GB card HOWEVER, if you are lazy like my mom and do not plan to transfer DATA from the card to Your computer HD after every trip, then get the 32GB card.or you gonna end up on a trip and a message pops "No memory"

    If you plan to shoot for longer time, check your camcorder battery too does it even last that long? so be sure about that before you drop over 100$ for this card

    1-0 out of 5 stars product failed., July 26, 2009
    Well, it was great while it lasted. Unfortunately, it did not last long.

    Like other reviewers, after <20 use cycles the device failed and I got a "lock" error when, in fact, the write-protection lock was not engaged. Oddly, by engaging the lock (i.e. entering read-only mode) I was able to remove the picture files from the card. Obviously, further use in the camera was impossible; I was also unable to reformat the card (either with my camera or with the SD Associations free software [..]).

    This card has a high average rating but I would urge customers to consider the number of 1-star ratings due to complete product failure before they purchase this item.



    5-0 out of 5 stars My Canon loves the 8 GB SDHC card, January 15, 2008
    I recently purchased a Canon Powershot A720IS digital camera that is capable of recognizing and using up to 2 TERRABYTES of memory card (in the future) so I wanted to get the largest memory card I could install for now. I wanted to use the camera both on dry land and with an underwater housing for shooting stills and video on dive trips. Camera specs said an 8 GB SDHC card would record one hour of hi res video at 30 fps. Or nearly 2300 hi res stills at 8 megapixels.

    A test of the Transcend 8GB SDHC card in the camera ended up shooting 70 minutes of full screen, 30fps digital video that could not be distinguished from my DV camcorder video quality. Playback from the memory card to the TV was so fast & efficient there was never a single "stutter" on the screen. The card speed is genuinely FAST as advertised. Low level formatting of the card allowed for very acceptable rapid-fire sequential still photo shooting speeds when light levels were bright enough that the flash was not needed/used. Something like 2 photos every 3 seconds. Files were flawless in display, both for stills and video.

    This product was significantly lower in price than the Kingston 8GB SDHC card I originally bought with the camera. I've used both interchangeably and cannot see any different in the speed or capacity and quality of imagery is identical. For the money I'll stick with Transcend and am looking forward to getting their 16GB card once the price drops substantially below the $100 mark. That would provide nearly 2 1/2 hours of video on my still camera or 4600 highest quality stills. I'm afraid my camcorder will be collecting dust much of the time. A big advantage to video on the card is there are NO MOVING PARTS, e.g. a mini DV tape cassette and camcorder or VCR playback unit needed to dump the video and stills to my Mac for editing and burning DVDs. I just stick the card in the MicroMate USB card reader, plug it in the computer and bingo, ready to sort thru and dump to the hard drive. Since the card is formatted by a Canon camera it automatically boots up the Canon Viewer software too. That should work the same for other brands of still cameras formatting this chip.

    3-0 out of 5 stars The Fastest Card at This Price But..., June 26, 2007
    This SDHC card is the fastest one in its price range but it may cause your images to be lost.

    I use two of this in a Canon SD750. After the first use, all of the images were lost. (But thank God, I could rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue 2, a program better than its competitors) Then I formated the card(s) in the camera(s) with "low level format" option several times and there has been no problem after that so far.

    I can suggest these points to potential owners of this card:
    1- Use it very carefully, make backups if possible.
    2- Format it several times before the first use with "low level format" option.
    3- If you loose your images, don't panic. At this situation, It is very important not to take anymore pictures. If you take pictures after this point, you can overwrite your lost images and there can be no chance to get them back. Connect your card to your computer with a card reader (SDHC Compatible) and rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Mini Hard Drive equivalent, December 11, 2007
    This card is able to hold a complete DVD movie, thousands of songs/photos, or just serve as a backup device for one's files.

    It operates very well - I now have purchased 3 and with each use its value becomes more apparent.

    One word of caution - even though most laptops and systems have an SD card slot, older computers may not be able to recognize or write to this card. Make sure your system has the ability to read SDHC configured products.

    If you do not have an SD slot you can purchase an tiny SD reader (very inexpensive) that plugs into your USB port.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Great value, just be careful..., January 2, 2009
    I recently ordered this card as an accessory for my Acer Aspire One netbook PC. The card took a little while to ship, about 8 days, but that wasn't a big deal. The card has lots of space, and the read speeds are quite impressive. I mostly use it to run and store portable software, and it does a very good job at that.

    My only complaint is that when I first inserted the card into my PC it attempted to install some adware. The program was from a company called RelevantKnowledge, and they gather your information for market research purposes. Luckily my spyware software picked it up immediately,so I was able to delete it. Afterward I formatted the card, and now I'm happy as can be.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Reliable card, good speeds!, December 4, 2008
    Transcend 16 GB SDHC SD Class 6 Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]
    I have 4 of these cards that I use in my Panasonic HMC-150, a professional grade video camera. I've run read/write tests on all of them and they get about 14 MB/s write speeds and 17.5 MB/s read speeds. Never encountered any errors! These cards are the best bang for your buck, and the frustration free packaging is awesome.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Don't Let This Happen to You....., August 3, 2008
    It's great to have 8GB of memory but it is a double edged sword. Today after using this card for only the second time, it failed on me. I lost almost 200 precious images - gone forever. I am what you would call an enthusiast or hobbyist. I love photography and spend every spare minute, which is very seldom these days, pursuing my passion. So I do a fair amount of experimentation. These cards are great when they work - but if they fail you even once - the results can be catastrophic. Maybe I am the unlucky 1 of 250 reviewers with a bad experience with this product, but I feel it is my responsibility to report this to everyone. I hope it never happens to you. It is human nature for me to wonder, if I had spent a few more dollars for a better brand name, would my photos be intact today? ... Read more


    12. Xbox 360 12 Month Live Gold Card
    Video Game
    list price: $59.99 -- our price: $48.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0029LJIFG
    Manufacturer: Microsoft Software
    Sales Rank: 14
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Experience the best in gaming and entertainment withXbox LIVE Gold. Raise the curtain on your own instantmovie night with thousands of HD movies and TV episodesstreamed instantly from Netflix. (Netflix membershipsold separately). Invite friends all over the worldto connect, cheer and play online multiplayer games.And as a Gold member, you’ll enjoy exclusive Deals ofthe Week that save you money and special sneak-peakgame demos that give you early access to the newestand latest. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Prepaid Is Better, December 19, 2006
    To start off, I'd like to say that XBox Live is amazing and worth every penny. Online gaming is incredibly fun and a quite good way to pass time.

    That aside, there are downsides to XBox Live that can be avoided through prepaid cards. Number one, you always run the risk that unwarranted transactions will be made if your credit card information is stored on your XBox 360 system. It may not happen all that often, but it's best to avoid it all together.

    The biggest reason to buy prepaid Xbox Live card is the renewal process that happens when you don't use one. If you order XBox Live through your system, it'll renew everytime your subscription runs out. This wouldn't be a problem except that it's not that easy to cancel. Instead of cancelling through your system, you have to go through the hassle of actually calling XBox Live support. Even then, depending on the representative you get, you may be hassled to keep your subscription because they really don't want you to cancel it. I'm guessing that's part of their job to convince you to keep it, but it still is frustrating to the person that is trying to cancel it.

    You'll have to go through this process everytime you want to cancel if you don't use a prepaid card. Is that hassle really worth it? I don't think so. Therefore, avoid all of the problems by simply buying a prepaid card. You won't be sorry.

    UPDATE (7/7/2010): This review was written in 2006 and back then you had to call customer service to stop the auto-renewal. As users in the comment of this review have pointed out, since then you can simply go to the main website and disable it, but you have to do this every single time you buy a new subscription.

    The prepaid card is still the ultimate way to go. You don't have to worry about forgetting to stop the renewal, plus the prices are just simply better during much of the year. Sometimes Microsoft will have special trials (such as three months for half off), but for the rest of the time, the ease of Amazon's new digital service to send you the code or the savings of having the actual card shipped to you is just too good to pass up. If you're buying it for a gift, that special gamer in your life will definitely love you for getting it for them!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Two reasons to get this card, November 12, 2004
    Amazon, it makes no sense. The card is cheaper than the code, which costs you nothing in storage or shipping.

    Plus the deal you offer with the games to get $10 off the code is still rubbish as the card is still cheaper.

    Where is the sense? Are you betting on people being stupid and clicking BUY before looking at the other options on your own website?

    5-0 out of 5 stars Prepaid Is Better, December 19, 2006
    To start off, I'd like to say that XBox Live is amazing and worth every penny. Online gaming is incredibly fun and a quite good way to pass time.

    That aside, there are downsides to XBox Live that can be avoided through prepaid cards. Number one, you always run the risk that unwarranted transactions will be made if your credit card information is stored on your XBox 360 system. It may not happen all that often, but it's best to avoid it all together.

    The biggest reason to buy prepaid Xbox Live card is the renewal process that happens when you don't use one. If you order XBox Live through your system, it'll renew everytime your subscription runs out. This wouldn't be a problem except that it's not that easy to cancel. Instead of cancelling through your system, you have to go through the hassle of actually calling XBox Live support. Even then, depending on the representative you get, you may be hassled to keep your subscription because they really don't want you to cancel it. I'm guessing that's part of their job to convince you to keep it, but it still is frustrating to the person that is trying to cancel it.

    You'll have to go through this process everytime you want to cancel if you don't use a prepaid card. Is that hassle really worth it? I don't think so. Therefore, avoid all of the problems by simply buying a prepaid card. You won't be sorry.

    UPDATE (7/7/2010): This review was written in 2006 and back then you had to call customer service to stop the auto-renewal. As users in the comment of this review have pointed out, since then you can simply go to the main website and disable it, but you have to do this every single time you buy a new subscription.

    The prepaid card is still the ultimate way to go. You don't have to worry about forgetting to stop the renewal, plus the prices are just simply better during much of the year. Sometimes Microsoft will have special trials (such as three months for half off), but for the rest of the time, the ease of Amazon's new digital service to send you the code or the savings of having the actual card shipped to you is just too good to pass up. If you're buying it for a gift, that special gamer in your life will definitely love you for getting it for them!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Two reasons to get this card, November 12, 2004
    Amazon, it makes no sense. The card is cheaper than the code, which costs you nothing in storage or shipping.

    Plus the deal you offer with the games to get $10 off the code is still rubbish as the card is still cheaper.

    Where is the sense? Are you betting on people being stupid and clicking BUY before looking at the other options on your own website?

    4-0 out of 5 stars Cheapest Live Subsription Option, November 5, 2009
    From what I can find this is the cheapest cost per month option available for a live gold subscription. Depending on the current price, it ranges from $2.9158 to $3.3325 per month. What I don't get is why this credit card sized subscription card comes in such wasteful packaging. It comes in a rather large plastic packaging, which requires it to be shipped in a box. You get free shipping, but how wasteful. Why doesn't amazon just offer the code online and not eat the cost of shipping and at the same time be a little greener?

    4-0 out of 5 stars Waste of money because of shipping charges, December 27, 2005
    This is the BEST deal I have ever found on the Xbox Live 12 Month Subscription.

    I looked 6-10 different places for a deal on this and only found 1 close to this and that was wal-fart but I dislike shopping there so Amazon was the place to go.

    This should be a guaranteed buy and you CAN'T beat the Price!!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars It is what it is, January 19, 2010
    Find the card on sale every so often each year. Don't pay the full price. The Xbox Live Gold is stellar and I love it, but I don't see how they charge $50 or more a year and you don't get any freebies...other than advanced demo downloads. They need to throw a bone for a free song or discounted DLC or a free rental every so often. I have spent well over $1000 in my 3 years with the Xbox 360 on peripherals, games and downloads. 2% of my money spent as a gift would have paid for 1600 points of DLC...that would be a nice thank you from Xbox 360 for keeping their community alive and well.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Nice deal!, December 6, 2009
    My fiancee was under the $6 a month plan - this is a much better deal. We bought this card for $40, which is better than the $72 we WERE paying.

    Xbox Live really contributes to the gaming experience. The connection to Netflix is almost enough to get it RIGHT there. It helps us to maximize use of our Netflix subscription AND any games we buy (expansion releases). ... Read more


    13. HDMI Cable 2M (6 Feet)
    Electronics
    list price: $39.99 -- our price: $0.01
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B0002L5R78
    Manufacturer: DVI Gear
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Hdmi cable Provides the most reliable signal transfer the purest picture.Unlike most HDMI cables, Inspire Audio video cables use individual, shielded twisted pair wires for unsurpassed video signal. ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Why pay out the wazoo when you can get this cable?!?!, June 18, 2007
    OK - here's the story. I was going to buy a Toshiba HDTV. I had picked it out already and was ready to purchase it and that was when I found a promotion at a local retailer that if I bought a Toshiba HDTV then I can get $200 off of any of the Toshiba HD DVD players. The HDA2 was normally $399 but was on sale for $299 and with the $200 off I got it for $99!! You can't beat that!

    Well, I got that on Tuesday and it was an unexpected purchase. I asked the person at the store how much the HDMI cable would be so that I can hook it up as soon as I get home. He said, it's a Monster Cable and it costs $124.99! Whoa! I went up to the shelf and saw the sticker that said $124.99 on it and on the sticker it said "Financing Available"! What?! I'm not going to pay more for the cable than I did for the DVD player! These guys are crazy!

    I told the guy "You are nuts if you think I'm going to pay that amount" and I logged onto Amazon and purchased this HDMI cable I'm doing the review for. I paid, with shipping, less than $9 for it. I was a little worried about it though - I'm sure that there must be a difference between the $124.99 cable and the $9 cable. So, I took the test. I went and purchased the $124.99 cable (mostly because I was too anxious to try out the new HD DVD player and couldn't wait for it to arrive). I plugged it in and of course the HD DVD I played looked absolutely amazing! The very next day I got the $9 cable (pretty fast shipping by these guys by the way) and I hooked it up. I was worried what I would find but when I started watching the same HD DVD that I watched the night before on the $124.99 cable I could notice NO DIFFERNCE WHATSOEVER between the two cables' results. So I returned the $124.99 cable.

    You will not be sorry if you purchase this cable over the other ones in the major retailers. Don't let them tell you "it's a better quality cable" or anything like that. This cable is built very well - you can just tell when you hold it in your hand that it was made well. You don't get the fancy plastic packaging that you have to tear into with a knife and cut your fingers on though (oh what a bummer!). Get this cable. It's great!

    The only thing you will want to research is that I have seen in some literature that there are two different kinds of cables. I think there is a special one for 1080p DVD players (dont' quote me on this). So do your research before purchasing just to make sure that this is the correct "type". As far as build quality - picture quality, for use with an upconverting DVD player as well as the Toshiba HDA2 HD DVD player, it's an absolute steal.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Price performer!, April 1, 2006
    HDMI is a digital signal. That means it's all or nothing--not like analog where you may have degradation due to signal loss, crosstalk, radio frequency interference, etc. As long as you have a decent HDMI cable to transmit the digital bitstream from point A to point B, you're set. I just purchased the new Sony Bravia S-series 32 inch LCD TV. To go with it, I trashed my old Apex with the missing remote and got a deal on a Sony DVP-NS70H upconverting DVD player that can synthesize "extra" lines of resolution. The player can send 720p or 1080i signal to the TV. (Current DVDs are 480p; that standard will change eventually with Blu-Ray and HD-DVD.) I knew that the upconversion feature only works through a digital connection, so I'd need to get an HDMI cable. Started checking prices and, no surprise, they were all over the place. Some were in the $100 range. Despite mild skepticism, I decided to try the cheapest one. This little beauty arrived in 3 days in a plain brown wrapper and a clear plastic bag. The cable is surprisingly robust, with nice build quality, supple insulation, and good connectors. I started to feel vindicated. So I plugged it in, put Harry Potter in the DVD player and WOW!! The DVD player and TV did their magic. Spellbindingly great picture and sound. I haven't tried a component analog connection--those cables are REALLY expensive and quality matters more there--so I can't compare component versus HDMI. Bottom line: this is an unbeatable price performer for around $10 incuding shipping. And no, this is not an April Fools joke.

    1-0 out of 5 stars This is NOT a Category 2 HDMI cable., June 17, 2009
    I bought this cable to connect my new Samsung LN32B550 to a cable box. I actually had read in other reviews that this cable was a Category 1, but I figured since 1080i was the most I was going to be using it for, that it wouldn't be a problem. WRONG! Like several other reviewers, I too experienced an annoying flicker of the picture. It wasn't a constant problem, but it was just often enough to annoy me. I tried everything from jiggling cables to trying the other 3 HDMI ports on the tv. Nothing worked.

    I ordered the Mediabridge - 6ft Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable - Version 1.3 Category 2 - 1080p - PS3 - Blu-Ray for less than $10, and the annoying flicker magically disappeared. There is absolutely no reason you need to pay $50 or $100 on some overpriced cable, but you should definitely make sure the cable you get is a Category 2.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Works, but flawed (not shielded), August 27, 2008
    First, this cable can transfer an HDMI audio and video signal from a source (I've tested with a Comcast HD DVR and a DVD player) to a TV.

    Second, this cable is not shielded.

    What this means, is that this cable can do most of what one costing 20 times as much can do: provide a clear digital connection. With a digital connection, the quality of the cable isn't very relevant, as you just need to get the signal across, not get it across in good shape. Therefore, a quality expensive cable is a waste of money.

    The downside is that an unshielded cable does 2 things: accepts interference and causes interference. What this means is if you lay the HDMI cable too close to the power cable of the device or another cable carrying signal, it may pick up interference. A little interference, no big deal, the beauty of digital signals is that picture quality is the same. Enough interference, though, and the signal can't get through properly. I saw this happen with my HD cable box, and was able to cure it by moving the HDMI and power cable farther apart. Until I realized the problem, though, I was getting no picture.

    The other problem with an unshielded cable is it causes interference. When my DVD player is turned on, it throws enough interference through the HDMI cable that my (also unshielded) OTA HD antenna cable receives interference. Turn the DVD off, and it's fine again.

    Bottom line: if you're ok with having to carefully setup this cable so it doesn't receive too much interference from other sources, or send too much interference into other sources, this cable will do a great job and will be a steal. If you're not the DIY type, you might be frustrated with this cable. You'll get a better quality cable if you pay way more, but for me, this is well worth it.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good, but not 1.3 OR certified category 2, April 10, 2008
    These cables will work and provide quality sound and video. However, these aren't 1.3a or category 2 certified. I rated them a 4 because they do what they're supposed to, as they are advertised.

    For future sound technologies, such as Dolby HD, etc, it takes a high bandwidth/high speed HDMI cable. If the HDMI cable you are using isn't fast enough you won't be able to listen to these better sound methods. A standard, category 1 HDMI cable will do 75mhz, category 2 will do 340mhz. These will also allow even higher resolutions, such as WQXGA cinema monitors (resolution of 2560 x 1600.)

    I bought 3 of the cables listed here but replaced them with some 1.3a/category 2 cables found at www.monoprice.com. They weren't much more expensive than these and provide the most up to date, fastest HDMI's around without paying 60 dollars a pop like you do with Monster cables. Yes, I did see a difference visually, but not anything different audio-wise.

    5-0 out of 5 stars great price...save $$$ buy this cable, June 7, 2007
    Living in Europe, I had to bite the bullet and buy an overpriced (approx $50) HDMI cable from the store that sold me my TV. I ordered this HDMI cable from Amazon and picked it up on a recent trip back to the US. As far as I can tell there is absolutely no difference in performance with this cable compared to the overpriced one on my other component. The spotlight reviews do an excellent job of explaining why this HDMI cable works just as well as the overpriced alternatives.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Now a believer, April 24, 2007
    You won't see a different in the quality of your iPod music when you use a gold plated gas injected USB cable to transfer the songs from your computer to your iPod! its a digital signal. Why should the HDMI be any different? Stick with this, clear and simple, if you want to read on, be my guest:


    I purchased an HDTV 1080p TV with true color support about 2 weeks ago and a PS3 about 3 weeks ago. I had my PS3 hooked up with a $130 monster cable because the guy at the store convinced me it would make a difference in my picture.

    While surfing the web, reading video and audiophile reviewers comment about HDTV related stuff, long story short I came across the cable debate and thought I'd test it out myself. I hooked up the PS3 with the monster cable, played clips of Black Hawk Down in Blu Ray, then hooked it up with this cheap cable. No difference at all. I guarantee you I am so picky with the picture and sound aspect of home theatre (well isn't that the point of home theater!) and would not subsidize quality to save a few bucks.

    The picture is exactly the same as the monster cables picture. For those who complain about durability:

    First off, the cables more durable then the monster cable. The monster cable was so thick it began to angle itself on the HDMI connection port. All that unnecessary crap was weighing it down and bending the connector port. Secondly, you don't say hey check out my super durable ultra quality HDMI cable that does the same thing as a $5 cable, you do that with cars and clothes, not cables. Therefore the performance is what should count not the brand name. Thirdly, digital signals have no loss, no matter how bad the cable is. This cables quality isn't bad, its actually very good, but assuming it was so bad that it was crap, the picture simply would not go through instead of going through poorly.

    Injecting gas and having 10 coats of plastic around the cable won't increase the bandwidth of it, either. Only the HDMI version certification can do that. An HDMI 1.1 monster cable has the same bandiwdth as a $10 HDMI 1.1 cable because its meant to support the expected bandwidth requirements of an HDMI 1.1 unit/tv/ps3, etc. The same goes with HDMI 1.2, 1.3, etc.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Not 1.3 Certified, May 16, 2008
    My Samsung 46550 does not like these cables. As Samsung warned, cables that are NOT 1.3 certified may create an annoying flicker effect--something that these cables have indeed created. I will not be using them with my LCD TV.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Why pay more?, September 4, 2007
    HDMI is the standard cable you would use to hookup your high definition cable box, satellite TV, and other HD sources to your television.

    Circuit City charges between $40.00 and $100.00 for this same cable. Since digital is digital and this one costs $1.00, there's no reason to pay more.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Just like every other HDMI cable, but cheaper., July 18, 2007
    Since HDMI cables carry a digital signal, it is nearly impossible to build one that works better or worse than any other.

    This was the cheapest one I could find, so I bought it. Its performance is absolutely identical to the $50 one I got from Radio Shack (and which I promptly returned once this one arrived in the mail.) I am 100% positive that its performance would be identical to the $100 HDMI cables peddled at home theatre stores.

    Thinking that a more expensive HDMI cable will give you a better picture is like thinking a more expensive network cable will give you better email. ... Read more


    14. Kindle Leather Cover, Burgundy Red (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle)
    Accessory
    -- our price: $34.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B003DZ163O
    Manufacturer: Amazon Digital Services, Inc
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Amazon.comAmazon's Kindle Leather Cover

    This leather cover offers optimal protection for your Kindle. Contoured, pebble-grain leather keeps your Kindle safe and secure, while the soft, charcoal-gray, microfiber interior protects the screen from scratches.

    Lightweight, this cover is perfect for taking Kindle wherever you go, and is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand.


    Secure Your Kindle

    Our patent-pending hinge system secures Kindle in place. An elastic strap keeps the cover firmly closed for maximum screen protection. Simply attach Kindle to the hinge, apply the strap, and rest assured it will stay securely in place even when you're on the go.


    Secure your Kindle in four easy steps
    Secure your Kindle in four easy steps


    Read Comfortably with One Hand


    Reading with the cover on, you can easily access Kindle's navigation features and power switch, while the rounded edges offer a perfect fit in your hands. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand.


    On the Go

    This lightweight, compact cover is perfect for taking Kindle wherever you go. The sleek leather ensures the ultimate fit and protection, without adding bulk or weight.



    Amazon’s official Kindle cover features contoured, pebble-grain leather available in 7 different colors.

     

     

    Read comfortably with Amazon’s protective leather Kindle cover.




    Read easily with one hand.



    Protect your Kindle on the go.

     

    ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Cover Band, August 28, 2010
    I have to hand it to the designers at Amazon. If nothing else, they listen to our comments and react.

    The cover is fabulous. It's a piece of nice leather lined with quality padding and soft felt. It folds all the way back without any difficulty, making reading with one hand a breeze. The band helps to show which way the Kindle inside is facing, and keeps the reader from opening the cover the wrong way, which damaged many K2's. The corners are softly rounded, adding to the comfort and ease of use.

    The patent-pending hinge is a work of genius. None of the Kindle is obstructed by bands or elastic straps. It securely locks the Kindle in place, leaving the whole device exposed.

    I have to remark on the quality leather. Even my wife, who over-criticizes almost everyting, was very impressed with the fine-grade pebble-grain leather and actually had nice things to say after opening and inspecting it. If you knew my wife, you would know the value of this comment.

    Unlike some other readers out there, Kindle makes available a custom-designed cover that works in concert with the device. I'm satisfied with the cover (and the Kindle3) and give it my highest recommendation.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Objective info that may be helpful - light or not, colors, September 4, 2010
    Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

    Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
    Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
    Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
    Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

    The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
    Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
    Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
    Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
    Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
    Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
    Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover for my first kindle, August 26, 2010
    I ended up going with the black leather cover to match the Kindle Wireless Reading Device, Wi-Fi, 6" Display, Graphite - Latest Generation that I bought. The cover itself feels like it's made out of decent leather and gives me the impression that it will protect my Kindle while it's in my backpack or being casually tossed around the house.

    The cover itself is easy to install. It took under a minute and once it was on, it wasn't really noticeable, more so than a hardcover bookcover is noticeable after a while when you read a book. It folds over fine behind the Kindle.

    I'm happy with this cover. Sure, I could have bought a cheaper neoprene one but I wanted something that made me feel good about an e-reader. It may sound weird, but I like it from an aesthetics standpoint. It makes me feel like I've got a proper book in my hands instead of a toy or a gadget.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Well designed, provides good protective padding, August 26, 2010
    My Kindle 3 and cover arrived today. The cover is fairly similar to the Kindle 2 cover design, but with an elastic strap that can be used to hold the cover closed, or to hold the cover behind the Kindle when you are reading.

    I bought the cover mostly to protect my Kindle when I'm traveling. The cover front and back are both tough and well padded, with a soft felt lining and look like they should provide good protection. The overall appearance is reasonably elegant.

    The cover clips on easily and securely. The Kindle 3 has two small slots on the left side and two clips on the cover latch into these slots. You can slide the top clip down to unlatch and release the Kindle.

    I have somewhat mixed feelings about the elastic strap. I know some people like to be able to securely close the cover, but for me it's mostly an unnecessary extra step. I will try it for a while: it looks easy enough to snip off if it becomes a nuisance. (Update in October: I'm getting used to it. I use the strap to hold the cover folded back when I am reading and I find that sliding my hand under the strap is a very comfortable way to hold the Kindle.)

    The Kindle 3 + cover total around 0.7" thickness. So the cover is roughly doubling the Kindle's natural 0.335" thickness. But since I want protective padding, this seems like a price I need to pay!

    The cover weighs 5.5 ounces. (The Kindle 3 by itself is 8.5 ounces.)

    Overall, I'm very happy with the cover.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Rather shoddy material and construction for the price, August 31, 2010
    On the first day of use, after only using the securing band a couple of times, the band suddenly snapped from the top of the cover. It turns out that it was only flimsily glued to a slot on the top edge. Some superglue fixed this, but it really should not have been necessary.

    The cover holds the Kindle snugly, however, it's a bit misaligned: the lower right side of the Kindle is more exposed than the upper right side.

    All in all, I'd still have purchased it (though perhaps in a different color -- black was the only one available when the pre-order process began), but had third party covers been updated for the 3rd generation Kindle (e.g. the Moleskine) this product would probably have been priced more affordably.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Glad I went ahead and got it...., September 4, 2010
    After reading the reviews I was concerned that the light might be an issue since several folks commented that it doesn't shine evenly on the page. But I wanted something that would allow me to read in bed without disturbing my husband and the clip on lights are a pain to fuss with and are way too bright I think. Anyway, the light on the cover is just fine. Yes, it is a little dimmer at the bottom of the page but still quite readable. It is not one of those intensely bright lights that you have to kind of avert your gaze from. And it will not disturb anyone else trying to sleep.It kind of reminds me of my childhood days of reading a book under the covers with a flashlight except that you don't feel like you're going to suffocate.

    The second thing that some people didn't like was the added weight of this cover. The added weight is what I really like. The Kindle itself is so thin and light....for me TOO light. It feels so fragile and un-book-like. The cover gives it that little bit of heft that turns it into a book. I especially like to bend the cover all the way back and hold it either in both hands or in my left hand while I eat popcorn and drink champagne cocktails with my right.

    This is just one woman's opinion but I think can assure you that the light is adequate and very handy. And the weight is not a burden and may make it more of a normal reading experience for you as it does for me. Hope this helps if you are on the fence.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I'm returning my Cole Haan cover for this one, but..., September 2, 2010
    I got this on Saturday. It broke today (Tuesday). The tabs that hold the kindle in the cover are not very sturdy. I don't think I put undue pressure on the kindle. But the top tab broke off, requiring the use of needle nose pliers to extract the broken piece from the kindle. I expect a product I pay $35 for to last longer than three days. I'm very disappointed.

    In looking at it, perhaps it is really a design issue and not a quality issue.

    Honestly, I did find the cover cumbersome when using the keypad. If you are using the keypad frequently, you might want to consider a sleeve. I will not replace this with another book type cover.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover, September 3, 2010
    I am very pleased with this cover. It is very protective, a nice shade of blue and very compact. It does fold over. I know some people don't realize this. The leather is stiff at first but it will fold over and soften after a few days. I had the official cover for kindle 2 and they have made some improvements. The leather is a better quality, they now offer a choice of colors and the spine doesn't feel like it will fall apart. Overall having the elastic is nice as well as it makes it more secure. I like that it makes the kindle feel more like a book and the hinge system is really nice. I like the clean look and won't be buying any cover that puts corner straps on the device. My one con is it weighs 5.7 ounces and while that is not heavy it really could be more like 4 ounces as they probably make the cover heavier than it really needs to be and still be protective.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Kindle 3 Cover - Video Review, August 27, 2010
    Video review of Kindle 3 cover. The app on the iPad is "Cheez Pro Clock" showing FAILblog - I thought it rather appropriate given the UPS FAILure to deliver on a weekend leaving me without a Kindle 3 to use with the case!

    Overall 4 stars. It feels slightly more sturdy and a little less cheap than the Kindle 2 cover. I took one star off because it still has the potential flaw of having nothing to keep the kindle in place at the right, and because I'd prefer a slightly more soft feel to the outside.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Cover Band, August 28, 2010
    I have to hand it to the designers at Amazon. If nothing else, they listen to our comments and react.

    The cover is fabulous. It's a piece of nice leather lined with quality padding and soft felt. It folds all the way back without any difficulty, making reading with one hand a breeze. The band helps to show which way the Kindle inside is facing, and keeps the reader from opening the cover the wrong way, which damaged many K2's. The corners are softly rounded, adding to the comfort and ease of use.

    The patent-pending hinge is a work of genius. None of the Kindle is obstructed by bands or elastic straps. It securely locks the Kindle in place, leaving the whole device exposed.

    I have to remark on the quality leather. Even my wife, who over-criticizes almost everyting, was very impressed with the fine-grade pebble-grain leather and actually had nice things to say after opening and inspecting it. If you knew my wife, you would know the value of this comment.

    Unlike some other readers out there, Kindle makes available a custom-designed cover that works in concert with the device. I'm satisfied with the cover (and the Kindle3) and give it my highest recommendation.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Objective info that may be helpful - light or not, colors, September 4, 2010
    Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

    Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
    Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
    Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
    Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

    The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
    Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
    Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
    Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
    Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
    Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
    Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover for my first kindle, August 26, 2010
    I ended up going with the black leather cover to match the Kindle Wireless Reading Device, Wi-Fi, 6" Display, Graphite - Latest Generation that I bought. The cover itself feels like it's made out of decent leather and gives me the impression that it will protect my Kindle while it's in my backpack or being casually tossed around the house.

    The cover itself is easy to install. It took under a minute and once it was on, it wasn't really noticeable, more so than a hardcover bookcover is noticeable after a while when you read a book. It folds over fine behind the Kindle.

    I'm happy with this cover. Sure, I could have bought a cheaper neoprene one but I wanted something that made me feel good about an e-reader. It may sound weird, but I like it from an aesthetics standpoint. It makes me feel like I've got a proper book in my hands instead of a toy or a gadget.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Well designed, provides good protective padding, August 26, 2010
    My Kindle 3 and cover arrived today. The cover is fairly similar to the Kindle 2 cover design, but with an elastic strap that can be used to hold the cover closed, or to hold the cover behind the Kindle when you are reading.

    I bought the cover mostly to protect my Kindle when I'm traveling. The cover front and back are both tough and well padded, with a soft felt lining and look like they should provide good protection. The overall appearance is reasonably elegant.

    The cover clips on easily and securely. The Kindle 3 has two small slots on the left side and two clips on the cover latch into these slots. You can slide the top clip down to unlatch and release the Kindle.

    I have somewhat mixed feelings about the elastic strap. I know some people like to be able to securely close the cover, but for me it's mostly an unnecessary extra step. I will try it for a while: it looks easy enough to snip off if it becomes a nuisance. (Update in October: I'm getting used to it. I use the strap to hold the cover folded back when I am reading and I find that sliding my hand under the strap is a very comfortable way to hold the Kindle.)

    The Kindle 3 + cover total around 0.7" thickness. So the cover is roughly doubling the Kindle's natural 0.335" thickness. But since I want protective padding, this seems like a price I need to pay!

    The cover weighs 5.5 ounces. (The Kindle 3 by itself is 8.5 ounces.)

    Overall, I'm very happy with the cover.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Rather shoddy material and construction for the price, August 31, 2010
    On the first day of use, after only using the securing band a couple of times, the band suddenly snapped from the top of the cover. It turns out that it was only flimsily glued to a slot on the top edge. Some superglue fixed this, but it really should not have been necessary.

    The cover holds the Kindle snugly, however, it's a bit misaligned: the lower right side of the Kindle is more exposed than the upper right side.

    All in all, I'd still have purchased it (though perhaps in a different color -- black was the only one available when the pre-order process began), but had third party covers been updated for the 3rd generation Kindle (e.g. the Moleskine) this product would probably have been priced more affordably.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Glad I went ahead and got it...., September 4, 2010
    After reading the reviews I was concerned that the light might be an issue since several folks commented that it doesn't shine evenly on the page. But I wanted something that would allow me to read in bed without disturbing my husband and the clip on lights are a pain to fuss with and are way too bright I think. Anyway, the light on the cover is just fine. Yes, it is a little dimmer at the bottom of the page but still quite readable. It is not one of those intensely bright lights that you have to kind of avert your gaze from. And it will not disturb anyone else trying to sleep.It kind of reminds me of my childhood days of reading a book under the covers with a flashlight except that you don't feel like you're going to suffocate.

    The second thing that some people didn't like was the added weight of this cover. The added weight is what I really like. The Kindle itself is so thin and light....for me TOO light. It feels so fragile and un-book-like. The cover gives it that little bit of heft that turns it into a book. I especially like to bend the cover all the way back and hold it either in both hands or in my left hand while I eat popcorn and drink champagne cocktails with my right.

    This is just one woman's opinion but I think can assure you that the light is adequate and very handy. And the weight is not a burden and may make it more of a normal reading experience for you as it does for me. Hope this helps if you are on the fence.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I'm returning my Cole Haan cover for this one, but..., September 2, 2010
    I'll admit it - I'm a bit of an accessories snob. I had the Cole Haan Hand-Stained Pebble Grain Leather Kindle Cover with Hinge (Fits 6" Display, 2nd Generation Kindle), Saddle Tan for my K2, and I originally purchased the Cole Haan Hand-Woven Leather Kindle Cover with Hinge (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle), Whiskey for my new K3. The new Cole Haan case is not meeting my needs, so I decided to give the Amazon cover a try.

    My new red cover just arrived today. The color is very nice - more brick red than burgundy. I immediately noticed that it was much smaller and sleeker than the Cole Haan cover. The Kindle fits just inside the cover, and there is not a lot of excess around the edges. I noticed that many reviewers are complaining about the weight/bulk, but for me this was an improvement over the Cole Haan covers. The strap is a nice feature as well, although I'm wondering how long it will hold up after reading some of the other negative reviews.

    The biggest con for me is that the leather doesn't feel as nice as I would like it to. Perhaps I shouldn't be comparing it to the incredibly buttery-soft leather that Cole Haan uses, but it's hard to ignore the difference. This leather is harder and reminds me of a plastic substance. I'm not saying it's bad, it's just not super lush. If I had never seen the Cole Haan cover, I would likely not even be commenting on this in such detail!

    Overall, this cover is perfectly fine. If you're super picky about the quality of the leather, you may not like it. If you can get over that detail, I think this cover will do the trick.


    1-0 out of 5 stars Lovely looking product that doesn't hold up, September 28, 2010
    I got this on Saturday. It broke today (Tuesday). The tabs that hold the kindle in the cover are not very sturdy. I don't think I put undue pressure on the kindle. But the top tab broke off, requiring the use of needle nose pliers to extract the broken piece from the kindle. I expect a product I pay $35 for to last longer than three days. I'm very disappointed.

    In looking at it, perhaps it is really a design issue and not a quality issue.

    Honestly, I did find the cover cumbersome when using the keypad. If you are using the keypad frequently, you might want to consider a sleeve. I will not replace this with another book type cover.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover, September 3, 2010
    I am very pleased with this cover. It is very protective, a nice shade of blue and very compact. It does fold over. I know some people don't realize this. The leather is stiff at first but it will fold over and soften after a few days. I had the official cover for kindle 2 and they have made some improvements. The leather is a better quality, they now offer a choice of colors and the spine doesn't feel like it will fall apart. Overall having the elastic is nice as well as it makes it more secure. I like that it makes the kindle feel more like a book and the hinge system is really nice. I like the clean look and won't be buying any cover that puts corner straps on the device. My one con is it weighs 5.7 ounces and while that is not heavy it really could be more like 4 ounces as they probably make the cover heavier than it really needs to be and still be protective.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Kindle 3 Cover - Video Review, August 27, 2010
    Video review of Kindle 3 cover. The app on the iPad is "Cheez Pro Clock" showing FAILblog - I thought it rather appropriate given the UPS FAILure to deliver on a weekend leaving me without a Kindle 3 to use with the case!

    Overall 4 stars. It feels slightly more sturdy and a little less cheap than the Kindle 2 cover. I took one star off because it still has the potential flaw of having nothing to keep the kindle in place at the right, and because I'd prefer a slightly more soft feel to the outside. ... Read more


    15. Kindle Leather Cover, Apple Green (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle)
    Accessory
    -- our price: $34.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B003DZ164I
    Manufacturer: Amazon Digital Services, Inc
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Amazon.comAmazon's Kindle Leather Cover

    This leather cover offers optimal protection for your Kindle. Contoured, pebble-grain leather keeps your Kindle safe and secure, while the soft, charcoal-gray, microfiber interior protects the screen from scratches.

    Lightweight, this cover is perfect for taking Kindle wherever you go, and is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand.


    Secure Your Kindle

    Our patent-pending hinge system secures Kindle in place. An elastic strap keeps the cover firmly closed for maximum screen protection. Simply attach Kindle to the hinge, apply the strap, and rest assured it will stay securely in place even when you're on the go.


    Secure your Kindle in four easy steps
    Secure your Kindle in four easy steps


    Read Comfortably with One Hand


    Reading with the cover on, you can easily access Kindle's navigation features and power switch, while the rounded edges offer a perfect fit in your hands. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand.


    On the Go

    This lightweight, compact cover is perfect for taking Kindle wherever you go. The sleek leather ensures the ultimate fit and protection, without adding bulk or weight.



    Amazon’s official Kindle cover features contoured, pebble-grain leather available in 7 different colors.

     

     

    Read comfortably with Amazon’s protective leather Kindle cover.




    Read easily with one hand.



    Protect your Kindle on the go.

     

    ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Cover Band, August 28, 2010
    I have to hand it to the designers at Amazon. If nothing else, they listen to our comments and react.

    The cover is fabulous. It's a piece of nice leather lined with quality padding and soft felt. It folds all the way back without any difficulty, making reading with one hand a breeze. The band helps to show which way the Kindle inside is facing, and keeps the reader from opening the cover the wrong way, which damaged many K2's. The corners are softly rounded, adding to the comfort and ease of use.

    The patent-pending hinge is a work of genius. None of the Kindle is obstructed by bands or elastic straps. It securely locks the Kindle in place, leaving the whole device exposed.

    I have to remark on the quality leather. Even my wife, who over-criticizes almost everyting, was very impressed with the fine-grade pebble-grain leather and actually had nice things to say after opening and inspecting it. If you knew my wife, you would know the value of this comment.

    Unlike some other readers out there, Kindle makes available a custom-designed cover that works in concert with the device. I'm satisfied with the cover (and the Kindle3) and give it my highest recommendation.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Objective info that may be helpful - light or not, colors, September 4, 2010
    Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

    Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
    Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
    Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
    Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

    The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
    Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
    Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
    Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
    Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
    Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
    Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover for my first kindle, August 26, 2010
    I ended up going with the black leather cover to match the Kindle Wireless Reading Device, Wi-Fi, 6" Display, Graphite - Latest Generation that I bought. The cover itself feels like it's made out of decent leather and gives me the impression that it will protect my Kindle while it's in my backpack or being casually tossed around the house.

    The cover itself is easy to install. It took under a minute and once it was on, it wasn't really noticeable, more so than a hardcover bookcover is noticeable after a while when you read a book. It folds over fine behind the Kindle.

    I'm happy with this cover. Sure, I could have bought a cheaper neoprene one but I wanted something that made me feel good about an e-reader. It may sound weird, but I like it from an aesthetics standpoint. It makes me feel like I've got a proper book in my hands instead of a toy or a gadget.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Well designed, provides good protective padding, August 26, 2010
    My Kindle 3 and cover arrived today. The cover is fairly similar to the Kindle 2 cover design, but with an elastic strap that can be used to hold the cover closed, or to hold the cover behind the Kindle when you are reading.

    I bought the cover mostly to protect my Kindle when I'm traveling. The cover front and back are both tough and well padded, with a soft felt lining and look like they should provide good protection. The overall appearance is reasonably elegant.

    The cover clips on easily and securely. The Kindle 3 has two small slots on the left side and two clips on the cover latch into these slots. You can slide the top clip down to unlatch and release the Kindle.

    I have somewhat mixed feelings about the elastic strap. I know some people like to be able to securely close the cover, but for me it's mostly an unnecessary extra step. I will try it for a while: it looks easy enough to snip off if it becomes a nuisance. (Update in October: I'm getting used to it. I use the strap to hold the cover folded back when I am reading and I find that sliding my hand under the strap is a very comfortable way to hold the Kindle.)

    The Kindle 3 + cover total around 0.7" thickness. So the cover is roughly doubling the Kindle's natural 0.335" thickness. But since I want protective padding, this seems like a price I need to pay!

    The cover weighs 5.5 ounces. (The Kindle 3 by itself is 8.5 ounces.)

    Overall, I'm very happy with the cover.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Rather shoddy material and construction for the price, August 31, 2010
    On the first day of use, after only using the securing band a couple of times, the band suddenly snapped from the top of the cover. It turns out that it was only flimsily glued to a slot on the top edge. Some superglue fixed this, but it really should not have been necessary.

    The cover holds the Kindle snugly, however, it's a bit misaligned: the lower right side of the Kindle is more exposed than the upper right side.

    All in all, I'd still have purchased it (though perhaps in a different color -- black was the only one available when the pre-order process began), but had third party covers been updated for the 3rd generation Kindle (e.g. the Moleskine) this product would probably have been priced more affordably.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Glad I went ahead and got it...., September 4, 2010
    After reading the reviews I was concerned that the light might be an issue since several folks commented that it doesn't shine evenly on the page. But I wanted something that would allow me to read in bed without disturbing my husband and the clip on lights are a pain to fuss with and are way too bright I think. Anyway, the light on the cover is just fine. Yes, it is a little dimmer at the bottom of the page but still quite readable. It is not one of those intensely bright lights that you have to kind of avert your gaze from. And it will not disturb anyone else trying to sleep.It kind of reminds me of my childhood days of reading a book under the covers with a flashlight except that you don't feel like you're going to suffocate.

    The second thing that some people didn't like was the added weight of this cover. The added weight is what I really like. The Kindle itself is so thin and light....for me TOO light. It feels so fragile and un-book-like. The cover gives it that little bit of heft that turns it into a book. I especially like to bend the cover all the way back and hold it either in both hands or in my left hand while I eat popcorn and drink champagne cocktails with my right.

    This is just one woman's opinion but I think can assure you that the light is adequate and very handy. And the weight is not a burden and may make it more of a normal reading experience for you as it does for me. Hope this helps if you are on the fence.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I'm returning my Cole Haan cover for this one, but..., September 2, 2010
    I'll admit it - I'm a bit of an accessories snob. I had the Cole Haan Hand-Stained Pebble Grain Leather Kindle Cover with Hinge (Fits 6" Display, 2nd Generation Kindle), Saddle Tan for my K2, and I originally purchased the Cole Haan Hand-Woven Leather Kindle Cover with Hinge (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle), Whiskey for my new K3. The new Cole Haan case is not meeting my needs, so I decided to give the Amazon cover a try.

    My new red cover just arrived today. The color is very nice - more brick red than burgundy. I immediately noticed that it was much smaller and sleeker than the Cole Haan cover. The Kindle fits just inside the cover, and there is not a lot of excess around the edges. I noticed that many reviewers are complaining about the weight/bulk, but for me this was an improvement over the Cole Haan covers. The strap is a nice feature as well, although I'm wondering how long it will hold up after reading some of the other negative reviews.

    The biggest con for me is that the leather doesn't feel as nice as I would like it to. Perhaps I shouldn't be comparing it to the incredibly buttery-soft leather that Cole Haan uses, but it's hard to ignore the difference. This leather is harder and reminds me of a plastic substance. I'm not saying it's bad, it's just not super lush. If I had never seen the Cole Haan cover, I would likely not even be commenting on this in such detail!

    Overall, this cover is perfectly fine. If you're super picky about the quality of the leather, you may not like it. If you can get over that detail, I think this cover will do the trick.


    1-0 out of 5 stars Lovely looking product that doesn't hold up, September 28, 2010
    I got this on Saturday. It broke today (Tuesday). The tabs that hold the kindle in the cover are not very sturdy. I don't think I put undue pressure on the kindle. But the top tab broke off, requiring the use of needle nose pliers to extract the broken piece from the kindle. I expect a product I pay $35 for to last longer than three days. I'm very disappointed.

    In looking at it, perhaps it is really a design issue and not a quality issue.

    Honestly, I did find the cover cumbersome when using the keypad. If you are using the keypad frequently, you might want to consider a sleeve. I will not replace this with another book type cover.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover, September 3, 2010
    I am very pleased with this cover. It is very protective, a nice shade of blue and very compact. It does fold over. I know some people don't realize this. The leather is stiff at first but it will fold over and soften after a few days. I had the official cover for kindle 2 and they have made some improvements. The leather is a better quality, they now offer a choice of colors and the spine doesn't feel like it will fall apart. Overall having the elastic is nice as well as it makes it more secure. I like that it makes the kindle feel more like a book and the hinge system is really nice. I like the clean look and won't be buying any cover that puts corner straps on the device. My one con is it weighs 5.7 ounces and while that is not heavy it really could be more like 4 ounces as they probably make the cover heavier than it really needs to be and still be protective.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Kindle 3 Cover - Video Review, August 27, 2010
    Video review of Kindle 3 cover. The app on the iPad is "Cheez Pro Clock" showing FAILblog - I thought it rather appropriate given the UPS FAILure to deliver on a weekend leaving me without a Kindle 3 to use with the case!

    Overall 4 stars. It feels slightly more sturdy and a little less cheap than the Kindle 2 cover. I took one star off because it still has the potential flaw of having nothing to keep the kindle in place at the right, and because I'd prefer a slightly more soft feel to the outside.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Cover Band, August 28, 2010
    I have to hand it to the designers at Amazon. If nothing else, they listen to our comments and react.

    The cover is fabulous. It's a piece of nice leather lined with quality padding and soft felt. It folds all the way back without any difficulty, making reading with one hand a breeze. The band helps to show which way the Kindle inside is facing, and keeps the reader from opening the cover the wrong way, which damaged many K2's. The corners are softly rounded, adding to the comfort and ease of use.

    The patent-pending hinge is a work of genius. None of the Kindle is obstructed by bands or elastic straps. It securely locks the Kindle in place, leaving the whole device exposed.

    I have to remark on the quality leather. Even my wife, who over-criticizes almost everyting, was very impressed with the fine-grade pebble-grain leather and actually had nice things to say after opening and inspecting it. If you knew my wife, you would know the value of this comment.

    Unlike some other readers out there, Kindle makes available a custom-designed cover that works in concert with the device. I'm satisfied with the cover (and the Kindle3) and give it my highest recommendation.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Objective info that may be helpful - light or not, colors, September 4, 2010
    Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

    Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
    Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
    Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
    Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

    The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
    Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
    Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
    Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
    Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
    Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
    Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover for my first kindle, August 26, 2010
    I ended up going with the black leather cover to match the Kindle Wireless Reading Device, Wi-Fi, 6" Display, Graphite - Latest Generation that I bought. The cover itself feels like it's made out of decent leather and gives me the impression that it will protect my Kindle while it's in my backpack or being casually tossed around the house.

    The cover itself is easy to install. It took under a minute and once it was on, it wasn't really noticeable, more so than a hardcover bookcover is noticeable after a while when you read a book. It folds over fine behind the Kindle.

    I'm happy with this cover. Sure, I could have bought a cheaper neoprene one but I wanted something that made me feel good about an e-reader. It may sound weird, but I like it from an aesthetics standpoint. It makes me feel like I've got a proper book in my hands instead of a toy or a gadget.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Well designed, provides good protective padding, August 26, 2010
    My Kindle 3 and cover arrived today. The cover is fairly similar to the Kindle 2 cover design, but with an elastic strap that can be used to hold the cover closed, or to hold the cover behind the Kindle when you are reading.

    I bought the cover mostly to protect my Kindle when I'm traveling. The cover front and back are both tough and well padded, with a soft felt lining and look like they should provide good protection. The overall appearance is reasonably elegant.

    The cover clips on easily and securely. The Kindle 3 has two small slots on the left side and two clips on the cover latch into these slots. You can slide the top clip down to unlatch and release the Kindle.

    I have somewhat mixed feelings about the elastic strap. I know some people like to be able to securely close the cover, but for me it's mostly an unnecessary extra step. I will try it for a while: it looks easy enough to snip off if it becomes a nuisance. (Update in October: I'm getting used to it. I use the strap to hold the cover folded back when I am reading and I find that sliding my hand under the strap is a very comfortable way to hold the Kindle.)

    The Kindle 3 + cover total around 0.7" thickness. So the cover is roughly doubling the Kindle's natural 0.335" thickness. But since I want protective padding, this seems like a price I need to pay!

    The cover weighs 5.5 ounces. (The Kindle 3 by itself is 8.5 ounces.)

    Overall, I'm very happy with the cover.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Rather shoddy material and construction for the price, August 31, 2010
    On the first day of use, after only using the securing band a couple of times, the band suddenly snapped from the top of the cover. It turns out that it was only flimsily glued to a slot on the top edge. Some superglue fixed this, but it really should not have been necessary.

    The cover holds the Kindle snugly, however, it's a bit misaligned: the lower right side of the Kindle is more exposed than the upper right side.

    All in all, I'd still have purchased it (though perhaps in a different color -- black was the only one available when the pre-order process began), but had third party covers been updated for the 3rd generation Kindle (e.g. the Moleskine) this product would probably have been priced more affordably.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Glad I went ahead and got it...., September 4, 2010
    After reading the reviews I was concerned that the light might be an issue since several folks commented that it doesn't shine evenly on the page. But I wanted something that would allow me to read in bed without disturbing my husband and the clip on lights are a pain to fuss with and are way too bright I think. Anyway, the light on the cover is just fine. Yes, it is a little dimmer at the bottom of the page but still quite readable. It is not one of those intensely bright lights that you have to kind of avert your gaze from. And it will not disturb anyone else trying to sleep.It kind of reminds me of my childhood days of reading a book under the covers with a flashlight except that you don't feel like you're going to suffocate.

    The second thing that some people didn't like was the added weight of this cover. The added weight is what I really like. The Kindle itself is so thin and light....for me TOO light. It feels so fragile and un-book-like. The cover gives it that little bit of heft that turns it into a book. I especially like to bend the cover all the way back and hold it either in both hands or in my left hand while I eat popcorn and drink champagne cocktails with my right.

    This is just one woman's opinion but I think can assure you that the light is adequate and very handy. And the weight is not a burden and may make it more of a normal reading experience for you as it does for me. Hope this helps if you are on the fence.

    4-0 out of 5 stars I'm returning my Cole Haan cover for this one, but..., September 2, 2010
    I'll admit it - I'm a bit of an accessories snob. I had the Cole Haan Hand-Stained Pebble Grain Leather Kindle Cover with Hinge (Fits 6" Display, 2nd Generation Kindle), Saddle Tan for my K2, and I originally purchased the Cole Haan Hand-Woven Leather Kindle Cover with Hinge (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle), Whiskey for my new K3. The new Cole Haan case is not meeting my needs, so I decided to give the Amazon cover a try.

    My new red cover just arrived today. The color is very nice - more brick red than burgundy. I immediately noticed that it was much smaller and sleeker than the Cole Haan cover. The Kindle fits just inside the cover, and there is not a lot of excess around the edges. I noticed that many reviewers are complaining about the weight/bulk, but for me this was an improvement over the Cole Haan covers. The strap is a nice feature as well, although I'm wondering how long it will hold up after reading some of the other negative reviews.

    The biggest con for me is that the leather doesn't feel as nice as I would like it to. Perhaps I shouldn't be comparing it to the incredibly buttery-soft leather that Cole Haan uses, but it's hard to ignore the difference. This leather is harder and reminds me of a plastic substance. I'm not saying it's bad, it's just not super lush. If I had never seen the Cole Haan cover, I would likely not even be commenting on this in such detail!

    Overall, this cover is perfectly fine. If you're super picky about the quality of the leather, you may not like it. If you can get over that detail, I think this cover will do the trick.


    1-0 out of 5 stars Lovely looking product that doesn't hold up, September 28, 2010
    I got this on Saturday. It broke today (Tuesday). The tabs that hold the kindle in the cover are not very sturdy. I don't think I put undue pressure on the kindle. But the top tab broke off, requiring the use of needle nose pliers to extract the broken piece from the kindle. I expect a product I pay $35 for to last longer than three days. I'm very disappointed.

    In looking at it, perhaps it is really a design issue and not a quality issue.

    Honestly, I did find the cover cumbersome when using the keypad. If you are using the keypad frequently, you might want to consider a sleeve. I will not replace this with another book type cover.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover, September 3, 2010
    I am very pleased with this cover. It is very protective, a nice shade of blue and very compact. It does fold over. I know some people don't realize this. The leather is stiff at first but it will fold over and soften after a few days. I had the official cover for kindle 2 and they have made some improvements. The leather is a better quality, they now offer a choice of colors and the spine doesn't feel like it will fall apart. Overall having the elastic is nice as well as it makes it more secure. I like that it makes the kindle feel more like a book and the hinge system is really nice. I like the clean look and won't be buying any cover that puts corner straps on the device. My one con is it weighs 5.7 ounces and while that is not heavy it really could be more like 4 ounces as they probably make the cover heavier than it really needs to be and still be protective.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Kindle 3 Cover - Video Review, August 27, 2010
    Video review of Kindle 3 cover. The app on the iPad is "Cheez Pro Clock" showing FAILblog - I thought it rather appropriate given the UPS FAILure to deliver on a weekend leaving me without a Kindle 3 to use with the case!

    Overall 4 stars. It feels slightly more sturdy and a little less cheap than the Kindle 2 cover. I took one star off because it still has the potential flaw of having nothing to keep the kindle in place at the right, and because I'd prefer a slightly more soft feel to the outside. ... Read more


    16. Garmin nvi 265W/265WT 4.3-Inch Widescreen Bluetooth Portable GPS Navigator with Traffic
    Electronics
    list price: $219.99 -- our price: $119.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B001ELJ9QK
    Manufacturer: Garmin
    Sales Rank: 9
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Reviews

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good unit for the price, November 5, 2008
    I was a bit confused at first by the 265w label on the device and on the screen during boot up; however, this unit does have the FM receiver built into the power adapter cable and works exactly as advertised. The routing software is much more intelligent than a previous model I've owned, the interface is notably improved and the text to speech for street names is a very nice addition. Hands-free phone features also work flawlessly.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Absolute Lemon, on 4th unit! Garmin is the pits!, August 12, 2009
    My refurbished 265wt looks and works like new and the features were as I expected. The only thing that I wish it had is the ability to save routes. But you can plan and follow a route by designating a final destination and then again using the "Where To" Feature to add additional locations and then for each selecting the option "Add as Via Point," but you cannot save the route for future use.

    I ran into two glitches when attempting to update the map (free within 60 days of first use). Since it was a refurbished unit, the first use date was more than 60 days before I received the GPS and thus I was unable to download the free update. A call to Garmin easily resolved that - the customer service contact person added it to my account for free download. The second problem was that when I tried to install the updated map I got a message indicating there was not enough space and it refused to install. Another call to Garmin and a software expert used "remote assist" (after my giving him permission to take control of my computer from his location) and made live changes to my GPS. After that the map update was successful. In both cases the Garmin personnel were most courteous, very competent, and easy to understand.

    I also found the Garmin MapSource program very helpful. It can be downloaded at no charge if you already have another Garmin program, and if you don't, you can first download and install the free Garmin Training Center program and then download and install MapSource at no cost. Working in MapSource to create, to view and to edit waypoints and tracks and other features and then using MapSource to transfer the data to the GPS is far easier than trying to do this directly on the GPS.

    Apart from mapping, the "Points of Interest" feature can lead you to unexpected places. After using the GPS "Where To", then "Points of Interest" in the Germantown, Maryland area I selected "Food" to look for lunch. The first two addresses ended up being residential addresses in townhouse developments. Out of curiosity I learned that one house was unoccupied according to a neighbor and at the other house no one answered the door. On my 3rd try I selected the chain "Subway" and that address was right on. Clearly the Points of Interest contains some unreliable information. However, this would likely be true for all Garmin GPS models.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Better than a Nuvi 760, February 3, 2009
    This GPS is rated very highly, and that is why I bought it. I have gotten refurbished phones before, so I didn't think it was a big deal to buy a refurbished gps. Also, I now remember reading that someone had trouble getting the free map update. BEWARE!!
    I have spent at least 4-5 hours total trying to get this update. Long story short, after being on hold several times, faxing an invoice showing proof of purchase, waiting for them to update my account, and then downloading the update, clearing tons of space on my computer to transfer the update, I now have the update. I figure it would have been worth the extra $40 to get the new one (I got it for $179). The unit may be fine if you don't care about the free update. That much time and hassle is not "free".

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good unit for the price, November 5, 2008
    Spent a weekend reviewing various GPS devices to replace my less than 1 year old Mio C320 (avoid these like the plague) that had its battery die about 4 months after purchase. Went back and forth along the entire line of Garmin devices, and finally settled on this one for the blue tooth and traffic, neither of which I'll probably hardly ever use, but nice to have when I want them.

    I was disappointed with the map, the "new" 2009 one, because I have some streets in my neighborhood that have been around for over four years and they're not to be found on this unit. Even the piece of junk cheap Mio had these streets.

    But that's about the only downside there is to it, the only reason I haven't given it 5 stars.

    Having been used to the MIO, and the horrible refresh rate, it is a pleasant change to see smooth scrolling as my vehicle moves. The ability to change the car icon is nice, especially with the plethora of icons available on the garmin website.

    Accuracy is very good as well, and even in turns the unit isn't so laggy that it becomes annoying. And also unlike what I was used to with the MIO, when I come to a stop at the intersection, the map doesn't start rotating randomly on me.

    Speaker is about as I expected, won't hear much over a loud stereo but crank it up enough you can at least hear it if you keep the music down a bit.

    The option to easily download voices is also appreciated.

    It did well with my testing of going point to point, following the instructions, and for the most part you're given the instructions in plenty of time. only once or twice did it not tell me "turn right on such and such" until I was about 20 feet from the street, but that was when I was coming up on stop signs and had slowed down, so it may be compensating for the speed factor.

    Recalculation notice is a bit annoying, my MIO would say it once, sometimes this says it three times before it starts to display the alternate route.

    Still has about 900MB free on the internal memory for additional voices, icons, maps, and such, and with the SD slot there's plenty of room to grow.

    I have a Verizon XV6900 phone with Windows Mobile 6.1, and while the bluetooth paired well and it can see the phone status, battery power, signal, even dialed and missed call lists, it never does get the phonebook. it gets a random entry and that's it - so whenever I turn it on, I have just one user to select from, and it's different each time. Still haven't tracked that one down yet. But every other bluetooth option worked just fine.

    I'm not a fan of the very thick double power cable for it though, and it would be doubly annoying (no pun intended) if I were mounting this somewhere higher up on the window to have that double cable dangling down.

    I can see how the ads would get annoying sometimes (the free traffic is because it is advertising driven) but you don't get them at all if you turn off the traffic feature, and since most of my driving isn't around times that traffic is a concern, i can just leave it for when I really have a use for it.

    Good response to finger input, and while the unit is overall much better quality than the MIO, I really do miss the MIO's ability to have an info pane down the last third of the screen and the map on the first two thirds of it when desired. But there's some of that info available in the data bubbles on the bottom and top so I'll survive.

    Overall happy with the unit, it works well and was worth the cost.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Best GPS I have ever Owned, December 10, 2008
    I have owned quite a few GPS units all including Phone, Laptop and Dedicated. Flat out before I even get started the Garmin Nuvi 265WT is the best I have ever owned. Let me just make a couple of comments on the most important features.

    Touch Screen Interface
    Very intuitive and easy to use. Touch screen is responsive but not instantaneous. What I particularly like is the ability to switch to a top down view by touching the screen. Once done you can use your finger to drag the map around at any zoom point. Once done you can hit the back button and resume your 3D view.

    Turn by Turn
    You have two options here. You can use one of the Text to Speech voices or one of natural voices. The text to speech voices will give you more information such as street names. This is what I use and even though you can tell it's a computer generated voice its quality is superb. The 265WT does a good job at keeping you updated. Also at any time you can hit the turn Icon and it will speak the distance to the next turn, giving you street name as well as direction. The audio is quite loud and in my noisy little Scion I have no problem hearing the messages.

    Maps
    I have found the map accuracy quite good. I live in Northern virginal and it seems to be very well updated as many of the very new streets included.

    Automatic Routing
    Very effective. You can choose between the quickest or the shortest with options to avoid U-Turns, Highways, Toll Roads, Traffic, Ferries. The automatic rerouting is faster than my TeleNav phone and my Laptop computers.

    Points of Interest
    On my TeleNav phone GPS system I can enter any business in the national database and I can get directions, address and phone number. This is where the 265WT falls short. The TeleNav system has the advantage of searching online. Since the 265WT is limited to onboard memory there is a limit to the number of points of interest. A good example is I was looking for "Off Broadway Shoes" and the unit could not find them. However a search for "Payless Shoes" worked very well.

    Traffic Alerts
    The lifetime free traffic comes at a price. You will get popup adds. These are very small popups that supposedly only come when you are in the menu. This is not true. I have gotten them while in the navigation screen. For now they it seems to be once per trip but there is nothing to say they wont start getting more frequent. The other thing I don't like about the messages is that you have to hit them to continue and doing so takes you out of the nav screen to a kind of favorites screen. You have to hit the back button to get back to your navigations screen.
    How well does the traffic system work. I live in Northern VA and have coverage throughout my area. The included radio fails to pick up a single signal without using an external antenna. Sadly you can just go down and purchase an FM antenna.. The Power cable has a 3/32" jack. What I did was to pick up a 3/32" plug from Radio Shack and soldered a 4' wire to the tip pin on the connector. Once draped out one of the windows I get very frequent traffic updates.
    Once you start getting traffic reports I found them to be accurate and they do help. You can automatically avoid high traffic arias or do it manually as they accrue.
    I am still debating if the popup adds are worth the effort.

    Bluetooth Integration
    This is my favorite feature. I can keep my keyboard locked Motorola Q in my pants pocket and use my 265WT to make and receive all my calls at a touch of a button. All my phone features are available on the 265WT. Phonebook, Call history, Voice Recognition. The voice quality is quite acceptable on both ends. As a matter of fact the echo I get on my Motorola is not there when using the 265WT as a hands free set.

    Picture Viewer
    I found this to be a very useless feature. If the photos are very big it takes forever for the 265WT to load them. This may be due to the slow access to the SD card slot.

    There are other features like the ability to connect the 265WT to your PC and automatically add favorite locations using GoogleMaps. All in all I am very happy with my purchase and would purchase it again.

    FYI the Nuvi 265WT is the same unit as the Nuvi 255W without the Bluetooth ability and the FM reliever cable (GTM 25). You can even purchase the GTM 25 from Garmin. If you don't want the Bluetooth feature and don't currently need the traffic feature you can pick up the Nuvi 255W cheaper.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Map database leaves something to be desired., January 1, 2009
    I got this unit for Christmas, 2008. Although this is the first GPS that I've owned, I've been passenger on many trips with a friend who has Nuvi 350 so I was already familiar with Garmin. The unit I bought had the 2009 maps, and the firmware was fairly recent. Firmware, etc has since been updated to most recent version(s).
    My choice came down to the nuvi 265WT, 765T or 760. The 760 is a premium unit for a bargain price due it's being last years model, while the 765T had the features I wanted but is still pricey since it's a new model. In the end I opted for 265WT since it had the updated/new features that the 760 didn't have and was at the price that I was willing to spend. I did not really consider other brands, though my impression is that other brands offer more "bells and whistles" but suffer in the areas of ease of use and reliability.
    The unit has worked fine, no problems to speak of, though my actual time spend driving with it has been limited so far (spent lots of time just "playing" with it, though).

    [update 9/11/09]
    I've now used for a week of commuting to work and running errands. I use for commute because of the traffic reporting.

    traffic -- haven't encountered a backup that it didn't warn me about, but have driven through a couple of non-existent backups. I've also found that it can take several minutes for the traffic status to be displayed after power-on, sometimes *after* it has picked a route.

    routing -- the route it gives me to work is rather strange. It routes me off of the freeway onto an expressway that has several lights. I tried it once, and sure enough it took longer than predicted, even with light traffic.

    reliability -- The unit has "glitched" 3 times in the last week. Once it just turned itself off, another time it jumped from the map to the speedometer screen (by itself) while the voice became very distorted, and another time the backlight setting was not as I had left it.
    [end of 9/1/09 update]

    My biggest complaint has to do with the POI database. For example, I searched for local cinema's... it did not have the 20 screen cineplex that is closest to me. When I searched for local Staples Office Supply locations the closest it found was 50 miles away, even though there are at least 4 within 15 miles. I didn't show a nearby Britannia Arms. A large regional shopping center is still called by a name that was dropped 5 years ago. etc...
    The POI management software (such as it is) could use more flexibility. For example, when searching for Staples, the unit was "busy" quite some time searching. There appears to be no way to put a limit the search distance.
    I think the map update policy is in need of revising. A two month "grace period" is not really fair to the buyers. Most of these are sold in Nov & Dec, and the maps are typically updated in the Spring, beyond the 60 day cutoff. Garmin should be guaranteeing map updates for at least 6 months, if not a year. Or, one free update within 2 years or something similar. Another gripe is the Garmin request for an "account" to register the unit. Yet another user name and password to forget.

    [update 1/9/09]
    At 2009 CES, Garmin announced a new map update policy. For $120 you get lifetime updates ("up to" 4 times a year) while a single update will be $69, which (I think) is less than before.
    [end of 1/9/09 update]

    5-0 out of 5 stars Impressed!, December 5, 2008
    After doing extensive research I decided on this unit. Mainly because the 265wt is one of their newer NUVI products and it had the features I was looking for. If you look at the sites that have reviews on the 265wt, most are from nov/2008. I think this unit was released about 6 months ago. Anyway, here's my opinion on some of the key features of the 255WT.

    1. Windsheild mount - works great. The suction cup is very high quality and I have no concerns that it will accidentally detach from the windsheild. I love the swivel capabilites and it allows you a perfect view no matter where you put it.

    2. Satellite aquisition time - incredible! once you perform the initial aquistion, you are set. Now when I turn the on it's ready to go in usually under 3 seconds. Awesome!

    3. Map directions and screen - wonderful. The GPS unit so far has given me perfect directions and the re-route capability works flawlessly. The screen is clear, bright and easy to navigate.

    4. Free traffic alerts - works as described. I love this feature and I hardly saw any ads.

    5. Bluetooth - giddy up! I had my Motorola KZR1 synched up in about 15 seconds. Easy to use and sure makes talking on the phone alot more enjoyable when driving. I've had conversations with multiple people and they could hear me fine. One cool thing is if your phone has voice dialing; because it allows you do it through the GPS unit. Also, all my contacts show up (even with multiple phone #'s).

    6. And finally...the internal speaker. If you researched the 265WT like I've done you'll see ALOT of people complaining that the speaker is too quiet to hear anything. That was a big concern of mine but I felt I would give the unit a try and if it was that bad then I would return it. My thoughts on the speaker are this. The speaker size/quality could and probably should be improved. It's a cheapy speaker...BUT...I CAN hear the directions perfectly fine and can here the other person talking to me when using the bluetooth phone capability. Side notes: You HAVE to turn down your radio if you want to be able to hear it. Also, I was driving with the windows closed (it's friggin winter), so I cannot say how well you'd be able to hear the directions/phone with your windows rolled all the way down.

    Bottom line - it has met or exceeded all of my expectations! I bought it on the day after Thanksgiving (aka Black Friday) and I got an incredible deal! $199.99 with free shipping, no tax, and got %50 off a $25 case logic travel case. I would have spent an extra $150 if I would have bought the same unit from a local retailer.

    Finally if your in the market to buy any GPS my suggestion is wait until it gets closer to X-mas and see if the price drops. I'm guessing they'll do it again. I was fortunate to get it when I did and hence saved a nice chunk of change.

    Hope this helped!

    5-0 out of 5 stars Works perfectly, June 18, 2009
    I was a bit confused at first by the 265w label on the device and on the screen during boot up; however, this unit does have the FM receiver built into the power adapter cable and works exactly as advertised. The routing software is much more intelligent than a previous model I've owned, the interface is notably improved and the text to speech for street names is a very nice addition. Hands-free phone features also work flawlessly.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Absolute Lemon, on 4th unit! Garmin is the pits!, August 12, 2009
    Bought it in April and now I'm on unit # 4! Garmin's acknowledgment is below.

    THESE UNITS consistently loose the voice. When this happens it still navigates but the system starts to hang. Also the navigation will start to hang too if you alter your route. You need to shut off the unit and restart but then it will soon happen again.

    The 1st replacement was a refurbished after they promised me a new unit. With the 2nd replacement, just like the first one, I made sure that not only did I have the most recent map but also that I had all the unit updates. On the 3rd replacement that I received yesterday I didn't update it and sure enough the same problems occur.

    I have spoken to Garmin by phone about 8 times since May and many e-mails. I just contacted Amazon and someone at Garmin Corporate, I'm waiting to hear back. I'm just amazed that Garmin is still selling this unit, why don't they recall these?

    Here is an e-mail from a Garmin support Tech from over two weeks ago:
    "Unfortunately, there has been an issue with the latest software update
    on these units. Our engineers are working on an update to correct this issue, and
    we expect to see this very soon.

    Your account is set up so that you will receive an email notification
    when the update is available, but you are more than welcome to email me
    if you do not hear about this soon."

    4-0 out of 5 stars A very good portable GPS, March 6, 2009
    I've used Garmin SPIII and Garmin SP2610 in over 7 years, and am very happy with their overall performance. I travel by cars frequently, and have been pleased for the most parts with these 2 units. However, they both share the same problem: "almost useless when I was driving in New York City", where tall buildings put both these models into a constant "lost of satellite signals" state.

    After much research, I decided to give this model a trial run, based on this review from one user "...I can leave the unit in the storage compartment under the armrest in the car, and follow the audio directions..." I theorized that if this unit worked in a "storage compartment under the armrest in the car", it will work under my windshield though surrounded by tall buildings in NYC (!)

    Here is my initial report after a 4-day trip in Orange County, CA, where I unfortunately did not have any chances to test the "tall buildings" syndrome, however there were many circumstances that it worked well where my previous 2 Garmin's didn't work. So here it goes:

    1) Pricing: My previous SPIII and SP2610, each costs almost 3 times as much back then. Much lower price for many more features. 5-star

    2) Form: Love the compact, thin size, and its light weight. The unit didn't come with a case. I have a case that came with my Bose in-ear headphones, and it fits perfectly into this otherwise wasted case :-) The glass suction cup works solidly. The unit can be adjusted smoothly once attached, yet is held firmly in place. The power cord also houses the traffic receiver and its length is generous. 5-star

    3) Functions:
    ....a) Pluses: 3D-map; like it for the most part, but have found on very few occasions where multi-level highways are intersected, its 3D image was confused. I could have been taking the wrong highway. 4-star
    ....b) Text-to-voice: great in the city where street signs are readable, or on highways. 5-star
    ....c) GPS signals acquisition: Much faster and more effective than my previous 2 models. It showed more than 3 green signals bars even when I was in my hotel room, or in the ... bathroom (playing with the new gadget ;) I experimented with putting it off the windshield, out of line of sight of the sky, and it worked just as well. This is a good indication how it will perform on my next trip to New York City. I'll report back on the real experience then. 5-star
    ....d) Battery: It turns out that I love this feature, as I never had this on SPIII and SP2610. I realized that I had left the power cord when I returned my rental car in LAX (luckily, Hertz lost-and-found dept was able to ship UPS back to me in a few days.) I was able turn it on, and used the Garmin 265WT w/o this cord. The SPIII and SP2610 would be dead! 5-star
    ....e) Points-of-interest: By all indications, it's as good as I expected, though there were times that I could not locate some local restaurants. It's just a matter of how updated the information is. 4-star
    ....f) Favorites: Aka "waypoints" in older SPIII and SP2610 models. This is markedly improved. In the older models, it stored the coordinates and lost the original address that you entered. I love how to pull up a saved "favorite", not only being able to command it to route there, but also recognizing the address, and as a bonus, I can actually call an associated phone number directly from this favorite destination (imaging a situation like "let me call first to see if s/he is at home, then ... ;) A very practical and brilliant approach! Now that I'm used to this feature, I'm greedy to ask to have the ability to store more than one phone number ;) 5-star
    ....g) Lifetime free Live-Traffic: It appears to be a great feature, but at this point I haven't really had much exposure to report in a meaningful way. I saw the signs of green, yellow, etc... But those didn't turn into any real actions for my driving. Btw, the power cord is doubled as the traffic receiver, so don't lose it! 5-star
    ....h) Bluetooth: This is my first experience with bluetooth in a unit other than my bluetooth headset. Though I'm very pleased overall, this is the one area that has shown the most problems. I relied on this feature entirely since California requires its drivers to use hand-free equipments. Here is what I found with this feature:
    .......70% chance of failing to make outgoing calls using my phone - So disappointed!
    .......98% chance of success to make outgoing calls using the 265WT. I either dialed the numbers using the dial pad on the 265WT screen, or dial by pressing the phone number of saved favorites.
    .......98% chance of success when receiving in coming calls. I used both methods: hit the "SEND" key from my phone, or press the "ANSWER" from the 265WT screen.
    .......The speaker quality though is very clear for GPS text-to-voice operation, sounded as it came from an old and cheap speaker when used with the cell phone. However, not once, anyone on the other end of the phone complains of sound quality, even on long conversations. No one asked if I used speaker phone! Apparently the microphone works well, but the speaker works badly for the phone. Nevertheless the speaker works well for GPS text-to-voice operation. 3-star
    4) Wishes: a case included in the package would be nice. 4-star

    I rated it overall a 4-star, despite of the bluetooth issue.

    pdn

    5-0 out of 5 stars Quite pleased. Also great Customer Service and Technical Assistance, July 7, 2009
    My refurbished 265wt looks and works like new and the features were as I expected. The only thing that I wish it had is the ability to save routes. But you can plan and follow a route by designating a final destination and then again using the "Where To" Feature to add additional locations and then for each selecting the option "Add as Via Point," but you cannot save the route for future use.

    I ran into two glitches when attempting to update the map (free within 60 days of first use). Since it was a refurbished unit, the first use date was more than 60 days before I received the GPS and thus I was unable to download the free update. A call to Garmin easily resolved that - the customer service contact person added it to my account for free download. The second problem was that when I tried to install the updated map I got a message indicating there was not enough space and it refused to install. Another call to Garmin and a software expert used "remote assist" (after my giving him permission to take control of my computer from his location) and made live changes to my GPS. After that the map update was successful. In both cases the Garmin personnel were most courteous, very competent, and easy to understand.

    I also found the Garmin MapSource program very helpful. It can be downloaded at no charge if you already have another Garmin program, and if you don't, you can first download and install the free Garmin Training Center program and then download and install MapSource at no cost. Working in MapSource to create, to view and to edit waypoints and tracks and other features and then using MapSource to transfer the data to the GPS is far easier than trying to do this directly on the GPS.

    Apart from mapping, the "Points of Interest" feature can lead you to unexpected places. After using the GPS "Where To", then "Points of Interest" in the Germantown, Maryland area I selected "Food" to look for lunch. The first two addresses ended up being residential addresses in townhouse developments. Out of curiosity I learned that one house was unoccupied according to a neighbor and at the other house no one answered the door. On my 3rd try I selected the chain "Subway" and that address was right on. Clearly the Points of Interest contains some unreliable information. However, this would likely be true for all Garmin GPS models.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Better than a Nuvi 760, February 3, 2009
    Before I decided to buy this Nuvi 265wt model, I had bought the Nuvi 760 model on Black Friday. The 760 model was okay at best. I had it for about three weeks until I realized that the upper right hand corner would not respond until after pressing that corner at least five times. So I decided to return the Garmin and I was thinking about getting a tomtom or magellan. But then I saw the 265wt on sale for $200 and I decided, since I bought the 760 for $250, maybe I could save money and just give Garmin one last try...As soon as I opened the 265wt, I fell in love with it!

    The 265wt FAR OUTWEIGHS the Nuvi 760 by a mile! The screen refresh rate on the 265wt is much better, the satellite locks on faster, the colors are brighter in my opinion (and yes, they were at the same brightness level!), and the free traffic is so much better on the 265wt. With the 760, I had free MSN Traffic for three months and comparing that with the 265wt traffic, they are exactly the same. Except with the 760, you have to pay a yearly subscription. Furthermore, with the 265wt, you can custom load POI's (Points of Interest) and so I have loaded mine with all the locations of In-N-Out Burger and Rudy's BBQ in America, which is awesome. They also have Custom POI's which show you where speed camera's and red light camera's are, if that's your kind of thing. But I'm a law abiding Texan, so I never mess with Texas and that kind of illegal stuff...

    The only thing that the 760 had that the 265wt doesn't have is mp3/audiobook and the FM Transmitter with audio jack.
    About the FM Transmitter - it was a cool feature but it wasn't practical because in Dallas, where I live, there are thousands of radio stations. There are hardly any open radio stations. You think there's an open one, but then all of a sudden, you hear the voice of a person speaking a different language (must have been Chinese Talk Radio) or you hear a Mariachi Band playing. Then you go one decimal point higher, and there's the Hip-Hop Station. With so much static in Dallas, the MP3/Audiobook Player really becomes useless...

    The only time I was able to use the transmitter without static was when I took a trip up to Oklahoma. In Oklahoma, there isn't much radio stations as there are only cows and fields in Oklahoma. I finally was able to put the 760 to the true test of using the MP3 player. However, what I found really dissappointing was that as I was listening to Richard P. Feynman's Audiobook, "The Elementary Particles and the Laws of Physics: The 1986 Dirac Memorial Lectures", I fell asleep on I35 and almost got into a car crash near Oklahoma City. It was then I realized that the Nuvi 760's MP3/Audiobook player was more of a driving hazzard than a helpful tool to get me safely to Norman, OK where I needed to go.

    Therefore, HANDS DOWN the 265wt is not only a better GPS than the Nuvi 760, but it's also a FAR SAFER GPS!!! If you want MP3's or Music without static, get an Ipod and connect it to your car. It's far better...

    3-0 out of 5 stars Nice GPS but don't buy refurbished! Hours were spent trying to get the FREE map update!!, July 31, 2009
    This GPS is rated very highly, and that is why I bought it. I have gotten refurbished phones before, so I didn't think it was a big deal to buy a refurbished gps. Also, I now remember reading that someone had trouble getting the free map update. BEWARE!!
    I have spent at least 4-5 hours total trying to get this update. Long story short, after being on hold several times, faxing an invoice showing proof of purchase, waiting for them to update my account, and then downloading the update, clearing tons of space on my computer to transfer the update, I now have the update. I figure it would have been worth the extra $40 to get the new one (I got it for $179). The unit may be fine if you don't care about the free update. That much time and hassle is not "free". ... Read more


    17. Transcend 16 GB Class 10 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC10E
    Electronics
    -- our price: $26.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B003VNKNEQ
    Manufacturer: TRANSCEND
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Amazon.com Product DescriptionTranscend 16GB Class 10 SDHC Flash Memory Card (TS16GSDHC10E) - Frustration Free Package

    Certified Frustration-Free Packaging
    Amazon.com has certified this product's packaging is Frustration-Free. A Frustration-Free Package is easy-to-open and comes without excess packaging materials such as hard plastic "clamshell" casings, plastic bindings, and wire ties. It is exactly the same as a traditionally packaged product--we've just streamlined the packaging to be opened without the use of a box cutter or knife and will protect your product just as well as traditional packaging during shipping. Products with Frustration-Free Packaging can frequently be shipped in their own boxes, without the need for an additional shipping box. Learn more.
    1 ... Read more

    Reviews

    4-0 out of 5 stars Not All Class 10 Cards are Equal, April 11, 2010
    UPDATE 9-10 I own 4 of these cards now. I have more of these than any other card I own because the are a very good value for capacity/price/and speed. My initial dissapointment over the lack of super high speed is outweighed by the reality that this card is an exceptional value.

    Origional Review:
    I purchased this card making the assumption that all class 10 cards had the same read and write speed. This was a poor assumption on my part.

    The product photo on Amazon does not have the card's speed printed on it. The card that was shipped shows the front of the card printed with "20MB/s" which is the cards read speed. The cards write speed is only 16MB/s.

    I own a SanDisk Extreme III class 10 card that has (up to) 30MB/s read and write speed. My Nikon D-90 that can take advantage of the SanDisk cards speed. The difference is the SanDisk card can capture 100 photos at fine resolution in 24 seconds. The Transcend card captures 66 photos in the same time/resolution.

    I reality very few people will ever have the need to drill off 100 photos in 24 seconds, but I can't stand to loose a good shot because the camera is slow while writing to the card and I can't fire the shutter. You can hear this happen at about 4.5 seconds in the video review. This does not happen with the SanDisk class 10 30MB/s card.

    A lot can happen in a fraction of a second that can make a shot good or bad and the having ability to fire a lot of shots in rapid succession is important to me.

    If you own an SLR that is capable of rapid fire, high-resolution photography you may want to consider the SanDisk Extreme III 30 MB/s card.

    If you own a compact digital camera, this card will exceed the capabilities of all of them. For compact cameras the card isn't usually the slowest part of the data write process, it's the camera.

    This card is reasonably priced for a class 10 card. Just know what you are getting, what your needs may be, and what else is available. I own other Transcend cards and they have always worked properly without any issues.

    The video that I attached shows this card with the same 24 seconds that I gave the SanDisk Card.

    To see the SanDisk Extreme III 30MB/s video demo and review on Amazon go to:

    Sandisk SDSDX3-008G-E31 8GB Extreme III SD Card 30MB/s (RETAIL PACKAGE)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast!, April 8, 2010
    I purchased this for use with my new Canon T2i. I use it primarily for shooting full resolution 1080p video, although I shoot stills as well.

    The camera choked on the class 4 chip that I originally purchased, but with this one, it is amazing. I can shoot rapidfire 18 megapixel stills (I've tested it up to 30+ shots in a row), and there is no lag. I've never had an error when shooting hi-def video.

    Highly recommended! I'm buying another one.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast, fast, fast!, March 15, 2010
    I bought this card for my Canon T1i. The card I had been using before ordering this one was a Kingston Class 6 micro sd card and it worked well enough for the type of shooting I did. Class 6 was the card speed that Canon recommended when I bought my T1i (Class 10 cards were not yet available) and it seemed fast enough for the way I used my camera - isolated single photos taken at Medium (8 MP) or Large (15 MP) jpg settings and 1280 x 720 video. And while I ocassionally took continuous photos, I had never much exceeded 5-10 photos in a row and had never run into a problem with my Class 6 card.

    When I first saw the Class 10 cards I did some experiments with my camera. How many continuous Large photos could I take before the camera slowed down? It turned out to be about 30. And how many RAW photos could I take before the camera slowed down? It turned out to be about 9. SInce I did not generally take any photos in RAW and never needed more than about 10 continuous photos at Large, the Class 6 card seemed more than sufficient for my needs. But I wondered about the speed of the Class 10 cards enough that I finally bought one.

    It turns out that the Class 10 card is sufficiently fast that there does not seem to be a reasonable upper limit on single Large photos. I have taken 60 on continuous without an issue. And although I still cannot take more than 9 RAW photos on continuous with the Class 10 card, when I am finished taking those photos the camera no longer displays a Wait - writing pictures screen. The RAW photos get written from the built-in memory to the card so quickly that the camera does not need to display the Wait screen.

    So this card is fast! Given the way I take photos this purchase was unnecessary, but still I am glad I bought it. I know I will not run into a situation where speed is an issue with this card.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Transcend vs Sandisk of equal price, July 31, 2010
    OK. this card was around $47 for a class 10 16gb. The other card i bought was a Sandisk class 10 8gb for the around same price. I did a 10 sec stop watch test on both cards with my Rebel T1i on raw and the Sandisk was only faster by 1 shot in a 10 sec burst. to me it seems trivial to pay 47 bucks for a Sandisk 8gig when you can get 16 gigs for the same price. yes i know, the Sandisk is good for arctic and desert temperatures... but i live in western NY... not Antarctica or the Sahara. If your looking for a good card, with more gigs for your buck, the Transcend is well worth it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Slower than slow on Pentax K-x, April 25, 2010
    I bought this for my pentax K-x but it would randomly corrupt images. Also, it was slower than my 3+ year old SandDisk Ultra 1GB card. I was told by the seller (Thememstore) that others with the k-x have had the same problems. So apparently it must have something to do with the class 10 part, because since I returned this card I bought a SandDisk Extreme III 4GB Class 6 and it works far better.

    Would I recommend this card? Yes, but only to someone who knows that class 10 will work in their camera. I don't fault the card as I think the problem is with the K-x.

    1-0 out of 5 stars DESTROYS DATA -- after working fine for just long enough to fool you!, November 6, 2010
    SUMMARY:


    DO NOT BUY THIS CARD UNLESS YOU WANT TO PLAY RUSSIAN ROULETTE WITH YOUR DATA. Card worked fine when I bought it, but malfunctioned within the first 400 photos -- malfunctioned so badly that some very technical tools were needed to recover anything at all, and some photos were still permanently lost. Recovering the data requires the attention of a serious data recovery expert or someone with substantial technical knowledge and lots of time.


    DETAILS:

    I made the mistake buying this card for my camera right before a long trip overseas. It worked fine on the first few dozen shots. I didn't see any improvement in speed over my trusty 1.5-year-old Transcend 8GB Class-6 card, but that was most likely because the camera itself (Canon EOS Rebel 1000D/XSi) could not write images any faster than that (full-size JPEG, continuous shutter mode, roughly did ~2.5-3 images/second on both cards, with no slowdown after the first few shots).

    200 shots or so into using this card, I get a sudden mysterious message from the camera when I try to take a new shot -- Card Format Invalid (never saw it in the previous 1.5 years on this camera with 3 other SDHC cards). I look around for a bit, and discover that turning the camera off, pulling the card out and putting it back in is enough to clear the error message, and the previous photos are still visible.

    I then make the mistake of assuming the problem is just that -- needing to "reboot" the camera when the card is acting stupid, and nothing else. Over the next 200 or so shots, this problem comes up every 50 shots or so. Then, after yet another "reboot", I notice that the camera's playback function is only showing the last 30 photos!!! Yet it shows that there's only 5.7G of space left on the camera -- the other 2G+ _should_ be taken up by the photos I've shot thus far, but the playback doesn't show them.

    And this happens in the middle of a trek through the Peruvian Andes, several days' walk/horse ride from the first village with electricity, let alone a computer (with lots of once-in-a-lifetime shots on the camera). I pull this card out immediately, plug in my backup card, and wait until coming back to civilization to take a look at the card. Sure enough, the card is severely corrupted -- the directory listing is showing a bunch of folders with weird-character names, and only the last ~30 photos are visible from the computer, too!


    RECOVERY SUGGESTIONS:

    Hopefully you'll read this before buying and will not buy this piece of junk card. If you had the misfortune of running into the same problem and losing your data, read on.

    I have now had time to examine what was left on the card, using tools that are not easily usable to people without substantial technical training. I've managed to recover over 90% of my photos, but this was NOT easy, and I suspect that even some shops specializing in data recovery from failed disks may not know how to get your data back -- this is NOT as simple as just undeleting a file!

    Non-technical instructions:

    1. As soon as you see the FIRST error involving the card format, turn off the camera, pull out the card, and copy all of your photos to a different device (computer/harddrive/whatnot). The earlier you stop using this card, the safer your photos will be.

    2. As soon as the first problem happens, move the little plastic slider on the side of the card to the "Lock" position -- this will prevent anything else from being written on the card, which lowers the risk of what's left of your photos being overwritten.

    3. If you see directories (aka folders) with weird names when you plug this card into a computer -- or see a huge number of photos missing when you look at them on the camera, take the card out IMMEDIATELY, and take the card to a data recovery shop or a technical expert willing to look at the card in depth. Give them a printout of the explanation below.


    Technical details:

    At least in my case, the filesystem was indeed somehow damaged, perhaps by the camera deciding to write over the location of the root directory somehow. I took a full disk image of the card, and operated on the disk image only (there were no read errors when making the image, FWIW). Somehow I was lucky enough to have the original _subdirectories_ \DCIM and \DCIM\100CANON survive on the card intact even though the root directory structure now pointed to a different, new, place on the filesystem as \DCIM.

    I found the location of the old 100CANON directory on the filesystem by searching for one of the filenames I knew would exist in the old directory, like IMG_7000, across the whole disk image.

    I then edited the filesystem (yea, with a hex editor!) to have the new \DCIM directory point to the old 100CANON subdirectory. See the Wikipedia article on FAT32 for a reasonably easy reference on how to find the 4 bytes that need to be edited, and how to calculate the correct updated value.

    Mounting the edited disk image (with Linux's 'mount -t loop'), the directory was intact, and all but about 5% of the photos were completely intact as well -- the remainder must have been overwritten after the directory structure got corrupted. Depending on how long it takes the user to notice a problem, of course, much more damage could easily happen to the original data.

    Here's one easy hack to see how much you can hope to recover, if you're recovering camera data. The same trick may be useful for locating the JPEGs if the original image-containing directory is no longer intact (good luck with recovery then! I thankfully didn't have to do this). Take any image produced by the same camera, look at its JFIF headers. My camera leaves the string "Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS" in two places in every JPEG it creates, early on in the JFIF header. Search for that string across the whole filesystem. If there's, say, 500 hits, that means you can hope for [easy] recovery of at most 250 photos -- any photo that is missing the JFIF headers will be missing the first chunk of the file, and will make it very hard both to find _and_ to reconstruct the remaining data, if any, into a usable JPEG (I have not tried to do this, at least, and it seems very hard).

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend Vs. Sandisk on Panasonic LX5, November 12, 2010
    I will be writing this review for both SanDisk Extreme SDHC class 10 8gb and Transcend SDHC class 10 16gb.

    I bought SanDisk class 10 and Transcend class 10 for my new Panasonic LX5. I got both card because no one really did a comparison with a compact camera and I was just going crazy trying to see if there is any big difference between the 2 cards.

    SanDisk Extreme package box indicated it's water proof, x-ray proof, shock proof, temperature proof. I am not ready to spend $50 to see if it really stand up to it's words. And I don't think normal people would go through the extreme condition in taking pictures or videos.

    Cut the story short, I really want to see if there is any difference in writing performance between the 2 cards in a compact camera. There is a continuous burst mode in LX5 and the manual indicated it is only limited by the condition of picture environment and performance of the SD card. Within the mode there are 2 different settings:1) speed priority or 2) picture/quality priority. The shutter speed is much faster with speed priority compare to picture priority.

    I first formatted both cards out of box then put each card in series of test(3 rounds each setting for each card) shooting at the same object under same lighting condition. The results:
    Speed Priority:
    SanDisk Class 10 8gb
    22-33 shots before camera stopped to allow the card to catch up with writing.

    Transcend Class 10 16gb
    22-24 shots before camera stopped to allow the card to catch up with writing.

    Picture priority
    SanDisk Class 10 8gb
    34-46 shots before camera stopped

    Transcend Class 10 16gb
    27-33 shots before camera stopped


    It seems that at a higher shutter speed, both cards performed very similar under the same shooting condition. But at a slower shutter speed the SanDisk definitely out perform Transcend. I hope this little experiment satisfied anyone with curiosity like me. Transcend definitely is a bargain with 16gb and almost half of the price compare to SanDisk. But I am going to use SanDisk Extreme as my primary card and Transcend as backup or on a second camera to ensure i would not miss any shots.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Depend on what you will use it for ..., October 13, 2010
    The "C10" is for "minimum sustaining speed" of 10mbps. The sustaining speed is critical if you're using for HD camcorder. There is other brand card that is also c10 but it costs more (2x) for its print of 30mbps on the card. It leads consumers into thinking that the higher price is worth for the 30mbps. However, the 30mbps is the "burst" speed. Burst speed is critical for HD camera and for doing copies. I have a HD camcorder and I'm very satisfied with this card after many hours for recording. I bought this card to do 100% of recording so it is the right price. I would buy the other high price brand card of 30mbps if I will do a lot of picture taking. The bottom line is to buy for the purpose of your usage.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Not very fast, April 14, 2010
    On my Panasonic GF1, it's the same speed as a Class 6 Transcend card and much slower than a Class 10 SanDisk Extreme. Buy the Transcend Class 6 if you want to save money or the SanDisk if you wan speed, but skip this one.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Class 10 pricing for Class 6 performance, June 10, 2010
    Ran some of my own informal tests of this card pitted against an older well used Transcend Class 6 card. The older cheaper card equalled or beat this "Class 10" card. Shop for the best priced Class 6 card right now or pay the premium for real Class 10 performance.

    Test Spec: ThinkPad T61p multi-format internal card reader, Windows 7 x64
    Both FAT32 formatted, both Taiwan mfg, sustained speed as reported by Windows.
    No multi-tasking during test.

    Material: Directory of 697 MB, Mix of Jpegs (~4.4mb/ea) & Nikon RAWs (~8.5mb/ea)
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 17.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.3 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10 (Formatted by Factory)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write
    (Reformatted w/ Windows 7)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write

    Material: 2.9GB DVD ISO File
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.8 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.1 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 12.3 MB/s read
    Averaged 8.2 MB/s write

    Other Card tested:
    Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS4GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]

    4-0 out of 5 stars Not All Class 10 Cards are Equal, April 11, 2010
    UPDATE 9-10 I own 4 of these cards now. I have more of these than any other card I own because the are a very good value for capacity/price/and speed. My initial dissapointment over the lack of super high speed is outweighed by the reality that this card is an exceptional value.

    Origional Review:
    I purchased this card making the assumption that all class 10 cards had the same read and write speed. This was a poor assumption on my part.

    The product photo on Amazon does not have the card's speed printed on it. The card that was shipped shows the front of the card printed with "20MB/s" which is the cards read speed. The cards write speed is only 16MB/s.

    I own a SanDisk Extreme III class 10 card that has (up to) 30MB/s read and write speed. My Nikon D-90 that can take advantage of the SanDisk cards speed. The difference is the SanDisk card can capture 100 photos at fine resolution in 24 seconds. The Transcend card captures 66 photos in the same time/resolution.

    I reality very few people will ever have the need to drill off 100 photos in 24 seconds, but I can't stand to loose a good shot because the camera is slow while writing to the card and I can't fire the shutter. You can hear this happen at about 4.5 seconds in the video review. This does not happen with the SanDisk class 10 30MB/s card.

    A lot can happen in a fraction of a second that can make a shot good or bad and the having ability to fire a lot of shots in rapid succession is important to me.

    If you own an SLR that is capable of rapid fire, high-resolution photography you may want to consider the SanDisk Extreme III 30 MB/s card.

    If you own a compact digital camera, this card will exceed the capabilities of all of them. For compact cameras the card isn't usually the slowest part of the data write process, it's the camera.

    This card is reasonably priced for a class 10 card. Just know what you are getting, what your needs may be, and what else is available. I own other Transcend cards and they have always worked properly without any issues.

    The video that I attached shows this card with the same 24 seconds that I gave the SanDisk Card.

    To see the SanDisk Extreme III 30MB/s video demo and review on Amazon go to:

    Sandisk SDSDX3-008G-E31 8GB Extreme III SD Card 30MB/s (RETAIL PACKAGE)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast!, April 8, 2010
    I purchased this for use with my new Canon T2i. I use it primarily for shooting full resolution 1080p video, although I shoot stills as well.

    The camera choked on the class 4 chip that I originally purchased, but with this one, it is amazing. I can shoot rapidfire 18 megapixel stills (I've tested it up to 30+ shots in a row), and there is no lag. I've never had an error when shooting hi-def video.

    Highly recommended! I'm buying another one.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast, fast, fast!, March 15, 2010
    I bought this card for my Canon T1i. The card I had been using before ordering this one was a Kingston Class 6 micro sd card and it worked well enough for the type of shooting I did. Class 6 was the card speed that Canon recommended when I bought my T1i (Class 10 cards were not yet available) and it seemed fast enough for the way I used my camera - isolated single photos taken at Medium (8 MP) or Large (15 MP) jpg settings and 1280 x 720 video. And while I ocassionally took continuous photos, I had never much exceeded 5-10 photos in a row and had never run into a problem with my Class 6 card.

    When I first saw the Class 10 cards I did some experiments with my camera. How many continuous Large photos could I take before the camera slowed down? It turned out to be about 30. And how many RAW photos could I take before the camera slowed down? It turned out to be about 9. SInce I did not generally take any photos in RAW and never needed more than about 10 continuous photos at Large, the Class 6 card seemed more than sufficient for my needs. But I wondered about the speed of the Class 10 cards enough that I finally bought one.

    It turns out that the Class 10 card is sufficiently fast that there does not seem to be a reasonable upper limit on single Large photos. I have taken 60 on continuous without an issue. And although I still cannot take more than 9 RAW photos on continuous with the Class 10 card, when I am finished taking those photos the camera no longer displays a Wait - writing pictures screen. The RAW photos get written from the built-in memory to the card so quickly that the camera does not need to display the Wait screen.

    So this card is fast! Given the way I take photos this purchase was unnecessary, but still I am glad I bought it. I know I will not run into a situation where speed is an issue with this card.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Transcend vs Sandisk of equal price, July 31, 2010
    OK. this card was around $47 for a class 10 16gb. The other card i bought was a Sandisk class 10 8gb for the around same price. I did a 10 sec stop watch test on both cards with my Rebel T1i on raw and the Sandisk was only faster by 1 shot in a 10 sec burst. to me it seems trivial to pay 47 bucks for a Sandisk 8gig when you can get 16 gigs for the same price. yes i know, the Sandisk is good for arctic and desert temperatures... but i live in western NY... not Antarctica or the Sahara. If your looking for a good card, with more gigs for your buck, the Transcend is well worth it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Slower than slow on Pentax K-x, April 25, 2010
    I bought this for my pentax K-x but it would randomly corrupt images. Also, it was slower than my 3+ year old SandDisk Ultra 1GB card. I was told by the seller (Thememstore) that others with the k-x have had the same problems. So apparently it must have something to do with the class 10 part, because since I returned this card I bought a SandDisk Extreme III 4GB Class 6 and it works far better.

    Would I recommend this card? Yes, but only to someone who knows that class 10 will work in their camera. I don't fault the card as I think the problem is with the K-x.

    1-0 out of 5 stars DESTROYS DATA -- after working fine for just long enough to fool you!, November 6, 2010
    SUMMARY:


    DO NOT BUY THIS CARD UNLESS YOU WANT TO PLAY RUSSIAN ROULETTE WITH YOUR DATA. Card worked fine when I bought it, but malfunctioned within the first 400 photos -- malfunctioned so badly that some very technical tools were needed to recover anything at all, and some photos were still permanently lost. Recovering the data requires the attention of a serious data recovery expert or someone with substantial technical knowledge and lots of time.


    DETAILS:

    I made the mistake buying this card for my camera right before a long trip overseas. It worked fine on the first few dozen shots. I didn't see any improvement in speed over my trusty 1.5-year-old Transcend 8GB Class-6 card, but that was most likely because the camera itself (Canon EOS Rebel 1000D/XSi) could not write images any faster than that (full-size JPEG, continuous shutter mode, roughly did ~2.5-3 images/second on both cards, with no slowdown after the first few shots).

    200 shots or so into using this card, I get a sudden mysterious message from the camera when I try to take a new shot -- Card Format Invalid (never saw it in the previous 1.5 years on this camera with 3 other SDHC cards). I look around for a bit, and discover that turning the camera off, pulling the card out and putting it back in is enough to clear the error message, and the previous photos are still visible.

    I then make the mistake of assuming the problem is just that -- needing to "reboot" the camera when the card is acting stupid, and nothing else. Over the next 200 or so shots, this problem comes up every 50 shots or so. Then, after yet another "reboot", I notice that the camera's playback function is only showing the last 30 photos!!! Yet it shows that there's only 5.7G of space left on the camera -- the other 2G+ _should_ be taken up by the photos I've shot thus far, but the playback doesn't show them.

    And this happens in the middle of a trek through the Peruvian Andes, several days' walk/horse ride from the first village with electricity, let alone a computer (with lots of once-in-a-lifetime shots on the camera). I pull this card out immediately, plug in my backup card, and wait until coming back to civilization to take a look at the card. Sure enough, the card is severely corrupted -- the directory listing is showing a bunch of folders with weird-character names, and only the last ~30 photos are visible from the computer, too!


    RECOVERY SUGGESTIONS:

    Hopefully you'll read this before buying and will not buy this piece of junk card. If you had the misfortune of running into the same problem and losing your data, read on.

    I have now had time to examine what was left on the card, using tools that are not easily usable to people without substantial technical training. I've managed to recover over 90% of my photos, but this was NOT easy, and I suspect that even some shops specializing in data recovery from failed disks may not know how to get your data back -- this is NOT as simple as just undeleting a file!

    Non-technical instructions:

    1. As soon as you see the FIRST error involving the card format, turn off the camera, pull out the card, and copy all of your photos to a different device (computer/harddrive/whatnot). The earlier you stop using this card, the safer your photos will be.

    2. As soon as the first problem happens, move the little plastic slider on the side of the card to the "Lock" position -- this will prevent anything else from being written on the card, which lowers the risk of what's left of your photos being overwritten.

    3. If you see directories (aka folders) with weird names when you plug this card into a computer -- or see a huge number of photos missing when you look at them on the camera, take the card out IMMEDIATELY, and take the card to a data recovery shop or a technical expert willing to look at the card in depth. Give them a printout of the explanation below.


    Technical details:

    At least in my case, the filesystem was indeed somehow damaged, perhaps by the camera deciding to write over the location of the root directory somehow. I took a full disk image of the card, and operated on the disk image only (there were no read errors when making the image, FWIW). Somehow I was lucky enough to have the original _subdirectories_ \DCIM and \DCIM\100CANON survive on the card intact even though the root directory structure now pointed to a different, new, place on the filesystem as \DCIM.

    I found the location of the old 100CANON directory on the filesystem by searching for one of the filenames I knew would exist in the old directory, like IMG_7000, across the whole disk image.

    I then edited the filesystem (yea, with a hex editor!) to have the new \DCIM directory point to the old 100CANON subdirectory. See the Wikipedia article on FAT32 for a reasonably easy reference on how to find the 4 bytes that need to be edited, and how to calculate the correct updated value.

    Mounting the edited disk image (with Linux's 'mount -t loop'), the directory was intact, and all but about 5% of the photos were completely intact as well -- the remainder must have been overwritten after the directory structure got corrupted. Depending on how long it takes the user to notice a problem, of course, much more damage could easily happen to the original data.

    Here's one easy hack to see how much you can hope to recover, if you're recovering camera data. The same trick may be useful for locating the JPEGs if the original image-containing directory is no longer intact (good luck with recovery then! I thankfully didn't have to do this). Take any image produced by the same camera, look at its JFIF headers. My camera leaves the string "Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS" in two places in every JPEG it creates, early on in the JFIF header. Search for that string across the whole filesystem. If there's, say, 500 hits, that means you can hope for [easy] recovery of at most 250 photos -- any photo that is missing the JFIF headers will be missing the first chunk of the file, and will make it very hard both to find _and_ to reconstruct the remaining data, if any, into a usable JPEG (I have not tried to do this, at least, and it seems very hard).

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend Vs. Sandisk on Panasonic LX5, November 12, 2010
    I will be writing this review for both SanDisk Extreme SDHC class 10 8gb and Transcend SDHC class 10 16gb.

    I bought SanDisk class 10 and Transcend class 10 for my new Panasonic LX5. I got both card because no one really did a comparison with a compact camera and I was just going crazy trying to see if there is any big difference between the 2 cards.

    SanDisk Extreme package box indicated it's water proof, x-ray proof, shock proof, temperature proof. I am not ready to spend $50 to see if it really stand up to it's words. And I don't think normal people would go through the extreme condition in taking pictures or videos.

    Cut the story short, I really want to see if there is any difference in writing performance between the 2 cards in a compact camera. There is a continuous burst mode in LX5 and the manual indicated it is only limited by the condition of picture environment and performance of the SD card. Within the mode there are 2 different settings:1) speed priority or 2) picture/quality priority. The shutter speed is much faster with speed priority compare to picture priority.

    I first formatted both cards out of box then put each card in series of test(3 rounds each setting for each card) shooting at the same object under same lighting condition. The results:
    Speed Priority:
    SanDisk Class 10 8gb
    22-33 shots before camera stopped to allow the card to catch up with writing.

    Transcend Class 10 16gb
    22-24 shots before camera stopped to allow the card to catch up with writing.

    Picture priority
    SanDisk Class 10 8gb
    34-46 shots before camera stopped

    Transcend Class 10 16gb
    27-33 shots before camera stopped


    It seems that at a higher shutter speed, both cards performed very similar under the same shooting condition. But at a slower shutter speed the SanDisk definitely out perform Transcend. I hope this little experiment satisfied anyone with curiosity like me. Transcend definitely is a bargain with 16gb and almost half of the price compare to SanDisk. But I am going to use SanDisk Extreme as my primary card and Transcend as backup or on a second camera to ensure i would not miss any shots.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Depend on what you will use it for ..., October 13, 2010
    The "C10" is for "minimum sustaining speed" of 10mbps. The sustaining speed is critical if you're using for HD camcorder. There is other brand card that is also c10 but it costs more (2x) for its print of 30mbps on the card. It leads consumers into thinking that the higher price is worth for the 30mbps. However, the 30mbps is the "burst" speed. Burst speed is critical for HD camera and for doing copies. I have a HD camcorder and I'm very satisfied with this card after many hours for recording. I bought this card to do 100% of recording so it is the right price. I would buy the other high price brand card of 30mbps if I will do a lot of picture taking. The bottom line is to buy for the purpose of your usage.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Not very fast, April 14, 2010
    On my Panasonic GF1, it's the same speed as a Class 6 Transcend card and much slower than a Class 10 SanDisk Extreme. Buy the Transcend Class 6 if you want to save money or the SanDisk if you wan speed, but skip this one.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Class 10 pricing for Class 6 performance, June 10, 2010
    Ran some of my own informal tests of this card pitted against an older well used Transcend Class 6 card. The older cheaper card equalled or beat this "Class 10" card. Shop for the best priced Class 6 card right now or pay the premium for real Class 10 performance.

    Test Spec: ThinkPad T61p multi-format internal card reader, Windows 7 x64
    Both FAT32 formatted, both Taiwan mfg, sustained speed as reported by Windows.
    No multi-tasking during test.

    Material: Directory of 697 MB, Mix of Jpegs (~4.4mb/ea) & Nikon RAWs (~8.5mb/ea)
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 17.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.3 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10 (Formatted by Factory)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write
    (Reformatted w/ Windows 7)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write

    Material: 2.9GB DVD ISO File
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.8 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.1 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 12.3 MB/s read
    Averaged 8.2 MB/s write

    Other Card tested:
    Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS4GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging] ... Read more


    18. Transcend 16GB Class 10 SDHC Card (TS16GSDHC10)
    Electronics
    list price: $49.99 -- our price: $26.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B002WE4HE2
    Manufacturer: TRANSCEND
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Transcend 16gb SDHC card SD 3.0 SPD class 10 ... Read more

    Reviews

    4-0 out of 5 stars Not All Class 10 Cards are Equal, April 11, 2010
    UPDATE 9-10 I own 4 of these cards now. I have more of these than any other card I own because the are a very good value for capacity/price/and speed. My initial dissapointment over the lack of super high speed is outweighed by the reality that this card is an exceptional value.

    Origional Review:
    I purchased this card making the assumption that all class 10 cards had the same read and write speed. This was a poor assumption on my part.

    The product photo on Amazon does not have the card's speed printed on it. The card that was shipped shows the front of the card printed with "20MB/s" which is the cards read speed. The cards write speed is only 16MB/s.

    I own a SanDisk Extreme III class 10 card that has (up to) 30MB/s read and write speed. My Nikon D-90 that can take advantage of the SanDisk cards speed. The difference is the SanDisk card can capture 100 photos at fine resolution in 24 seconds. The Transcend card captures 66 photos in the same time/resolution.

    I reality very few people will ever have the need to drill off 100 photos in 24 seconds, but I can't stand to loose a good shot because the camera is slow while writing to the card and I can't fire the shutter. You can hear this happen at about 4.5 seconds in the video review. This does not happen with the SanDisk class 10 30MB/s card.

    A lot can happen in a fraction of a second that can make a shot good or bad and the having ability to fire a lot of shots in rapid succession is important to me.

    If you own an SLR that is capable of rapid fire, high-resolution photography you may want to consider the SanDisk Extreme III 30 MB/s card.

    If you own a compact digital camera, this card will exceed the capabilities of all of them. For compact cameras the card isn't usually the slowest part of the data write process, it's the camera.

    This card is reasonably priced for a class 10 card. Just know what you are getting, what your needs may be, and what else is available. I own other Transcend cards and they have always worked properly without any issues.

    The video that I attached shows this card with the same 24 seconds that I gave the SanDisk Card.

    To see the SanDisk Extreme III 30MB/s video demo and review on Amazon go to:

    Sandisk SDSDX3-008G-E31 8GB Extreme III SD Card 30MB/s (RETAIL PACKAGE)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast!, April 8, 2010
    I bought this for my pentax K-x but it would randomly corrupt images. Also, it was slower than my 3+ year old SandDisk Ultra 1GB card. I was told by the seller (Thememstore) that others with the k-x have had the same problems. So apparently it must have something to do with the class 10 part, because since I returned this card I bought a SandDisk Extreme III 4GB Class 6 and it works far better.

    Would I recommend this card? Yes, but only to someone who knows that class 10 will work in their camera. I don't fault the card as I think the problem is with the K-x.

    1-0 out of 5 stars DESTROYS DATA -- after working fine for just long enough to fool you!, November 6, 2010
    SUMMARY:


    DO NOT BUY THIS CARD UNLESS YOU WANT TO PLAY RUSSIAN ROULETTE WITH YOUR DATA. Card worked fine when I bought it, but malfunctioned within the first 400 photos -- malfunctioned so badly that some very technical tools were needed to recover anything at all, and some photos were still permanently lost. Recovering the data requires the attention of a serious data recovery expert or someone with substantial technical knowledge and lots of time.


    DETAILS:

    I made the mistake buying this card for my camera right before a long trip overseas. It worked fine on the first few dozen shots. I didn't see any improvement in speed over my trusty 1.5-year-old Transcend 8GB Class-6 card, but that was most likely because the camera itself (Canon EOS Rebel 1000D/XSi) could not write images any faster than that (full-size JPEG, continuous shutter mode, roughly did ~2.5-3 images/second on both cards, with no slowdown after the first few shots).

    200 shots or so into using this card, I get a sudden mysterious message from the camera when I try to take a new shot -- Card Format Invalid (never saw it in the previous 1.5 years on this camera with 3 other SDHC cards). I look around for a bit, and discover that turning the camera off, pulling the card out and putting it back in is enough to clear the error message, and the previous photos are still visible.

    I then make the mistake of assuming the problem is just that -- needing to "reboot" the camera when the card is acting stupid, and nothing else. Over the next 200 or so shots, this problem comes up every 50 shots or so. Then, after yet another "reboot", I notice that the camera's playback function is only showing the last 30 photos!!! Yet it shows that there's only 5.7G of space left on the camera -- the other 2G+ _should_ be taken up by the photos I've shot thus far, but the playback doesn't show them.

    And this happens in the middle of a trek through the Peruvian Andes, several days' walk/horse ride from the first village with electricity, let alone a computer (with lots of once-in-a-lifetime shots on the camera). I pull this card out immediately, plug in my backup card, and wait until coming back to civilization to take a look at the card. Sure enough, the card is severely corrupted -- the directory listing is showing a bunch of folders with weird-character names, and only the last ~30 photos are visible from the computer, too!


    RECOVERY SUGGESTIONS:

    Hopefully you'll read this before buying and will not buy this piece of junk card. If you had the misfortune of running into the same problem and losing your data, read on.

    I have now had time to examine what was left on the card, using tools that are not easily usable to people without substantial technical training. I've managed to recover over 90% of my photos, but this was NOT easy, and I suspect that even some shops specializing in data recovery from failed disks may not know how to get your data back -- this is NOT as simple as just undeleting a file!

    Non-technical instructions:

    1. As soon as you see the FIRST error involving the card format, turn off the camera, pull out the card, and copy all of your photos to a different device (computer/harddrive/whatnot). The earlier you stop using this card, the safer your photos will be.

    2. As soon as the first problem happens, move the little plastic slider on the side of the card to the "Lock" position -- this will prevent anything else from being written on the card, which lowers the risk of what's left of your photos being overwritten.

    3. If you see directories (aka folders) with weird names when you plug this card into a computer -- or see a huge number of photos missing when you look at them on the camera, take the card out IMMEDIATELY, and take the card to a data recovery shop or a technical expert willing to look at the card in depth. Give them a printout of the explanation below.


    Technical details:

    At least in my case, the filesystem was indeed somehow damaged, perhaps by the camera deciding to write over the location of the root directory somehow. I took a full disk image of the card, and operated on the disk image only (there were no read errors when making the image, FWIW). Somehow I was lucky enough to have the original _subdirectories_ \DCIM and \DCIM\100CANON survive on the card intact even though the root directory structure now pointed to a different, new, place on the filesystem as \DCIM.

    I found the location of the old 100CANON directory on the filesystem by searching for one of the filenames I knew would exist in the old directory, like IMG_7000, across the whole disk image.

    I then edited the filesystem (yea, with a hex editor!) to have the new \DCIM directory point to the old 100CANON subdirectory. See the Wikipedia article on FAT32 for a reasonably easy reference on how to find the 4 bytes that need to be edited, and how to calculate the correct updated value.

    Mounting the edited disk image (with Linux's 'mount -t loop'), the directory was intact, and all but about 5% of the photos were completely intact as well -- the remainder must have been overwritten after the directory structure got corrupted. Depending on how long it takes the user to notice a problem, of course, much more damage could easily happen to the original data.

    Here's one easy hack to see how much you can hope to recover, if you're recovering camera data. The same trick may be useful for locating the JPEGs if the original image-containing directory is no longer intact (good luck with recovery then! I thankfully didn't have to do this). Take any image produced by the same camera, look at its JFIF headers. My camera leaves the string "Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS" in two places in every JPEG it creates, early on in the JFIF header. Search for that string across the whole filesystem. If there's, say, 500 hits, that means you can hope for [easy] recovery of at most 250 photos -- any photo that is missing the JFIF headers will be missing the first chunk of the file, and will make it very hard both to find _and_ to reconstruct the remaining data, if any, into a usable JPEG (I have not tried to do this, at least, and it seems very hard).

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend Vs. Sandisk on Panasonic LX5, November 12, 2010
    The "C10" is for "minimum sustaining speed" of 10mbps. The sustaining speed is critical if you're using for HD camcorder. There is other brand card that is also c10 but it costs more (2x) for its print of 30mbps on the card. It leads consumers into thinking that the higher price is worth for the 30mbps. However, the 30mbps is the "burst" speed. Burst speed is critical for HD camera and for doing copies. I have a HD camcorder and I'm very satisfied with this card after many hours for recording. I bought this card to do 100% of recording so it is the right price. I would buy the other high price brand card of 30mbps if I will do a lot of picture taking. The bottom line is to buy for the purpose of your usage.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Not very fast, April 14, 2010
    Ran some of my own informal tests of this card pitted against an older well used Transcend Class 6 card. The older cheaper card equalled or beat this "Class 10" card. Shop for the best priced Class 6 card right now or pay the premium for real Class 10 performance.

    Test Spec: ThinkPad T61p multi-format internal card reader, Windows 7 x64
    Both FAT32 formatted, both Taiwan mfg, sustained speed as reported by Windows.
    No multi-tasking during test.

    Material: Directory of 697 MB, Mix of Jpegs (~4.4mb/ea) & Nikon RAWs (~8.5mb/ea)
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 17.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.3 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10 (Formatted by Factory)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write
    (Reformatted w/ Windows 7)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write

    Material: 2.9GB DVD ISO File
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.8 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.1 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 12.3 MB/s read
    Averaged 8.2 MB/s write

    Other Card tested:
    Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS4GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]

    4-0 out of 5 stars Not All Class 10 Cards are Equal, April 11, 2010
    UPDATE 9-10 I own 4 of these cards now. I have more of these than any other card I own because the are a very good value for capacity/price/and speed. My initial dissapointment over the lack of super high speed is outweighed by the reality that this card is an exceptional value.

    Origional Review:
    I purchased this card making the assumption that all class 10 cards had the same read and write speed. This was a poor assumption on my part.

    The product photo on Amazon does not have the card's speed printed on it. The card that was shipped shows the front of the card printed with "20MB/s" which is the cards read speed. The cards write speed is only 16MB/s.

    I own a SanDisk Extreme III class 10 card that has (up to) 30MB/s read and write speed. My Nikon D-90 that can take advantage of the SanDisk cards speed. The difference is the SanDisk card can capture 100 photos at fine resolution in 24 seconds. The Transcend card captures 66 photos in the same time/resolution.

    I reality very few people will ever have the need to drill off 100 photos in 24 seconds, but I can't stand to loose a good shot because the camera is slow while writing to the card and I can't fire the shutter. You can hear this happen at about 4.5 seconds in the video review. This does not happen with the SanDisk class 10 30MB/s card.

    A lot can happen in a fraction of a second that can make a shot good or bad and the having ability to fire a lot of shots in rapid succession is important to me.

    If you own an SLR that is capable of rapid fire, high-resolution photography you may want to consider the SanDisk Extreme III 30 MB/s card.

    If you own a compact digital camera, this card will exceed the capabilities of all of them. For compact cameras the card isn't usually the slowest part of the data write process, it's the camera.

    This card is reasonably priced for a class 10 card. Just know what you are getting, what your needs may be, and what else is available. I own other Transcend cards and they have always worked properly without any issues.

    The video that I attached shows this card with the same 24 seconds that I gave the SanDisk Card.

    To see the SanDisk Extreme III 30MB/s video demo and review on Amazon go to:

    Sandisk SDSDX3-008G-E31 8GB Extreme III SD Card 30MB/s (RETAIL PACKAGE)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast!, April 8, 2010
    I purchased this for use with my new Canon T2i. I use it primarily for shooting full resolution 1080p video, although I shoot stills as well.

    The camera choked on the class 4 chip that I originally purchased, but with this one, it is amazing. I can shoot rapidfire 18 megapixel stills (I've tested it up to 30+ shots in a row), and there is no lag. I've never had an error when shooting hi-def video.

    Highly recommended! I'm buying another one.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Fast, fast, fast!, March 15, 2010
    I bought this card for my Canon T1i. The card I had been using before ordering this one was a Kingston Class 6 micro sd card and it worked well enough for the type of shooting I did. Class 6 was the card speed that Canon recommended when I bought my T1i (Class 10 cards were not yet available) and it seemed fast enough for the way I used my camera - isolated single photos taken at Medium (8 MP) or Large (15 MP) jpg settings and 1280 x 720 video. And while I ocassionally took continuous photos, I had never much exceeded 5-10 photos in a row and had never run into a problem with my Class 6 card.

    When I first saw the Class 10 cards I did some experiments with my camera. How many continuous Large photos could I take before the camera slowed down? It turned out to be about 30. And how many RAW photos could I take before the camera slowed down? It turned out to be about 9. SInce I did not generally take any photos in RAW and never needed more than about 10 continuous photos at Large, the Class 6 card seemed more than sufficient for my needs. But I wondered about the speed of the Class 10 cards enough that I finally bought one.

    It turns out that the Class 10 card is sufficiently fast that there does not seem to be a reasonable upper limit on single Large photos. I have taken 60 on continuous without an issue. And although I still cannot take more than 9 RAW photos on continuous with the Class 10 card, when I am finished taking those photos the camera no longer displays a Wait - writing pictures screen. The RAW photos get written from the built-in memory to the card so quickly that the camera does not need to display the Wait screen.

    So this card is fast! Given the way I take photos this purchase was unnecessary, but still I am glad I bought it. I know I will not run into a situation where speed is an issue with this card.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Transcend vs Sandisk of equal price, July 31, 2010
    OK. this card was around $47 for a class 10 16gb. The other card i bought was a Sandisk class 10 8gb for the around same price. I did a 10 sec stop watch test on both cards with my Rebel T1i on raw and the Sandisk was only faster by 1 shot in a 10 sec burst. to me it seems trivial to pay 47 bucks for a Sandisk 8gig when you can get 16 gigs for the same price. yes i know, the Sandisk is good for arctic and desert temperatures... but i live in western NY... not Antarctica or the Sahara. If your looking for a good card, with more gigs for your buck, the Transcend is well worth it.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Slower than slow on Pentax K-x, April 25, 2010
    I bought this for my pentax K-x but it would randomly corrupt images. Also, it was slower than my 3+ year old SandDisk Ultra 1GB card. I was told by the seller (Thememstore) that others with the k-x have had the same problems. So apparently it must have something to do with the class 10 part, because since I returned this card I bought a SandDisk Extreme III 4GB Class 6 and it works far better.

    Would I recommend this card? Yes, but only to someone who knows that class 10 will work in their camera. I don't fault the card as I think the problem is with the K-x.

    1-0 out of 5 stars DESTROYS DATA -- after working fine for just long enough to fool you!, November 6, 2010
    SUMMARY:


    DO NOT BUY THIS CARD UNLESS YOU WANT TO PLAY RUSSIAN ROULETTE WITH YOUR DATA. Card worked fine when I bought it, but malfunctioned within the first 400 photos -- malfunctioned so badly that some very technical tools were needed to recover anything at all, and some photos were still permanently lost. Recovering the data requires the attention of a serious data recovery expert or someone with substantial technical knowledge and lots of time.


    DETAILS:

    I made the mistake buying this card for my camera right before a long trip overseas. It worked fine on the first few dozen shots. I didn't see any improvement in speed over my trusty 1.5-year-old Transcend 8GB Class-6 card, but that was most likely because the camera itself (Canon EOS Rebel 1000D/XSi) could not write images any faster than that (full-size JPEG, continuous shutter mode, roughly did ~2.5-3 images/second on both cards, with no slowdown after the first few shots).

    200 shots or so into using this card, I get a sudden mysterious message from the camera when I try to take a new shot -- Card Format Invalid (never saw it in the previous 1.5 years on this camera with 3 other SDHC cards). I look around for a bit, and discover that turning the camera off, pulling the card out and putting it back in is enough to clear the error message, and the previous photos are still visible.

    I then make the mistake of assuming the problem is just that -- needing to "reboot" the camera when the card is acting stupid, and nothing else. Over the next 200 or so shots, this problem comes up every 50 shots or so. Then, after yet another "reboot", I notice that the camera's playback function is only showing the last 30 photos!!! Yet it shows that there's only 5.7G of space left on the camera -- the other 2G+ _should_ be taken up by the photos I've shot thus far, but the playback doesn't show them.

    And this happens in the middle of a trek through the Peruvian Andes, several days' walk/horse ride from the first village with electricity, let alone a computer (with lots of once-in-a-lifetime shots on the camera). I pull this card out immediately, plug in my backup card, and wait until coming back to civilization to take a look at the card. Sure enough, the card is severely corrupted -- the directory listing is showing a bunch of folders with weird-character names, and only the last ~30 photos are visible from the computer, too!


    RECOVERY SUGGESTIONS:

    Hopefully you'll read this before buying and will not buy this piece of junk card. If you had the misfortune of running into the same problem and losing your data, read on.

    I have now had time to examine what was left on the card, using tools that are not easily usable to people without substantial technical training. I've managed to recover over 90% of my photos, but this was NOT easy, and I suspect that even some shops specializing in data recovery from failed disks may not know how to get your data back -- this is NOT as simple as just undeleting a file!

    Non-technical instructions:

    1. As soon as you see the FIRST error involving the card format, turn off the camera, pull out the card, and copy all of your photos to a different device (computer/harddrive/whatnot). The earlier you stop using this card, the safer your photos will be.

    2. As soon as the first problem happens, move the little plastic slider on the side of the card to the "Lock" position -- this will prevent anything else from being written on the card, which lowers the risk of what's left of your photos being overwritten.

    3. If you see directories (aka folders) with weird names when you plug this card into a computer -- or see a huge number of photos missing when you look at them on the camera, take the card out IMMEDIATELY, and take the card to a data recovery shop or a technical expert willing to look at the card in depth. Give them a printout of the explanation below.


    Technical details:

    At least in my case, the filesystem was indeed somehow damaged, perhaps by the camera deciding to write over the location of the root directory somehow. I took a full disk image of the card, and operated on the disk image only (there were no read errors when making the image, FWIW). Somehow I was lucky enough to have the original _subdirectories_ \DCIM and \DCIM\100CANON survive on the card intact even though the root directory structure now pointed to a different, new, place on the filesystem as \DCIM.

    I found the location of the old 100CANON directory on the filesystem by searching for one of the filenames I knew would exist in the old directory, like IMG_7000, across the whole disk image.

    I then edited the filesystem (yea, with a hex editor!) to have the new \DCIM directory point to the old 100CANON subdirectory. See the Wikipedia article on FAT32 for a reasonably easy reference on how to find the 4 bytes that need to be edited, and how to calculate the correct updated value.

    Mounting the edited disk image (with Linux's 'mount -t loop'), the directory was intact, and all but about 5% of the photos were completely intact as well -- the remainder must have been overwritten after the directory structure got corrupted. Depending on how long it takes the user to notice a problem, of course, much more damage could easily happen to the original data.

    Here's one easy hack to see how much you can hope to recover, if you're recovering camera data. The same trick may be useful for locating the JPEGs if the original image-containing directory is no longer intact (good luck with recovery then! I thankfully didn't have to do this). Take any image produced by the same camera, look at its JFIF headers. My camera leaves the string "Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XS" in two places in every JPEG it creates, early on in the JFIF header. Search for that string across the whole filesystem. If there's, say, 500 hits, that means you can hope for [easy] recovery of at most 250 photos -- any photo that is missing the JFIF headers will be missing the first chunk of the file, and will make it very hard both to find _and_ to reconstruct the remaining data, if any, into a usable JPEG (I have not tried to do this, at least, and it seems very hard).

    4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend Vs. Sandisk on Panasonic LX5, November 12, 2010
    I will be writing this review for both SanDisk Extreme SDHC class 10 8gb and Transcend SDHC class 10 16gb.

    I bought SanDisk class 10 and Transcend class 10 for my new Panasonic LX5. I got both card because no one really did a comparison with a compact camera and I was just going crazy trying to see if there is any big difference between the 2 cards.

    SanDisk Extreme package box indicated it's water proof, x-ray proof, shock proof, temperature proof. I am not ready to spend $50 to see if it really stand up to it's words. And I don't think normal people would go through the extreme condition in taking pictures or videos.

    Cut the story short, I really want to see if there is any difference in writing performance between the 2 cards in a compact camera. There is a continuous burst mode in LX5 and the manual indicated it is only limited by the condition of picture environment and performance of the SD card. Within the mode there are 2 different settings:1) speed priority or 2) picture/quality priority. The shutter speed is much faster with speed priority compare to picture priority.

    I first formatted both cards out of box then put each card in series of test(3 rounds each setting for each card) shooting at the same object under same lighting condition. The results:
    Speed Priority:
    SanDisk Class 10 8gb
    22-33 shots before camera stopped to allow the card to catch up with writing.

    Transcend Class 10 16gb
    22-24 shots before camera stopped to allow the card to catch up with writing.

    Picture priority
    SanDisk Class 10 8gb
    34-46 shots before camera stopped

    Transcend Class 10 16gb
    27-33 shots before camera stopped


    It seems that at a higher shutter speed, both cards performed very similar under the same shooting condition. But at a slower shutter speed the SanDisk definitely out perform Transcend. I hope this little experiment satisfied anyone with curiosity like me. Transcend definitely is a bargain with 16gb and almost half of the price compare to SanDisk. But I am going to use SanDisk Extreme as my primary card and Transcend as backup or on a second camera to ensure i would not miss any shots.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Depend on what you will use it for ..., October 13, 2010
    The "C10" is for "minimum sustaining speed" of 10mbps. The sustaining speed is critical if you're using for HD camcorder. There is other brand card that is also c10 but it costs more (2x) for its print of 30mbps on the card. It leads consumers into thinking that the higher price is worth for the 30mbps. However, the 30mbps is the "burst" speed. Burst speed is critical for HD camera and for doing copies. I have a HD camcorder and I'm very satisfied with this card after many hours for recording. I bought this card to do 100% of recording so it is the right price. I would buy the other high price brand card of 30mbps if I will do a lot of picture taking. The bottom line is to buy for the purpose of your usage.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Not very fast, April 14, 2010
    On my Panasonic GF1, it's the same speed as a Class 6 Transcend card and much slower than a Class 10 SanDisk Extreme. Buy the Transcend Class 6 if you want to save money or the SanDisk if you wan speed, but skip this one.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Class 10 pricing for Class 6 performance, June 10, 2010
    Ran some of my own informal tests of this card pitted against an older well used Transcend Class 6 card. The older cheaper card equalled or beat this "Class 10" card. Shop for the best priced Class 6 card right now or pay the premium for real Class 10 performance.

    Test Spec: ThinkPad T61p multi-format internal card reader, Windows 7 x64
    Both FAT32 formatted, both Taiwan mfg, sustained speed as reported by Windows.
    No multi-tasking during test.

    Material: Directory of 697 MB, Mix of Jpegs (~4.4mb/ea) & Nikon RAWs (~8.5mb/ea)
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 17.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.3 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10 (Formatted by Factory)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write
    (Reformatted w/ Windows 7)
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.5 MB/s read
    Averaged 3.7 MB/s write

    Material: 2.9GB DVD ISO File
    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 10
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 14.8 MB/s read
    Averaged 7.1 MB/s write

    Transcend 4GB SDHC Class 6
    Partition detail: 4K Offset/32K Blocks
    Averaged 12.3 MB/s read
    Averaged 8.2 MB/s write

    Other Card tested:
    Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS4GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging] ... Read more


    19. Kindle Lighted Leather Cover, Chocolate Brown (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle)
    Accessory
    -- our price: $59.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B003DZ166G
    Manufacturer: Amazon Digital Services, Inc
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Editorial Review

    Amazon.comAmazon's Kindle Lighted Leather Cover

    Our new design seamlessly incorporates a reading light into the cover, so you can carry your Kindle wherever you go and always have a reading light with you. Simply pull the light out to illuminate Kindle when you need it, and slide it away to be invisible when you don't. And since the light draws its power from Kindle, no batteries are needed.

    The contoured, pebble-grain leather (available in 7 different colors) keeps your Kindle safe and secure, while the soft charcoal microfiber interior protects the screen from scratches. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand.


    The built-in, retractable LED light pulls out to illuminate Kindle, and slides away when not in use.


    Never Be Without a Light

    Our all-new Kindle cover features an integrated, retractable LED reading light that lets you read comfortably anytime, anywhere. The high-quality LED light illuminates Kindle's paper-like display, adding brightness without adding glare.

    A permanent part of the cover, the reading light is located in the top right-hand corner of the back cover. When needed, simply pull the light out and it automatically illuminates, eliminating the need for a separate power switch. To turn the light off, slide it back in to the corner of the cover.

    Since the light is powered by Kindle's battery, no batteries are needed.

     

    How It Works

    In addition to securing Kindle in place, our new hinge system conducts electricity from Kindle's battery to the reading light - when Kindle is attached to the hinge, an electrical connection is formed that powers the light.

    The cover's hinge points are gold-plated, to ensure a reliable electrical connection. Gold is used because of its ability to make good electrical contact even with low force, and for its corrosion resistance.


    Secure Your Kindle in Four Easy Steps


    Read Comfortably with One Hand


    Reading with the cover on, you can easily access Kindle's navigation features and power switch, while the rounded edges offer a perfect fit in your hands. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand. And the retractable reading light is easily accessible with the cover open or folded back.


    On the Go

    This compact cover is perfect for taking Kindle wherever you go. The sleek leather ensures the ultimate fit and protection, without adding bulk or weight. Our patent-pending hinge system secures Kindle in place, and an elastic strap keeps the cover firmly closed for maximum screen protection. Simply attach Kindle to the hinge, apply the strap, and rest assured it will stay securely in place even when you're on the go.

    You'll never be without a reading light, and since the light draws its power from Kindle, no batteries are needed.



    Amazon’s official Kindle lighted cover features contoured, pebble-grain leather available in 7 different colors.

     

     

    Read Kindle easily in the dark with Amazon's revolutionary, all-new lighted leather cover.



    The hinge points are gold-plated to ensure a reliable electrical connection. No batteries required.


    Read easily with one hand, with or without the light on.


    Protect your Kindle on the go, and never be without a reading light

     

    ... Read more

    Reviews

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good Quality K3 Cover with Handy Light, August 26, 2010
    I bought the burnt orange color cover so I can spot my Kindle where ever I leave it easily--and hopefully not misplace it! The cover is good quality leather, and even with the cover on, I can slip the K3 into my small purse without squeezing it in--something I could not do with my coverless Kindle 2.

    I think for an easy purchase without having to buy a separate book light, the Kindle 3 lighted cover is a good choice. The light worked _great_ reading in bed last night. I could see all of the lighted screen just fine with the upper right corner a bit brighter. See the pics I loaded to customer images for the lighted cover to see the light in action in a dark room, and what the cover looks light from the back.

    Pluses: Built in light that slips securely out of the way, no batteries to replace, better clips/fit than past covers that connect to Kindle, adequate to light the entire screen, no looking for a booklight, no clipping a booklight to my Kindle and scratching or damaging it, the book light LEDs point down towards the screen, so no bright lights in your eyes.

    Minuses: The cover's weight doubles the weight of the Kindle 3 in your hand, the book light stays in one corner and doesn't move around the Kindle, uses more Kindle battery life (it's powered by the Kindle 3 -- and I noticed a definite drain on the battery from using the light)

    UPDATE: I used the Kindle light for a couple days now, and the battery life goes down noticeably as you use the light (esp. if you keep the wireless "On"). Last night I read with the light for about 2 hours after a full charge and today the battery looks down about 15%. At that rate of use (with no wireless constantly "On" and regular reading in the daylight), I estimate the battery will need charging after approx. 1 week.

    If the overall cover+Kindle weight is an issue for you--more than protecting your Kindle and the handy light--then this cover is not for you.

    Kindle Lighted Leather Cover alone = 233 grams or 8.2 oz

    Kindle Lighted Leather Cover + Kindle 3 = 447 grams or 15.75 oz. (almost 1 lb.)

    Thickness: Kindle cover + Kindle 3 = 3/4 inch

    Cover Measurements (with Kindle inside):

    Front: 7 3/4" x 5 1/8" (closer to 3/16")
    Back: SAME as front
    Spine: 7/8"
    Open side (to the right) with Kindle inside: 3/4"

    I have to say I'm getting used to the weight with the cover as I use it. The piece of mind of extra Kindle protection, plus a handy light whenever you need it, is worth the trade off for me. '

    November 20th UPDATE:

    **Still love the cover** and having the light handy without having to think about needing a light _is better than ever_. One thing however, is that the hooks to connect the cover are not sturdy enough, IMO, to take the cover on and off often. The Kindle "wiggles" a bit on the connectors, and be careful not to pull the Kindle forward or up off the back of the cover to avoid bending or breaking the metal connectors. Despite this, I am very happy with this cover after using it almost 3 months now.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Lighted Leather Case - Two Important Concerns, August 31, 2010
    I've noticed that like myself customers have been concerned primarily with two things regarding the new lighted case from amazon. These are: 1)The weight and 2) The uneven lighting. My review will briefly discuss these two things.

    1)The Weight - The lighted leather case is a nice weight, sturdy and comfortable to hold. In ounces it is about the weight of the kindle itself however don't let that concern you. With the case on it feels like a medium sized paperback, however it is far much more comfortable to hold. It's easy to hold the case open like a book (nice for couch and table type reading) or to fold the front back and close it with the bungee so that the bungee doesn't hang around (this is good for bedtime reading).Closing the front back with bungee keeps the case folded in position and you don't have to worry about it bothering you. BTW THIS CASE FOLDS BACK 100% - Very comfortable. In sum very comfortable to read with the case and very sturdy.

    2) The uneven lighting - Amazon's pictures don't do this case justice. The light hits the ENTIRE screen. Yes if you look closely it's brighter in the top right corner then in the bottom left but Amazon's pics make it look the top is lighted while the bottom is dark. There is good light all over the screen. Trust me I'm fussy about these things - the lighting will not bother you, your entire screen will be lighted and it is extremely pleasant to read in the dark.

    *Final Thoughts - Great case, good quality, works well, kindle feels very secure and protected (I would feel comfortable slipping this case into my backpack or suitcase and I think it would sustain some mild impact). Lastly hinges are a non-issue, casing of the kindle will not get damaged with normal or even slightly aggressive use. You could damage the kindle by trying to pull the back of the case but you'd have to really force it to cause any sort of damage to your kindle. The hinges work fine and should not be a concern to any case user.

    Update 1st December 2010:

    Have now been using the case for 3 months. Leather still looks impeccable. Some people expressed concern that the bungee cord might loosen with use. I have not experienced any loosening so far. Quality of the product has proven outstanding. I've occasionally spilled or messed the cover, just a wipe with a damp cloth has cleaned it up, and the case looks like new. Have to admit I enjoy the feel of the case in my hand, there's just something great about taking your kindle to a coffee shop in this case, it just looks and feels so classy. Also with regard to the hinges: I have had no scratches on my kindle or any other issues, so I remain convinced that the hinges are a non issue.

    5-0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Kindle Case Yet, September 2, 2010
    I read in bed every single night, so having my Kindle be able to read in the dark is very important to me. With my Kindle 2 I used a mighty bright light, and with my Kindle 3 I've been using this Lighted Leather cover - and I love it!

    Check out my video review for a size comparison of this case against my Kindle 2 and also an actual hardcover and softcover book, and then a lights out comparison of the Mighty Bright vs Lighted Leather cover.

    Sorry for the shaky camera, it's the best I could do with one hand!

    If you're interested in seeing a video review of the Kindle 3 itself, check out the one I did one here:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R21YU59NMOGKUR

    3-0 out of 5 stars For those that REALLY care, it's not worth the money., August 28, 2010
    I've been an avid Kindle user since Kindle 1, and I take my lights VERY seriously.

    The problem is that the new Kindle 3 cover+light does not evenly light the screen. This results in a very bright top right corner, including the top right of the frame of the Kindle 3. And while the light doesn't glare off the screen, it does glare off my graphite Kindle 3's top right corner, making for constant distraction while reading. The light then gets fainter and fainter in a diagonal line from the top right to bottom left. It's not very fun, unfortunately.

    Now, for convenience, this new cover is fantastic. I have the non-lighted one and the one with the light, and the weight difference isn't very much, and the bulk difference is truly negligible, so kudos to Amazon for this.

    That said, I simply cannot recommend this cover unless you don't mind an incredibly uneven light. I will stick to my Mighty Bright. Yes, it's an addition to the Kindle, but I know that when I sit down to read, I want the pages to "disappear" as I become immersed in my reading. It's very hard for them to do so when the light is so incredibly awkward and uneven, constantly distracting. I'm happy to spend a few extra seconds clipping my light to the back of my Kindle so I can spend hours enjoying my book. That simply wasn't possible with the Kindle Lighted Leather Cover.

    3 stars out of 5.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Compact and well made, August 27, 2010
    For a folio type case, this looks and feels great and works very well. It does add significantly to the weight but that seems a predictable consequence of using leather, making it stiff enough to offer real protection, and building in a light.

    Attaching Kindle is very simple using the directions on the product page. Make sure you heed the warning to work at it until ALL the gold is covered, which tells you Kindle is securely attached. Removing is quite simple: Slide down the top hook and rotate Kindle right off. I'm using a fingertip to do it rather than a fingernail. It's quick and easy enough to attach and detach Kindle that I won't have any difficulty switching to "naked" reading at will.

    The cord seems to me strong enough for its purpose, but only time will tell. When the cover is closed, the cord is buried in a "channel" in the front cover so should not normally be subjected to much stress and strain. I did remove the little "flag" attached to the cord. Even without using fingernails, it's easy to open the cord up. Others have posted about the cord being in the way during reading, especially when holding Kindle and case in "open book" form. I put the cord between Kindle and the back cover, solving the issue to my own satisfaction. YMMV.

    I don't think I'll use the "book style" reading position much. I'll "break the spine" as I did with my K2's case and read with the front cover folded flat against the back. It feels good like that, but when I have good light and will be reading a while I expect I'll do as I did with my K2: Remove Kindle from the case and read "naked." Still, even brand new, the leather folds flat easily and it's comfortable to hold and read.

    The light seems to me to be well placed. I don't get any glare in any of my normal reading positions, so don't have a practical issue with its lack of adjustability. One very nice feature, particularly since it's powered by Kindle's battery, is that it turns off when Kindle turns off. So if you fall asleep reading, your light won't just keep running. I find it a bit stiff to pull out, but I expect it will ease in time. Also maybe stiff is good, as you don't want it just lolling out on its own while you've got it stowed away. Still, folks with difficulty applying much force with their fingers could find this an issue.

    I bought this unseen, intending to return it if it didn't work well. It won't be going back. I may in fact buy another case for travel, as by design this folio style case is open on three sides. In some situations I would want more dust and bang protection, but I still give five stars because this is an unavoidable consequence of this style of design.

    5-0 out of 5 stars well worth it, August 27, 2010
    This is a comparison between mighty bright and the kindle cover light. NOTE: the bottom left of the kindle is the part that receives the less light because it is the farthest away. The light still shines well enough to read the bottom left of the kindle , but the light distribution is not even.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Exceeded my expectations, August 27, 2010
    I was hesitant to buy this cover mostly due to the pictures in its listing, which seem to show a light that doesn't even extend to the opposite corner. The fact that I have not been impressed with the Amazon's Kindle covers in the past didn't help. I went ahead and purchased it because the cover I wanted isn't available yet and I don't like to take my Kindle out and about without a cover. Now I am glad that I went ahead and bought it.

    PROS:

    1. The light is much better than I thought it would be. Using it in a darkened room I found that the light did the job very well. In a pitch black room, it performs even better. While the screen corner opposite the light is a bit dimmer than other areas, there is no problem reading the page at all.

    2. The light gets its power from the Kindle itself, through the gold-plated hinges which attach it to the cover, so batteries are a thing of the past. When your Kindle goes to sleep, the light will go out as well. It will also turn off when you slide it back into the case.

    3. The cover is slim, well-fitted and very easy to attach and detach using the hinges. The inside has good padding. The leather outer surface has a nice pebbled texture with the exception of a smooth area along the edge of the front. While stiff enough to protect the reader, the cover is slight flexible and the front easily folds behind when reading so you can hold your Kindle with one hand if you like.

    4. A great plus is that the cover has an elastic cord that fits into a groove on the front of it. This holds your cover closed (unlike the original Kindle 2 cover that would flop open in your purse & let things slide into it) and easily distinguishes the front from the back--important as many owners of the Kindle 2 cover accidentally opened it from the back, which could cause cracking along the Kindle's spine.


    CONS:

    I haven't found any, really. The light Is a bit hard (stiff) to pull out of the cover, but then you wouldn't want it to be flopping out when you don't want to use it so that is more of a Pro than a Con.

    The one concern I do have is about pulling the light in and out--I wonder if whatever wiring or conductor that is used to get the power from the hinges to the light will eventually break. But that is something to find out down the road. Right now, the more I use this cover, the more I like it.

    4-0 out of 5 stars From the bungee cord thingy to the pull-out light, a solid choice for the Kindle, September 4, 2010
    I ordered this cover because it was the only real game in town at the time. To let you know where I come from with this review... I purchased the 2nd generation Kindle back in March of 2009 with the Amazon cover. Didn't like that one, it actually cracked my mother's Kindle that I purchased shortly thereafter (Amazon replaced it, although it was probably from her opening the wrong side, doesn't matter, this isn't about Amazon great customer service). When that happened, we immediately went looking for a new cover and fell in love with the M-Edge Prodigy with light. Unfortunately, M-Edge isn't offering that for the 3rd generation Kindle, they changed it to have a nylon strap instead of leather and aren't utilizing the hinge technology for the light, which I think is genius and a terrible error on their part. I'm telling you this so you know that I ordered this new Amazon Lighted Cover with a WHOLE LOT of trepidation.

    When deciding on the color, I didn't want black (I wanted purple, but Amazon doesn't offer that *boo*hiss*) and the green was backordered slightly, didn't like the other colors so I decided to get the orange. It looked interesting and since I live in Austin, some UT fan would buy it off me if I hated it, I was sure. It came in and it's the perfect burnt orange color. It might be slightly too tan colored, but it's not vibrant orange by any means. A great almost pumpkin pie color actually.

    So... what did I think of the cover itself?

    I slid the Kindle in there and pulled the light out and... nothing happened. I spent a good 3 to 5 minutes pulling the light out and pushing it back in, looking for a switch, something, anything. I finally gave up and turned the Kindle on and... yeah, the light came on. DUH! It works only if the Kindle is on. This is actually GREAT because I fall asleep reading a good deal and the light will go off when the Kindle goes to sleep after 15 minutes or so. I felt stupid, but at least I didn't call customer service and have them giggle in the background and the stupid lady that can't work the cover, eh?

    ANYWAY... the Kindle slides in easily and the light works great. There is no glare at all because the LED lights are directed down the arm of the light so there's no "direct" light hitting the screen, it just flows down. It is brighter in the upper right than in the lower left because of that, but it's more than adequate. The light is NOT adjustable but you shouldn't need to adjust it either. I have found it really is a genius way of handling it.

    The case itself is not too thick. In fact when I first picked up the case, I thought I had the wrong one because it looked too slim to have a light in there, but it's there. It is a little hard to pull the light out, but I guess the alternative is having it be too easy, right? I really wish they had included corner straps though. I read laying in bed and I worry it's going to flop open and crack the Kindle. I do realize this is probably unfounded and they fixed that flaw, but because I'm paranoid, I did put two small circles of velcro to the back of the Kindle and the cover so it couldn't accidentally bend the hinge system or crack the case. I'm aware this is insane overkill type stuff, so feel free to snicker... I'll wait... done? Okay, onward...

    Now, back to reality... the chance of you opening the Kindle from the wrong side is basically zero. You have to unwrap it using this bungee cord thingy (yes, that's the technical term here, folks). It has a little leather tag on it that says "Amazon Kindle". The tag is a little annoying because I fold the cover back and use the cord to hold it and keep hitting the tag with my hand no matter where I put. I'm thinking of cutting it off. *shrug*

    It does, of course, add some weight to the Kindle. The case, with Kindle and velcro circles weighs 15.5 oz on my postal scale. There's been some discussion if this is "too heavy" but I must say that I don't think so. I read with it folded back and the bungee cord thingy wrapped around the back. I have weak hands that keep me from reading hard backs and large paperback books. I think it's more of the force of holding the book open than the weight, so it's not been an issue at all for me. I also read with it propped up somewhere usually.

    My favorite part is that with the new slim and sleek design of the Kindle and this slim and sleek cover (with a light, no less!) it really is a great size to grab and go, toss in my purse, in the car or my bedside. My other favorite (it's a tie) is the light. It runs off power from the Kindle itself so I'm never without a light. I don't have to find a battery somewhere when it burns out. Amazon knocked it out of the park as far as I'm concerned. I'm taking off a star just for the few little niggle things I mentioned before. After over a week of use though, this is the cover I'm recommending to friends/family at this time.

    Well worth it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Data to compare colors and weights, with and without light, September 4, 2010
    Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

    Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
    Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
    Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
    Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

    The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
    Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
    Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
    Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
    Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
    Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
    Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

    4-0 out of 5 stars (4.5 stars) Very good, and not THAT heavy!, August 28, 2010
    I bought two of these (burgundy for my wife's graphite kindle and green for my white kindle).

    The colors are gorgeous, and exactly as shown in the pictures Amazon has here.

    The look and feel of the leather is very good and should more than satisfy most folks. If you're willing to spend more for even better leather, you'll soon be able to get high-end leather cases from designers like Cole-Haan. (If you're interested, look up their Kindle 2 cases here at Amazon and you're get an idea of what they're likely to offer for Kindle 3).

    We love the design. We've had no trouble hooking our kindles in and out of the case. We love that the light is built in and we will never need to replace its battery. The cover folds completely flat around the back, and the elastic band keeps it there, then it's easy and quite comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    A few reviews here complain about the weight of this case. I disagree. It is not heavy compared to other cases of this type (folio-style hard shell leather cases). My wife and I were up reading for hours last night, holding our kindles, cases on, in one hand, with no fatigue. (We're such an old married couple, that's how exciting our Friday nights are!) I used to have a nook with the same type of case (minus the light), and it was noticeably heavier. If you want something lighter, consider a neoprene sleeve or cloth case.

    My only qualm about the Amazon lighted case is the uneven distribution of light on the screen - very bright in the upper right corner, dim in the lower left corner. It seems this doesn't bother most people here, but it bothers me a bit, enough to knock half a star off my review, but not enough to make me hesitate to recommend this case.

    Some folks complain about the price. It is high, to be sure. But, you'd pay about the same if you bought a good leather case and a separate light. Then you'd have to worry about remembering to pack the light when you travel, making sure it has fresh batteries, making sure you don't lose it, etc etc. For me, the convenience of the built-in light is well worth the price.

    And there's something intangible but very very nice about keeping our kindles in these gorgeous, almost luxuriously nice cases. They are definitely eye-catching and lust-worthy.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Good Quality K3 Cover with Handy Light, August 26, 2010
    I bought the burnt orange color cover so I can spot my Kindle where ever I leave it easily--and hopefully not misplace it! The cover is good quality leather, and even with the cover on, I can slip the K3 into my small purse without squeezing it in--something I could not do with my coverless Kindle 2.

    I think for an easy purchase without having to buy a separate book light, the Kindle 3 lighted cover is a good choice. The light worked _great_ reading in bed last night. I could see all of the lighted screen just fine with the upper right corner a bit brighter. See the pics I loaded to customer images for the lighted cover to see the light in action in a dark room, and what the cover looks light from the back.

    Pluses: Built in light that slips securely out of the way, no batteries to replace, better clips/fit than past covers that connect to Kindle, adequate to light the entire screen, no looking for a booklight, no clipping a booklight to my Kindle and scratching or damaging it, the book light LEDs point down towards the screen, so no bright lights in your eyes.

    Minuses: The cover's weight doubles the weight of the Kindle 3 in your hand, the book light stays in one corner and doesn't move around the Kindle, uses more Kindle battery life (it's powered by the Kindle 3 -- and I noticed a definite drain on the battery from using the light)

    UPDATE: I used the Kindle light for a couple days now, and the battery life goes down noticeably as you use the light (esp. if you keep the wireless "On"). Last night I read with the light for about 2 hours after a full charge and today the battery looks down about 15%. At that rate of use (with no wireless constantly "On" and regular reading in the daylight), I estimate the battery will need charging after approx. 1 week.

    If the overall cover+Kindle weight is an issue for you--more than protecting your Kindle and the handy light--then this cover is not for you.

    Kindle Lighted Leather Cover alone = 233 grams or 8.2 oz

    Kindle Lighted Leather Cover + Kindle 3 = 447 grams or 15.75 oz. (almost 1 lb.)

    Thickness: Kindle cover + Kindle 3 = 3/4 inch

    Cover Measurements (with Kindle inside):

    Front: 7 3/4" x 5 1/8" (closer to 3/16")
    Back: SAME as front
    Spine: 7/8"
    Open side (to the right) with Kindle inside: 3/4"

    I have to say I'm getting used to the weight with the cover as I use it. The piece of mind of extra Kindle protection, plus a handy light whenever you need it, is worth the trade off for me. '

    November 20th UPDATE:

    **Still love the cover** and having the light handy without having to think about needing a light _is better than ever_. One thing however, is that the hooks to connect the cover are not sturdy enough, IMO, to take the cover on and off often. The Kindle "wiggles" a bit on the connectors, and be careful not to pull the Kindle forward or up off the back of the cover to avoid bending or breaking the metal connectors. Despite this, I am very happy with this cover after using it almost 3 months now.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Lighted Leather Case - Two Important Concerns, August 31, 2010
    I've noticed that like myself customers have been concerned primarily with two things regarding the new lighted case from amazon. These are: 1)The weight and 2) The uneven lighting. My review will briefly discuss these two things.

    1)The Weight - The lighted leather case is a nice weight, sturdy and comfortable to hold. In ounces it is about the weight of the kindle itself however don't let that concern you. With the case on it feels like a medium sized paperback, however it is far much more comfortable to hold. It's easy to hold the case open like a book (nice for couch and table type reading) or to fold the front back and close it with the bungee so that the bungee doesn't hang around (this is good for bedtime reading).Closing the front back with bungee keeps the case folded in position and you don't have to worry about it bothering you. BTW THIS CASE FOLDS BACK 100% - Very comfortable. In sum very comfortable to read with the case and very sturdy.

    2) The uneven lighting - Amazon's pictures don't do this case justice. The light hits the ENTIRE screen. Yes if you look closely it's brighter in the top right corner then in the bottom left but Amazon's pics make it look the top is lighted while the bottom is dark. There is good light all over the screen. Trust me I'm fussy about these things - the lighting will not bother you, your entire screen will be lighted and it is extremely pleasant to read in the dark.

    *Final Thoughts - Great case, good quality, works well, kindle feels very secure and protected (I would feel comfortable slipping this case into my backpack or suitcase and I think it would sustain some mild impact). Lastly hinges are a non-issue, casing of the kindle will not get damaged with normal or even slightly aggressive use. You could damage the kindle by trying to pull the back of the case but you'd have to really force it to cause any sort of damage to your kindle. The hinges work fine and should not be a concern to any case user.

    Update 1st December 2010:

    Have now been using the case for 3 months. Leather still looks impeccable. Some people expressed concern that the bungee cord might loosen with use. I have not experienced any loosening so far. Quality of the product has proven outstanding. I've occasionally spilled or messed the cover, just a wipe with a damp cloth has cleaned it up, and the case looks like new. Have to admit I enjoy the feel of the case in my hand, there's just something great about taking your kindle to a coffee shop in this case, it just looks and feels so classy. Also with regard to the hinges: I have had no scratches on my kindle or any other issues, so I remain convinced that the hinges are a non issue.

    5-0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Kindle Case Yet, September 2, 2010
    I read in bed every single night, so having my Kindle be able to read in the dark is very important to me. With my Kindle 2 I used a mighty bright light, and with my Kindle 3 I've been using this Lighted Leather cover - and I love it!

    Check out my video review for a size comparison of this case against my Kindle 2 and also an actual hardcover and softcover book, and then a lights out comparison of the Mighty Bright vs Lighted Leather cover.

    Sorry for the shaky camera, it's the best I could do with one hand!

    If you're interested in seeing a video review of the Kindle 3 itself, check out the one I did one here:

    http://www.amazon.com/review/R21YU59NMOGKUR

    3-0 out of 5 stars For those that REALLY care, it's not worth the money., August 28, 2010
    I've been an avid Kindle user since Kindle 1, and I take my lights VERY seriously.

    The problem is that the new Kindle 3 cover+light does not evenly light the screen. This results in a very bright top right corner, including the top right of the frame of the Kindle 3. And while the light doesn't glare off the screen, it does glare off my graphite Kindle 3's top right corner, making for constant distraction while reading. The light then gets fainter and fainter in a diagonal line from the top right to bottom left. It's not very fun, unfortunately.

    Now, for convenience, this new cover is fantastic. I have the non-lighted one and the one with the light, and the weight difference isn't very much, and the bulk difference is truly negligible, so kudos to Amazon for this.

    That said, I simply cannot recommend this cover unless you don't mind an incredibly uneven light. I will stick to my Mighty Bright. Yes, it's an addition to the Kindle, but I know that when I sit down to read, I want the pages to "disappear" as I become immersed in my reading. It's very hard for them to do so when the light is so incredibly awkward and uneven, constantly distracting. I'm happy to spend a few extra seconds clipping my light to the back of my Kindle so I can spend hours enjoying my book. That simply wasn't possible with the Kindle Lighted Leather Cover.

    3 stars out of 5.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Compact and well made, August 27, 2010
    For a folio type case, this looks and feels great and works very well. It does add significantly to the weight but that seems a predictable consequence of using leather, making it stiff enough to offer real protection, and building in a light.

    Attaching Kindle is very simple using the directions on the product page. Make sure you heed the warning to work at it until ALL the gold is covered, which tells you Kindle is securely attached. Removing is quite simple: Slide down the top hook and rotate Kindle right off. I'm using a fingertip to do it rather than a fingernail. It's quick and easy enough to attach and detach Kindle that I won't have any difficulty switching to "naked" reading at will.

    The cord seems to me strong enough for its purpose, but only time will tell. When the cover is closed, the cord is buried in a "channel" in the front cover so should not normally be subjected to much stress and strain. I did remove the little "flag" attached to the cord. Even without using fingernails, it's easy to open the cord up. Others have posted about the cord being in the way during reading, especially when holding Kindle and case in "open book" form. I put the cord between Kindle and the back cover, solving the issue to my own satisfaction. YMMV.

    I don't think I'll use the "book style" reading position much. I'll "break the spine" as I did with my K2's case and read with the front cover folded flat against the back. It feels good like that, but when I have good light and will be reading a while I expect I'll do as I did with my K2: Remove Kindle from the case and read "naked." Still, even brand new, the leather folds flat easily and it's comfortable to hold and read.

    The light seems to me to be well placed. I don't get any glare in any of my normal reading positions, so don't have a practical issue with its lack of adjustability. One very nice feature, particularly since it's powered by Kindle's battery, is that it turns off when Kindle turns off. So if you fall asleep reading, your light won't just keep running. I find it a bit stiff to pull out, but I expect it will ease in time. Also maybe stiff is good, as you don't want it just lolling out on its own while you've got it stowed away. Still, folks with difficulty applying much force with their fingers could find this an issue.

    I bought this unseen, intending to return it if it didn't work well. It won't be going back. I may in fact buy another case for travel, as by design this folio style case is open on three sides. In some situations I would want more dust and bang protection, but I still give five stars because this is an unavoidable consequence of this style of design.

    5-0 out of 5 stars well worth it, August 27, 2010
    This is a comparison between mighty bright and the kindle cover light. NOTE: the bottom left of the kindle is the part that receives the less light because it is the farthest away. The light still shines well enough to read the bottom left of the kindle , but the light distribution is not even.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Exceeded my expectations, August 27, 2010
    I was hesitant to buy this cover mostly due to the pictures in its listing, which seem to show a light that doesn't even extend to the opposite corner. The fact that I have not been impressed with the Amazon's Kindle covers in the past didn't help. I went ahead and purchased it because the cover I wanted isn't available yet and I don't like to take my Kindle out and about without a cover. Now I am glad that I went ahead and bought it.

    PROS:

    1. The light is much better than I thought it would be. Using it in a darkened room I found that the light did the job very well. In a pitch black room, it performs even better. While the screen corner opposite the light is a bit dimmer than other areas, there is no problem reading the page at all.

    2. The light gets its power from the Kindle itself, through the gold-plated hinges which attach it to the cover, so batteries are a thing of the past. When your Kindle goes to sleep, the light will go out as well. It will also turn off when you slide it back into the case.

    3. The cover is slim, well-fitted and very easy to attach and detach using the hinges. The inside has good padding. The leather outer surface has a nice pebbled texture with the exception of a smooth area along the edge of the front. While stiff enough to protect the reader, the cover is slight flexible and the front easily folds behind when reading so you can hold your Kindle with one hand if you like.

    4. A great plus is that the cover has an elastic cord that fits into a groove on the front of it. This holds your cover closed (unlike the original Kindle 2 cover that would flop open in your purse & let things slide into it) and easily distinguishes the front from the back--important as many owners of the Kindle 2 cover accidentally opened it from the back, which could cause cracking along the Kindle's spine.


    CONS:

    I haven't found any, really. The light Is a bit hard (stiff) to pull out of the cover, but then you wouldn't want it to be flopping out when you don't want to use it so that is more of a Pro than a Con.

    The one concern I do have is about pulling the light in and out--I wonder if whatever wiring or conductor that is used to get the power from the hinges to the light will eventually break. But that is something to find out down the road. Right now, the more I use this cover, the more I like it.

    4-0 out of 5 stars From the bungee cord thingy to the pull-out light, a solid choice for the Kindle, September 4, 2010
    I ordered this cover because it was the only real game in town at the time. To let you know where I come from with this review... I purchased the 2nd generation Kindle back in March of 2009 with the Amazon cover. Didn't like that one, it actually cracked my mother's Kindle that I purchased shortly thereafter (Amazon replaced it, although it was probably from her opening the wrong side, doesn't matter, this isn't about Amazon great customer service). When that happened, we immediately went looking for a new cover and fell in love with the M-Edge Prodigy with light. Unfortunately, M-Edge isn't offering that for the 3rd generation Kindle, they changed it to have a nylon strap instead of leather and aren't utilizing the hinge technology for the light, which I think is genius and a terrible error on their part. I'm telling you this so you know that I ordered this new Amazon Lighted Cover with a WHOLE LOT of trepidation.

    When deciding on the color, I didn't want black (I wanted purple, but Amazon doesn't offer that *boo*hiss*) and the green was backordered slightly, didn't like the other colors so I decided to get the orange. It looked interesting and since I live in Austin, some UT fan would buy it off me if I hated it, I was sure. It came in and it's the perfect burnt orange color. It might be slightly too tan colored, but it's not vibrant orange by any means. A great almost pumpkin pie color actually.

    So... what did I think of the cover itself?

    I slid the Kindle in there and pulled the light out and... nothing happened. I spent a good 3 to 5 minutes pulling the light out and pushing it back in, looking for a switch, something, anything. I finally gave up and turned the Kindle on and... yeah, the light came on. DUH! It works only if the Kindle is on. This is actually GREAT because I fall asleep reading a good deal and the light will go off when the Kindle goes to sleep after 15 minutes or so. I felt stupid, but at least I didn't call customer service and have them giggle in the background and the stupid lady that can't work the cover, eh?

    ANYWAY... the Kindle slides in easily and the light works great. There is no glare at all because the LED lights are directed down the arm of the light so there's no "direct" light hitting the screen, it just flows down. It is brighter in the upper right than in the lower left because of that, but it's more than adequate. The light is NOT adjustable but you shouldn't need to adjust it either. I have found it really is a genius way of handling it.

    The case itself is not too thick. In fact when I first picked up the case, I thought I had the wrong one because it looked too slim to have a light in there, but it's there. It is a little hard to pull the light out, but I guess the alternative is having it be too easy, right? I really wish they had included corner straps though. I read laying in bed and I worry it's going to flop open and crack the Kindle. I do realize this is probably unfounded and they fixed that flaw, but because I'm paranoid, I did put two small circles of velcro to the back of the Kindle and the cover so it couldn't accidentally bend the hinge system or crack the case. I'm aware this is insane overkill type stuff, so feel free to snicker... I'll wait... done? Okay, onward...

    Now, back to reality... the chance of you opening the Kindle from the wrong side is basically zero. You have to unwrap it using this bungee cord thingy (yes, that's the technical term here, folks). It has a little leather tag on it that says "Amazon Kindle". The tag is a little annoying because I fold the cover back and use the cord to hold it and keep hitting the tag with my hand no matter where I put. I'm thinking of cutting it off. *shrug*

    It does, of course, add some weight to the Kindle. The case, with Kindle and velcro circles weighs 15.5 oz on my postal scale. There's been some discussion if this is "too heavy" but I must say that I don't think so. I read with it folded back and the bungee cord thingy wrapped around the back. I have weak hands that keep me from reading hard backs and large paperback books. I think it's more of the force of holding the book open than the weight, so it's not been an issue at all for me. I also read with it propped up somewhere usually.

    My favorite part is that with the new slim and sleek design of the Kindle and this slim and sleek cover (with a light, no less!) it really is a great size to grab and go, toss in my purse, in the car or my bedside. My other favorite (it's a tie) is the light. It runs off power from the Kindle itself so I'm never without a light. I don't have to find a battery somewhere when it burns out. Amazon knocked it out of the park as far as I'm concerned. I'm taking off a star just for the few little niggle things I mentioned before. After over a week of use though, this is the cover I'm recommending to friends/family at this time.

    Well worth it.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Data to compare colors and weights, with and without light, September 4, 2010
    Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

    Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
    Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
    Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
    Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

    The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
    Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
    Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
    Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
    Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
    Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
    Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

    4-0 out of 5 stars (4.5 stars) Very good, and not THAT heavy!, August 28, 2010
    I bought two of these (burgundy for my wife's graphite kindle and green for my white kindle).

    The colors are gorgeous, and exactly as shown in the pictures Amazon has here.

    The look and feel of the leather is very good and should more than satisfy most folks. If you're willing to spend more for even better leather, you'll soon be able to get high-end leather cases from designers like Cole-Haan. (If you're interested, look up their Kindle 2 cases here at Amazon and you're get an idea of what they're likely to offer for Kindle 3).

    We love the design. We've had no trouble hooking our kindles in and out of the case. We love that the light is built in and we will never need to replace its battery. The cover folds completely flat around the back, and the elastic band keeps it there, then it's easy and quite comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

    A few reviews here complain about the weight of this case. I disagree. It is not heavy compared to other cases of this type (folio-style hard shell leather cases). My wife and I were up reading for hours last night, holding our kindles, cases on, in one hand, with no fatigue. (We're such an old married couple, that's how exciting our Friday nights are!) I used to have a nook with the same type of case (minus the light), and it was noticeably heavier. If you want something lighter, consider a neoprene sleeve or cloth case.

    My only qualm about the Amazon lighted case is the uneven distribution of light on the screen -