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$13.60
21. Transcend 8 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash
$13.60
22. Transcend 8 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash
$84.00
23. Garmin nvi 205W 4.3-Inch Widescreen
$59.99
24. Kindle Lighted Leather Cover,
$59.00
25. Fujifilm FinePix J40 12.2 MP Digital
$34.99
26. Kindle Leather Cover, Chocolate
$379.00
27. Kindle DX Wireless Reading Device,
$59.99
28. Kindle Lighted Leather Cover,
$9.99
29. Mediabridge Ultra Series - High
$179.00
30. Flip UltraHD Video Camera - Black,
$7.99
31. Caselogic TBC-302 Ultra Compact
$24.73
32. Garmin Portable Friction Mount
$99.00
33. Apple TV MC572LL/A (2010)
$9.99
34. AmazonBasics High-Speed HDMI Cable
$79.99
35. LG BD530 1080p Network Blu-ray
$9.99
36. Scotch(TM) Thermal Laminating
$44.99
37. Apple iPod shuffle 2 GB Silver
$228.54
38. Apple iPod classic 160 GB Black
$59.99
39. Kindle Lighted Leather Cover,
$79.99
40. Roku XD Streaming Player 1080p

21. Transcend 8 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS8GSDHC6
Electronics
list price: $42.92 -- our price: $13.60
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B000P9ZBFA
Manufacturer: TRANSCEND
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

SDHC (SD High-Capacity) is the new generation of SD cards (Version 2.0). Formatted in FAT32, SDHC cards reach a maximum capacity of 32GB and can fulfill the high-capacity demand of the new SDHC devices such as Casio Exilim Z1000/Z600/S600 cameras, Panasonic DMC-L1 camera, and HP printer A/B. Now you can enjoy a high-quality digital life and store all of your MP3 music files, high-resolution pictures, and video clips in your SDHC card. ... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars Great affordable SDHC card, March 28, 2008
UPDATE - March 2, 2010: This review was originally written for the 4 GB class 6 SDHC card, but the reviews have been grouped for all class 6 SDHC cards in the 4, 8, 16 and 32 GB sizes. All the cards should perform similarly since they are all class 6 and all made by Transcend. However, I will have to check which cards I have used hands on. I believe I only own the 4GB and 8GB cards. I will update the review further. If you have concerns regarding the 16GB or 32GB sizes, you should seek out the reviews tagged with the product links from those cards.


The Transcend 4GB SDHC CARD (Class 6) is a great card for the price. I was at first a little skeptical about the brand, but I buy way too many memory cards to ignore a good price when I see one. And I'm happy to report that I've experienced decent performance and reliability issues with this card. That's as compared to other cards I own including SanDisk, PNY and Kingston.

As long as your devices are compatible with the SDHC format, this card is a good buy. 4 GB is a nice size though I do prefer 8 GB capacity for high capacity storage.

The class 6 speed is the fastest speed available in mass market SDHC cards. Class 6 guarantees minimum transfer speeds of 6 MBs, but I've gotten speeds up to 20Mbs! That makes this card perfect for storing pictures in RAW image formats.

The Class 6 speed is on par with the Sandisk Extreme III cards that on average are about $15 to $20 more per card. If you don't have an SDHC reader, you may opt to get the package with a reader included to download your pics. If not you can just transfer your pics directly from your camera with your card still inserted. An SDHC card reader can be bought separately if your PC doesn't have a compatible slot.

General SDHC and SD Card Tips

There are a few tips that I've learned the hard way through buying TOO MANY different memory cards.
1. Make sure your device is compatible with the card! Even in regular SD cards, some older electronics aren't compatible with that large of a size (2 GB). In terms of SDHC cards, make sure your camera or other device is SDHC compatible. SDHC is different from regular SD and only newer devices tend to have built-in compatibility
2. Once you install this in your camera or device, you will generally want to format the card with your compatible device's interface. That is because the standard formats for certain devices, particularly Canon, are different from the factory installed format
3. Just like your devices, most computer SD card readers are not compatible with the SDHC format. So use a card reader or download the pictures via USB connection to the camera with the card still installed.
4. For some reason, placing the card in the locked position allows some older laptops to still read it. This is just to be used in a pinch however, and it won't apply to all systems
5. If you did not properly format your card, you may be able to save things to it and then have them "disappear." If this happens to you, make sure you use the software recovery tools BEFORE you try to save anything else to your card. That way, you can retrieve your images without over-writing them.
6. Make sure you know what you are going to use this card for. Once you have set up everything and ensured it's all compatible, you still have to decide on speed. If you are using this for storing RAW images instead of JPEGs or HD video, step up to the faster class 6 speed format if you can afford it.
7. If you are going to pay more for a faster speed, make sure your device can benefit from it. I've read, for example, that Kodak cameras are set to a fixed voltage and cannot go faster than standard speed. So the extra cash spent on Class 4, 5, or 6 is basically wasted.

Conclusion

It's great to have several extra cards on hand just in case. This 4 GB card is a nice performer. If you have a high capacity camera (10 Megapixels or more) and are storing videos or RAW images, the extra cash for the 8GB card is worth it. Or you may want to step up to the larger 16 GB size that is now available.

Enjoy!

4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 32 GB SDHC Review, May 25, 2009
Before you drop 120~$ for a SD card ask yourself, Do you really need 32GB card? because the card itself with same specs costs only 35$ for the 16GB version, anyway here is info that might help you

Pros :
1- Class 6 Card the(guaranteed minimum Read/write speed of 6MB/s)
2- My Test Results 18.2-18.5MB/S Read - 11.6-11.8 Write (very stable)
3- Faster than average cards and almost close to top speed SDHC cards
4- 32GB in a single small chip is awesome(You can use it as a portable HD once in a while, i share some stuff with my friends with it sometimes


Cons :
1- Expensive
2- You can get two 16GB cards for around only 70$ and save yourself 50$~
3- Slow write speeds for a 32GB card (Takes forever to fill it with DATA from PC, its not the card fault though , its just the SDHC technology is getting old and slow for 2009 standards , time for newer Tech)

* Important Info

Avoid the Sandisk Ultra Series they never reach the true marketed speed "15MB-20MB/S" its just in theory speed like how everybody knows that USB2 is much slower than its specs, and they are only Class 2 for the 32GB version which will drop frames from your HD video (Plus Class 4 is minimum requirement for shooting in HD ) if you plan to get San disk Card then get the Extreme III Series (but again from my own Tests there read speed is about 20MB not 30MB and the write speed is 14MB/s~ instead of the transcend 11MB/s write speed (Unless you spam shooting pictures with your DSLR you don't "need" faster speed)

I bought This card because i plan to take videos with my HD camcorder that last more 2 Hours, if you do not plan to shoot for longtime then you are better with getting the 16GB card HOWEVER, if you are lazy like my mom and do not plan to transfer DATA from the card to Your computer HD after every trip, then get the 32GB card.or you gonna end up on a trip and a message pops "No memory"

If you plan to shoot for longer time, check your camcorder battery too does it even last that long? so be sure about that before you drop over 100$ for this card

1-0 out of 5 stars product failed., July 26, 2009
Well, it was great while it lasted. Unfortunately, it did not last long.

Like other reviewers, after <20 use cycles the device failed and I got a "lock" error when, in fact, the write-protection lock was not engaged. Oddly, by engaging the lock (i.e. entering read-only mode) I was able to remove the picture files from the card. Obviously, further use in the camera was impossible; I was also unable to reformat the card (either with my camera or with the SD Associations free software [..]).

This card has a high average rating but I would urge customers to consider the number of 1-star ratings due to complete product failure before they purchase this item.



5-0 out of 5 stars My Canon loves the 8 GB SDHC card, January 15, 2008
This SDHC card is the fastest one in its price range but it may cause your images to be lost.

I use two of this in a Canon SD750. After the first use, all of the images were lost. (But thank God, I could rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue 2, a program better than its competitors) Then I formated the card(s) in the camera(s) with "low level format" option several times and there has been no problem after that so far.

I can suggest these points to potential owners of this card:
1- Use it very carefully, make backups if possible.
2- Format it several times before the first use with "low level format" option.
3- If you loose your images, don't panic. At this situation, It is very important not to take anymore pictures. If you take pictures after this point, you can overwrite your lost images and there can be no chance to get them back. Connect your card to your computer with a card reader (SDHC Compatible) and rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Mini Hard Drive equivalent, December 11, 2007
I recently ordered this card as an accessory for my Acer Aspire One netbook PC. The card took a little while to ship, about 8 days, but that wasn't a big deal. The card has lots of space, and the read speeds are quite impressive. I mostly use it to run and store portable software, and it does a very good job at that.

My only complaint is that when I first inserted the card into my PC it attempted to install some adware. The program was from a company called RelevantKnowledge, and they gather your information for market research purposes. Luckily my spyware software picked it up immediately,so I was able to delete it. Afterward I formatted the card, and now I'm happy as can be.

5-0 out of 5 stars Reliable card, good speeds!, December 4, 2008
Transcend 16 GB SDHC SD Class 6 Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]
I have 4 of these cards that I use in my Panasonic HMC-150, a professional grade video camera. I've run read/write tests on all of them and they get about 14 MB/s write speeds and 17.5 MB/s read speeds. Never encountered any errors! These cards are the best bang for your buck, and the frustration free packaging is awesome.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great affordable SDHC card, March 28, 2008
In the past, I bought a Transcend 8GB SDHC card for my Canon SD1000 camera. I recently bought the Transcend 16GB SDHC for my new Canon SX20IS. Both cards work very well and I've had no problems with it so far. I wanted to take this opportunity to update my review since my original review was also posted (by Amazon) for the 16GB card. This is because the only difference between these two cards is the different capacity. So, if you're in the market for an affordable high quality SDHC card, this may be the one for you. Sorry, I kind of sounded like a used car salesman right there, didn't I? I assure you that I don't work for Transcend. But, here's why I think this card is awesome:

Pros:

-Affordable!

-Large capacity

-Class 6 read/write speed (which is very fast... but is no longer the fastest class available)

-Lifetime warranty (at least that's what the package says :)

-Transcend is a reputable company that's been making memory products for a very long time. ( I swear to the tech Gods that I don't work for them!) Other reputable and reliable memory card companies include Kingston and PNY. All three of these companies have been making memory chips for many, many years.


Cons:

- I can' really think of any "Cons" about this card. But here's the 2 closest things I can come up with right now: (1) "Class 6" is no longer the fastest speed available and (2) This card does NOT make coffee for you in the morning, do your dishes for you, give you compliments when you're having a bad day, or magically improve your photography skills.




IMPORTANT SPECIAL NOTES ABOUT SDHC MEMORY CARDS:

-SDHC cards are not compatible with most older SD cameras, SD devices, or SD card readers.

-SDHC cards are rated by speed using different "classes". There are currently 4 data transfer speed classes available for SDHC cards. These classes are "class 2, class 4, and class 6, and the new class 10. For example, "Class 2" would have the slowest read/write speed while "Class 6" has the fastest read/write speed. So if you have a device in which speed may play a crucial role, make sure you buy a higher "class" SDHC card. Please note that this SDHC card no longer has the fastest read/write speed available. There is now a new class, called "Class 10". Class 6 has a minimum read/write speed of 6MB/sec... while Class 2 has minimum speed rating of 2MB/sec, and Class 4 is 4MB/sec. Starting to see the pattern?


SO WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "SD CARDS" AND "SDHC CARDS?

SDHC is basically an upgrade to the older SD cards. The reason they upgraded it was to achieve greater data transfer speeds AND capacity than previously possible with normal SD cards... and to do this, they had to redesign the card (which is why it's not compatible with normal SD devices). This was necessary because digital cameras and digital video cameras these days have higher resolutions, which equate to larger file sizes and faster data transfer needs.

Now that many digital cameras also can record HD video, you may consider getting a larger capacity card because video takes much more space than photos. The size of the video varies from camera to camera depending on what resolution and video compression the camera uses. If you plan on taking lots of video (especially HD video), I would consider getting at least a 16GB card. Check your camera specifications to see how many minutes per Gig of memory your camera can capture ...to gauge how big of a memory card you'll want to get to meet your needs.

Special Note on regular SD Cards:
If you primarily take casual photos and don't need a exceptionally fast read/write capable card, you should know that newer cameras that take "SDHC" cards will also work with older normal "SD" cards. These older cards are cheaper than the new SDHC cards, so this may be something to consider. So to sum things up, newer cameras will take SDHC and regular SD cards, but older cameras that use SD cards may not be able to use SDHC cards. This is because newer technology is usually made to be compatible with older technology (the technical term used to describe this is "backwards compatibility") ... but older technology may not have the hardware necessary to run newer tech (technical term used is "obsolete"... just kidding! ;)

I hope I haven't confused everybody by going into this much detail, but I can't help being the nerd that I am. If you are confused, don't hesitate to comment on this post and I will try my best to answer your questions. Also, any feedback is always welcome!

Conclusion: Buy the card if you have a new device that uses SDHC. It rocks! (This message has been approved by the "Duke of New Mexico")


4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Card - Good Card for SDHC Compatible Devices, May 10, 2008
UPDATE - March 2, 2010: This review was originally written for the 4 GB class 6 SDHC card, but the reviews have been grouped for all class 6 SDHC cards in the 4, 8, 16 and 32 GB sizes. All the cards should perform similarly since they are all class 6 and all made by Transcend. However, I will have to check which cards I have used hands on. I believe I only own the 4GB and 8GB cards. I will update the review further. If you have concerns regarding the 16GB or 32GB sizes, you should seek out the reviews tagged with the product links from those cards.


The Transcend 4GB SDHC CARD (Class 6) is a great card for the price. I was at first a little skeptical about the brand, but I buy way too many memory cards to ignore a good price when I see one. And I'm happy to report that I've experienced decent performance and reliability issues with this card. That's as compared to other cards I own including SanDisk, PNY and Kingston.

As long as your devices are compatible with the SDHC format, this card is a good buy. 4 GB is a nice size though I do prefer 8 GB capacity for high capacity storage.

The class 6 speed is the fastest speed available in mass market SDHC cards. Class 6 guarantees minimum transfer speeds of 6 MBs, but I've gotten speeds up to 20Mbs! That makes this card perfect for storing pictures in RAW image formats.

The Class 6 speed is on par with the Sandisk Extreme III cards that on average are about $15 to $20 more per card. If you don't have an SDHC reader, you may opt to get the package with a reader included to download your pics. If not you can just transfer your pics directly from your camera with your card still inserted. An SDHC card reader can be bought separately if your PC doesn't have a compatible slot.

General SDHC and SD Card Tips

There are a few tips that I've learned the hard way through buying TOO MANY different memory cards.
1. Make sure your device is compatible with the card! Even in regular SD cards, some older electronics aren't compatible with that large of a size (2 GB). In terms of SDHC cards, make sure your camera or other device is SDHC compatible. SDHC is different from regular SD and only newer devices tend to have built-in compatibility
2. Once you install this in your camera or device, you will generally want to format the card with your compatible device's interface. That is because the standard formats for certain devices, particularly Canon, are different from the factory installed format
3. Just like your devices, most computer SD card readers are not compatible with the SDHC format. So use a card reader or download the pictures via USB connection to the camera with the card still installed.
4. For some reason, placing the card in the locked position allows some older laptops to still read it. This is just to be used in a pinch however, and it won't apply to all systems
5. If you did not properly format your card, you may be able to save things to it and then have them "disappear." If this happens to you, make sure you use the software recovery tools BEFORE you try to save anything else to your card. That way, you can retrieve your images without over-writing them.
6. Make sure you know what you are going to use this card for. Once you have set up everything and ensured it's all compatible, you still have to decide on speed. If you are using this for storing RAW images instead of JPEGs or HD video, step up to the faster class 6 speed format if you can afford it.
7. If you are going to pay more for a faster speed, make sure your device can benefit from it. I've read, for example, that Kodak cameras are set to a fixed voltage and cannot go faster than standard speed. So the extra cash spent on Class 4, 5, or 6 is basically wasted.

Conclusion

It's great to have several extra cards on hand just in case. This 4 GB card is a nice performer. If you have a high capacity camera (10 Megapixels or more) and are storing videos or RAW images, the extra cash for the 8GB card is worth it. Or you may want to step up to the larger 16 GB size that is now available.

Enjoy!

4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 32 GB SDHC Review, May 25, 2009
Before you drop 120~$ for a SD card ask yourself, Do you really need 32GB card? because the card itself with same specs costs only 35$ for the 16GB version, anyway here is info that might help you

Pros :
1- Class 6 Card the(guaranteed minimum Read/write speed of 6MB/s)
2- My Test Results 18.2-18.5MB/S Read - 11.6-11.8 Write (very stable)
3- Faster than average cards and almost close to top speed SDHC cards
4- 32GB in a single small chip is awesome(You can use it as a portable HD once in a while, i share some stuff with my friends with it sometimes


Cons :
1- Expensive
2- You can get two 16GB cards for around only 70$ and save yourself 50$~
3- Slow write speeds for a 32GB card (Takes forever to fill it with DATA from PC, its not the card fault though , its just the SDHC technology is getting old and slow for 2009 standards , time for newer Tech)

* Important Info

Avoid the Sandisk Ultra Series they never reach the true marketed speed "15MB-20MB/S" its just in theory speed like how everybody knows that USB2 is much slower than its specs, and they are only Class 2 for the 32GB version which will drop frames from your HD video (Plus Class 4 is minimum requirement for shooting in HD ) if you plan to get San disk Card then get the Extreme III Series (but again from my own Tests there read speed is about 20MB not 30MB and the write speed is 14MB/s~ instead of the transcend 11MB/s write speed (Unless you spam shooting pictures with your DSLR you don't "need" faster speed)

I bought This card because i plan to take videos with my HD camcorder that last more 2 Hours, if you do not plan to shoot for longtime then you are better with getting the 16GB card HOWEVER, if you are lazy like my mom and do not plan to transfer DATA from the card to Your computer HD after every trip, then get the 32GB card.or you gonna end up on a trip and a message pops "No memory"

If you plan to shoot for longer time, check your camcorder battery too does it even last that long? so be sure about that before you drop over 100$ for this card

1-0 out of 5 stars product failed., July 26, 2009
Well, it was great while it lasted. Unfortunately, it did not last long.

Like other reviewers, after <20 use cycles the device failed and I got a "lock" error when, in fact, the write-protection lock was not engaged. Oddly, by engaging the lock (i.e. entering read-only mode) I was able to remove the picture files from the card. Obviously, further use in the camera was impossible; I was also unable to reformat the card (either with my camera or with the SD Associations free software [..]).

This card has a high average rating but I would urge customers to consider the number of 1-star ratings due to complete product failure before they purchase this item.



5-0 out of 5 stars My Canon loves the 8 GB SDHC card, January 15, 2008
I recently purchased a Canon Powershot A720IS digital camera that is capable of recognizing and using up to 2 TERRABYTES of memory card (in the future) so I wanted to get the largest memory card I could install for now. I wanted to use the camera both on dry land and with an underwater housing for shooting stills and video on dive trips. Camera specs said an 8 GB SDHC card would record one hour of hi res video at 30 fps. Or nearly 2300 hi res stills at 8 megapixels.

A test of the Transcend 8GB SDHC card in the camera ended up shooting 70 minutes of full screen, 30fps digital video that could not be distinguished from my DV camcorder video quality. Playback from the memory card to the TV was so fast & efficient there was never a single "stutter" on the screen. The card speed is genuinely FAST as advertised. Low level formatting of the card allowed for very acceptable rapid-fire sequential still photo shooting speeds when light levels were bright enough that the flash was not needed/used. Something like 2 photos every 3 seconds. Files were flawless in display, both for stills and video.

This product was significantly lower in price than the Kingston 8GB SDHC card I originally bought with the camera. I've used both interchangeably and cannot see any different in the speed or capacity and quality of imagery is identical. For the money I'll stick with Transcend and am looking forward to getting their 16GB card once the price drops substantially below the $100 mark. That would provide nearly 2 1/2 hours of video on my still camera or 4600 highest quality stills. I'm afraid my camcorder will be collecting dust much of the time. A big advantage to video on the card is there are NO MOVING PARTS, e.g. a mini DV tape cassette and camcorder or VCR playback unit needed to dump the video and stills to my Mac for editing and burning DVDs. I just stick the card in the MicroMate USB card reader, plug it in the computer and bingo, ready to sort thru and dump to the hard drive. Since the card is formatted by a Canon camera it automatically boots up the Canon Viewer software too. That should work the same for other brands of still cameras formatting this chip.

3-0 out of 5 stars The Fastest Card at This Price But..., June 26, 2007
This SDHC card is the fastest one in its price range but it may cause your images to be lost.

I use two of this in a Canon SD750. After the first use, all of the images were lost. (But thank God, I could rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue 2, a program better than its competitors) Then I formated the card(s) in the camera(s) with "low level format" option several times and there has been no problem after that so far.

I can suggest these points to potential owners of this card:
1- Use it very carefully, make backups if possible.
2- Format it several times before the first use with "low level format" option.
3- If you loose your images, don't panic. At this situation, It is very important not to take anymore pictures. If you take pictures after this point, you can overwrite your lost images and there can be no chance to get them back. Connect your card to your computer with a card reader (SDHC Compatible) and rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Mini Hard Drive equivalent, December 11, 2007
This card is able to hold a complete DVD movie, thousands of songs/photos, or just serve as a backup device for one's files.

It operates very well - I now have purchased 3 and with each use its value becomes more apparent.

One word of caution - even though most laptops and systems have an SD card slot, older computers may not be able to recognize or write to this card. Make sure your system has the ability to read SDHC configured products.

If you do not have an SD slot you can purchase an tiny SD reader (very inexpensive) that plugs into your USB port.

4-0 out of 5 stars Great value, just be careful..., January 2, 2009
I recently ordered this card as an accessory for my Acer Aspire One netbook PC. The card took a little while to ship, about 8 days, but that wasn't a big deal. The card has lots of space, and the read speeds are quite impressive. I mostly use it to run and store portable software, and it does a very good job at that.

My only complaint is that when I first inserted the card into my PC it attempted to install some adware. The program was from a company called RelevantKnowledge, and they gather your information for market research purposes. Luckily my spyware software picked it up immediately,so I was able to delete it. Afterward I formatted the card, and now I'm happy as can be.

5-0 out of 5 stars Reliable card, good speeds!, December 4, 2008
Transcend 16 GB SDHC SD Class 6 Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]
I have 4 of these cards that I use in my Panasonic HMC-150, a professional grade video camera. I've run read/write tests on all of them and they get about 14 MB/s write speeds and 17.5 MB/s read speeds. Never encountered any errors! These cards are the best bang for your buck, and the frustration free packaging is awesome.

1-0 out of 5 stars Don't Let This Happen to You....., August 3, 2008
It's great to have 8GB of memory but it is a double edged sword. Today after using this card for only the second time, it failed on me. I lost almost 200 precious images - gone forever. I am what you would call an enthusiast or hobbyist. I love photography and spend every spare minute, which is very seldom these days, pursuing my passion. So I do a fair amount of experimentation. These cards are great when they work - but if they fail you even once - the results can be catastrophic. Maybe I am the unlucky 1 of 250 reviewers with a bad experience with this product, but I feel it is my responsibility to report this to everyone. I hope it never happens to you. It is human nature for me to wonder, if I had spent a few more dollars for a better brand name, would my photos be intact today? Read more


22. Transcend 8 GB Class 6 SDHC Flash Memory Card TS8GSDHC6E
Electronics
-- our price: $13.60
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B001ECQVSS
Manufacturer: TRANSCEND
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

Fully Compatible with SDA 2.0 specification. Suitable for SDHC compliant devices, MLC flash chip with High Speed transfer rate. Perfect for highend digital devices. Please make sure your device can support SDHC format before you purchase! SDHC host devices can use both SD and SDHC memory cards. ... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars Great affordable SDHC card, March 28, 2008
In the past, I bought a Transcend 8GB SDHC card for my Canon SD1000 camera. I recently bought the Transcend 16GB SDHC for my new Canon SX20IS. Both cards work very well and I've had no problems with it so far. I wanted to take this opportunity to update my review since my original review was also posted (by Amazon) for the 16GB card. This is because the only difference between these two cards is the different capacity. So, if you're in the market for an affordable high quality SDHC card, this may be the one for you. Sorry, I kind of sounded like a used car salesman right there, didn't I? I assure you that I don't work for Transcend. But, here's why I think this card is awesome:

Pros:

-Affordable!

-Large capacity

-Class 6 read/write speed (which is very fast... but is no longer the fastest class available)

-Lifetime warranty (at least that's what the package says :)

-Transcend is a reputable company that's been making memory products for a very long time. ( I swear to the tech Gods that I don't work for them!) Other reputable and reliable memory card companies include Kingston and PNY. All three of these companies have been making memory chips for many, many years.


Cons:

- I can' really think of any "Cons" about this card. But here's the 2 closest things I can come up with right now: (1) "Class 6" is no longer the fastest speed available and (2) This card does NOT make coffee for you in the morning, do your dishes for you, give you compliments when you're having a bad day, or magically improve your photography skills.




IMPORTANT SPECIAL NOTES ABOUT SDHC MEMORY CARDS:

-SDHC cards are not compatible with most older SD cameras, SD devices, or SD card readers.

-SDHC cards are rated by speed using different "classes". There are currently 4 data transfer speed classes available for SDHC cards. These classes are "class 2, class 4, and class 6, and the new class 10. For example, "Class 2" would have the slowest read/write speed while "Class 6" has the fastest read/write speed. So if you have a device in which speed may play a crucial role, make sure you buy a higher "class" SDHC card. Please note that this SDHC card no longer has the fastest read/write speed available. There is now a new class, called "Class 10". Class 6 has a minimum read/write speed of 6MB/sec... while Class 2 has minimum speed rating of 2MB/sec, and Class 4 is 4MB/sec. Starting to see the pattern?


SO WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "SD CARDS" AND "SDHC CARDS?

SDHC is basically an upgrade to the older SD cards. The reason they upgraded it was to achieve greater data transfer speeds AND capacity than previously possible with normal SD cards... and to do this, they had to redesign the card (which is why it's not compatible with normal SD devices). This was necessary because digital cameras and digital video cameras these days have higher resolutions, which equate to larger file sizes and faster data transfer needs.

Now that many digital cameras also can record HD video, you may consider getting a larger capacity card because video takes much more space than photos. The size of the video varies from camera to camera depending on what resolution and video compression the camera uses. If you plan on taking lots of video (especially HD video), I would consider getting at least a 16GB card. Check your camera specifications to see how many minutes per Gig of memory your camera can capture ...to gauge how big of a memory card you'll want to get to meet your needs.

Special Note on regular SD Cards:
If you primarily take casual photos and don't need a exceptionally fast read/write capable card, you should know that newer cameras that take "SDHC" cards will also work with older normal "SD" cards. These older cards are cheaper than the new SDHC cards, so this may be something to consider. So to sum things up, newer cameras will take SDHC and regular SD cards, but older cameras that use SD cards may not be able to use SDHC cards. This is because newer technology is usually made to be compatible with older technology (the technical term used to describe this is "backwards compatibility") ... but older technology may not have the hardware necessary to run newer tech (technical term used is "obsolete"... just kidding! ;)

I hope I haven't confused everybody by going into this much detail, but I can't help being the nerd that I am. If you are confused, don't hesitate to comment on this post and I will try my best to answer your questions. Also, any feedback is always welcome!

Conclusion: Buy the card if you have a new device that uses SDHC. It rocks! (This message has been approved by the "Duke of New Mexico")


4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Card - Good Card for SDHC Compatible Devices, May 10, 2008
UPDATE - March 2, 2010: This review was originally written for the 4 GB class 6 SDHC card, but the reviews have been grouped for all class 6 SDHC cards in the 4, 8, 16 and 32 GB sizes. All the cards should perform similarly since they are all class 6 and all made by Transcend. However, I will have to check which cards I have used hands on. I believe I only own the 4GB and 8GB cards. I will update the review further. If you have concerns regarding the 16GB or 32GB sizes, you should seek out the reviews tagged with the product links from those cards.


The Transcend 4GB SDHC CARD (Class 6) is a great card for the price. I was at first a little skeptical about the brand, but I buy way too many memory cards to ignore a good price when I see one. And I'm happy to report that I've experienced decent performance and reliability issues with this card. That's as compared to other cards I own including SanDisk, PNY and Kingston.

As long as your devices are compatible with the SDHC format, this card is a good buy. 4 GB is a nice size though I do prefer 8 GB capacity for high capacity storage.

The class 6 speed is the fastest speed available in mass market SDHC cards. Class 6 guarantees minimum transfer speeds of 6 MBs, but I've gotten speeds up to 20Mbs! That makes this card perfect for storing pictures in RAW image formats.

The Class 6 speed is on par with the Sandisk Extreme III cards that on average are about $15 to $20 more per card. If you don't have an SDHC reader, you may opt to get the package with a reader included to download your pics. If not you can just transfer your pics directly from your camera with your card still inserted. An SDHC card reader can be bought separately if your PC doesn't have a compatible slot.

General SDHC and SD Card Tips

There are a few tips that I've learned the hard way through buying TOO MANY different memory cards.
1. Make sure your device is compatible with the card! Even in regular SD cards, some older electronics aren't compatible with that large of a size (2 GB). In terms of SDHC cards, make sure your camera or other device is SDHC compatible. SDHC is different from regular SD and only newer devices tend to have built-in compatibility
2. Once you install this in your camera or device, you will generally want to format the card with your compatible device's interface. That is because the standard formats for certain devices, particularly Canon, are different from the factory installed format
3. Just like your devices, most computer SD card readers are not compatible with the SDHC format. So use a card reader or download the pictures via USB connection to the camera with the card still installed.
4. For some reason, placing the card in the locked position allows some older laptops to still read it. This is just to be used in a pinch however, and it won't apply to all systems
5. If you did not properly format your card, you may be able to save things to it and then have them "disappear." If this happens to you, make sure you use the software recovery tools BEFORE you try to save anything else to your card. That way, you can retrieve your images without over-writing them.
6. Make sure you know what you are going to use this card for. Once you have set up everything and ensured it's all compatible, you still have to decide on speed. If you are using this for storing RAW images instead of JPEGs or HD video, step up to the faster class 6 speed format if you can afford it.
7. If you are going to pay more for a faster speed, make sure your device can benefit from it. I've read, for example, that Kodak cameras are set to a fixed voltage and cannot go faster than standard speed. So the extra cash spent on Class 4, 5, or 6 is basically wasted.

Conclusion

It's great to have several extra cards on hand just in case. This 4 GB card is a nice performer. If you have a high capacity camera (10 Megapixels or more) and are storing videos or RAW images, the extra cash for the 8GB card is worth it. Or you may want to step up to the larger 16 GB size that is now available.

Enjoy!

4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 32 GB SDHC Review, May 25, 2009
Before you drop 120~$ for a SD card ask yourself, Do you really need 32GB card? because the card itself with same specs costs only 35$ for the 16GB version, anyway here is info that might help you

Pros :
1- Class 6 Card the(guaranteed minimum Read/write speed of 6MB/s)
2- My Test Results 18.2-18.5MB/S Read - 11.6-11.8 Write (very stable)
3- Faster than average cards and almost close to top speed SDHC cards
4- 32GB in a single small chip is awesome(You can use it as a portable HD once in a while, i share some stuff with my friends with it sometimes


Cons :
1- Expensive
2- You can get two 16GB cards for around only 70$ and save yourself 50$~
3- Slow write speeds for a 32GB card (Takes forever to fill it with DATA from PC, its not the card fault though , its just the SDHC technology is getting old and slow for 2009 standards , time for newer Tech)

* Important Info

Avoid the Sandisk Ultra Series they never reach the true marketed speed "15MB-20MB/S" its just in theory speed like how everybody knows that USB2 is much slower than its specs, and they are only Class 2 for the 32GB version which will drop frames from your HD video (Plus Class 4 is minimum requirement for shooting in HD ) if you plan to get San disk Card then get the Extreme III Series (but again from my own Tests there read speed is about 20MB not 30MB and the write speed is 14MB/s~ instead of the transcend 11MB/s write speed (Unless you spam shooting pictures with your DSLR you don't "need" faster speed)

I bought This card because i plan to take videos with my HD camcorder that last more 2 Hours, if you do not plan to shoot for longtime then you are better with getting the 16GB card HOWEVER, if you are lazy like my mom and do not plan to transfer DATA from the card to Your computer HD after every trip, then get the 32GB card.or you gonna end up on a trip and a message pops "No memory"

If you plan to shoot for longer time, check your camcorder battery too does it even last that long? so be sure about that before you drop over 100$ for this card

1-0 out of 5 stars product failed., July 26, 2009
Well, it was great while it lasted. Unfortunately, it did not last long.

Like other reviewers, after <20 use cycles the device failed and I got a "lock" error when, in fact, the write-protection lock was not engaged. Oddly, by engaging the lock (i.e. entering read-only mode) I was able to remove the picture files from the card. Obviously, further use in the camera was impossible; I was also unable to reformat the card (either with my camera or with the SD Associations free software [..]).

This card has a high average rating but I would urge customers to consider the number of 1-star ratings due to complete product failure before they purchase this item.



5-0 out of 5 stars My Canon loves the 8 GB SDHC card, January 15, 2008
I recently purchased a Canon Powershot A720IS digital camera that is capable of recognizing and using up to 2 TERRABYTES of memory card (in the future) so I wanted to get the largest memory card I could install for now. I wanted to use the camera both on dry land and with an underwater housing for shooting stills and video on dive trips. Camera specs said an 8 GB SDHC card would record one hour of hi res video at 30 fps. Or nearly 2300 hi res stills at 8 megapixels.

A test of the Transcend 8GB SDHC card in the camera ended up shooting 70 minutes of full screen, 30fps digital video that could not be distinguished from my DV camcorder video quality. Playback from the memory card to the TV was so fast & efficient there was never a single "stutter" on the screen. The card speed is genuinely FAST as advertised. Low level formatting of the card allowed for very acceptable rapid-fire sequential still photo shooting speeds when light levels were bright enough that the flash was not needed/used. Something like 2 photos every 3 seconds. Files were flawless in display, both for stills and video.

This product was significantly lower in price than the Kingston 8GB SDHC card I originally bought with the camera. I've used both interchangeably and cannot see any different in the speed or capacity and quality of imagery is identical. For the money I'll stick with Transcend and am looking forward to getting their 16GB card once the price drops substantially below the $100 mark. That would provide nearly 2 1/2 hours of video on my still camera or 4600 highest quality stills. I'm afraid my camcorder will be collecting dust much of the time. A big advantage to video on the card is there are NO MOVING PARTS, e.g. a mini DV tape cassette and camcorder or VCR playback unit needed to dump the video and stills to my Mac for editing and burning DVDs. I just stick the card in the MicroMate USB card reader, plug it in the computer and bingo, ready to sort thru and dump to the hard drive. Since the card is formatted by a Canon camera it automatically boots up the Canon Viewer software too. That should work the same for other brands of still cameras formatting this chip.

3-0 out of 5 stars The Fastest Card at This Price But..., June 26, 2007
This SDHC card is the fastest one in its price range but it may cause your images to be lost.

I use two of this in a Canon SD750. After the first use, all of the images were lost. (But thank God, I could rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue 2, a program better than its competitors) Then I formated the card(s) in the camera(s) with "low level format" option several times and there has been no problem after that so far.

I can suggest these points to potential owners of this card:
1- Use it very carefully, make backups if possible.
2- Format it several times before the first use with "low level format" option.
3- If you loose your images, don't panic. At this situation, It is very important not to take anymore pictures. If you take pictures after this point, you can overwrite your lost images and there can be no chance to get them back. Connect your card to your computer with a card reader (SDHC Compatible) and rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Mini Hard Drive equivalent, December 11, 2007
This card is able to hold a complete DVD movie, thousands of songs/photos, or just serve as a backup device for one's files.

It operates very well - I now have purchased 3 and with each use its value becomes more apparent.

One word of caution - even though most laptops and systems have an SD card slot, older computers may not be able to recognize or write to this card. Make sure your system has the ability to read SDHC configured products.

If you do not have an SD slot you can purchase an tiny SD reader (very inexpensive) that plugs into your USB port.

4-0 out of 5 stars Great value, just be careful..., January 2, 2009
I recently ordered this card as an accessory for my Acer Aspire One netbook PC. The card took a little while to ship, about 8 days, but that wasn't a big deal. The card has lots of space, and the read speeds are quite impressive. I mostly use it to run and store portable software, and it does a very good job at that.

My only complaint is that when I first inserted the card into my PC it attempted to install some adware. The program was from a company called RelevantKnowledge, and they gather your information for market research purposes. Luckily my spyware software picked it up immediately,so I was able to delete it. Afterward I formatted the card, and now I'm happy as can be.

5-0 out of 5 stars Reliable card, good speeds!, December 4, 2008
Transcend 16 GB SDHC SD Class 6 Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]
I have 4 of these cards that I use in my Panasonic HMC-150, a professional grade video camera. I've run read/write tests on all of them and they get about 14 MB/s write speeds and 17.5 MB/s read speeds. Never encountered any errors! These cards are the best bang for your buck, and the frustration free packaging is awesome.

1-0 out of 5 stars Don't Let This Happen to You....., August 3, 2008
It's great to have 8GB of memory but it is a double edged sword. Today after using this card for only the second time, it failed on me. I lost almost 200 precious images - gone forever. I am what you would call an enthusiast or hobbyist. I love photography and spend every spare minute, which is very seldom these days, pursuing my passion. So I do a fair amount of experimentation. These cards are great when they work - but if they fail you even once - the results can be catastrophic. Maybe I am the unlucky 1 of 250 reviewers with a bad experience with this product, but I feel it is my responsibility to report this to everyone. I hope it never happens to you. It is human nature for me to wonder, if I had spent a few more dollars for a better brand name, would my photos be intact today?

5-0 out of 5 stars Great affordable SDHC card, March 28, 2008
In the past, I bought a Transcend 8GB SDHC card for my Canon SD1000 camera. I recently bought the Transcend 16GB SDHC for my new Canon SX20IS. Both cards work very well and I've had no problems with it so far. I wanted to take this opportunity to update my review since my original review was also posted (by Amazon) for the 16GB card. This is because the only difference between these two cards is the different capacity. So, if you're in the market for an affordable high quality SDHC card, this may be the one for you. Sorry, I kind of sounded like a used car salesman right there, didn't I? I assure you that I don't work for Transcend. But, here's why I think this card is awesome:

Pros:

-Affordable!

-Large capacity

-Class 6 read/write speed (which is very fast... but is no longer the fastest class available)

-Lifetime warranty (at least that's what the package says :)

-Transcend is a reputable company that's been making memory products for a very long time. ( I swear to the tech Gods that I don't work for them!) Other reputable and reliable memory card companies include Kingston and PNY. All three of these companies have been making memory chips for many, many years.


Cons:

- I can' really think of any "Cons" about this card. But here's the 2 closest things I can come up with right now: (1) "Class 6" is no longer the fastest speed available and (2) This card does NOT make coffee for you in the morning, do your dishes for you, give you compliments when you're having a bad day, or magically improve your photography skills.




IMPORTANT SPECIAL NOTES ABOUT SDHC MEMORY CARDS:

-SDHC cards are not compatible with most older SD cameras, SD devices, or SD card readers.

-SDHC cards are rated by speed using different "classes". There are currently 4 data transfer speed classes available for SDHC cards. These classes are "class 2, class 4, and class 6, and the new class 10. For example, "Class 2" would have the slowest read/write speed while "Class 6" has the fastest read/write speed. So if you have a device in which speed may play a crucial role, make sure you buy a higher "class" SDHC card. Please note that this SDHC card no longer has the fastest read/write speed available. There is now a new class, called "Class 10". Class 6 has a minimum read/write speed of 6MB/sec... while Class 2 has minimum speed rating of 2MB/sec, and Class 4 is 4MB/sec. Starting to see the pattern?


SO WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "SD CARDS" AND "SDHC CARDS?

SDHC is basically an upgrade to the older SD cards. The reason they upgraded it was to achieve greater data transfer speeds AND capacity than previously possible with normal SD cards... and to do this, they had to redesign the card (which is why it's not compatible with normal SD devices). This was necessary because digital cameras and digital video cameras these days have higher resolutions, which equate to larger file sizes and faster data transfer needs.

Now that many digital cameras also can record HD video, you may consider getting a larger capacity card because video takes much more space than photos. The size of the video varies from camera to camera depending on what resolution and video compression the camera uses. If you plan on taking lots of video (especially HD video), I would consider getting at least a 16GB card. Check your camera specifications to see how many minutes per Gig of memory your camera can capture ...to gauge how big of a memory card you'll want to get to meet your needs.

Special Note on regular SD Cards:
If you primarily take casual photos and don't need a exceptionally fast read/write capable card, you should know that newer cameras that take "SDHC" cards will also work with older normal "SD" cards. These older cards are cheaper than the new SDHC cards, so this may be something to consider. So to sum things up, newer cameras will take SDHC and regular SD cards, but older cameras that use SD cards may not be able to use SDHC cards. This is because newer technology is usually made to be compatible with older technology (the technical term used to describe this is "backwards compatibility") ... but older technology may not have the hardware necessary to run newer tech (technical term used is "obsolete"... just kidding! ;)

I hope I haven't confused everybody by going into this much detail, but I can't help being the nerd that I am. If you are confused, don't hesitate to comment on this post and I will try my best to answer your questions. Also, any feedback is always welcome!

Conclusion: Buy the card if you have a new device that uses SDHC. It rocks! (This message has been approved by the "Duke of New Mexico")


4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 4 GB Class 6 SDHC Card - Good Card for SDHC Compatible Devices, May 10, 2008
UPDATE - March 2, 2010: This review was originally written for the 4 GB class 6 SDHC card, but the reviews have been grouped for all class 6 SDHC cards in the 4, 8, 16 and 32 GB sizes. All the cards should perform similarly since they are all class 6 and all made by Transcend. However, I will have to check which cards I have used hands on. I believe I only own the 4GB and 8GB cards. I will update the review further. If you have concerns regarding the 16GB or 32GB sizes, you should seek out the reviews tagged with the product links from those cards.


The Transcend 4GB SDHC CARD (Class 6) is a great card for the price. I was at first a little skeptical about the brand, but I buy way too many memory cards to ignore a good price when I see one. And I'm happy to report that I've experienced decent performance and reliability issues with this card. That's as compared to other cards I own including SanDisk, PNY and Kingston.

As long as your devices are compatible with the SDHC format, this card is a good buy. 4 GB is a nice size though I do prefer 8 GB capacity for high capacity storage.

The class 6 speed is the fastest speed available in mass market SDHC cards. Class 6 guarantees minimum transfer speeds of 6 MBs, but I've gotten speeds up to 20Mbs! That makes this card perfect for storing pictures in RAW image formats.

The Class 6 speed is on par with the Sandisk Extreme III cards that on average are about $15 to $20 more per card. If you don't have an SDHC reader, you may opt to get the package with a reader included to download your pics. If not you can just transfer your pics directly from your camera with your card still inserted. An SDHC card reader can be bought separately if your PC doesn't have a compatible slot.

General SDHC and SD Card Tips

There are a few tips that I've learned the hard way through buying TOO MANY different memory cards.
1. Make sure your device is compatible with the card! Even in regular SD cards, some older electronics aren't compatible with that large of a size (2 GB). In terms of SDHC cards, make sure your camera or other device is SDHC compatible. SDHC is different from regular SD and only newer devices tend to have built-in compatibility
2. Once you install this in your camera or device, you will generally want to format the card with your compatible device's interface. That is because the standard formats for certain devices, particularly Canon, are different from the factory installed format
3. Just like your devices, most computer SD card readers are not compatible with the SDHC format. So use a card reader or download the pictures via USB connection to the camera with the card still installed.
4. For some reason, placing the card in the locked position allows some older laptops to still read it. This is just to be used in a pinch however, and it won't apply to all systems
5. If you did not properly format your card, you may be able to save things to it and then have them "disappear." If this happens to you, make sure you use the software recovery tools BEFORE you try to save anything else to your card. That way, you can retrieve your images without over-writing them.
6. Make sure you know what you are going to use this card for. Once you have set up everything and ensured it's all compatible, you still have to decide on speed. If you are using this for storing RAW images instead of JPEGs or HD video, step up to the faster class 6 speed format if you can afford it.
7. If you are going to pay more for a faster speed, make sure your device can benefit from it. I've read, for example, that Kodak cameras are set to a fixed voltage and cannot go faster than standard speed. So the extra cash spent on Class 4, 5, or 6 is basically wasted.

Conclusion

It's great to have several extra cards on hand just in case. This 4 GB card is a nice performer. If you have a high capacity camera (10 Megapixels or more) and are storing videos or RAW images, the extra cash for the 8GB card is worth it. Or you may want to step up to the larger 16 GB size that is now available.

Enjoy!

4-0 out of 5 stars Transcend 32 GB SDHC Review, May 25, 2009
Before you drop 120~$ for a SD card ask yourself, Do you really need 32GB card? because the card itself with same specs costs only 35$ for the 16GB version, anyway here is info that might help you

Pros :
1- Class 6 Card the(guaranteed minimum Read/write speed of 6MB/s)
2- My Test Results 18.2-18.5MB/S Read - 11.6-11.8 Write (very stable)
3- Faster than average cards and almost close to top speed SDHC cards
4- 32GB in a single small chip is awesome(You can use it as a portable HD once in a while, i share some stuff with my friends with it sometimes


Cons :
1- Expensive
2- You can get two 16GB cards for around only 70$ and save yourself 50$~
3- Slow write speeds for a 32GB card (Takes forever to fill it with DATA from PC, its not the card fault though , its just the SDHC technology is getting old and slow for 2009 standards , time for newer Tech)

* Important Info

Avoid the Sandisk Ultra Series they never reach the true marketed speed "15MB-20MB/S" its just in theory speed like how everybody knows that USB2 is much slower than its specs, and they are only Class 2 for the 32GB version which will drop frames from your HD video (Plus Class 4 is minimum requirement for shooting in HD ) if you plan to get San disk Card then get the Extreme III Series (but again from my own Tests there read speed is about 20MB not 30MB and the write speed is 14MB/s~ instead of the transcend 11MB/s write speed (Unless you spam shooting pictures with your DSLR you don't "need" faster speed)

I bought This card because i plan to take videos with my HD camcorder that last more 2 Hours, if you do not plan to shoot for longtime then you are better with getting the 16GB card HOWEVER, if you are lazy like my mom and do not plan to transfer DATA from the card to Your computer HD after every trip, then get the 32GB card.or you gonna end up on a trip and a message pops "No memory"

If you plan to shoot for longer time, check your camcorder battery too does it even last that long? so be sure about that before you drop over 100$ for this card

1-0 out of 5 stars product failed., July 26, 2009
Well, it was great while it lasted. Unfortunately, it did not last long.

Like other reviewers, after <20 use cycles the device failed and I got a "lock" error when, in fact, the write-protection lock was not engaged. Oddly, by engaging the lock (i.e. entering read-only mode) I was able to remove the picture files from the card. Obviously, further use in the camera was impossible; I was also unable to reformat the card (either with my camera or with the SD Associations free software [..]).

This card has a high average rating but I would urge customers to consider the number of 1-star ratings due to complete product failure before they purchase this item.



5-0 out of 5 stars My Canon loves the 8 GB SDHC card, January 15, 2008
I recently purchased a Canon Powershot A720IS digital camera that is capable of recognizing and using up to 2 TERRABYTES of memory card (in the future) so I wanted to get the largest memory card I could install for now. I wanted to use the camera both on dry land and with an underwater housing for shooting stills and video on dive trips. Camera specs said an 8 GB SDHC card would record one hour of hi res video at 30 fps. Or nearly 2300 hi res stills at 8 megapixels.

A test of the Transcend 8GB SDHC card in the camera ended up shooting 70 minutes of full screen, 30fps digital video that could not be distinguished from my DV camcorder video quality. Playback from the memory card to the TV was so fast & efficient there was never a single "stutter" on the screen. The card speed is genuinely FAST as advertised. Low level formatting of the card allowed for very acceptable rapid-fire sequential still photo shooting speeds when light levels were bright enough that the flash was not needed/used. Something like 2 photos every 3 seconds. Files were flawless in display, both for stills and video.

This product was significantly lower in price than the Kingston 8GB SDHC card I originally bought with the camera. I've used both interchangeably and cannot see any different in the speed or capacity and quality of imagery is identical. For the money I'll stick with Transcend and am looking forward to getting their 16GB card once the price drops substantially below the $100 mark. That would provide nearly 2 1/2 hours of video on my still camera or 4600 highest quality stills. I'm afraid my camcorder will be collecting dust much of the time. A big advantage to video on the card is there are NO MOVING PARTS, e.g. a mini DV tape cassette and camcorder or VCR playback unit needed to dump the video and stills to my Mac for editing and burning DVDs. I just stick the card in the MicroMate USB card reader, plug it in the computer and bingo, ready to sort thru and dump to the hard drive. Since the card is formatted by a Canon camera it automatically boots up the Canon Viewer software too. That should work the same for other brands of still cameras formatting this chip.

3-0 out of 5 stars The Fastest Card at This Price But..., June 26, 2007
This SDHC card is the fastest one in its price range but it may cause your images to be lost.

I use two of this in a Canon SD750. After the first use, all of the images were lost. (But thank God, I could rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue 2, a program better than its competitors) Then I formated the card(s) in the camera(s) with "low level format" option several times and there has been no problem after that so far.

I can suggest these points to potential owners of this card:
1- Use it very carefully, make backups if possible.
2- Format it several times before the first use with "low level format" option.
3- If you loose your images, don't panic. At this situation, It is very important not to take anymore pictures. If you take pictures after this point, you can overwrite your lost images and there can be no chance to get them back. Connect your card to your computer with a card reader (SDHC Compatible) and rescue them with Lexar Image Rescue.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Mini Hard Drive equivalent, December 11, 2007
This card is able to hold a complete DVD movie, thousands of songs/photos, or just serve as a backup device for one's files.

It operates very well - I now have purchased 3 and with each use its value becomes more apparent.

One word of caution - even though most laptops and systems have an SD card slot, older computers may not be able to recognize or write to this card. Make sure your system has the ability to read SDHC configured products.

If you do not have an SD slot you can purchase an tiny SD reader (very inexpensive) that plugs into your USB port.

4-0 out of 5 stars Great value, just be careful..., January 2, 2009
I recently ordered this card as an accessory for my Acer Aspire One netbook PC. The card took a little while to ship, about 8 days, but that wasn't a big deal. The card has lots of space, and the read speeds are quite impressive. I mostly use it to run and store portable software, and it does a very good job at that.

My only complaint is that when I first inserted the card into my PC it attempted to install some adware. The program was from a company called RelevantKnowledge, and they gather your information for market research purposes. Luckily my spyware software picked it up immediately,so I was able to delete it. Afterward I formatted the card, and now I'm happy as can be.

5-0 out of 5 stars Reliable card, good speeds!, December 4, 2008
Transcend 16 GB SDHC SD Class 6 Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC6E [Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging]
I have 4 of these cards that I use in my Panasonic HMC-150, a professional grade video camera. I've run read/write tests on all of them and they get about 14 MB/s write speeds and 17.5 MB/s read speeds. Never encountered any errors! These cards are the best bang for your buck, and the frustration free packaging is awesome.

1-0 out of 5 stars Don't Let This Happen to You....., August 3, 2008
It's great to have 8GB of memory but it is a double edged sword. Today after using this card for only the second time, it failed on me. I lost almost 200 precious images - gone forever. I am what you would call an enthusiast or hobbyist. I love photography and spend every spare minute, which is very seldom these days, pursuing my passion. So I do a fair amount of experimentation. These cards are great when they work - but if they fail you even once - the results can be catastrophic. Maybe I am the unlucky 1 of 250 reviewers with a bad experience with this product, but I feel it is my responsibility to report this to everyone. I hope it never happens to you. It is human nature for me to wonder, if I had spent a few more dollars for a better brand name, would my photos be intact today? Read more


23. Garmin nvi 205W 4.3-Inch Widescreen Portable GPS Navigator
Electronics
list price: $249.99 -- our price: $84.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0015F1L7A
Manufacturer: Garmin
Sales Rank: 13
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Editorial Review

GARMIN Nuvi 205W 4.3 Inch Auto NavigatorUnit dimensions, WxHxD:4.8 W x 2.9 H x .8 in D /12.2 x 7.4 x 2.0 cmDisplay size, WxH:3.81W x 2.25 in H /9.7 x 5.7 cm; 4.3 in diag /10.9 cm Display resolution, WxH:480 x 272 pixels Display type:WQVGA color TFT with white backlight Weight:5.2 ounces /147.42 g Battery:rechargeable lithium ion Battery life:up to 4 hoursHigh sensitivity receiver:yes RoHS version available:yes Maps and Memory:Basemap:yes Preloaded maps:yes /regional Ability to add maps:yes Built in memory:internal solid state Accepts data cards:SD card /not included Waypoints/favorites/locations:1000 Routes:0 Features:Voice prompts /e.g. Turn right in 500 ft.:yes /internal speaker3D map view:yesAuto re route /fast off route and detour recalculation:yes Choice of route setup /faster time, shorter distance, off road:yes Route avoidance /avoid highways, tolls etc.:yes Custom POIs /ability to add additional points of interest:yesFM traffic compatible:yesMSN Direct for U.S. compatible:yes Where Am I. feature /find closest hospitals, police and gas stations, nearest address and intersection:yesPicture viewer:yes Configurable vehicle icons /select car shaped icons for map navigation:yes World travel clock, currency and measurement converter, calculator:yes Touchscreen:yes Qwerty or ABC keyboard /choose keyboard layout:yes Garmin Lock /anti theft feature:yesAdditional:This USB mass storage device is compatible with Windows 2000 or later and Mac OS X 10.4 or later.Part Number: 010-00718-40 ... Read more

Reviews

4-0 out of 5 stars Best I can find, but room for improvement, August 30, 2008
I have owned a Garmin c320 for a few years now and was looking for some new features, like coordinates and altitude. I first bought the TomTom 330 XL, which was a disaster. After lots of research, I bought this and kept it. Here is my long list of pros and cons:

PROS:

1. Best routes. (See my cons) This may be one of the main reasons Garmin dominates in the US -- good routing. Of course, I wish it had more a brain and could think about traffic lights and general traffic in certain areas at certain times (not actual traffic reporting), but I guess needing brains is good.

2. Where Am I? (See my cons) This will list your nearest street address. In this screen it also shows altitude and your coordinates.

3. Easier broad map access. On my c320, you had to dig in the menus to find a broad map view, so you could touch areas on the map and go to it. On the 205w, you can just touch the map while driving and it will take you to the broad map. You can then touch an area that you want to make a Via Point and change your route that way.

4. Speed Limit sign. You can set it up to show the current speed limit on the screen. It has been super accurate to the instant of a speed limit change in real driving. If the sign is missing on the screen, you also then know that it doesn't really know how to calculate arrival time from the road. You may want to use that information to take or avoid that road on your next trip.

5. Very compact. My c320 was much bigger, so this is super small.

CONS:

1. Touchscreen. This may change as I use it, but the touchscreen is no where near as sensitive as my c320. It requires some hard touching. It also shows fingerprints much worse than my old GPS unit.

2. Ball mount. This gives a better range of motion than the mount on my c320, but it feels like I need to push really hard on my GPS unit to get it to snap in. This may change in age, too.

3. Keyboard speed. When I'm typing in a city, street, etc., the keyboard is a full QWERY keyboard, which is an improvement over my c320 (I think you can choose ABC keyboard), but there are two things I don't like: 1) there is a delay from when you type to when it shows, so if you type fast, you can't see what you're typing, if you make a mistake, you don't see if very fast; 2)the spacebar is tiny and way off to the right, while dumb menus are in the bottom middle -- very annoying!!

4. Charging cord. On my c320, the charging cord would plug into the mount and there wasn't a charge jack in the GPS unit itself. This was nice because you could leave the power cord in the mount all the time and take the GPS with you - you never had to plug in, just clip the GPS in and out. Now, the power cord won't stay put and it falls out the door, etc. because it must be plugged into the back of the GPS. I suppose with the mount the way it is, it's not possible to have a jack in the mount and GPS, but I think they should work on that.

5. Current road. The TomTom XL 330 did show what road you are currently on and what the next road to turn onto was. Garmin only shows the next road name.

6. Routing pet peeve. Sometimes I won't want to take its routing because I know of a better way. Let's say I turn off of the normal route -- it will recalculate and have a shorter time than before I turned. What's up with that? Why didn't it take me that way to begin with?

6. Routing choices. I don't like the fact that I can choose either Fastest Time or Shortest Route. I would imagine that some of the time, the best route would be in between those to extremes.

7. Missing POIs. There are just so many cases where I'll be looking for something and it's not in the Garmin -- even for stores and restaurants open for years. I know you'll have this will all GPS units, but for the #1 seller in the US, can't they figure out a way to get the users involved? How about incentives for users to fix problems online and give them discounts on map updates? If you have the best maps and POIs by far, why would anyone buy any other company?

8. Tinny speaker. I'm not impressed with the speaker, it is much worse sounding than the deep c320, but you can hear it. It's just not pleasant.

9. Voice choices. It would be nice to choose your voice, but I don't see that option, unless you choose another language.

10. Nearest intersection. This is within the "Where Am I" place in the menu. It could be very useful in an emergency to have the nearest intersection in addition to the nearest address. However, I've found that they should have labeled it, "random intersection within a few miles." It will generally show me a major intersection, and sometimes ignore dozens of closer small intersections that would be much more beneficial to the police, fire, ambulance, etc.

11. Volume. I hate how they have the volume setup. On the c320 there was a wheel on the side of the unit -- that's best. On the TomTom, there was a place on the main driving screen that you touched and then moved the volume slider. On this 205W, you must hit Menu, Volume, move it, then back, then View Map. This is just awful. I want a Mute button on the driving screen and a separate volume button there, too. This is widescreen after all. I hope this doesn't cause accidents, because I think it will. When I answer my phone, I want fast access to mute!

12. Need customization! Let me choose 3 shortcut buttons for the driving map view. That way I can put Where Am I, Volume, and POI on the main screen. Please!! I also want to change my route color to red instead of light purple.

13. POI choices. This is something I've never found a GPS that does this how I want it. If I'm looking for gas or food, it is usually on a long trip. If I want to go to fast food, let's say (that wouldn't happen!), I would choose Restaurant, Fast Food. It will show me all the restaurants by how far they are from me now. That's not what I want, so I choose Near...My Current Route. That's closer to what I want, but it still shows how far it is from where I am now. I want it to show me that, but also how far I'd have to deviate from my route.

[UPDATE 6/5/09] 14. Battery life. The battery life is just awful in my unit. It might last a few hours, and if it is sitting idle for a couple weeks, it's almost dead. My c320's battery was far superior. It has been this way since it was new. I suppose mine could be defective..

Overall, this is an excellent unit and I would buy it again because I believe the Pros outweigh the Cons and no competitor has yet beat it.

[UPDATE 3/18/10] I'm still using this and it's working well, except for the battery life. I did find that you can add the EcoRoute features if you upgrade your firmware from Garmin's website. Sorry, I can't post instructions, but the feature is very cool. You add your car's miles per gallon and the current gas price and it tells you how much it will cost to get to your destination, along with other features.

3-0 out of 5 stars Very good 'cheap' GPS if looking for basic navigation, December 8, 2008
I have had this unit for about 8 months. It has given me no problems what so ever. The bad thing about it for me is how basic it is. If you want bluetooth compatibility, traffic updates, movie times, etc on your GPS, then this is not the device for you. But if all you want is to get around and find places, then this unit will work well.

The price seems a little high right now for what it does ($180). For that price I would expect bluetooth compatibility. This unit does not say the road names, it just says turn left or turn right in 200 feet(not a big deal). When you look places up, it has their phone number and address (usually) which is nice because if its late at night, you can call first to see if they are still open.

This GPS has an SD card reader on the side, which can be used to view pictures in slideshow mode when you don't need the unit for navigation.

The screen is very bright during the day, so you can easily see the screen. And a nice feature is that when it gets dark, the screen automatically changes colors to 'night' mode, which helps when driving at night (the screen dims and the bright white background colors change to dark blues and blacks).

The trip features are nice. It keeps track of your average speed, how long you spent moving, how long you spent stopped, total travel time, how many miles you've gone, etc.

It takes about a minute to a minute and a half to find your location from a cold start, but if you leave it powered all the time (with a car in which the cig lighter stays on when you turn the car off) it never loses the location (not sure if that is bad for it).

The battery life is very good (about 4-5 hours).

There are many add-ons that a technologically advanced person can add to it. Such as custom points of interest (you can download them or even make your own, and you can set alerts so that it warns you when you are close to a certain place or when you are speeding in a school zone). You can add different vehicle icons to use as the car on the screen.

Overall, it is a decent, but very basic navigation device. Not many bells or whistles, but it gets you from point A to point B well.

5-0 out of 5 stars Back to Great Navigation ... at its BEST, September 3, 2008
I agree with others that mp3, bluetooth, fm, announcing street "names," etc., is overboard and is NOT what makes a good GPS. Certainly Garmin has to make those for persons who want them; but for really just GOOD AND FAST navigation, the new series (205W etc) is all that's necessary and is awesome at that. What is a good GPS ... the Garmin handheld 60CSx ... which I have! So I compared the two which isn't really realistic since they both have different purposes, but both do navigation extremely well. Only the 60CSx will maintain its connection in extremely difficult areas (sky scraper buildings, overpasses, canyons, forest canopy, etc); but the 205W is not a slouch here either.

Satelite information ... Speed: the 205W is every bit as fast as the 60CSx, if not just a tad faster, and that, in itself is amazing. It gathers satellites easily and once obtained, reconnects almost instantaneously after being turned back on. Get off Interstate 35E in Dallas and try to get back on ... it's a nightmare. But for the Nuvie 205W it was easy and very clearly described and stated ... a great GPS.

I was skeptical at first about the new series until I read what Garmin accomplished here and other comments from reviewers: fast chip, storage for 1000 favorites, trip minder, clear directions and markings with distances given, road mph and your current mph (on screen) and time arrival at the objective (waypoint to go to), beautiful wide screen, easy mount dismount, etc. I could go on and on but ... if it is toys you want (mp3, bluetooth telephone, fm, etc.), don't buy this one. BUT if you want the absolute BEST for the BUCK navigation ... this series has it. The reaction speed of the unit is really impressive.

My wife loves this unit and how easy it is to do what she wants (that, my friend, is a good sales talk ...).

Garmin's back to great navigation is ... great and at a great price. Your friends will be impressed.

Only complaint ... no online operators manual ... yet? But since I already had the 60CSx, it was easy to figure out and Garmin menus are easy and direct you to what you need to know. I have owned and used the 205W Nuvi since July 14, 2008. Very satisfied!

5-0 out of 5 stars Nice Choice, September 11, 2008
I am very impressed with this product and it sure is nice knowing I will never be lost again as I have in the past (just ask my wife).

If you could afford the extra expense, I would recommend choosing the larger 4.3 display (205W). The 205W's only drawback is the street name is not announced which is something I thought I might regret but it is easily seen at the top of the display.

A GPS power supply for the car is included. I mention this because it is not clearly stated in the product details.

This 205W model would be what the majority of customers would need in a GPS without all the useless features that the more expensive models offer.

5-0 out of 5 stars Best value in wide-screen GPS... plain & simple., September 1, 2008
The Garmin nuvi 205W is simply a great GPS and the best value of any widescreen GPS. It has a no extra bells and whistles (no MP3 player -LOL, doesn't speak road names - annoying, no maps of Alaska or Canada - not needed, no FM transmitter to listen to MP3 - useless gimmick, etc.). The 205W is a useful widescreen GPS - plain and simple. It has over 6 million POIs (restaurants, lodging, shopping) and can be customized to add your own POIs. It has a trip computer which I used last week on a road trip to Hershey Park which was pretty neat (tracks time traveled, speed, distance, etc.). This newly released Garmin GPS has the new user interface which shows the road speed limit, your speed, next turn arrow and distance to next turn all on the main screen. The mapping information is the best available on the market and will provide you with clear directions on where you want to go. The Garmin 205 (regular screen) and the 205W (widescreen) are both highly recommended - just a matter of preference in screen size.

4-0 out of 5 stars Very Good Entry Level GPS Unit, January 2, 2009
The Good: Good routes, clear voice, plenty of volume, and accurate maps.

The Bad: No external volume control, POI database fairly small, no text to speech, and map colors seem a bit kindergartenish.

Overall: The Garmin Nuvi 205w is a solid entry level unit for basic navigation needs. If you're looking for extras, this isn't the place to find them. Below you will find my detailed, usage based review.

SETUP: Your overall comfort level with technology and electronics really drives how important this aspect a device is because you should only perform it infrequently if more than once. Fortunately for the Nuvi 205w, there isn't really anything to do. Other than product registration and charging, the unit is ready to use out of the box. While some may change a few of the settings, most will have no problem going with the defaults.

DISPLAY: This is an area where the published information doesn't tell the correct story. The difference between the W and non-W units is more than just 3.5" (Nuvi 205) vs. 4.3" (Nuvi 205w). The Nuvi 205 is correctly labeled as being QVGA (320x240) resolution. However the Nuvi 205w is incorrectly labeled as WQVGA which would be (480x240). If this were the case, the only difference you would notice is that you have a larger area displayed at the same resolution. In reality, the Nuvi 205w has a resolution of (480x272) which is actually Sixteenth HD1080. So why do you care? Those extra 32 pixels give you a crisper display on the w units.

SOUND: When choosing which unit to buy, I went to a local retailer to compare units. I ran the same simulations on a Nuvi 205 and a 255w. I already described the difference in display above. When I compared the sound, I was disappointed that the text to speech on the 255w lacked the clarity of the basic instructions on the 205. I decided to opt for clearer, but simpler guidance. I've used both types in other GPS units, and I find that the clarity in verbal prompts is more helpful that spoken street names. On the 205w, the next turn is listed at the top of the unit, and you can watch for it along your route. This is also an area of cost consideration as the difference in base price between the 205w and 255w is $70. I just didn't think it was worth it. The one feature I would like to have seen is an external volume control on the unit. If you decide to adjust the volume, you have to press the menu button and choose the volume icon on the main screen. However once you have a good volume, you probably won't be making many adjustments since this unit has neither an MP3 player nor Bluetooth capabilities.

NAVIGATION: The sound and display don't mean a lot if the unit doesn't get the directions correct. I tested my 205w in areas that I drive frequently to see how it would do in generating routes. Of the five different trips I tested, each was at least 10 miles. The routes the 205w generated were essentially the ones that I would choose, and I had direction prompts before I could place the unit in the windshield mount. I intentionally missed a few turns or turned early to force a route recalculation. I found that the process was quick, and it was able to get me back on route quickly. The only area where the unit did not excel was differentiating between a highway and the access road. I have had more sensitive units that would enter route recalculation before I made it to the stoplight at the end of the exit ramp. The 205w did not notice that I was off route until I turned on the street at the end of the ramp. This is a fairly contrived test so you can decide if you think it is important for your usage.

USABILITY: This is an area where the Nuvi 205w gets high marks. The user interface is very easy to work with. One other reason to splurge for the w model is to have the QWERTY keyboard layout. For some reason, the non-w units only have alphabetical order layouts which I find very unintuitive. Menu navigation and data entry are a snap. The only thing I would change is the color coding on the maps. It seems that they tried to use all the colors from a box of crayons with all of the street color coding. This gives the maps the appearance of something out of a kindergarten coloring book. I have to admit that this is pretty minor, but I would have liked something a little more grown up such as the Navigon color schemes.

EXTRAS: There's not a lot to comment on here. The 205w has a photo viewer, and you can navigate to a picture that is tagged with coordinates. Frankly, I would have rather seen this feature left off and saved a few more dollars on the base cost. The maps only take up about half of the internal memory so the need for an SD card reader would not exist without the photo features.

It is pure novelty, but I did like the ability to add additional vehicles and voices from the Garmin web site. I added a few vehicles and the Halloween voice. I found the voice amusing, but it annoyed my wife. If you connect the 205w to your PC, the web site can install them directly to the unit.

The 205w does not ship with a USB cable, but most people already have more of these than they know what to do with. If you have a digital camera or non-iPod MP3 player, you probably already have what you need. The car charging cable that ships with the unit is very stiff, and I found that I had to maneuver it more than I would have liked in order to run it from the unit to the power jack without creating an obstruction to my instrument and windshield view.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good value, great product!, July 4, 2008
I bought the Garmin nuvi 205w after experience and return of two Magellan products for about two weeks, the two Magellans, Maestro 3225 and Roadmate 1412 were buggy and felt cheap compare to Garmin.
The Garmin nuvi 205w is just great, responsive, clear maps, extremely quick satellite reception from a cold start, you don't even have to be outside, just standing next to a window will do the trick. Built quality is superb, it feels like a little brick, the PC software to load IPO's is great; you can also look for an address on Google maps and click "send" to load the location to the Garmin.
Accuracy in busy NYC streets is amazing, it will recalculate after half a block when you miss a turn, also, on the Henry Hudson Pkwy it will detect if I'm on the main road or the service road, and they are really close to each other.
So far I'm very satisfy, easy to use, responsive and does not have anything that I don't need !


1-0 out of 5 stars Won't display approaching streets., December 14, 2009
I upgraded from my old 200W to the 205W when it was stolen. The 205W locks on to satellites much faster, otherwise, it is more or less the same, which is good, except for one MAJOR unacceptable change. Unlike the old 200W, it will not display the approaching street name on the top information bar. It does it on freeways, but for some inexplicable reason, won't do it on streets. Countless times I have driven past the street I wanted to turn on, forcing a u-turn. What good is a GPS if it does not tell you this? On dark canyon roads, I have missed the street by miles because I did not know that I passed the street. This makes this GPS worthless, I loved the 200W, but I hate the 205W. What was Garmin thinking by deleting this valuable feature? I will never buy Garmin again and neither should you.

4-0 out of 5 stars A good non-geek GPS unit, March 22, 2009
I have an older Garmin V that I have used for about 7 years. The old Garmin is great for driving around provided you plan ahead and update the maps to show where you're traveling. If you forget, you miss critical detail and you'd better have good local maps. I still have that unit and use it mostly in the woods due to its limited memory.

So on a recent trip to Sacramento, I decided to upgrade to a newer unit that had more memory. The 205W worked so well out of the box I was a little disappointed. The tech on these is so simple now it's almost 'boring' to use. It navigated rapidly and accurately and provided clear directions within minutes. Most amazing to me was how well it picked up satellites compared to the Garmin V. Extremely fast and even worked resting in the space between the seats of our rental car. Pretty cool.

I'm not sure you can go wrong with the 205W. I've been a GPS geek for about 10 years and we use them at work.

The 205W is intuitive enough for most folks to use right out of the box and the routing is good. By 'good', I mean it's fast and accurate. If you accidentally drive by something it quickly recalculates a route for you.

The screen is nice and bright too, even in daylight. It is wise to bring along the supplied 12 volt cigarette lighter plug as it seems to last for very short times on battery alone and there is no way to replace the battery or bring along a spare. Fortunately, you can charge it off a mini-usb port from your computer too so it's not a big issue but if you're the forgetful sort, perhaps a replaceable battery model is better for you.

This is not a unit you'd really use in the back-country. It's designed for highway use and works great for that. There are other more costly units that more effectively marry the needs of sportsman and the occasional traveler.

It does nicely link up with Google Earth via your computer (you'll need to latest free version of Google Earth). It does not appear to provide a real-time GPS position signal to your computer (my 7 year old Garmin V does though) so if you're looking for that capability this doesn't appear to be a solution for that specific problem. However, if you are traveling and wish to save the addresses / places that you visited it easily imports that information and it's pretty cool to see those points overlaid on Google Earth.

You can add an SD card and put photos and stuff on it like you might on a USB memory stick but I don't think many people use that sort of capability.

You can easily download different icons to show your position. I downloaded the tank. The tank rules. It's a gimmick but it shows the folks at Garmin have a sense of humor.

You can view your route in the traditional overhead routing or 3D; both work really well.

The provided suction cup mount works very well. It uses a ball mount that allows for infinite positioning. If you want a really rugged mount I'd strongly recommend the Ram-Mount systems available online. I bought one for my ATV and it's amazingly stout and simple. I digress.

If your primary need for a GPS is a very simple, plain and effective unit for over the road travel, this will exceed your needs and your expectations in an easy to use package.

4-0 out of 5 stars Nice to have a navigator, July 24, 2008
I was sold on this product when we used it cross-country to find lodging for the night. Couldn't remember the name of the motel chain a friend recommended, but scrolling through the listings for our night's destination city, I recognized the name, drilled down to the details (which include phone numbers), called the motel's number on my cell phone and got a reservation. The Garmin then led us directly to the motel (which would not have been easy to find otherwise). I have been less impressed with the navigator's performance near my own home, as over time I have developed favorite paths to frequent destinations, and the Garmin rarely chooses those. I turn it off rather than listen to the constant "recalculating route." It has made me more adventuresome, however, as I know I can go to places I've never been before without getting hopelessly lost in the process. I am unfamiliar with other GPS units so I am unaware how this compares with others out there. We were given it as a gift by my daughter and son-in-law who had used a similar one in a rental car while on vacation. It suits my needs and it is very simple to use. Read more


24. Kindle Lighted Leather Cover, Apple Green (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle)
Accessory
-- our price: $59.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B003DZ167K
Manufacturer: Amazon Digital Services, Inc
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

Amazon.comAmazon's Kindle Lighted Leather Cover

Our new design seamlessly incorporates a reading light into the cover, so you can carry your Kindle wherever you go and always have a reading light with you. Simply pull the light out to illuminate Kindle when you need it, and slide it away to be invisible when you don't. And since the light draws its power from Kindle, no batteries are needed.

The contoured, pebble-grain leather (available in 7 different colors) keeps your Kindle safe and secure, while the soft charcoal microfiber interior protects the screen from scratches. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand.


The built-in, retractable LED light pulls out to illuminate Kindle, and slides away when not in use.


Never Be Without a Light

Our all-new Kindle cover features an integrated, retractable LED reading light that lets you read comfortably anytime, anywhere. The high-quality LED light illuminates Kindle's paper-like display, adding brightness without adding glare.

A permanent part of the cover, the reading light is located in the top right-hand corner of the back cover. When needed, simply pull the light out and it automatically illuminates, eliminating the need for a separate power switch. To turn the light off, slide it back in to the corner of the cover.

Since the light is powered by Kindle's battery, no batteries are needed.

 

How It Works

In addition to securing Kindle in place, our new hinge system conducts electricity from Kindle's battery to the reading light - when Kindle is attached to the hinge, an electrical connection is formed that powers the light.

The cover's hinge points are gold-plated, to ensure a reliable electrical connection. Gold is used because of its ability to make good electrical contact even with low force, and for its corrosion resistance.


Secure Your Kindle in Four Easy Steps


Read Comfortably with One Hand


Reading with the cover on, you can easily access Kindle's navigation features and power switch, while the rounded edges offer a perfect fit in your hands. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand. And the retractable reading light is easily accessible with the cover open or folded back.


On the Go

This compact cover is perfect for taking Kindle wherever you go. The sleek leather ensures the ultimate fit and protection, without adding bulk or weight. Our patent-pending hinge system secures Kindle in place, and an elastic strap keeps the cover firmly closed for maximum screen protection. Simply attach Kindle to the hinge, apply the strap, and rest assured it will stay securely in place even when you're on the go.

You'll never be without a reading light, and since the light draws its power from Kindle, no batteries are needed.



Amazon’s official Kindle lighted cover features contoured, pebble-grain leather available in 7 different colors.

 

 

Read Kindle easily in the dark with Amazon's revolutionary, all-new lighted leather cover.



The hinge points are gold-plated to ensure a reliable electrical connection. No batteries required.


Read easily with one hand, with or without the light on.


Protect your Kindle on the go, and never be without a reading light

 

... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Quality K3 Cover with Handy Light, August 26, 2010
I bought the burnt orange color cover so I can spot my Kindle where ever I leave it easily--and hopefully not misplace it! The cover is good quality leather, and even with the cover on, I can slip the K3 into my small purse without squeezing it in--something I could not do with my coverless Kindle 2.

I think for an easy purchase without having to buy a separate book light, the Kindle 3 lighted cover is a good choice. The light worked _great_ reading in bed last night. I could see all of the lighted screen just fine with the upper right corner a bit brighter. See the pics I loaded to customer images for the lighted cover to see the light in action in a dark room, and what the cover looks light from the back.

Pluses: Built in light that slips securely out of the way, no batteries to replace, better clips/fit than past covers that connect to Kindle, adequate to light the entire screen, no looking for a booklight, no clipping a booklight to my Kindle and scratching or damaging it, the book light LEDs point down towards the screen, so no bright lights in your eyes.

Minuses: The cover's weight doubles the weight of the Kindle 3 in your hand, the book light stays in one corner and doesn't move around the Kindle, uses more Kindle battery life (it's powered by the Kindle 3 -- and I noticed a definite drain on the battery from using the light)

UPDATE: I used the Kindle light for a couple days now, and the battery life goes down noticeably as you use the light (esp. if you keep the wireless "On"). Last night I read with the light for about 2 hours after a full charge and today the battery looks down about 15%. At that rate of use (with no wireless constantly "On" and regular reading in the daylight), I estimate the battery will need charging after approx. 1 week.

If the overall cover+Kindle weight is an issue for you--more than protecting your Kindle and the handy light--then this cover is not for you.

Kindle Lighted Leather Cover alone = 233 grams or 8.2 oz

Kindle Lighted Leather Cover + Kindle 3 = 447 grams or 15.75 oz. (almost 1 lb.)

Thickness: Kindle cover + Kindle 3 = 3/4 inch

Cover Measurements (with Kindle inside):

Front: 7 3/4" x 5 1/8" (closer to 3/16")
Back: SAME as front
Spine: 7/8"
Open side (to the right) with Kindle inside: 3/4"

I have to say I'm getting used to the weight with the cover as I use it. The piece of mind of extra Kindle protection, plus a handy light whenever you need it, is worth the trade off for me. '

November 20th UPDATE:

**Still love the cover** and having the light handy without having to think about needing a light _is better than ever_. One thing however, is that the hooks to connect the cover are not sturdy enough, IMO, to take the cover on and off often. The Kindle "wiggles" a bit on the connectors, and be careful not to pull the Kindle forward or up off the back of the cover to avoid bending or breaking the metal connectors. Despite this, I am very happy with this cover after using it almost 3 months now.

5-0 out of 5 stars Lighted Leather Case - Two Important Concerns, August 31, 2010
I've noticed that like myself customers have been concerned primarily with two things regarding the new lighted case from amazon. These are: 1)The weight and 2) The uneven lighting. My review will briefly discuss these two things.

1)The Weight - The lighted leather case is a nice weight, sturdy and comfortable to hold. In ounces it is about the weight of the kindle itself however don't let that concern you. With the case on it feels like a medium sized paperback, however it is far much more comfortable to hold. It's easy to hold the case open like a book (nice for couch and table type reading) or to fold the front back and close it with the bungee so that the bungee doesn't hang around (this is good for bedtime reading).Closing the front back with bungee keeps the case folded in position and you don't have to worry about it bothering you. BTW THIS CASE FOLDS BACK 100% - Very comfortable. In sum very comfortable to read with the case and very sturdy.

2) The uneven lighting - Amazon's pictures don't do this case justice. The light hits the ENTIRE screen. Yes if you look closely it's brighter in the top right corner then in the bottom left but Amazon's pics make it look the top is lighted while the bottom is dark. There is good light all over the screen. Trust me I'm fussy about these things - the lighting will not bother you, your entire screen will be lighted and it is extremely pleasant to read in the dark.

*Final Thoughts - Great case, good quality, works well, kindle feels very secure and protected (I would feel comfortable slipping this case into my backpack or suitcase and I think it would sustain some mild impact). Lastly hinges are a non-issue, casing of the kindle will not get damaged with normal or even slightly aggressive use. You could damage the kindle by trying to pull the back of the case but you'd have to really force it to cause any sort of damage to your kindle. The hinges work fine and should not be a concern to any case user.

Update 1st December 2010:

Have now been using the case for 3 months. Leather still looks impeccable. Some people expressed concern that the bungee cord might loosen with use. I have not experienced any loosening so far. Quality of the product has proven outstanding. I've occasionally spilled or messed the cover, just a wipe with a damp cloth has cleaned it up, and the case looks like new. Have to admit I enjoy the feel of the case in my hand, there's just something great about taking your kindle to a coffee shop in this case, it just looks and feels so classy. Also with regard to the hinges: I have had no scratches on my kindle or any other issues, so I remain convinced that the hinges are a non issue.

5-0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Kindle Case Yet, September 2, 2010
I read in bed every single night, so having my Kindle be able to read in the dark is very important to me. With my Kindle 2 I used a mighty bright light, and with my Kindle 3 I've been using this Lighted Leather cover - and I love it!

Check out my video review for a size comparison of this case against my Kindle 2 and also an actual hardcover and softcover book, and then a lights out comparison of the Mighty Bright vs Lighted Leather cover.

Sorry for the shaky camera, it's the best I could do with one hand!

If you're interested in seeing a video review of the Kindle 3 itself, check out the one I did one here:

http://www.amazon.com/review/R21YU59NMOGKUR

3-0 out of 5 stars For those that REALLY care, it's not worth the money., August 28, 2010
I've been an avid Kindle user since Kindle 1, and I take my lights VERY seriously.

The problem is that the new Kindle 3 cover+light does not evenly light the screen. This results in a very bright top right corner, including the top right of the frame of the Kindle 3. And while the light doesn't glare off the screen, it does glare off my graphite Kindle 3's top right corner, making for constant distraction while reading. The light then gets fainter and fainter in a diagonal line from the top right to bottom left. It's not very fun, unfortunately.

Now, for convenience, this new cover is fantastic. I have the non-lighted one and the one with the light, and the weight difference isn't very much, and the bulk difference is truly negligible, so kudos to Amazon for this.

That said, I simply cannot recommend this cover unless you don't mind an incredibly uneven light. I will stick to my Mighty Bright. Yes, it's an addition to the Kindle, but I know that when I sit down to read, I want the pages to "disappear" as I become immersed in my reading. It's very hard for them to do so when the light is so incredibly awkward and uneven, constantly distracting. I'm happy to spend a few extra seconds clipping my light to the back of my Kindle so I can spend hours enjoying my book. That simply wasn't possible with the Kindle Lighted Leather Cover.

3 stars out of 5.

5-0 out of 5 stars Compact and well made, August 27, 2010
For a folio type case, this looks and feels great and works very well. It does add significantly to the weight but that seems a predictable consequence of using leather, making it stiff enough to offer real protection, and building in a light.

Attaching Kindle is very simple using the directions on the product page. Make sure you heed the warning to work at it until ALL the gold is covered, which tells you Kindle is securely attached. Removing is quite simple: Slide down the top hook and rotate Kindle right off. I'm using a fingertip to do it rather than a fingernail. It's quick and easy enough to attach and detach Kindle that I won't have any difficulty switching to "naked" reading at will.

The cord seems to me strong enough for its purpose, but only time will tell. When the cover is closed, the cord is buried in a "channel" in the front cover so should not normally be subjected to much stress and strain. I did remove the little "flag" attached to the cord. Even without using fingernails, it's easy to open the cord up. Others have posted about the cord being in the way during reading, especially when holding Kindle and case in "open book" form. I put the cord between Kindle and the back cover, solving the issue to my own satisfaction. YMMV.

I don't think I'll use the "book style" reading position much. I'll "break the spine" as I did with my K2's case and read with the front cover folded flat against the back. It feels good like that, but when I have good light and will be reading a while I expect I'll do as I did with my K2: Remove Kindle from the case and read "naked." Still, even brand new, the leather folds flat easily and it's comfortable to hold and read.

The light seems to me to be well placed. I don't get any glare in any of my normal reading positions, so don't have a practical issue with its lack of adjustability. One very nice feature, particularly since it's powered by Kindle's battery, is that it turns off when Kindle turns off. So if you fall asleep reading, your light won't just keep running. I find it a bit stiff to pull out, but I expect it will ease in time. Also maybe stiff is good, as you don't want it just lolling out on its own while you've got it stowed away. Still, folks with difficulty applying much force with their fingers could find this an issue.

I bought this unseen, intending to return it if it didn't work well. It won't be going back. I may in fact buy another case for travel, as by design this folio style case is open on three sides. In some situations I would want more dust and bang protection, but I still give five stars because this is an unavoidable consequence of this style of design.

5-0 out of 5 stars well worth it, August 27, 2010
This is a comparison between mighty bright and the kindle cover light. NOTE: the bottom left of the kindle is the part that receives the less light because it is the farthest away. The light still shines well enough to read the bottom left of the kindle , but the light distribution is not even.

5-0 out of 5 stars Exceeded my expectations, August 27, 2010
I was hesitant to buy this cover mostly due to the pictures in its listing, which seem to show a light that doesn't even extend to the opposite corner. The fact that I have not been impressed with the Amazon's Kindle covers in the past didn't help. I went ahead and purchased it because the cover I wanted isn't available yet and I don't like to take my Kindle out and about without a cover. Now I am glad that I went ahead and bought it.

PROS:

1. The light is much better than I thought it would be. Using it in a darkened room I found that the light did the job very well. In a pitch black room, it performs even better. While the screen corner opposite the light is a bit dimmer than other areas, there is no problem reading the page at all.

2. The light gets its power from the Kindle itself, through the gold-plated hinges which attach it to the cover, so batteries are a thing of the past. When your Kindle goes to sleep, the light will go out as well. It will also turn off when you slide it back into the case.

3. The cover is slim, well-fitted and very easy to attach and detach using the hinges. The inside has good padding. The leather outer surface has a nice pebbled texture with the exception of a smooth area along the edge of the front. While stiff enough to protect the reader, the cover is slight flexible and the front easily folds behind when reading so you can hold your Kindle with one hand if you like.

4. A great plus is that the cover has an elastic cord that fits into a groove on the front of it. This holds your cover closed (unlike the original Kindle 2 cover that would flop open in your purse & let things slide into it) and easily distinguishes the front from the back--important as many owners of the Kindle 2 cover accidentally opened it from the back, which could cause cracking along the Kindle's spine.


CONS:

I haven't found any, really. The light Is a bit hard (stiff) to pull out of the cover, but then you wouldn't want it to be flopping out when you don't want to use it so that is more of a Pro than a Con.

The one concern I do have is about pulling the light in and out--I wonder if whatever wiring or conductor that is used to get the power from the hinges to the light will eventually break. But that is something to find out down the road. Right now, the more I use this cover, the more I like it.

4-0 out of 5 stars From the bungee cord thingy to the pull-out light, a solid choice for the Kindle, September 4, 2010
I ordered this cover because it was the only real game in town at the time. To let you know where I come from with this review... I purchased the 2nd generation Kindle back in March of 2009 with the Amazon cover. Didn't like that one, it actually cracked my mother's Kindle that I purchased shortly thereafter (Amazon replaced it, although it was probably from her opening the wrong side, doesn't matter, this isn't about Amazon great customer service). When that happened, we immediately went looking for a new cover and fell in love with the M-Edge Prodigy with light. Unfortunately, M-Edge isn't offering that for the 3rd generation Kindle, they changed it to have a nylon strap instead of leather and aren't utilizing the hinge technology for the light, which I think is genius and a terrible error on their part. I'm telling you this so you know that I ordered this new Amazon Lighted Cover with a WHOLE LOT of trepidation.

When deciding on the color, I didn't want black (I wanted purple, but Amazon doesn't offer that *boo*hiss*) and the green was backordered slightly, didn't like the other colors so I decided to get the orange. It looked interesting and since I live in Austin, some UT fan would buy it off me if I hated it, I was sure. It came in and it's the perfect burnt orange color. It might be slightly too tan colored, but it's not vibrant orange by any means. A great almost pumpkin pie color actually.

So... what did I think of the cover itself?

I slid the Kindle in there and pulled the light out and... nothing happened. I spent a good 3 to 5 minutes pulling the light out and pushing it back in, looking for a switch, something, anything. I finally gave up and turned the Kindle on and... yeah, the light came on. DUH! It works only if the Kindle is on. This is actually GREAT because I fall asleep reading a good deal and the light will go off when the Kindle goes to sleep after 15 minutes or so. I felt stupid, but at least I didn't call customer service and have them giggle in the background and the stupid lady that can't work the cover, eh?

ANYWAY... the Kindle slides in easily and the light works great. There is no glare at all because the LED lights are directed down the arm of the light so there's no "direct" light hitting the screen, it just flows down. It is brighter in the upper right than in the lower left because of that, but it's more than adequate. The light is NOT adjustable but you shouldn't need to adjust it either. I have found it really is a genius way of handling it.

The case itself is not too thick. In fact when I first picked up the case, I thought I had the wrong one because it looked too slim to have a light in there, but it's there. It is a little hard to pull the light out, but I guess the alternative is having it be too easy, right? I really wish they had included corner straps though. I read laying in bed and I worry it's going to flop open and crack the Kindle. I do realize this is probably unfounded and they fixed that flaw, but because I'm paranoid, I did put two small circles of velcro to the back of the Kindle and the cover so it couldn't accidentally bend the hinge system or crack the case. I'm aware this is insane overkill type stuff, so feel free to snicker... I'll wait... done? Okay, onward...

Now, back to reality... the chance of you opening the Kindle from the wrong side is basically zero. You have to unwrap it using this bungee cord thingy (yes, that's the technical term here, folks). It has a little leather tag on it that says "Amazon Kindle". The tag is a little annoying because I fold the cover back and use the cord to hold it and keep hitting the tag with my hand no matter where I put. I'm thinking of cutting it off. *shrug*

It does, of course, add some weight to the Kindle. The case, with Kindle and velcro circles weighs 15.5 oz on my postal scale. There's been some discussion if this is "too heavy" but I must say that I don't think so. I read with it folded back and the bungee cord thingy wrapped around the back. I have weak hands that keep me from reading hard backs and large paperback books. I think it's more of the force of holding the book open than the weight, so it's not been an issue at all for me. I also read with it propped up somewhere usually.

My favorite part is that with the new slim and sleek design of the Kindle and this slim and sleek cover (with a light, no less!) it really is a great size to grab and go, toss in my purse, in the car or my bedside. My other favorite (it's a tie) is the light. It runs off power from the Kindle itself so I'm never without a light. I don't have to find a battery somewhere when it burns out. Amazon knocked it out of the park as far as I'm concerned. I'm taking off a star just for the few little niggle things I mentioned before. After over a week of use though, this is the cover I'm recommending to friends/family at this time.

Well worth it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Data to compare colors and weights, with and without light, September 4, 2010
Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

4-0 out of 5 stars (4.5 stars) Very good, and not THAT heavy!, August 28, 2010
I bought two of these (burgundy for my wife's graphite kindle and green for my white kindle).

The colors are gorgeous, and exactly as shown in the pictures Amazon has here.

The look and feel of the leather is very good and should more than satisfy most folks. If you're willing to spend more for even better leather, you'll soon be able to get high-end leather cases from designers like Cole-Haan. (If you're interested, look up their Kindle 2 cases here at Amazon and you're get an idea of what they're likely to offer for Kindle 3).

We love the design. We've had no trouble hooking our kindles in and out of the case. We love that the light is built in and we will never need to replace its battery. The cover folds completely flat around the back, and the elastic band keeps it there, then it's easy and quite comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

A few reviews here complain about the weight of this case. I disagree. It is not heavy compared to other cases of this type (folio-style hard shell leather cases). My wife and I were up reading for hours last night, holding our kindles, cases on, in one hand, with no fatigue. (We're such an old married couple, that's how exciting our Friday nights are!) I used to have a nook with the same type of case (minus the light), and it was noticeably heavier. If you want something lighter, consider a neoprene sleeve or cloth case.

My only qualm about the Amazon lighted case is the uneven distribution of light on the screen - very bright in the upper right corner, dim in the lower left corner. It seems this doesn't bother most people here, but it bothers me a bit, enough to knock half a star off my review, but not enough to make me hesitate to recommend this case.

Some folks complain about the price. It is high, to be sure. But, you'd pay about the same if you bought a good leather case and a separate light. Then you'd have to worry about remembering to pack the light when you travel, making sure it has fresh batteries, making sure you don't lose it, etc etc. For me, the convenience of the built-in light is well worth the price.

And there's something intangible but very very nice about keeping our kindles in these gorgeous, almost luxuriously nice cases. They are definitely eye-catching and lust-worthy.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Quality K3 Cover with Handy Light, August 26, 2010
I bought the burnt orange color cover so I can spot my Kindle where ever I leave it easily--and hopefully not misplace it! The cover is good quality leather, and even with the cover on, I can slip the K3 into my small purse without squeezing it in--something I could not do with my coverless Kindle 2.

I think for an easy purchase without having to buy a separate book light, the Kindle 3 lighted cover is a good choice. The light worked _great_ reading in bed last night. I could see all of the lighted screen just fine with the upper right corner a bit brighter. See the pics I loaded to customer images for the lighted cover to see the light in action in a dark room, and what the cover looks light from the back.

Pluses: Built in light that slips securely out of the way, no batteries to replace, better clips/fit than past covers that connect to Kindle, adequate to light the entire screen, no looking for a booklight, no clipping a booklight to my Kindle and scratching or damaging it, the book light LEDs point down towards the screen, so no bright lights in your eyes.

Minuses: The cover's weight doubles the weight of the Kindle 3 in your hand, the book light stays in one corner and doesn't move around the Kindle, uses more Kindle battery life (it's powered by the Kindle 3 -- and I noticed a definite drain on the battery from using the light)

UPDATE: I used the Kindle light for a couple days now, and the battery life goes down noticeably as you use the light (esp. if you keep the wireless "On"). Last night I read with the light for about 2 hours after a full charge and today the battery looks down about 15%. At that rate of use (with no wireless constantly "On" and regular reading in the daylight), I estimate the battery will need charging after approx. 1 week.

If the overall cover+Kindle weight is an issue for you--more than protecting your Kindle and the handy light--then this cover is not for you.

Kindle Lighted Leather Cover alone = 233 grams or 8.2 oz

Kindle Lighted Leather Cover + Kindle 3 = 447 grams or 15.75 oz. (almost 1 lb.)

Thickness: Kindle cover + Kindle 3 = 3/4 inch

Cover Measurements (with Kindle inside):

Front: 7 3/4" x 5 1/8" (closer to 3/16")
Back: SAME as front
Spine: 7/8"
Open side (to the right) with Kindle inside: 3/4"

I have to say I'm getting used to the weight with the cover as I use it. The piece of mind of extra Kindle protection, plus a handy light whenever you need it, is worth the trade off for me. '

November 20th UPDATE:

**Still love the cover** and having the light handy without having to think about needing a light _is better than ever_. One thing however, is that the hooks to connect the cover are not sturdy enough, IMO, to take the cover on and off often. The Kindle "wiggles" a bit on the connectors, and be careful not to pull the Kindle forward or up off the back of the cover to avoid bending or breaking the metal connectors. Despite this, I am very happy with this cover after using it almost 3 months now.

5-0 out of 5 stars Lighted Leather Case - Two Important Concerns, August 31, 2010
I've noticed that like myself customers have been concerned primarily with two things regarding the new lighted case from amazon. These are: 1)The weight and 2) The uneven lighting. My review will briefly discuss these two things.

1)The Weight - The lighted leather case is a nice weight, sturdy and comfortable to hold. In ounces it is about the weight of the kindle itself however don't let that concern you. With the case on it feels like a medium sized paperback, however it is far much more comfortable to hold. It's easy to hold the case open like a book (nice for couch and table type reading) or to fold the front back and close it with the bungee so that the bungee doesn't hang around (this is good for bedtime reading).Closing the front back with bungee keeps the case folded in position and you don't have to worry about it bothering you. BTW THIS CASE FOLDS BACK 100% - Very comfortable. In sum very comfortable to read with the case and very sturdy.

2) The uneven lighting - Amazon's pictures don't do this case justice. The light hits the ENTIRE screen. Yes if you look closely it's brighter in the top right corner then in the bottom left but Amazon's pics make it look the top is lighted while the bottom is dark. There is good light all over the screen. Trust me I'm fussy about these things - the lighting will not bother you, your entire screen will be lighted and it is extremely pleasant to read in the dark.

*Final Thoughts - Great case, good quality, works well, kindle feels very secure and protected (I would feel comfortable slipping this case into my backpack or suitcase and I think it would sustain some mild impact). Lastly hinges are a non-issue, casing of the kindle will not get damaged with normal or even slightly aggressive use. You could damage the kindle by trying to pull the back of the case but you'd have to really force it to cause any sort of damage to your kindle. The hinges work fine and should not be a concern to any case user.

Update 1st December 2010:

Have now been using the case for 3 months. Leather still looks impeccable. Some people expressed concern that the bungee cord might loosen with use. I have not experienced any loosening so far. Quality of the product has proven outstanding. I've occasionally spilled or messed the cover, just a wipe with a damp cloth has cleaned it up, and the case looks like new. Have to admit I enjoy the feel of the case in my hand, there's just something great about taking your kindle to a coffee shop in this case, it just looks and feels so classy. Also with regard to the hinges: I have had no scratches on my kindle or any other issues, so I remain convinced that the hinges are a non issue.

5-0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Kindle Case Yet, September 2, 2010
I read in bed every single night, so having my Kindle be able to read in the dark is very important to me. With my Kindle 2 I used a mighty bright light, and with my Kindle 3 I've been using this Lighted Leather cover - and I love it!

Check out my video review for a size comparison of this case against my Kindle 2 and also an actual hardcover and softcover book, and then a lights out comparison of the Mighty Bright vs Lighted Leather cover.

Sorry for the shaky camera, it's the best I could do with one hand!

If you're interested in seeing a video review of the Kindle 3 itself, check out the one I did one here:

http://www.amazon.com/review/R21YU59NMOGKUR

3-0 out of 5 stars For those that REALLY care, it's not worth the money., August 28, 2010
I've been an avid Kindle user since Kindle 1, and I take my lights VERY seriously.

The problem is that the new Kindle 3 cover+light does not evenly light the screen. This results in a very bright top right corner, including the top right of the frame of the Kindle 3. And while the light doesn't glare off the screen, it does glare off my graphite Kindle 3's top right corner, making for constant distraction while reading. The light then gets fainter and fainter in a diagonal line from the top right to bottom left. It's not very fun, unfortunately.

Now, for convenience, this new cover is fantastic. I have the non-lighted one and the one with the light, and the weight difference isn't very much, and the bulk difference is truly negligible, so kudos to Amazon for this.

That said, I simply cannot recommend this cover unless you don't mind an incredibly uneven light. I will stick to my Mighty Bright. Yes, it's an addition to the Kindle, but I know that when I sit down to read, I want the pages to "disappear" as I become immersed in my reading. It's very hard for them to do so when the light is so incredibly awkward and uneven, constantly distracting. I'm happy to spend a few extra seconds clipping my light to the back of my Kindle so I can spend hours enjoying my book. That simply wasn't possible with the Kindle Lighted Leather Cover.

3 stars out of 5.

5-0 out of 5 stars Compact and well made, August 27, 2010
For a folio type case, this looks and feels great and works very well. It does add significantly to the weight but that seems a predictable consequence of using leather, making it stiff enough to offer real protection, and building in a light.

Attaching Kindle is very simple using the directions on the product page. Make sure you heed the warning to work at it until ALL the gold is covered, which tells you Kindle is securely attached. Removing is quite simple: Slide down the top hook and rotate Kindle right off. I'm using a fingertip to do it rather than a fingernail. It's quick and easy enough to attach and detach Kindle that I won't have any difficulty switching to "naked" reading at will.

The cord seems to me strong enough for its purpose, but only time will tell. When the cover is closed, the cord is buried in a "channel" in the front cover so should not normally be subjected to much stress and strain. I did remove the little "flag" attached to the cord. Even without using fingernails, it's easy to open the cord up. Others have posted about the cord being in the way during reading, especially when holding Kindle and case in "open book" form. I put the cord between Kindle and the back cover, solving the issue to my own satisfaction. YMMV.

I don't think I'll use the "book style" reading position much. I'll "break the spine" as I did with my K2's case and read with the front cover folded flat against the back. It feels good like that, but when I have good light and will be reading a while I expect I'll do as I did with my K2: Remove Kindle from the case and read "naked." Still, even brand new, the leather folds flat easily and it's comfortable to hold and read.

The light seems to me to be well placed. I don't get any glare in any of my normal reading positions, so don't have a practical issue with its lack of adjustability. One very nice feature, particularly since it's powered by Kindle's battery, is that it turns off when Kindle turns off. So if you fall asleep reading, your light won't just keep running. I find it a bit stiff to pull out, but I expect it will ease in time. Also maybe stiff is good, as you don't want it just lolling out on its own while you've got it stowed away. Still, folks with difficulty applying much force with their fingers could find this an issue.

I bought this unseen, intending to return it if it didn't work well. It won't be going back. I may in fact buy another case for travel, as by design this folio style case is open on three sides. In some situations I would want more dust and bang protection, but I still give five stars because this is an unavoidable consequence of this style of design.

5-0 out of 5 stars well worth it, August 27, 2010
This is a comparison between mighty bright and the kindle cover light. NOTE: the bottom left of the kindle is the part that receives the less light because it is the farthest away. The light still shines well enough to read the bottom left of the kindle , but the light distribution is not even.

5-0 out of 5 stars Exceeded my expectations, August 27, 2010
I was hesitant to buy this cover mostly due to the pictures in its listing, which seem to show a light that doesn't even extend to the opposite corner. The fact that I have not been impressed with the Amazon's Kindle covers in the past didn't help. I went ahead and purchased it because the cover I wanted isn't available yet and I don't like to take my Kindle out and about without a cover. Now I am glad that I went ahead and bought it.

PROS:

1. The light is much better than I thought it would be. Using it in a darkened room I found that the light did the job very well. In a pitch black room, it performs even better. While the screen corner opposite the light is a bit dimmer than other areas, there is no problem reading the page at all.

2. The light gets its power from the Kindle itself, through the gold-plated hinges which attach it to the cover, so batteries are a thing of the past. When your Kindle goes to sleep, the light will go out as well. It will also turn off when you slide it back into the case.

3. The cover is slim, well-fitted and very easy to attach and detach using the hinges. The inside has good padding. The leather outer surface has a nice pebbled texture with the exception of a smooth area along the edge of the front. While stiff enough to protect the reader, the cover is slight flexible and the front easily folds behind when reading so you can hold your Kindle with one hand if you like.

4. A great plus is that the cover has an elastic cord that fits into a groove on the front of it. This holds your cover closed (unlike the original Kindle 2 cover that would flop open in your purse & let things slide into it) and easily distinguishes the front from the back--important as many owners of the Kindle 2 cover accidentally opened it from the back, which could cause cracking along the Kindle's spine.


CONS:

I haven't found any, really. The light Is a bit hard (stiff) to pull out of the cover, but then you wouldn't want it to be flopping out when you don't want to use it so that is more of a Pro than a Con.

The one concern I do have is about pulling the light in and out--I wonder if whatever wiring or conductor that is used to get the power from the hinges to the light will eventually break. But that is something to find out down the road. Right now, the more I use this cover, the more I like it.

4-0 out of 5 stars From the bungee cord thingy to the pull-out light, a solid choice for the Kindle, September 4, 2010
I ordered this cover because it was the only real game in town at the time. To let you know where I come from with this review... I purchased the 2nd generation Kindle back in March of 2009 with the Amazon cover. Didn't like that one, it actually cracked my mother's Kindle that I purchased shortly thereafter (Amazon replaced it, although it was probably from her opening the wrong side, doesn't matter, this isn't about Amazon great customer service). When that happened, we immediately went looking for a new cover and fell in love with the M-Edge Prodigy with light. Unfortunately, M-Edge isn't offering that for the 3rd generation Kindle, they changed it to have a nylon strap instead of leather and aren't utilizing the hinge technology for the light, which I think is genius and a terrible error on their part. I'm telling you this so you know that I ordered this new Amazon Lighted Cover with a WHOLE LOT of trepidation.

When deciding on the color, I didn't want black (I wanted purple, but Amazon doesn't offer that *boo*hiss*) and the green was backordered slightly, didn't like the other colors so I decided to get the orange. It looked interesting and since I live in Austin, some UT fan would buy it off me if I hated it, I was sure. It came in and it's the perfect burnt orange color. It might be slightly too tan colored, but it's not vibrant orange by any means. A great almost pumpkin pie color actually.

So... what did I think of the cover itself?

I slid the Kindle in there and pulled the light out and... nothing happened. I spent a good 3 to 5 minutes pulling the light out and pushing it back in, looking for a switch, something, anything. I finally gave up and turned the Kindle on and... yeah, the light came on. DUH! It works only if the Kindle is on. This is actually GREAT because I fall asleep reading a good deal and the light will go off when the Kindle goes to sleep after 15 minutes or so. I felt stupid, but at least I didn't call customer service and have them giggle in the background and the stupid lady that can't work the cover, eh?

ANYWAY... the Kindle slides in easily and the light works great. There is no glare at all because the LED lights are directed down the arm of the light so there's no "direct" light hitting the screen, it just flows down. It is brighter in the upper right than in the lower left because of that, but it's more than adequate. The light is NOT adjustable but you shouldn't need to adjust it either. I have found it really is a genius way of handling it.

The case itself is not too thick. In fact when I first picked up the case, I thought I had the wrong one because it looked too slim to have a light in there, but it's there. It is a little hard to pull the light out, but I guess the alternative is having it be too easy, right? I really wish they had included corner straps though. I read laying in bed and I worry it's going to flop open and crack the Kindle. I do realize this is probably unfounded and they fixed that flaw, but because I'm paranoid, I did put two small circles of velcro to the back of the Kindle and the cover so it couldn't accidentally bend the hinge system or crack the case. I'm aware this is insane overkill type stuff, so feel free to snicker... I'll wait... done? Okay, onward...

Now, back to reality... the chance of you opening the Kindle from the wrong side is basically zero. You have to unwrap it using this bungee cord thingy (yes, that's the technical term here, folks). It has a little leather tag on it that says "Amazon Kindle". The tag is a little annoying because I fold the cover back and use the cord to hold it and keep hitting the tag with my hand no matter where I put. I'm thinking of cutting it off. *shrug*

It does, of course, add some weight to the Kindle. The case, with Kindle and velcro circles weighs 15.5 oz on my postal scale. There's been some discussion if this is "too heavy" but I must say that I don't think so. I read with it folded back and the bungee cord thingy wrapped around the back. I have weak hands that keep me from reading hard backs and large paperback books. I think it's more of the force of holding the book open than the weight, so it's not been an issue at all for me. I also read with it propped up somewhere usually.

My favorite part is that with the new slim and sleek design of the Kindle and this slim and sleek cover (with a light, no less!) it really is a great size to grab and go, toss in my purse, in the car or my bedside. My other favorite (it's a tie) is the light. It runs off power from the Kindle itself so I'm never without a light. I don't have to find a battery somewhere when it burns out. Amazon knocked it out of the park as far as I'm concerned. I'm taking off a star just for the few little niggle things I mentioned before. After over a week of use though, this is the cover I'm recommending to friends/family at this time.

Well worth it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Data to compare colors and weights, with and without light, September 4, 2010
Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

4-0 out of 5 stars (4.5 stars) Very good, and not THAT heavy!, August 28, 2010
I bought two of these (burgundy for my wife's graphite kindle and green for my white kindle).

The colors are gorgeous, and exactly as shown in the pictures Amazon has here.

The look and feel of the leather is very good and should more than satisfy most folks. If you're willing to spend more for even better leather, you'll soon be able to get high-end leather cases from designers like Cole-Haan. (If you're interested, look up their Kindle 2 cases here at Amazon and you're get an idea of what they're likely to offer for Kindle 3).

We love the design. We've had no trouble hooking our kindles in and out of the case. We love that the light is built in and we will never need to replace its battery. The cover folds completely flat around the back, and the elastic band keeps it there, then it's easy and quite comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

A few reviews here complain about the weight of this case. I disagree. It is not heavy compared to other cases of this type (folio-style hard shell leather cases). My wife and I were up reading for hours last night, holding our kindles, cases on, in one hand, with no fatigue. (We're such an old married couple, that's how exciting our Friday nights are!) I used to have a nook with the same type of case (minus the light), and it was noticeably heavier. If you want something lighter, consider a neoprene sleeve or cloth case.

My only qualm about the Amazon lighted case is the uneven distribution of light on the screen - very bright in the upper right corner, dim in the lower left corner. It seems this doesn't bother most people here, but it bothers me a bit, enough to knock half a star off my review, but not enough to make me hesitate to recommend this case.

Some folks complain about the price. It is high, to be sure. But, you'd pay about the same if you bought a good leather case and a separate light. Then you'd have to worry about remembering to pack the light when you travel, making sure it has fresh batteries, making sure you don't lose it, etc etc. For me, the convenience of the built-in light is well worth the price.

And there's something intangible but very very nice about keeping our kindles in these gorgeous, almost luxuriously nice cases. They are definitely eye-catching and lust-worthy. Read more


25. Fujifilm FinePix J40 12.2 MP Digital Camera with 3x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom and 3-Inch LCD (Includes 2 GB SD Memory Card)
Electronics
list price: $99.95 -- our price: $59.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B003ZHV70C
Manufacturer: FUJIFILM
Sales Rank: 2
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

Fujifilm's FinePix J40 will be a hit with those who demand a compact that's affordable, easy-to-use and produces great images. Not only does it feature the latest technology, such as Scene Recognition AUTO and Face Detection, but it's very stylish too, with a petite slim-line frame and high-gloss, double coated veneer finish. With 12 megapixels, pin-sharp 3x Fujinon optical zoom lens, and a huge 3.0-inch LCD screen, the FinePix J40 will deliver fantastic pictures with minimal effort. Offering wide photographic versatility, a new Panoramic Shooting mode allows users to create stunning shots of sweeping landscapes and large groups of people. Just slip it in your pocket and go and have fun! ... Read more

Reviews

4-0 out of 5 stars Great camera for the price, November 5, 2010

Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
(added a couple of pics in the comments section)

I don't think it's possible to stress enough what an awful photographer I am. I've had cameras five times as expensive as this in my hands and taken blurry, yellowed and just dank-looking shots. I really, really suck at taking pictures. I wish I could give you all sorts of details about the lenses and shutter speeds and all that, but frankly, that's all beyond my expertise too. I'm a really, really basic camera user. Point and click, that's me.

This is like the Jitterbug of cameras. Even I took good pictures with this. It's basic, it's simple and me-proof. Setup was so easy; you just follow the instructions on the screen (a good thing, since all you get in the package is a huge foldout sheet with the very basics in French, English and Spanish) and go from there. From then, it's just trial and error, but I mostly just left things as they were and still managed not to fudge anything. The zoom worked perfectly, as did the flash. I took three shots in a row: indoors, my subject two feet in front of me in low light; in front of the window, my subject about five feet away from me; finally, outdoors, a wide shot in direct sunlight. All turned out clear and sharp and I never changed a single setting except to zoom in on my close subject a bit and out when I was outside.

The camera's much smaller than I expected, although it's nice and heavy. I've already found that the big LCD screen is a fingerprint magnet, no matter how much I try to protect it in a case I have. I'm getting quite a bit of life out of the battery; I've been taking quite a few pictures and it's lasting four or five days between charges.

One note: whatever you do, DON'T download the software that comes with this. I did and ended up in a maze of software upgrades that took me almost an hour to work through before I threw my hands up and uninstalled everything and just went with the basic hooking the USB cord up and letting my computer installing the driver on its own and using my own choice of program to view the images.

Software headache aside, I'm very happy with this, as basic as it is. It doesn't have a lot of advanced options, but truthfully, I not only wouldn't know what to do with them anyway, if I did, I'm sure I'd only end up messing up whatever pictures I took anyway. This is perfect for a bumbling photographer to take great pictures with.

3-0 out of 5 stars Nice camera, some new gripes! Update:11-29-2010, October 27, 2010

Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
Update 11-29-2010:
I have some serious gripes now and have downgraded this to 3 stars. It takes a VERY long time to take a second picture. At first I thought it might take a while for the flash to charge up, but that is not the case, as I had the same problem in full daylight. I should also note that I use a fast card (San Disk Extreme). These cards have proven to be super fast and very reliable. Also, it is VERY annoying to have to go into the menu and change shooting modes from picture to video and back again. This still takes great pictures, but you will miss shots with this camera, and that is very frustrating.

This is the first camera I have ever used that did not have a fluid zoom. In fact, it is very odd, but it has 8 stages of "zoom" and you do not have a choice if you want to zoom somewhere in between. Since we are on the topic of zoom, let me tell you that the digital zoom is useless for any serious photography (my Canon is about the same size and the zoom is awesome, even the digital zoom). So, the zoom disappoints. Take off one star. Let's move indoors, where most compacts tend to have some trouble (including my Canon). The Fuji has a very strong flash, almost too strong. There is no blur, and the only real problem is the white balance, which is easily fixed, and for me not a deal breaker. Pictures come out a bit bright with the flash. They are not washed out, just a little too bright. The details, etc., look great, and it's very nice to be confident of indoor photographs. The quality of the camera is average, though the slot for the battery/SD card, feels a bit flimsy. The camera is very light and very compact. The screen is sharp and shows a lot of detail. The camera is pretty easy to use and set up. I did have some trouble with the included SD card, but third try was the charm (after I locked and unlocked it), and the camera was able to see the card. Video is clear and can be saved in two different sizes. If you are looking for an inexpensive camera that covers all the bases, this is a front runner. I don't know what the newer Canon's go for, but if the are comparable, I would compare the two. I am happy with this camera and believe it does offer a good value, especially with the 2 gig SD card. Oh, I should note that battery life is a little weak, but then, I did put it through its paces.

5-0 out of 5 stars Superior value for money, October 25, 2010

Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
The camera is $[..]for gosh sakes! It's an amazing little piece of technology. The 3X optics and 12.2MP CMOS camera are well matched in the optical train to provide a great image for casual photos adequate for most users. It's the simplest start-up I've ever seen. The viewer LCD provides a maximum size to the package. `The manual' is 7 steps of which 4 include inserting memory, battery, charging battery and turning it on. It's `point and shoot' in the extreme.

I work in the domain of optics & imaging design. My wife has a 5 year old Fuji camera of this same genre that I've gone to some lengths to compare with Nikon and Canon in this low cost market. Without getting technical ... for the old Fuji, there are no user discernable image quality differences. The Fuji optics were superior (i.e. best objective lens light capture and transfer). Take your pick between the 3 on the backend image processing system/PC interface.

My wife has carried the 5 year old Fuji in her purse every day ... that's a technically demanding reliability challenge. Fuji can be relied on to deliver the best value for money in an image capture platform if you're designing a million dollar platform or this $69 platform. You're not paying the premium for the huge advertisement budget of Nikon and Canon when you buy Fuji. I think you just get a better camera.

I can't speak to this unit's reliability for now. A 3x optical train with autofocus, f-stop, etc mechanisms and micro motors are robust to a point. They will all fail, even the highest dollar product, if exposed to the wrong environment (g-shock, sand, salt spray, thermal shock, etc).

One reviewer mentioned software loading problems. I had absolutely no problems on a Windows 7, 64bit OS.

You can't go wrong with this device. It's an excellent camera for you or the kids or the g-kids for Xmas.

4-0 out of 5 stars Good camera for the price, November 21, 2010

Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
For someone who just wants a basic point and shoot, this camera will do the job. Its small size makes it convenient to take with you in a pocket or a purse, and the battery life seems pretty long. I charged it in for less than an hour before taking some test shots and it lasted several days (it probably could have lasted longer) before I got around to giving it a full charge.

This camera is user-friendly enough that you could leave it on auto for most of the time and your pictures would still turn out crisp and clear. If you are looking for a little more, the menu is intuitive and easy to navigate. The panoramic mode in particular is a fun feature that's easy to use and produces some impressive photos, but it doesn't work like Sony's Sweep Panorama feature. Instead of sweeping, the camera will prompt you to take three photos, each time displaying the right edge of the previous photo so you can manually align the scene. It's a little clunky to use, but it still works well.

A far as downsides go, I initially missed having a viewfinder to look through, but I quickly got used to the LCD screen. The flash is powerful, but verges on being too harsh depending on how 'natural' you like your lighting.

To upload my photos, I tried to just use the included USB cable but my computer (Mac) would not recognize the camera until I installed the software. My old camera worked fine without any software. This isn't a deal breaker, but it was a bit of a pain to have to use the software and I'm not sure yet if there's a way around it.

All in all I'd say the positives far outweigh the negatives. This is a great camera at an affordable price.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fuji FinePix J40 12 MP Digital Camera - a nice little camera!, November 15, 2010

Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
Fuji FinePix J40 12 MP Digital Camera

This is a camera made for people who just want to push a button to take a picture. And it works well. The picture quality is very good. Under low light levels, including artificial and mixed light sources, this camera produces very pleasing results (something a lot of cameras have problems with). Go outside and the pictures are great. The zoom lens is imaged stabilized to help give sharp images. It is a 3x zoom lens which is about standard in small point and shoot cameras.

The back of the camera is mostly the LCD viewing screen. Nice and big, the brightness is very good. One thing the camera is missing is an optical viewfinder. Most P&S cameras are not coming with them, but on a very bright day at the beach they do come in handy. There are also a few control buttons here as well as an LED that tells you when the battery is charged.

As for the battery, it's a removable small rechargable one. The battery recharges in the camera... the charger plugs into the USB port. That's probably to keep the cost down (and this camera is pretty inexpensive). It's nice to have a spare battery and be able to charge one while shooting with the other. But to get that feature, you need to move to higher priced cameras. 3rd party stand alone chargers are available on line for about $20.00.

One nice feature is that the camera has 10MB of internal memory. If your memory card fills up, you can still take a few pictures. I was surprised to see that Fuji also includes a 2GB card with the camera (nice touch... most other cameras don't).

I can't comment on the software that came with the camera as I don't use it. Printing small prints at home is too costly compared to having them printed at Walmart, Costco, Shutterfly, etc. Pop you memory card into one of their machines and the prints look really nice.

Easy to use, the only thing you need the manual for is inserting the battery, memory card, and charging instructions. And if you've used a digital camera before, you won't need that. Picture quality is very good. Overall, this is a highly recommended camera.

5-0 out of 5 stars This compact, accessible, and intuitive performer is a tremendous value., November 13, 2010

Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
Right off the bat I want to nod toward B.Walker's review, and echo his (or her!) suggestion that you opt to not use the software bundled with this camera. I used the included USB cable to connect to Win7 64-bit, Win7 32-bit, and Vista 32-bit, and each was immediately able to access the directories on the camera so that I could cut/copy/delete as I pleased.

That addressed, what a wonderful little camera! At this price whether you intend it for a gift or your own pocket, Fujifilm has packed higher end features into a compact and intuitive body, priced it brilliantly as part of the Amazon exclusivity, packaged it hassle-free -- and to top it all off they just throw in a 2GB memory card for good value. It's a rare opportunity to come away from a purchase feeling as if you've somehow been done a favor, but that may well be how some feel after taking advantage of this opportunity.

I'm not going to belabor some sort of meaty comparison to much more expensive and feature-laden cameras. You're not considering the FinePix J40 because you're in the market for something like the Canon Digital Rebel XSi 12.2MP (I only link that to illustrate that you could have nearly six of these for the same price), you are (I imagine) looking for something not just affordable, but convenient. A small profile digital camera that can go with you, not take up a lot of space, but still offer a terrific value in terms of features and performance. Something intuitive, quick, and responsive. This is absolutely it.

Low light performance, image stabilization, battery life -- all outstanding given the class. The rear display is very generous given the very compact body, and it offers a bright and crisp picture. While there is no traditional viewfinder, few within the target market for this camera will miss that feature. Those that do will likely be nonetheless pleased with its accessibility and ease of use.

In terms of bang for the buck, this is a clear winner. These have absolutely made my short-list for Christmas gift ideas. My octogenarian grandfather and pre-teen niece alike would love and be able to get equal use out of these, as will I. Terrific camera at this price!

4-0 out of 5 stars great for taking pics of kids on the move!, November 28, 2010
My daughter is a shaker and a mover. Getting a good pic of her was nearly impossible unless we found a means to keep her still. This camera by far beats my digital Sony camera which recently stopped working. The flash does not cause the pics to be white washed and the pics are also perfectly clear whether it's the photographer or the subjects that are moving! For the price and ease of use (uneducated in photography) this camera exceeds my expectations. I've never owned a Fuji, only sony and kodak, but they have won my heart. Now i just need to find a decent carrying case.

5-0 out of 5 stars Little automatic camera, November 23, 2010
My girlfriend picked this camera: she liked the price, and how it looked. The camera is pleasant to look at and to hold in hands, it features nice finish and easy to use interface. The zoom equivalent is 32 - 96 mm.

There is a bunch of scene modes, including a panorama mode for stitching two or three side-by-side pictures together automatically (the camera displays a part of the previous image so you can overlay the next image in the viewfinder).

A thirds grid can be turned on on the screen to assist in picture framing.

There is an easy access to macro mode, self timer (10 and 2 sec), and flash mode (auto, always on, always off, and red eye reduction [auto only]).

In manual scene mode the camera lets you select ISO sensitivity, exposure compensation, white balance, and adds two more flash settings (slow sync and red eye slow sync).

The camera does not detect portrait orientation automatically, but there is a menu option to rotate pictures after taking.

5-0 out of 5 stars J40 - Great Value!, November 29, 2010
I recently purchased the FinePix J40 and I am very happy with my purchase. I bought this camera over some other budget cameras offered on Amazon last week because of the rechargeable battery and thin metal body.

I bought a similar camera last year and one of the features that my wife loves the most is the SR-Auto mode. This allows the camera to detect one of 6 different scenes that you might be shooting. She finds this particularly useful taking pictures of our daughter, closeups or landscapes.

We got back our first set of photos from Thanksgiving and the photos are very clear and colorful.

We took lots of photos from the time we got the camera through Thanksgiving and didn't have to recharge the battery!

I would recommend this to anybody looking for a quality camera at a great deal.

4-0 out of 5 stars Excellent camera for the price!, October 28, 2010

Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
I am a casual snapshot photographer, and I often use my camera outdoors for work as well, so my camera must be simple, fast on the draw, and survive in my pocket or bag. I find this Fujifilm is a great camera for that purpose. The camera is noticeably lighter weight and thinner than the usual, and I like there are no protruding setting dials to get bumped around.

Its minimalistic in look but has almost every capability of a camera costing $150 more, except just the slightest loss in fine detail and color richness as a fancier camera. When snapping a pic, this camera does not make the usual loud "click" when you take a picture. I find there is virtually none of the annoying shutter lag when using a flash. The settings and playback easy to work with without having to pour over the manual. Picture download is easy and I love that you dont need to use the software it comes with, if you use Picasa or some other program.

One minor caution, I found the battery can be put in backwards, which is probably not good for the camera or the battery. If this camera came with a case, now that would be great, but I just pop it in a soft Ipod sock and that works perfectly. Overall I think this is a great camera for the price point, making it perfect for gift giving or for yourself. Read more

26. Kindle Leather Cover, Chocolate Brown (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle)
Electronics
-- our price: $34.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B003DZ1YAO
Manufacturer: Amazon Digital Services, Inc
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

Amazon.comAmazon's Kindle Leather Cover

This leather cover offers optimal protection for your Kindle. Contoured, pebble-grain leather keeps your Kindle safe and secure, while the soft, charcoal-gray, microfiber interior protects the screen from scratches.

Lightweight, this cover is perfect for taking Kindle wherever you go, and is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand.


Secure Your Kindle

Our patent-pending hinge system secures Kindle in place. An elastic strap keeps the cover firmly closed for maximum screen protection. Simply attach Kindle to the hinge, apply the strap, and rest assured it will stay securely in place even when you're on the go.


Secure your Kindle in four easy steps
Secure your Kindle in four easy steps


Read Comfortably with One Hand


Reading with the cover on, you can easily access Kindle's navigation features and power switch, while the rounded edges offer a perfect fit in your hands. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand.


On the Go

This lightweight, compact cover is perfect for taking Kindle wherever you go. The sleek leather ensures the ultimate fit and protection, without adding bulk or weight.



Amazon’s official Kindle cover features contoured, pebble-grain leather available in 7 different colors.

 

 

Read comfortably with Amazon’s protective leather Kindle cover.




Read easily with one hand.



Protect your Kindle on the go.

 

... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars Cover Band, August 28, 2010
I have to hand it to the designers at Amazon. If nothing else, they listen to our comments and react.

The cover is fabulous. It's a piece of nice leather lined with quality padding and soft felt. It folds all the way back without any difficulty, making reading with one hand a breeze. The band helps to show which way the Kindle inside is facing, and keeps the reader from opening the cover the wrong way, which damaged many K2's. The corners are softly rounded, adding to the comfort and ease of use.

The patent-pending hinge is a work of genius. None of the Kindle is obstructed by bands or elastic straps. It securely locks the Kindle in place, leaving the whole device exposed.

I have to remark on the quality leather. Even my wife, who over-criticizes almost everyting, was very impressed with the fine-grade pebble-grain leather and actually had nice things to say after opening and inspecting it. If you knew my wife, you would know the value of this comment.

Unlike some other readers out there, Kindle makes available a custom-designed cover that works in concert with the device. I'm satisfied with the cover (and the Kindle3) and give it my highest recommendation.

5-0 out of 5 stars Objective info that may be helpful - light or not, colors, September 4, 2010
Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover for my first kindle, August 26, 2010
I ended up going with the black leather cover to match the Kindle Wireless Reading Device, Wi-Fi, 6" Display, Graphite - Latest Generation that I bought. The cover itself feels like it's made out of decent leather and gives me the impression that it will protect my Kindle while it's in my backpack or being casually tossed around the house.

The cover itself is easy to install. It took under a minute and once it was on, it wasn't really noticeable, more so than a hardcover bookcover is noticeable after a while when you read a book. It folds over fine behind the Kindle.

I'm happy with this cover. Sure, I could have bought a cheaper neoprene one but I wanted something that made me feel good about an e-reader. It may sound weird, but I like it from an aesthetics standpoint. It makes me feel like I've got a proper book in my hands instead of a toy or a gadget.

5-0 out of 5 stars Well designed, provides good protective padding, August 26, 2010
My Kindle 3 and cover arrived today. The cover is fairly similar to the Kindle 2 cover design, but with an elastic strap that can be used to hold the cover closed, or to hold the cover behind the Kindle when you are reading.

I bought the cover mostly to protect my Kindle when I'm traveling. The cover front and back are both tough and well padded, with a soft felt lining and look like they should provide good protection. The overall appearance is reasonably elegant.

The cover clips on easily and securely. The Kindle 3 has two small slots on the left side and two clips on the cover latch into these slots. You can slide the top clip down to unlatch and release the Kindle.

I have somewhat mixed feelings about the elastic strap. I know some people like to be able to securely close the cover, but for me it's mostly an unnecessary extra step. I will try it for a while: it looks easy enough to snip off if it becomes a nuisance. (Update in October: I'm getting used to it. I use the strap to hold the cover folded back when I am reading and I find that sliding my hand under the strap is a very comfortable way to hold the Kindle.)

The Kindle 3 + cover total around 0.7" thickness. So the cover is roughly doubling the Kindle's natural 0.335" thickness. But since I want protective padding, this seems like a price I need to pay!

The cover weighs 5.5 ounces. (The Kindle 3 by itself is 8.5 ounces.)

Overall, I'm very happy with the cover.

3-0 out of 5 stars Rather shoddy material and construction for the price, August 31, 2010
On the first day of use, after only using the securing band a couple of times, the band suddenly snapped from the top of the cover. It turns out that it was only flimsily glued to a slot on the top edge. Some superglue fixed this, but it really should not have been necessary.

The cover holds the Kindle snugly, however, it's a bit misaligned: the lower right side of the Kindle is more exposed than the upper right side.

All in all, I'd still have purchased it (though perhaps in a different color -- black was the only one available when the pre-order process began), but had third party covers been updated for the 3rd generation Kindle (e.g. the Moleskine) this product would probably have been priced more affordably.

5-0 out of 5 stars Glad I went ahead and got it...., September 4, 2010
After reading the reviews I was concerned that the light might be an issue since several folks commented that it doesn't shine evenly on the page. But I wanted something that would allow me to read in bed without disturbing my husband and the clip on lights are a pain to fuss with and are way too bright I think. Anyway, the light on the cover is just fine. Yes, it is a little dimmer at the bottom of the page but still quite readable. It is not one of those intensely bright lights that you have to kind of avert your gaze from. And it will not disturb anyone else trying to sleep.It kind of reminds me of my childhood days of reading a book under the covers with a flashlight except that you don't feel like you're going to suffocate.

The second thing that some people didn't like was the added weight of this cover. The added weight is what I really like. The Kindle itself is so thin and light....for me TOO light. It feels so fragile and un-book-like. The cover gives it that little bit of heft that turns it into a book. I especially like to bend the cover all the way back and hold it either in both hands or in my left hand while I eat popcorn and drink champagne cocktails with my right.

This is just one woman's opinion but I think can assure you that the light is adequate and very handy. And the weight is not a burden and may make it more of a normal reading experience for you as it does for me. Hope this helps if you are on the fence.

4-0 out of 5 stars I'm returning my Cole Haan cover for this one, but..., September 2, 2010
I'll admit it - I'm a bit of an accessories snob. I had the Cole Haan Hand-Stained Pebble Grain Leather Kindle Cover with Hinge (Fits 6" Display, 2nd Generation Kindle), Saddle Tan for my K2, and I originally purchased the Cole Haan Hand-Woven Leather Kindle Cover with Hinge (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle), Whiskey for my new K3. The new Cole Haan case is not meeting my needs, so I decided to give the Amazon cover a try.

My new red cover just arrived today. The color is very nice - more brick red than burgundy. I immediately noticed that it was much smaller and sleeker than the Cole Haan cover. The Kindle fits just inside the cover, and there is not a lot of excess around the edges. I noticed that many reviewers are complaining about the weight/bulk, but for me this was an improvement over the Cole Haan covers. The strap is a nice feature as well, although I'm wondering how long it will hold up after reading some of the other negative reviews.

The biggest con for me is that the leather doesn't feel as nice as I would like it to. Perhaps I shouldn't be comparing it to the incredibly buttery-soft leather that Cole Haan uses, but it's hard to ignore the difference. This leather is harder and reminds me of a plastic substance. I'm not saying it's bad, it's just not super lush. If I had never seen the Cole Haan cover, I would likely not even be commenting on this in such detail!

Overall, this cover is perfectly fine. If you're super picky about the quality of the leather, you may not like it. If you can get over that detail, I think this cover will do the trick.


1-0 out of 5 stars Lovely looking product that doesn't hold up, September 28, 2010
I got this on Saturday. It broke today (Tuesday). The tabs that hold the kindle in the cover are not very sturdy. I don't think I put undue pressure on the kindle. But the top tab broke off, requiring the use of needle nose pliers to extract the broken piece from the kindle. I expect a product I pay $35 for to last longer than three days. I'm very disappointed.

In looking at it, perhaps it is really a design issue and not a quality issue.

Honestly, I did find the cover cumbersome when using the keypad. If you are using the keypad frequently, you might want to consider a sleeve. I will not replace this with another book type cover.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover, September 3, 2010
I am very pleased with this cover. It is very protective, a nice shade of blue and very compact. It does fold over. I know some people don't realize this. The leather is stiff at first but it will fold over and soften after a few days. I had the official cover for kindle 2 and they have made some improvements. The leather is a better quality, they now offer a choice of colors and the spine doesn't feel like it will fall apart. Overall having the elastic is nice as well as it makes it more secure. I like that it makes the kindle feel more like a book and the hinge system is really nice. I like the clean look and won't be buying any cover that puts corner straps on the device. My one con is it weighs 5.7 ounces and while that is not heavy it really could be more like 4 ounces as they probably make the cover heavier than it really needs to be and still be protective.

4-0 out of 5 stars Kindle 3 Cover - Video Review, August 27, 2010
Video review of Kindle 3 cover. The app on the iPad is "Cheez Pro Clock" showing FAILblog - I thought it rather appropriate given the UPS FAILure to deliver on a weekend leaving me without a Kindle 3 to use with the case!

Overall 4 stars. It feels slightly more sturdy and a little less cheap than the Kindle 2 cover. I took one star off because it still has the potential flaw of having nothing to keep the kindle in place at the right, and because I'd prefer a slightly more soft feel to the outside.

5-0 out of 5 stars Cover Band, August 28, 2010
I have to hand it to the designers at Amazon. If nothing else, they listen to our comments and react.

The cover is fabulous. It's a piece of nice leather lined with quality padding and soft felt. It folds all the way back without any difficulty, making reading with one hand a breeze. The band helps to show which way the Kindle inside is facing, and keeps the reader from opening the cover the wrong way, which damaged many K2's. The corners are softly rounded, adding to the comfort and ease of use.

The patent-pending hinge is a work of genius. None of the Kindle is obstructed by bands or elastic straps. It securely locks the Kindle in place, leaving the whole device exposed.

I have to remark on the quality leather. Even my wife, who over-criticizes almost everyting, was very impressed with the fine-grade pebble-grain leather and actually had nice things to say after opening and inspecting it. If you knew my wife, you would know the value of this comment.

Unlike some other readers out there, Kindle makes available a custom-designed cover that works in concert with the device. I'm satisfied with the cover (and the Kindle3) and give it my highest recommendation.

5-0 out of 5 stars Objective info that may be helpful - light or not, colors, September 4, 2010
Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover for my first kindle, August 26, 2010
I ended up going with the black leather cover to match the Kindle Wireless Reading Device, Wi-Fi, 6" Display, Graphite - Latest Generation that I bought. The cover itself feels like it's made out of decent leather and gives me the impression that it will protect my Kindle while it's in my backpack or being casually tossed around the house.

The cover itself is easy to install. It took under a minute and once it was on, it wasn't really noticeable, more so than a hardcover bookcover is noticeable after a while when you read a book. It folds over fine behind the Kindle.

I'm happy with this cover. Sure, I could have bought a cheaper neoprene one but I wanted something that made me feel good about an e-reader. It may sound weird, but I like it from an aesthetics standpoint. It makes me feel like I've got a proper book in my hands instead of a toy or a gadget.

5-0 out of 5 stars Well designed, provides good protective padding, August 26, 2010
My Kindle 3 and cover arrived today. The cover is fairly similar to the Kindle 2 cover design, but with an elastic strap that can be used to hold the cover closed, or to hold the cover behind the Kindle when you are reading.

I bought the cover mostly to protect my Kindle when I'm traveling. The cover front and back are both tough and well padded, with a soft felt lining and look like they should provide good protection. The overall appearance is reasonably elegant.

The cover clips on easily and securely. The Kindle 3 has two small slots on the left side and two clips on the cover latch into these slots. You can slide the top clip down to unlatch and release the Kindle.

I have somewhat mixed feelings about the elastic strap. I know some people like to be able to securely close the cover, but for me it's mostly an unnecessary extra step. I will try it for a while: it looks easy enough to snip off if it becomes a nuisance. (Update in October: I'm getting used to it. I use the strap to hold the cover folded back when I am reading and I find that sliding my hand under the strap is a very comfortable way to hold the Kindle.)

The Kindle 3 + cover total around 0.7" thickness. So the cover is roughly doubling the Kindle's natural 0.335" thickness. But since I want protective padding, this seems like a price I need to pay!

The cover weighs 5.5 ounces. (The Kindle 3 by itself is 8.5 ounces.)

Overall, I'm very happy with the cover.

3-0 out of 5 stars Rather shoddy material and construction for the price, August 31, 2010
On the first day of use, after only using the securing band a couple of times, the band suddenly snapped from the top of the cover. It turns out that it was only flimsily glued to a slot on the top edge. Some superglue fixed this, but it really should not have been necessary.

The cover holds the Kindle snugly, however, it's a bit misaligned: the lower right side of the Kindle is more exposed than the upper right side.

All in all, I'd still have purchased it (though perhaps in a different color -- black was the only one available when the pre-order process began), but had third party covers been updated for the 3rd generation Kindle (e.g. the Moleskine) this product would probably have been priced more affordably.

5-0 out of 5 stars Glad I went ahead and got it...., September 4, 2010
After reading the reviews I was concerned that the light might be an issue since several folks commented that it doesn't shine evenly on the page. But I wanted something that would allow me to read in bed without disturbing my husband and the clip on lights are a pain to fuss with and are way too bright I think. Anyway, the light on the cover is just fine. Yes, it is a little dimmer at the bottom of the page but still quite readable. It is not one of those intensely bright lights that you have to kind of avert your gaze from. And it will not disturb anyone else trying to sleep.It kind of reminds me of my childhood days of reading a book under the covers with a flashlight except that you don't feel like you're going to suffocate.

The second thing that some people didn't like was the added weight of this cover. The added weight is what I really like. The Kindle itself is so thin and light....for me TOO light. It feels so fragile and un-book-like. The cover gives it that little bit of heft that turns it into a book. I especially like to bend the cover all the way back and hold it either in both hands or in my left hand while I eat popcorn and drink champagne cocktails with my right.

This is just one woman's opinion but I think can assure you that the light is adequate and very handy. And the weight is not a burden and may make it more of a normal reading experience for you as it does for me. Hope this helps if you are on the fence.

4-0 out of 5 stars I'm returning my Cole Haan cover for this one, but..., September 2, 2010
I'll admit it - I'm a bit of an accessories snob. I had the Cole Haan Hand-Stained Pebble Grain Leather Kindle Cover with Hinge (Fits 6" Display, 2nd Generation Kindle), Saddle Tan for my K2, and I originally purchased the Cole Haan Hand-Woven Leather Kindle Cover with Hinge (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle), Whiskey for my new K3. The new Cole Haan case is not meeting my needs, so I decided to give the Amazon cover a try.

My new red cover just arrived today. The color is very nice - more brick red than burgundy. I immediately noticed that it was much smaller and sleeker than the Cole Haan cover. The Kindle fits just inside the cover, and there is not a lot of excess around the edges. I noticed that many reviewers are complaining about the weight/bulk, but for me this was an improvement over the Cole Haan covers. The strap is a nice feature as well, although I'm wondering how long it will hold up after reading some of the other negative reviews.

The biggest con for me is that the leather doesn't feel as nice as I would like it to. Perhaps I shouldn't be comparing it to the incredibly buttery-soft leather that Cole Haan uses, but it's hard to ignore the difference. This leather is harder and reminds me of a plastic substance. I'm not saying it's bad, it's just not super lush. If I had never seen the Cole Haan cover, I would likely not even be commenting on this in such detail!

Overall, this cover is perfectly fine. If you're super picky about the quality of the leather, you may not like it. If you can get over that detail, I think this cover will do the trick.


1-0 out of 5 stars Lovely looking product that doesn't hold up, September 28, 2010
I got this on Saturday. It broke today (Tuesday). The tabs that hold the kindle in the cover are not very sturdy. I don't think I put undue pressure on the kindle. But the top tab broke off, requiring the use of needle nose pliers to extract the broken piece from the kindle. I expect a product I pay $35 for to last longer than three days. I'm very disappointed.

In looking at it, perhaps it is really a design issue and not a quality issue.

Honestly, I did find the cover cumbersome when using the keypad. If you are using the keypad frequently, you might want to consider a sleeve. I will not replace this with another book type cover.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great cover, September 3, 2010
I am very pleased with this cover. It is very protective, a nice shade of blue and very compact. It does fold over. I know some people don't realize this. The leather is stiff at first but it will fold over and soften after a few days. I had the official cover for kindle 2 and they have made some improvements. The leather is a better quality, they now offer a choice of colors and the spine doesn't feel like it will fall apart. Overall having the elastic is nice as well as it makes it more secure. I like that it makes the kindle feel more like a book and the hinge system is really nice. I like the clean look and won't be buying any cover that puts corner straps on the device. My one con is it weighs 5.7 ounces and while that is not heavy it really could be more like 4 ounces as they probably make the cover heavier than it really needs to be and still be protective.

4-0 out of 5 stars Kindle 3 Cover - Video Review, August 27, 2010
Video review of Kindle 3 cover. The app on the iPad is "Cheez Pro Clock" showing FAILblog - I thought it rather appropriate given the UPS FAILure to deliver on a weekend leaving me without a Kindle 3 to use with the case!

Overall 4 stars. It feels slightly more sturdy and a little less cheap than the Kindle 2 cover. I took one star off because it still has the potential flaw of having nothing to keep the kindle in place at the right, and because I'd prefer a slightly more soft feel to the outside. Read more


27. Kindle DX Wireless Reading Device, Free 3G, 3G Works Globally, Graphite, 9.7" Display with New E Ink Pearl Technology
Electronics
list price: $379.00 -- our price: $379.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B002GYWHSQ
Manufacturer: Amazon.com
Sales Rank: 8
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

Say Hello to the Newest Kindle DXAll New, High Contrast E-Ink Screen: Our graphite Kindle DX uses our all new, improved electronic ink display, with 50% better contrast for the clearest text and sharpest imagesBeautiful Large Display: The 9.7" diagonal E-ink screen is ideal for a broad range of reading material, including graphic-rich books, PDFs, newspapers, magazines, and blogs Read in Sunlight with No Glare: Unlike backlit computer or LCD screens, Kindle DX's display looks and reads like real paper, with no glare. Read as easily in bright sunlight as in your living roomSlim: Just over 1/3 of an inch, as thin as most magazinesBooks In Under 60 Seconds: Get books delivered wirelessly in less than 60 seconds; no PC requiredFree 3G Wireless: 3G wireless lets you download books right from your Kindle DX; no monthly fees, no annual contracts.Enjoy 3G wireless coverage at home or abroad in over 100 countries.Long Battery Life: Read for up to 1 week on a single charge with wireless on. Turn wireless off and read for up to two weeks.Carry Your Library: Holds up to 3,500 books, periodicals, and documentsBuilt-In PDF Reader: Carry and read all of your personal and professional documents on the go. Now with Zoom capability to easily view small print and detailed tables or graphicsAuto-Rotating Screen: Display auto-rotates from portrait to landscape as you turn the device so you can view full-width maps, graphs, tables, and Web pagesLarge Selection: Over 600,000 books and the largest selection of the most popular books people want to read plus U.S. and international newspapers, magazines, and blogs.Over 1.8 million free, out-of-copyright, pre-1923 books are available to read on Kindle.For non-U.S. customers, content availability and pricing will vary. Low Book Prices and Free Book Samples: New York Times Best Sellers and New Releases from $9.99. Download and read first chapters for free before you decide to buy ... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars Different and Better, June 11, 2009
I have owned both Kindle 1 and Kindle 2, so I'm already committed to the basic idea: e-ink reading in a slim form factor with excellent connectivity to a large selection of books and subscriptions. I have come to rely on my Kindle experience, and it has seriously enhanced my reading.

The DX was not an obvious upgrade for me, but two features put me over the edge: the larger screen, and the native PDF reader. I now have the DX in my hands, and can report PROS, CONS, and NEUTRALS:

PROS:

-- the larger screen is a definite plus. I use the larger type size on my Kindle 2 (older eyes), and at this type size I get far more text per page on the DX. This makes the whole reading experience more book-like (and should be a boon to people who buy large-print books.)

-- the screen is also sharper and crisper than my Kindle 2 in a side-by-side comparison: the text is darker, and the contrast is much better, making for better visibility overall.

-- on a side note, the larger screen also makes it possible to read poetry on the kindle, even at large type sizes. On earlier Kindles, the smaller screen cut off lines, so that you would lose the sense of when the poet ended the line. On the DX, you can see the whole line exactly as the poet meant it, with the cut-off in the right spot.

-- the PDF reader works as advertised, and is extremely convenient. PDF documents appear on the DX exactly as they do on a computer screen. Moreover, you can drag and drop your documents directly to the device using the USB cable (or use the for-a-fee email if you absolutely must.) The only downside: at least for the documents that I've used so far, I cannot adjust the type size as I can with native Kindle documents.

-- screen rotation also works as advertised: it operates as a mild zoom on both graphics and text and offsets slightly the downside of not being able to adjust the typesize on PDF documents. One nice design touch: the four-way navigation stick introduced on the Kindle 2 is rotation-sensitive, and will move as expected relative to the screen rotation.

-- more of the device space is devoted to the screen, while the white plastic border around the screen seems to have shrunk, both in general and compared to the proportion of screen to plastic on the Kindle 2. I like this (but see below about the keyboard).

-- storage: I like the increase in storage space, and don't mind the lack of an external storage card. I can see some people having trouble with this, but only those folks who either a) must regularly carry around PDF documents totalling more than 3.5 GB of space or b) must have nearly 3500 books regularly at their fingertips. I fall in neither category.

CONS:

-- price: it's expensive, as you can tell pretty quickly. If you value the larger size, and the native PDF reader, these features may justify the roughly 30% premium you pay for the DX over the Kindle 2. In truth, the DX SHOULD cost more than the Kindle 2, and a 30% premium isn't unreasonable. But, for my money, Amazon should drop the price on the Kindle 2 to $300 or so, and charge $400 or a little less for the DX. Still, I bought it, and will keep it at this price.

-- one-sided navigation buttons: all of the buttons are now on the right side, and none are on the left. I'm a righty, so I shouldn't complain, but I found myself using both sides on the Kindle 2. Lefties have reason to complain, I think.

-- One-handed handling: I often read while I walk, with my Kindle in one hand, and something else in my other. Because of the button layout, this will be more difficult on the DX.

-- metal backing: I miss the tacky rubberized backing on my Kindle 1. When I placed my Kindle 1 on an inclined surface, it stayed in place. Not so my Kindle 2 and now my DX. This is not a complaint specific to the DX, but it's still there.

NEUTRALS (i.e. things worth noting):

-- weight: the DX is heavier, noticeably so. This is only an issue if, like me, you regularly use the kindle with one hand . . . and even so, it's still doable.

-- keyboard: the keyboard has 4 rows, and not 5: the top row of numbers from the Kindle 1 and 2 has been merged into the top qwerty row, so that numbers are now only accessible with an alt-key combination. The keys are vertically thinner too, so that the whole keyboard is no more than 1" tall (compared to over an 1.5" on the Kindle 2). At the same time, the keys themselves are a bit easier to press, a bit more protruding than on the Kindle 2. For someone with big fingers (like me), this will be a slightly harder keyboard to use, but only slightly.

That's all I can see. Overall, the pluses outweigh the minuses for me, and I'm satisfied with my purchase. I can now think of using my DX for work documents on a regular basis, because of the PDF reader. The screen size and screen rotation make the overall reading experience more immersive.

Overall, the DX feels more like text and less like device and comes closer to the stated goal of the Kindle: for the device to disappear, leaving only the joy of reading.







3-0 out of 5 stars DX not quite all that--but has been improved a bit, June 13, 2009
This review was written back when the DX first came out and--as has been brought to my attention--needs to be updated a bit. I will indicate where things have changed for the better within the body of the review:

I owned the K1 and then the K2 and love them both, so I was really looking forward to the DX. My plan was to use the DX at home, and keep my K2 for carrying all over creation with me. It wasn't long, though, after my DX arrived the day before yesterday before disappointment set in.

Don't get me wrong, there is a LOT to like about the DX:

1) Pictures are awesome on it, if the publisher formats them properly.

2) Those who complain about darkness of text on their K2 (a problem I've never had, btw) will be thrilled by the DX's very dark text.

EDIT: LIKE THE KINDLE 3, THE DX NOW SPORTS A NEW E-INK DISPLAY THAT HAS MUCH BETTER CONTRAST, SO TEXT & PICTURES REALLY "POP."


3) The ability to rotate the screen is great. Gives you a closer look at things like maps and charts.

4) The browser is a bit faster than on the K1 or K2, though that isn't saying much--it is still very clunky to use.

EDIT: THOUGH STILL CLUNKY, THE BROWSER *HAS* BEEN IMPROVED FOR EASIER USE. BUT STILL DON'T PLAN TO DO A LOT OF WEB SURFING WITH IT.


5) But web pages look pretty good on the DX.

6) It holds 3500 books.


BUT.....the DX just isn't all that. It has drawbacks that are really making me consider sending it back before my 30 days are up:

1) First and foremost, while it is true that it natively reads PDFs, it is really only a PDF *viewer*. You can't change the font size on PDFs, links will not function on them, and the ability to magnify pictures doesn't work on them either. So you better have LARGE fonts on your PDF before you load it. Looking at the PDF in horizontal mode helps a bit, but not by much.

EDIT: WE NOW HAVE THE ABILITY TO ZOOM IN ON PDF DOCUMENTS, WHICH HELPS IN READING THEM--BUT IT WOULD STILL BEHOOVE USERS TO USE LARGER FONT SIZES IN DOCUMENTS BEFORE CONVERTING TO PDF FORMAT.



2) The DX is too big to hold comfortably. It's not really all that heavy, but it is top heavy and you feel a pull on your hands. And that pull is really evident if you try to use the keyboard while holding it--you practically have to lay the DX down flat, it becomes so difficult to type.

3) They merged the number keys with the QWERTY keys (losing a line of keys). What development genius thought it would be helpful and an "improvement?" To go to a location within a book you have to click Menu, choose "go to," then click the Symbols key, choose the numbers you want, then close Symbols before you can choose "location." Whew! Or you can click Alt + the letter button at the top that corresponds to the number you want. Joy.



4) Before my DX came, I really didn't think this would bother me at all, but I have to say: I really HATE the fact that the "next page" button is only on one side. I mostly use the left hand button. And yes, with the DX's rotation ability you can turn it upside down, placing the "next page" button on the left side.... However, when you do this, the button is so high up that you have to slide your hand (not your thumb, your whole hand) up in order to turn the page. May sound nit-picky, but it is truly a PITA to break off reading to do it. Not only that, but having the keyboard at the top makes it even more top-heavy than when it is right side up!

5) when you rotate the DX so that it is horizontal, the "next page" button is either at the bottom or the top--in either case you can't just flick your thumb and change the page. Again, a PITA.

6) If you leave the rotation feature on "Auto" when you are not using your DX it drains your battery, so you must remember to turn the feature off when you stop reading.

7) Still no folders. An organization nightmare three times bigger than that of the K2 (which itself had increased the same problem on the K1): the possibility of storing 3500 books but only being able to sort them by author, title, and "most recent first."

EDIT: AMAZON HAS NOW GIVEN ALL KINDLE USERS THE ABILITY TO CREATE "COLLECTIONS." THIS LETS YOU ORGANIZE YOUR BOOKS BY GENRE OR WHATEVER YOU LIKE, SO THAT'S A BIG HELP. HOWEVER, FOR SOME STRANGE REASON, UNLESS YOU RESORT TO FIXES LIKE PUTTING SYMBOLS BEFORE THE COLLECTION NAMES WHEN IN "VIEW BY COLLECTIONS" IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO ALPHABETIZE THEM! I WOULD HOPE THAT THIS GETS FIXED IN THE NEAR FUTURE WITH A SOFTWARE UPDATE.



I will be fiercely debating with myself in the next week or so, on whether I really want to keep the DX. It is so disappointing. It has the potential of being a really great e-reader...but as it stands now, it isn't. It's OK. But for $489, it should be a lot more than merely OK.

EDIT: I DID END UP RETURNING MY DX THE FOLLOWING WEEK. THE PRICE HAS SINCE DROPPED--IT NOW COSTS $379--BUT IT *STILL* ISN'T ALL THAT.

4-0 out of 5 stars From a first time Kindle buyer: Good, but not perfect, June 11, 2009
First off, I am a first time kindle buyer, so this review will be more geared to those buyers thinking of entering into the kindle market, not a comparison of past editions.

My first impression of the Kindle DX was that it was actually very small compared to what I expected. The entire device is slightly smaller (in height and width) than a piece of paper, with the screen taking up approximately 85-90% of the front. This was actually a nice surprise, since I wanted something very portable, but good for magazines/research articles. After seeing the size of the DX, I think a K2 would have been way too small for what I want. At the same time, the device is very hefty. Picking it up, it becomes almost tiring to hold up in one hand for too long (another reason I think this one is better geared toward short articles instead of extended novel reading). It has a nice solid feel to it, but for some reason I was expecting it to be lighter.

The kindle only takes a couple of seconds to power up and immediately goes to the last article you were reading. A row of buttons are positioned on the right, which let you go to the main home page, go to the next page of an article, previous page, bring up a menu, or go "back". There is also a small four-way joystick to navigate around (which also has the ability to be pressed for selections). The joystick is very sensitive and easy to navigate with, although not overly sensitive that you hit things by mistake (at least very often - it has happened a couple of times so far).

For those in the market for an ereader and can't decide between the Kindle and another device, I can tell you what made me go toward the Kindle: Whispernet. It is a free, no subscription based service that comes on all Kindles. You get free access to the internet anywhere Sprint reception can be found. You can purchase books/magazines/newspapers anywhere, and have them in less than 60 seconds. You can access the web, check your web-based email, look up directions, find weather reports, movie times, etc. Although the Kindle terms say that normal web browsing might result in extra charges, my assumption is that this clause will just cover amazon if they choose to charge for web in the future. As of right now, everything is free. The Web Browser is very rudimentary and does not show pages very well. Even most pages designed for mobile phones showed up badly for me, although some were okay. The browser is very slow, but could really come in handy if some information was needed and no internet was available.

I have tried several blogs and magazines, as well as the native pdf viewer and all seem to produce well formatted articles with crisp, clear pictures. Lighter pictures tend to show up better as darker pictures blur together if they do not have enough contrasting elements. The one problem I have noticed with the pdf viewer is that some text/elements can end up being very small and hard to see. The pdf viewer is stuck on one size, which is slightly smaller than most pdf's are intended to be viewed at. There is no way to increase font size, and the only way to zoom is by rotating the display. This zooms in on the top or bottom half of the screen. Rotating to a landscape display actually helps that problem a great deal, but some sort of zoom feature would have been nice. You can search in pdf documents or go to certain pages, but it is impossible to annotate as the Kindle lets you do in normal document files. Pdf documents can be sent to the Kindle DX via usb cable or through a special email that is set up for the device. However, documents that are sent via email are charged a small fee (I was charged $0.45 for a pdf slightly larger than 2MB - I will use the usb cable from now on unless it's absolutely necessary to use email). Blogs I have subscribed to have continuously updated over the time I've had the DX... it is nice to have a constant stream of info to read even when not in the position to surf the web. Most blogs and magazines are subscription based with costs ranging from free to $1.99 or more for the more popular ones. This fact turns many people off since blogs can be found free on the net, but the convenience of having them constantly updated with no internet connection required and brought to you in an easy to read format makes them somewhat worth it in my opinion. Having read through some and watched constant updates while writing this review, I think I will be more likely to keep the blog subscriptions even more than the magazines subscriptions. Most blogs and magazines give you a 14-day trial to see how well you like them before committing to a purchase. They can be organized into separate articles/sections, and are easy to navigate.

There is a text-to-speech function that can be used in most books (Random House published books excluded because of a lawsuit brought against amazon). The sound of it seems a little old fashioned with an extremely computer-sounding voice, but it is a nice addition. You can also play MP3's, but don't expect extremely high-quality sound. The Kindle DX has a earphone jack on the top of the device, or small speakers on the bottom of the device for these funtctions.

A keyboard is present at the bottom of the device. It has a QWERTY format, but with the numbers located on the top row of letters (a shift button selects them). It is fairly easy to type on in my opinion, but takes a little getting used to. The buttons are small, rounded and don't take much to push. For this reason, it is difficult to tell if you hit the button acurately or not, and often times you find you hit wrong keys by accident. The Kindle actually tends to be a bit wide to easily type if you have small hands like me. Larger hands should do fine.

As for the screen, the e-ink is easy to read, easy on the eyes, and it is crisp and has a nice resolution. Highly detailed pictures showed up nicely as long as they weren't too dark. The only complaint I would have about the screen is that it is very reflective. I need to make sure I'm not around any bright lights before reading. Otherwise, the glare interferes.

SHOULD YOU BUY THE DX?: Well, I think that comes down to what you want to read. The DX is a nice reader (although expensive!). It is probably the perfect size for reading magazine articles, journal articles, and newspapers. The articles come out as being crisp and easy to read, and having them constantly delivered to you is great. I think the device might be a little on the heavy/large side for continous reading of books, so for that, I would probably go with the Kindle 2 instead. For textbooks, I think the verdict is still out. Being able to flip through the pages of textbooks and quickly find information still isn't completely replicated by the Kindle. However, the search features of the Kindle could prove to be invaluable in studying, and there's no doubt the kindle helps in areas of portability. The DX replicates figures and images nicely, but in some textbooks, color is vital. That could be the downfall of the DX when it comes to Textbooks.

CONS/FOR FUTURE KINDLES: There's quite a few things that prevent the DX from being perfect, but maybe they can be added into future editions. First and foremost: Folders/Organization! Right now, all articles/blogs/newspapers/books get clumped together in one big menu. Why is there no way to organize these and place them in categories? This would be a huge improvement and would take very little effort. Also: Color. As I just mentioned above, color is a huge part of many textbooks, articles, etc. As soon as the technology is ready, a color kindle will be a huge improvement. A memory card slot was included in the first Kindle; however it was removed in the second and DX. This needs to be added back. Especially for those of us with large pdf libraries, we need the extra memory slot. Not to expand the memory so much as to just give us a portable way of getting articles onto the kindle. As of right now, you can be charged to have articles sent to the Kindle, or we can be near a computer. Why not add the memory card slot back and give us one more option? A better web browser, some sort of side-lighting for nighttime reading, touchscreen, thinner, and lighter are other suggestions I can think of to strive for.

UPDATE: So, after using the DX for a while now, I have come to absolutely love it. Unfortunately, so has my girlfriend, so I don't get to see it much anymore.

A few small things have come to annoy me though, so I would like to point those out. First, the screen rotation is becoming more and more annoying. I find the screen rotating on me many times when I don't want it to. Slightly changing the position of the device suddenly leads to the screen being rotated, and then it takes another few seconds of shifting it around to get it back the way you want. There should be a way to turn screen rotation off if you know you won't want it bothering you for a while. A simple setting could then be turned on again for normal use. (UPDATE: Apparently, you can disable the auto-rotation. User A.Nichols wrote in the comments: "Push the button with the Aa (to change font size) and you'll find the option to set change screen rotation from Auto (default) to portrait. I found the screen rotation to be annoying also when reading, it's easy to accidentally change the angle.")

Another thing that has come to bother me is the screen lag. Very often, it's as though the screen sticks after you push buttons. You push them again and again, and then the screen finally unsticks and you fly through 3-4 pages. It's difficult to tell if the device didn't register the button you pushed or if it's just running behind. Unfortunately, this has resulted in my purchasing a book that I didn't mean to (amazon was nice enough to remove the charge though). Usually you get a "Would you like to cancel your order?" immediately after purchasing on the kindle, but this time I guess I pushed too much and flew through that screen too.

Even with these small issues, I can't put my Kindle down. It is the best money I have spent in a long time.

2-0 out of 5 stars OK device, terrible warranty, June 25, 2009
I have had my Kindle DX for about two months and am mostly pleased with it--it works well for reading, and the display is easy to read--but I wish it had better support for PDFs. Yes, they display, but if you don't like the way it zooms, you can't do anything about it except rotate the device; you should be able to to some manual tweaking. Additionally, you cannot make annotations on PDFs (I understand why you can't highlight, but there's no reason you shouldn't be able to make notes for a page as a whole). I was hoping to use this more for grad school, but I don't think students or professionals with a lot of PDFs to read will find this useful, unless they are formatted specifically with the Kindle in mind.

Additionally, my screen has recently developed a defect. Namely, I have horizontal and vertical lines, in addition to a portion of the display that is stuck black. I did not do anything unsual to my device like smash it or drop it, but Amazon refuses to replace the Kindle because they claim it is not covered under the 1-year limited warranty (even though, while I am not a lawyer, it certainly seems to be if you actually read it: "We warrant the Device against defects in materials and workmanship under ordinary consumer use for one year from the date of original retail purchase...."). Further, some people HAVE had their Kindles replaced (even when it is cleary their fault!), so it seems to be hit or miss depending on who you get on the other end of the phone. If you buy this device, I recommend treating it like a piece of glass: very carefully, always in a caseor sleeve, and DO get the extended warranty--except you'd be better off buying a warranty from SquareTrade at a much more reasonable price than Amazon's.

In the mean time, I have a $389 brick that Amazon won't replace. You should NOT have to buy an extra warranty to have damage resulting from normal use and handling of the device be covered (and, depending on who at Amazon you talk to, you apparently don't). But because of the sketchy 1-year warranty, I cannot recommend that anyone buy this device; Amazon needs to stand by it better, with or without the extended 2-year warranty (although you'd be better off purchasing a similar third-party warranty for less). The device is OK (good, not great); the customer support with regard to warranty (they *were* good when I made an accidental purchase on the Kindle) is terrible.

EDIT: After a month-long battle with customer service, they finally agreed to replace my device. It has been functioning fine since then, but my original complains about reading (particularly PDFs) still stands, and the warranty battle should have never happened.

5-0 out of 5 stars Going to buy the GRAY!! Sorry Sony PRS-505... I'm moving on, June 11, 2009
July 5 update: I've apparently been living under an e-reader rock because today is the first day I hear of the new dark gray DX. If you are contemplating the whether to go with the white or gray DX -- DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT IT!! Get the gray!! The one thing I learned with my Sony Readers is that the darker the bezel -- the more contrast between the screen and the easier it is to read. So even if the screen and nothing in the e-ink display has changed and everything else is the same except for the color of the bezel -- the darker bezel will make for an easier more constrasty reading experience. FINALLY, Amazon gets a clue and realizes that the darker bezel will make for better reading though it may not look as "nice" as the white!

FIRMWARE UPDATE as of 11.30.2009:

I have now M-Edge Platform Jacket for Kindle DX (Genuine Leather--Pebbled Navy)--Back to School Sale!! because you can set the Kindle up to stand by itself on the table next to you or a lap desk. This makes it easier to to view music, knitting patterns, or just plain books (addressing some users complaints about it being "too heavy" to hold comfortably).

I had been disappointed that the Kindle automatically goes to sleep after 5 minutes because if you are using the Kindle for reading patterns or music, it times out on you while you are still "working" on a page. However, Amazon come out with a new firmware release... the Kindle DX now stays on for 20 minutes before going into screen saver mode which is a big improvement.

In addition, with the new firmware, you have the option of converting your PDFs to Kindle format -- which should address the lack of "zoom" and "annotation" features -- at least there is a workaround for now.

UPDATE as of 06.16.2009: The Kindle may have just literally saved my career and saved my "backend". I had an interview yesterday and thought I knew where I was going. I'm one of the last dinosaurs not to have a Garmin and got lost. After circling around for awhile and getting more and more uptight about missing my interview, I remembered the Browser on the Kindle.

On the K2, the browser was basically unusable because of the size. However, with the DX, I was able to go to Google Maps, look up the address and had my directions in just a couple of seconds. The map was rendered beautifully and the turn-by-turn directions could be bookmarked and even if my DX fell asleep, it awoke still displaying the directions. THANK YOU KINDLE!!!

---------------------------------------------

The UPS truck arrived a couple of hours ago. I feel like a kid on Christmas Day and I got (just about) everything I wanted!

My Sony PRS-505 has finally and officially become my "Emergency Backup Reader"

My romance with ebook readers got off to a bumpy start when I got my first eInk device -- the Cybook Bookeen. Firmware issues and awkward buttons made it rather disappointing.

Then I found true love with the Sony PRS-505. I loved the metal case. I loved the "Collections" (essentially folders features). I loved the looks and loved the display.

However, the Kindle 2 woo'ed me with the size of its content collection. However, for reading I still ultimately preferred my Sony.

Now, with the larger Kindle DX, I've set my Sony aside and there is a new love in my life. Let me count the ways:

1. SCREEN SIZE: Reading on the Kindle DX vs 6" readers is like the difference between sleeping in a King sized bed vs a Twin Bed or riding in the backseat of a 2-door 1981 Honda Accord vs bucket seats in a Honda Odyssey. You feel like you have room to breath. The larger screen allows you to maximize the use of the real estate -- taking advantage of larger fonts and more white space. This makes text much easier to read -- even if you are just reading regular books.

2. KEYBOARD: I also love that they have compacted the keyboard so that it doesn't dominate the overall appearance of the device. The smaller keyboard in no way compromises the ability to type. However, it improves the look by making the proportions more appealing and it means the device isn't horrifically larger than the 6" device.

3. PDF + BIG SCREEN = LOTS MORE USES: I can transfer my knitting patterns (complete with knitting graphs and diagrams) and cello music to my e-reader.

Using the Kindle for knitting -- I can highlight my place in the knitting pattern making it easier to work more complicated stitch patterns.

I play cello and many of my music books are available in PDF format -- again the Kindle is wonderful for carrying all my music with me at one time. Turning pages is faster and easier than with a physical book. The kindle sits well on the music stand (though you want to make sure the tray of the music stand is taller than the Kindle or the Kindle will be "top heavy" making the bottom slide forward and potentially falling off the stand.

4. SCREEN ROTATION -- You can rotate the screen in any direction and the page quickly re-orients itself. You can keep rotating 360 degrees and the screen follows you. The buttons remain the same but the thumb stick also reorients so that if you push right relative to the current orientation, that always means "page forward" no matter what direction you are in.

If you are left handed and really bothered by having the buttons only on the right side, you can turn the device upside down and voila -- now your buttons are on the left side.

5. BUTTON CONFIGURATION -- I actually PREFER having the next page and back page on the same side and in a contiguous location (as opposed to opposite sides of the device like the Kindle 2). It makes one-handed reading easier without having to reach over to the other side of the device to flip back and forth.

6. SOLID feeling -- I like the heavier feel -- it is comparable to the heft of a hardbound book.

7. READING While charging -- this sounds like a little thing but with the Sony, if you have the device plugged in for charging, you can't read on the device at the same time.

There are a two things I still think the Sony does better:

1. COLLECTIONS: It would be nice to have folders so that music could be separated from technical books which is also separated from knitting patterns etc. The absence of folders is even MORE annoying on the DX because you are likely to have a much more diverse collection of books/documents on there.

2. EPUB SUPPORT: ePUB would allow users to acquire content from public libraries and virtually any other online ebookseller. But that is basically why Amazon isn't doing that... they WANT you to only get your content from them. Frankly, the ability to view PDFs without having to do a bunch of emailing back in forth is a huge leap forward so I guess it is sort of a "baby steps" thing.

Sony has just really dropped the ball by not bringing out a larger format. You wouldn't think that a couple of extra inches on the screen would make that much of a difference in terms of your reading enjoyment. But then again, going from a 17" monitor to a 19" monitor is a huge difference in terms of usability of a computer screen.

All in all -- Amazon really made a brilliant move with the DX. It is clear that they have really thought through the little things this time around and even the DX is a substantial improvement over the K2. I'm very very happy!

[NCJAR]

1-0 out of 5 stars DO NOT BUY THIS PRODUCT!! AMAZON WILL DENY WARRANTY WHEN UNIT DEFECTIVE!!, September 8, 2009
My Kindle DX shipped July 30. I really liked it until today. There is a white out on about 1/12 of screen so you cannot read many words on the page and the text is running veritical and horizontal at the same time. The product has not been dropped or otherwise damaged during use. When I called Amazon Kindle support they said they had never heard of problem, even though I told them I found in a few seconds on the web. They asked me to reset, which I did, but problem persisted. I was then told that the problem was not covered by warranty!!!!!!!!!!! I asked how could they know that without looking at device and they said it was not on known list of manufacturer defects. They told me to not even bother sending it in for warranty service but if I wanted a new one, I could pay them $250.00!! I spoke to 2 supervisors at the Washington call center who gave me the same line. Amazon is not standng behind this product, and this is the worst example of poor customer service I have encountered. I asked them how could they make a technical diagnosis over phone and they had no good answer, just kept repeating that it was not a covered defect. I asked them why they would not just say "send it in and we will take a look at it", and they said it was a waste of time because it was not covered (even though they were 3000 miles away from unit and had not seen it) They wiggled when I demanded a written explanantion of denial of warranty service ( which to me is breach of contract.Kindle DX: Amazon's 9.7" Wireless Reading Device (Latest Generation) DO NOT BUY THIS PRODUCT. Amazon should be ashamed of itself. They have lost a valuable and up to now loyal customer.

5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle DX first impressions from a former Kindle 2 user, June 11, 2009
Here are my first impressions of the Kindle DX which I received earlier today. I've been using the Kindle 2 for the past three months and have loved it. It has improved the way I read by making it easy to download and try books before purchasing them, and allowing me to carry a variety of reading material with me. I was disappointed with the way it handled PDF's, which is important to me, so I sold the Kindle 2 and bought the DX.

- The DX works like the Kindle 2 in terms of keys, navigation, joystick etc., except all the navigation keys are on the right.
- Was concerned about lack of navigation on the left, but if you flip it 180 degrees, the display auto rotates and you can use your left hand. Very slick.
- The DX is heavier, but is still comfortable to hold and read.
- The overall size of the DX is not as big as I expected from the pictures on the web.
- The digital ink looks similar on both, but a little sharper on the DX.
- The DX works much better for PDF's overall. The bigger screen really helps here.
- A complex powerpoint I converted to pdf looks just like it does on my pc except in b&w.
- PDF's with columns work fine. I couldn't read them on the Kindle 2.
- If you have a PDF with multiple columns, the print may appear small on the DX, and you can't adjust fonts in PDFs.
- Newspapers are easier to read on the DX, especially pics and tables.
- I downloaded a sample chapter of a textbook. I can see this working well for students.
- The rotate feature is excellent on the DX; works as advertised.
- The Kindle 2 weighs less and is more portable. If reading only books, I'd probably prefer the Kindle 2, given the lower price and size, and nav keys on both sides.

Regarding the price, while I'd love Kindles to cost less, I think the price is reasonable. Here's how I justified it. I assumed I could resell the DX in 2 years for 50% of its purchase price, or $245. (50% seems reasonable based on the experience of Kindle 1). So my net cost is $245. The differentiating feature of the Kindle is the built in wireless capability. Not only is it elegant and integrated, it is also included in the purchase price. If unlimited wireless were priced separately, a reasonable price would be around $10/month. So effectively my out of pocket cost using the DX for 2 years is roughly equivalent to what the wireless would cost me if it was priced separately.

Both the DX and Kindle 2 are good values. If you only read books, the Kindle 2 is probably better. If you already own a Kindle 2, and don't read PDF's, I recommend keeping your Kindle 2. If you read a lot of pdf's or newspapers, or you like to read with large fonts, you'll be happier with the DX. For my needs, I like the DX more.

3-0 out of 5 stars Not "the answer" for academics and professionals, June 14, 2009
As a grad student who is tired of printing out scores of journal articles or straining my eyes (and sucking battery power) reading them on a conventional computer screen, I have been eagerly watching the evolution of e-book devices waiting for one that would meet the needs of academics and professionals who are constantly reading, highlighting, and annotating documents and books. Because Amazon has marketed the Kindle DX as the e-reader for academics and professionals, highlighting its large screen and native PDF support, I finally thought that this was a product suitable for types like me and forked out the five hundred dollars for the DX. Alas, upon receiving the Kindle yesterday in the mail, it did not take long to realize that this machine is not the "answer" that I had hoped it would be. The reason is simple: no highlighting or annotating PDFs, Word documents, and other personal documents. It did not even occur to me to inquire, before purchasing the DX, whether highlighting and annotating PDFs and Word docs was possible. After all, one can easily acquire free software that enables one to do this on a computer (e.g. Skim for Macs), and in the Kindle DX press conference Amazon made a big deal about bringing reality to paperless workplaces, putting an end to the routine of printing out document after document. Well, surely one of the major reasons people print out documents is so that they can mark on them with underlinings, highlights, and notes. And given that one cannot do that for PDFs and other documents on a Kindle DX, Amazon's sales pitch is quite misleading: anyone who needs to interact with documents in the way typical of academics and professionals will still need to print out those documents (or make due on an eye-straining and power-consuming computer). Not only is it impossible to add an annotation to a specific passage in a PDF or Word document, one cannot add any annotations whatsoever, even at the page level (or document level, for that matter). Clipping/highlighting support is also completely absent. This is frankly unacceptable for a product marketed as the Kindle for students and professionals.

As I'm sure other reviews here will attest, the Kindle DX is in other respects a beautiful and wonderful machine. If you just want to read PDFs, and have no desire to annotate or highlight them, then this would be a very satisfying device. And if you only need to annotate and/or highlight books (and can find the books you need in the Kindle store and can afford to buy them!), then the DX will be a wonderful piece of equipment to own. But if you are a typical student, academic or professional who needs to interact with your documents (and not just read them), and are looking for something that will replace the need to print documents or read them on your computer, the DX simply does not fit the bill. Wait for the next product, or for Amazon to update their firmware with respectable support for PDFs and other document types. I'll be mailing my Kindle back to Amazon tomorrow.

1-0 out of 5 stars Kindle DX - Amazon's Apathy and Greed At Work, July 31, 2009
First, let me say that I purchased and use my Kindle DX daily. I thought about how to accurately write this review for some time now. When it gets right down to it, all eReaders on the market - and the flood now hitting the market - use the same e-ink panels made by the same company, generally have the same features as far as reading an actual book, etc. When this was a niche product in a market with no real competition than the product would get a much higher rating. However, it is now a market with many choices. The only way to be fair about writing a review is to assume that there are some basic functions that MUST exist (wireless access, reader screen quality, basic zoom/bookmark features, etc.) that all e-readers today have. The review should be what is UNIQUE about the Kindle DX and review those features. If you just want to download a book and read it on an e-ink panel than every single e-reader on the market today will work fine.

To that end, when looking at what makes the DX unique, I have to honestly say that I would not purchase this reader again - there are better options out there with several more just announced. After careful consideration, it becomes clear that Amazon just felt that they could get away with a sub-par device based on their name and position in the market.

1) PDF issues: This is a larger format reader, presumably for the purpose of reading standard sized documents (8.5" by 11"). It is also being marketed heavily to students. Both of these demand native full PDF support. While the Kindle DX does render PDF's, it does so in an extremely crippled way. While I am well versed with the fact that some PDF's are rendered as images and the document itself does not contain links or text, most do. Despite that fact the Kindle does not allow you to change font size, add bookmarks, highlight text, use the dictionary feature, zoom in, use any links (i.e., the Table of Contents), etc. In other words, it presents that pages as pictures and provides absolutely zero "digital control" over the documents - the very features that someone would want to use an electronic reader instead of a hardcopy for. I purchased this device as an engineer because I have hundreds of PDF's (manuals, client systems documentation, etc.). I have found that I am completely unable to use it for the reason I purchased it for. Other readers treat PDF's as any other document allowing all the same e-reader functions and there is no reason - short of not wanting to pay Adobe a license fee - that the Kindle does not have this same functionality.

2) File formats: While the Kindle DX does support several file formats, Amazon is one of the last holdouts to insist on providing content in a DRM protected proprietary format. They also do not read many industry standard formats. CHM and LIT are two of the HUGE formats that come to mind. Many publishers - especially of technology books - release in CHM format, essentially a slightly marked up HTML derivative that should be easy to render. MOBI and others come to mind as well - with over 1,000,000 public domain titles available from many web sites in these other formats. Yes, I understand protecting content - but Amazon has gone overboard in trying to lock down the Kindle to only offer "all the features" on their proprietary format. This locks you in to buying eBooks from the Kindle store. I understand the financial drive to do that - but most of us have documents that we have created, or content we have previously purchased for other platforms and have rights to, that we would like to read on the Kindle. Devices that restrict access to their own formats are generally given away or sold for a very low cost, with the understanding that the profit will be made on content (think about some of the original movie on demand set-top devices). Amazon is selling this as a standalone device, and needs to not intentionally cripple it. And yes, there are tools to convert file type - which usually result in formatting issues and the burden should be placed on the end user.

3) File System Flaws: Amazon advertises the ability to hold 3,500+ books/documents (a HUGE exaggerating in and of itself). Even if it held 350 titles, the file system has a HUGE problem. There are no ways to create any type of folder structure. You have to go to a single large flat listing of the documents on the reader and hit Next Page over and over - a painfully slow process in and of itself - and hope do don't miss the title you were looking for and have to start over. Yes, the titles do start in alphabetical order, but they change based on most recently read being moved to the top. It is a ridiculous and unrealistic expectation to put more than a couple dozen documents on a device without any way to organize them into folders. The official Amazon reply: You can add tags and search by tags. Yep, you can - and if you want to take the couple weeks it would take to add tags to a couple thousand PDF's then you have far more free time than I do. The Kindle was purchased to save time - not to use my entire annual vacation time to organize it.

4) No Card Reader: For some unknown reason, Amazon decided to not include any type of card reader. The memory can hold a large number of books - but PDF's can get to be 100MB or more if they are heavily diagrammed. The memory cannot be upgraded, so there should be some method to pop in a memory card. All of my cells phones have had this feature...and my $500 Kindle DX does not?

5) Ergonomics: I admit that the e-reader market is emerging so there has not been a large pool of users to pull opinions from. That said, it seems that the Kindle DX made it through the art department and skipped the usability testing department. While it looks great and each to carry, the 5-way joystick thing, the lack of Next/Previous page buttons on both sides (that existed on previous models) and the absolute worst keyboard I have ever touched do not help the device. Again - being marketed to students and professionals - just look at the official page on the Amazon site. What is on the screen on the largest image there? It is a power plant diagram - not a page from a NYT Best Seller list. There should be a way to quickly type notes on things. There is no possible way a student could sit in a lecture and flip through pages and be able to type in notes and keep up with the class on this thing - completely unrealistic.

6) No Desktop Application: While Amazon advertises that no computer is required, they leave out the fact that even if you had one there isn't really anything you could do with it. There should be some application similar to Apple's iTunes that will auto convert file formats and allow organization of files and folders (if they existed), allow backup in case the device is lost/stolen/damaged and needs to be replaced, etc. This is especially true for students that would desire a full sized keyboard to add notes to documents/books and sync with the Kindle.

Bottom line: The Kindle DX is an absolutely great e-reader for someone that wants to simply read books, is comfortable buying only Kindle content and just desires a larger screen. This is what I am now using it for. To this end it works great. If this is your only expectation - then get out the credit card. If you have fantasies of using it to actually read PDF's with any functionality, store a large number of documents, use it in a classroom setting, etc. then get a different e-reader and sacrifice battery life and get a tablet or laptop and wait for the next generation.

4-0 out of 5 stars Perspective from a biomedical researcher, June 12, 2009
I don't generally write reviews, but I hope this one will be useful for other scientists who are contemplating a Kindle DX. My use for the DX will be different from most of the users who have posted reviews. I maintain a library of nearly 4,000 PDF manuscripts/grants/documents. I probably have minimal use for eBooks from the Kindle Store. The number of PDFs is constantly growing as new research manuscripts are published (and downloaded to my computer). My principle reasons for purchasing a DX were to:

1) Carry the electronic equivalent of binders of PDFs with me when traveling. An iPod for PDFs. This is a metaphor that works for the way that I view an eReader, though it probably doesn't apply equally well to everyone.

2) Have an easier way to read papers when traveling. Easier means not worrying about battery life, unfurling a laptop in a cramped airplane, or carrying a bag full of papers.

3) Reduce eye strain from staring at a computer screen by moving serious reading from the laptop screen to the DX.

From my preliminary use, I think the DX is a qualified success. Text in manuscripts looks great. Figures from manuscripts do not render well in portrait mode if there is a lot of detail; switching to landscape mode helps substantially. Zoom into individual images/sections of PDFs would be welcome.

Navigating large numbers of PDFs from the home screen is currently clumsy. Lack of directory support to organize large numbers of files is an issue. I've read about users using complex naming conventions to use 'search' as an indirect way to find files. Renaming hundreds (or thousands) of files to make them easier to find is not a great solution. I suspect this will improve in time, either through a firmware update to this device or in the next generation of hardware.

I'm also hoping against hope that one or more of the reference manager software providers (Bookends, I'm looking at you) realizes that their software is to the Kindle as iTunes is to the iPod. If I could manage the content of my Kindle through a reference manager, I would be thrilled. The idea of downloading a paper and syncing it in one step to the Kindle to take with me is really appealing. This wouldn't completely overcome the problem with a flat file hierarchy once the papers are on the Kindle, but it would help organize getting content onto and off the device.

The biggest surprise to me is the functionality of the web browser. Yes, it is pokey to render pages. No, I wouldn't want to use it to web surf. But if I had a destination web site that is heavy on content, I think reading on the Kindle will be vastly superior to reading on the iPhone or other mobile/tablet devices. I do doubt, however, that wireless data access will remain free on the Kindle long-term. I can't imagine how Amazon will be able to continue subsidizing the data costs. I think that this is a feature that should be enjoyed while it lasts, but I wouldn't be surprised if it goes away at some point in the future.

Though it adds another $50 to the cost, I think the matching case is attractive, functional, and creates an easy-to-carry package.

So is it worth the high cost? I don't think I (or anyone) can really evaluate that until determining how well it integrates into daily work habits. I suspect that I will get heavy use out of it, but then I read a ton of PDFs. I do hope that the PDF support for dictionary lookup, highlighting, and annotation improves, but I base my review on what the product does - not what I would like it to do.

Hope this helps other heavy PDF users!

5-0 out of 5 stars Different and Better, June 11, 2009
I have owned both Kindle 1 and Kindle 2, so I'm already committed to the basic idea: e-ink reading in a slim form factor with excellent connectivity to a large selection of books and subscriptions. I have come to rely on my Kindle experience, and it has seriously enhanced my reading.

The DX was not an obvious upgrade for me, but two features put me over the edge: the larger screen, and the native PDF reader. I now have the DX in my hands, and can report PROS, CONS, and NEUTRALS:

PROS:

-- the larger screen is a definite plus. I use the larger type size on my Kindle 2 (older eyes), and at this type size I get far more text per page on the DX. This makes the whole reading experience more book-like (and should be a boon to people who buy large-print books.)

-- the screen is also sharper and crisper than my Kindle 2 in a side-by-side comparison: the text is darker, and the contrast is much better, making for better visibility overall.

-- on a side note, the larger screen also makes it possible to read poetry on the kindle, even at large type sizes. On earlier Kindles, the smaller screen cut off lines, so that you would lose the sense of when the poet ended the line. On the DX, you can see the whole line exactly as the poet meant it, with the cut-off in the right spot.

-- the PDF reader works as advertised, and is extremely convenient. PDF documents appear on the DX exactly as they do on a computer screen. Moreover, you can drag and drop your documents directly to the device using the USB cable (or use the for-a-fee email if you absolutely must.) The only downside: at least for the documents that I've used so far, I cannot adjust the type size as I can with native Kindle documents.

-- screen rotation also works as advertised: it operates as a mild zoom on both graphics and text and offsets slightly the downside of not being able to adjust the typesize on PDF documents. One nice design touch: the four-way navigation stick introduced on the Kindle 2 is rotation-sensitive, and will move as expected relative to the screen rotation.

-- more of the device space is devoted to the screen, while the white plastic border around the screen seems to have shrunk, both in general and compared to the proportion of screen to plastic on the Kindle 2. I like this (but see below about the keyboard).

-- storage: I like the increase in storage space, and don't mind the lack of an external storage card. I can see some people having trouble with this, but only those folks who either a) must regularly carry around PDF documents totalling more than 3.5 GB of space or b) must have nearly 3500 books regularly at their fingertips. I fall in neither category.

CONS:

-- price: it's expensive, as you can tell pretty quickly. If you value the larger size, and the native PDF reader, these features may justify the roughly 30% premium you pay for the DX over the Kindle 2. In truth, the DX SHOULD cost more than the Kindle 2, and a 30% premium isn't unreasonable. But, for my money, Amazon should drop the price on the Kindle 2 to $300 or so, and charge $400 or a little less for the DX. Still, I bought it, and will keep it at this price.

-- one-sided navigation buttons: all of the buttons are now on the right side, and none are on the left. I'm a righty, so I shouldn't complain, but I found myself using both sides on the Kindle 2. Lefties have reason to complain, I think.

-- One-handed handling: I often read while I walk, with my Kindle in one hand, and something else in my other. Because of the button layout, this will be more difficult on the DX.

-- metal backing: I miss the tacky rubberized backing on my Kindle 1. When I placed my Kindle 1 on an inclined surface, it stayed in place. Not so my Kindle 2 and now my DX. This is not a complaint specific to the DX, but it's still there.

NEUTRALS (i.e. things worth noting):

-- weight: the DX is heavier, noticeably so. This is only an issue if, like me, you regularly use the kindle with one hand . . . and even so, it's still doable.

-- keyboard: the keyboard has 4 rows, and not 5: the top row of numbers from the Kindle 1 and 2 has been merged into the top qwerty row, so that numbers are now only accessible with an alt-key combination. The keys are vertically thinner too, so that the whole keyboard is no more than 1" tall (compared to over an 1.5" on the Kindle 2). At the same time, the keys themselves are a bit easier to press, a bit more protruding than on the Kindle 2. For someone with big fingers (like me), this will be a slightly harder keyboard to use, but only slightly.

That's all I can see. Overall, the pluses outweigh the minuses for me, and I'm satisfied with my purchase. I can now think of using my DX for work documents on a regular basis, because of the PDF reader. The screen size and screen rotation make the overall reading experience more immersive.

Overall, the DX feels more like text and less like device and comes closer to the stated goal of the Kindle: for the device to disappear, leaving only the joy of reading.







3-0 out of 5 stars DX not quite all that--but has been improved a bit, June 13, 2009
This review was written back when the DX first came out and--as has been brought to my attention--needs to be updated a bit. I will indicate where things have changed for the better within the body of the review:

I owned the K1 and then the K2 and love them both, so I was really looking forward to the DX. My plan was to use the DX at home, and keep my K2 for carrying all over creation with me. It wasn't long, though, after my DX arrived the day before yesterday before disappointment set in.

Don't get me wrong, there is a LOT to like about the DX:

1) Pictures are awesome on it, if the publisher formats them properly.

2) Those who complain about darkness of text on their K2 (a problem I've never had, btw) will be thrilled by the DX's very dark text.

EDIT: LIKE THE KINDLE 3, THE DX NOW SPORTS A NEW E-INK DISPLAY THAT HAS MUCH BETTER CONTRAST, SO TEXT & PICTURES REALLY "POP."


3) The ability to rotate the screen is great. Gives you a closer look at things like maps and charts.

4) The browser is a bit faster than on the K1 or K2, though that isn't saying much--it is still very clunky to use.

EDIT: THOUGH STILL CLUNKY, THE BROWSER *HAS* BEEN IMPROVED FOR EASIER USE. BUT STILL DON'T PLAN TO DO A LOT OF WEB SURFING WITH IT.


5) But web pages look pretty good on the DX.

6) It holds 3500 books.


BUT.....the DX just isn't all that. It has drawbacks that are really making me consider sending it back before my 30 days are up:

1) First and foremost, while it is true that it natively reads PDFs, it is really only a PDF *viewer*. You can't change the font size on PDFs, links will not function on them, and the ability to magnify pictures doesn't work on them either. So you better have LARGE fonts on your PDF before you load it. Looking at the PDF in horizontal mode helps a bit, but not by much.

EDIT: WE NOW HAVE THE ABILITY TO ZOOM IN ON PDF DOCUMENTS, WHICH HELPS IN READING THEM--BUT IT WOULD STILL BEHOOVE USERS TO USE LARGER FONT SIZES IN DOCUMENTS BEFORE CONVERTING TO PDF FORMAT.



2) The DX is too big to hold comfortably. It's not really all that heavy, but it is top heavy and you feel a pull on your hands. And that pull is really evident if you try to use the keyboard while holding it--you practically have to lay the DX down flat, it becomes so difficult to type.

3) They merged the number keys with the QWERTY keys (losing a line of keys). What development genius thought it would be helpful and an "improvement?" To go to a location within a book you have to click Menu, choose "go to," then click the Symbols key, choose the numbers you want, then close Symbols before you can choose "location." Whew! Or you can click Alt + the letter button at the top that corresponds to the number you want. Joy.



4) Before my DX came, I really didn't think this would bother me at all, but I have to say: I really HATE the fact that the "next page" button is only on one side. I mostly use the left hand button. And yes, with the DX's rotation ability you can turn it upside down, placing the "next page" button on the left side.... However, when you do this, the button is so high up that you have to slide your hand (not your thumb, your whole hand) up in order to turn the page. May sound nit-picky, but it is truly a PITA to break off reading to do it. Not only that, but having the keyboard at the top makes it even more top-heavy than when it is right side up!

5) when you rotate the DX so that it is horizontal, the "next page" button is either at the bottom or the top--in either case you can't just flick your thumb and change the page. Again, a PITA.

6) If you leave the rotation feature on "Auto" when you are not using your DX it drains your battery, so you must remember to turn the feature off when you stop reading.

7) Still no folders. An organization nightmare three times bigger than that of the K2 (which itself had increased the same problem on the K1): the possibility of storing 3500 books but only being able to sort them by author, title, and "most recent first."

EDIT: AMAZON HAS NOW GIVEN ALL KINDLE USERS THE ABILITY TO CREATE "COLLECTIONS." THIS LETS YOU ORGANIZE YOUR BOOKS BY GENRE OR WHATEVER YOU LIKE, SO THAT'S A BIG HELP. HOWEVER, FOR SOME STRANGE REASON, UNLESS YOU RESORT TO FIXES LIKE PUTTING SYMBOLS BEFORE THE COLLECTION NAMES WHEN IN "VIEW BY COLLECTIONS" IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO ALPHABETIZE THEM! I WOULD HOPE THAT THIS GETS FIXED IN THE NEAR FUTURE WITH A SOFTWARE UPDATE.



I will be fiercely debating with myself in the next week or so, on whether I really want to keep the DX. It is so disappointing. It has the potential of being a really great e-reader...but as it stands now, it isn't. It's OK. But for $489, it should be a lot more than merely OK.

EDIT: I DID END UP RETURNING MY DX THE FOLLOWING WEEK. THE PRICE HAS SINCE DROPPED--IT NOW COSTS $379--BUT IT *STILL* ISN'T ALL THAT.

4-0 out of 5 stars From a first time Kindle buyer: Good, but not perfect, June 11, 2009
First off, I am a first time kindle buyer, so this review will be more geared to those buyers thinking of entering into the kindle market, not a comparison of past editions.

My first impression of the Kindle DX was that it was actually very small compared to what I expected. The entire device is slightly smaller (in height and width) than a piece of paper, with the screen taking up approximately 85-90% of the front. This was actually a nice surprise, since I wanted something very portable, but good for magazines/research articles. After seeing the size of the DX, I think a K2 would have been way too small for what I want. At the same time, the device is very hefty. Picking it up, it becomes almost tiring to hold up in one hand for too long (another reason I think this one is better geared toward short articles instead of extended novel reading). It has a nice solid feel to it, but for some reason I was expecting it to be lighter.

The kindle only takes a couple of seconds to power up and immediately goes to the last article you were reading. A row of buttons are positioned on the right, which let you go to the main home page, go to the next page of an article, previous page, bring up a menu, or go "back". There is also a small four-way joystick to navigate around (which also has the ability to be pressed for selections). The joystick is very sensitive and easy to navigate with, although not overly sensitive that you hit things by mistake (at least very often - it has happened a couple of times so far).

For those in the market for an ereader and can't decide between the Kindle and another device, I can tell you what made me go toward the Kindle: Whispernet. It is a free, no subscription based service that comes on all Kindles. You get free access to the internet anywhere Sprint reception can be found. You can purchase books/magazines/newspapers anywhere, and have them in less than 60 seconds. You can access the web, check your web-based email, look up directions, find weather reports, movie times, etc. Although the Kindle terms say that normal web browsing might result in extra charges, my assumption is that this clause will just cover amazon if they choose to charge for web in the future. As of right now, everything is free. The Web Browser is very rudimentary and does not show pages very well. Even most pages designed for mobile phones showed up badly for me, although some were okay. The browser is very slow, but could really come in handy if some information was needed and no internet was available.

I have tried several blogs and magazines, as well as the native pdf viewer and all seem to produce well formatted articles with crisp, clear pictures. Lighter pictures tend to show up better as darker pictures blur together if they do not have enough contrasting elements. The one problem I have noticed with the pdf viewer is that some text/elements can end up being very small and hard to see. The pdf viewer is stuck on one size, which is slightly smaller than most pdf's are intended to be viewed at. There is no way to increase font size, and the only way to zoom is by rotating the display. This zooms in on the top or bottom half of the screen. Rotating to a landscape display actually helps that problem a great deal, but some sort of zoom feature would have been nice. You can search in pdf documents or go to certain pages, but it is impossible to annotate as the Kindle lets you do in normal document files. Pdf documents can be sent to the Kindle DX via usb cable or through a special email that is set up for the device. However, documents that are sent via email are charged a small fee (I was charged $0.45 for a pdf slightly larger than 2MB - I will use the usb cable from now on unless it's absolutely necessary to use email). Blogs I have subscribed to have continuously updated over the time I've had the DX... it is nice to have a constant stream of info to read even when not in the position to surf the web. Most blogs and magazines are subscription based with costs ranging from free to $1.99 or more for the more popular ones. This fact turns many people off since blogs can be found free on the net, but the convenience of having them constantly updated with no internet connection required and brought to you in an easy to read format makes them somewhat worth it in my opinion. Having read through some and watched constant updates while writing this review, I think I will be more likely to keep the blog subscriptions even more than the magazines subscriptions. Most blogs and magazines give you a 14-day trial to see how well you like them before committing to a purchase. They can be organized into separate articles/sections, and are easy to navigate.

There is a text-to-speech function that can be used in most books (Random House published books excluded because of a lawsuit brought against amazon). The sound of it seems a little old fashioned with an extremely computer-sounding voice, but it is a nice addition. You can also play MP3's, but don't expect extremely high-quality sound. The Kindle DX has a earphone jack on the top of the device, or small speakers on the bottom of the device for these funtctions.

A keyboard is present at the bottom of the device. It has a QWERTY format, but with the numbers located on the top row of letters (a shift button selects them). It is fairly easy to type on in my opinion, but takes a little getting used to. The buttons are small, rounded and don't take much to push. For this reason, it is difficult to tell if you hit the button acurately or not, and often times you find you hit wrong keys by accident. The Kindle actually tends to be a bit wide to easily type if you have small hands like me. Larger hands should do fine.

As for the screen, the e-ink is easy to read, easy on the eyes, and it is crisp and has a nice resolution. Highly detailed pictures showed up nicely as long as they weren't too dark. The only complaint I would have about the screen is that it is very reflective. I need to make sure I'm not around any bright lights before reading. Otherwise, the glare interferes.

SHOULD YOU BUY THE DX?: Well, I think that comes down to what you want to read. The DX is a nice reader (although expensive!). It is probably the perfect size for reading magazine articles, journal articles, and newspapers. The articles come out as being crisp and easy to read, and having them constantly delivered to you is great. I think the device might be a little on the heavy/large side for continous reading of books, so for that, I would probably go with the Kindle 2 instead. For textbooks, I think the verdict is still out. Being able to flip through the pages of textbooks and quickly find information still isn't completely replicated by the Kindle. However, the search features of the Kindle could prove to be invaluable in studying, and there's no doubt the kindle helps in areas of portability. The DX replicates figures and images nicely, but in some textbooks, color is vital. That could be the downfall of the DX when it comes to Textbooks.

CONS/FOR FUTURE KINDLES: There's quite a few things that prevent the DX from being perfect, but maybe they can be added into future editions. First and foremost: Folders/Organization! Right now, all articles/blogs/newspapers/books get clumped together in one big menu. Why is there no way to organize these and place them in categories? This would be a huge improvement and would take very little effort. Also: Color. As I just mentioned above, color is a huge part of many textbooks, articles, etc. As soon as the technology is ready, a color kindle will be a huge improvement. A memory card slot was included in the first Kindle; however it was removed in the second and DX. This needs to be added back. Especially for those of us with large pdf libraries, we need the extra memory slot. Not to expand the memory so much as to just give us a portable way of getting articles onto the kindle. As of right now, you can be charged to have articles sent to the Kindle, or we can be near a computer. Why not add the memory card slot back and give us one more option? A better web browser, some sort of side-lighting for nighttime reading, touchscreen, thinner, and lighter are other suggestions I can think of to strive for.

UPDATE: So, after using the DX for a while now, I have come to absolutely love it. Unfortunately, so has my girlfriend, so I don't get to see it much anymore.

A few small things have come to annoy me though, so I would like to point those out. First, the screen rotation is becoming more and more annoying. I find the screen rotating on me many times when I don't want it to. Slightly changing the position of the device suddenly leads to the screen being rotated, and then it takes another few seconds of shifting it around to get it back the way you want. There should be a way to turn screen rotation off if you know you won't want it bothering you for a while. A simple setting could then be turned on again for normal use. (UPDATE: Apparently, you can disable the auto-rotation. User A.Nichols wrote in the comments: "Push the button with the Aa (to change font size) and you'll find the option to set change screen rotation from Auto (default) to portrait. I found the screen rotation to be annoying also when reading, it's easy to accidentally change the angle.")

Another thing that has come to bother me is the screen lag. Very often, it's as though the screen sticks after you push buttons. You push them again and again, and then the screen finally unsticks and you fly through 3-4 pages. It's difficult to tell if the device didn't register the button you pushed or if it's just running behind. Unfortunately, this has resulted in my purchasing a book that I didn't mean to (amazon was nice enough to remove the charge though). Usually you get a "Would you like to cancel your order?" immediately after purchasing on the kindle, but this time I guess I pushed too much and flew through that screen too.

Even with these small issues, I can't put my Kindle down. It is the best money I have spent in a long time.

2-0 out of 5 stars OK device, terrible warranty, June 25, 2009
I have had my Kindle DX for about two months and am mostly pleased with it--it works well for reading, and the display is easy to read--but I wish it had better support for PDFs. Yes, they display, but if you don't like the way it zooms, you can't do anything about it except rotate the device; you should be able to to some manual tweaking. Additionally, you cannot make annotations on PDFs (I understand why you can't highlight, but there's no reason you shouldn't be able to make notes for a page as a whole). I was hoping to use this more for grad school, but I don't think students or professionals with a lot of PDFs to read will find this useful, unless they are formatted specifically with the Kindle in mind.

Additionally, my screen has recently developed a defect. Namely, I have horizontal and vertical lines, in addition to a portion of the display that is stuck black. I did not do anything unsual to my device like smash it or drop it, but Amazon refuses to replace the Kindle because they claim it is not covered under the 1-year limited warranty (even though, while I am not a lawyer, it certainly seems to be if you actually read it: "We warrant the Device against defects in materials and workmanship under ordinary consumer use for one year from the date of original retail purchase...."). Further, some people HAVE had their Kindles replaced (even when it is cleary their fault!), so it seems to be hit or miss depending on who you get on the other end of the phone. If you buy this device, I recommend treating it like a piece of glass: very carefully, always in a caseor sleeve, and DO get the extended warranty--except you'd be better off buying a warranty from SquareTrade at a much more reasonable price than Amazon's.

In the mean time, I have a $389 brick that Amazon won't replace. You should NOT have to buy an extra warranty to have damage resulting from normal use and handling of the device be covered (and, depending on who at Amazon you talk to, you apparently don't). But because of the sketchy 1-year warranty, I cannot recommend that anyone buy this device; Amazon needs to stand by it better, with or without the extended 2-year warranty (although you'd be better off purchasing a similar third-party warranty for less). The device is OK (good, not great); the customer support with regard to warranty (they *were* good when I made an accidental purchase on the Kindle) is terrible.

EDIT: After a month-long battle with customer service, they finally agreed to replace my device. It has been functioning fine since then, but my original complains about reading (particularly PDFs) still stands, and the warranty battle should have never happened.

5-0 out of 5 stars Going to buy the GRAY!! Sorry Sony PRS-505... I'm moving on, June 11, 2009
July 5 update: I've apparently been living under an e-reader rock because today is the first day I hear of the new dark gray DX. If you are contemplating the whether to go with the white or gray DX -- DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT IT!! Get the gray!! The one thing I learned with my Sony Readers is that the darker the bezel -- the more contrast between the screen and the easier it is to read. So even if the screen and nothing in the e-ink display has changed and everything else is the same except for the color of the bezel -- the darker bezel will make for an easier more constrasty reading experience. FINALLY, Amazon gets a clue and realizes that the darker bezel will make for better reading though it may not look as "nice" as the white!

FIRMWARE UPDATE as of 11.30.2009:

I have now M-Edge Platform Jacket for Kindle DX (Genuine Leather--Pebbled Navy)--Back to School Sale!! because you can set the Kindle up to stand by itself on the table next to you or a lap desk. This makes it easier to to view music, knitting patterns, or just plain books (addressing some users complaints about it being "too heavy" to hold comfortably).

I had been disappointed that the Kindle automatically goes to sleep after 5 minutes because if you are using the Kindle for reading patterns or music, it times out on you while you are still "working" on a page. However, Amazon come out with a new firmware release... the Kindle DX now stays on for 20 minutes before going into screen saver mode which is a big improvement.

In addition, with the new firmware, you have the option of converting your PDFs to Kindle format -- which should address the lack of "zoom" and "annotation" features -- at least there is a workaround for now.

UPDATE as of 06.16.2009: The Kindle may have just literally saved my career and saved my "backend". I had an interview yesterday and thought I knew where I was going. I'm one of the last dinosaurs not to have a Garmin and got lost. After circling around for awhile and getting more and more uptight about missing my interview, I remembered the Browser on the Kindle.

On the K2, the browser was basically unusable because of the size. However, with the DX, I was able to go to Google Maps, look up the address and had my directions in just a couple of seconds. The map was rendered beautifully and the turn-by-turn directions could be bookmarked and even if my DX fell asleep, it awoke still displaying the directions. THANK YOU KINDLE!!!

---------------------------------------------

The UPS truck arrived a couple of hours ago. I feel like a kid on Christmas Day and I got (just about) everything I wanted!

My Sony PRS-505 has finally and officially become my "Emergency Backup Reader"

My romance with ebook readers got off to a bumpy start when I got my first eInk device -- the Cybook Bookeen. Firmware issues and awkward buttons made it rather disappointing.

Then I found true love with the Sony PRS-505. I loved the metal case. I loved the "Collections" (essentially folders features). I loved the looks and loved the display.

However, the Kindle 2 woo'ed me with the size of its content collection. However, for reading I still ultimately preferred my Sony.

Now, with the larger Kindle DX, I've set my Sony aside and there is a new love in my life. Let me count the ways:

1. SCREEN SIZE: Reading on the Kindle DX vs 6" readers is like the difference between sleeping in a King sized bed vs a Twin Bed or riding in the backseat of a 2-door 1981 Honda Accord vs bucket seats in a Honda Odyssey. You feel like you have room to breath. The larger screen allows you to maximize the use of the real estate -- taking advantage of larger fonts and more white space. This makes text much easier to read -- even if you are just reading regular books.

2. KEYBOARD: I also love that they have compacted the keyboard so that it doesn't dominate the overall appearance of the device. The smaller keyboard in no way compromises the ability to type. However, it improves the look by making the proportions more appealing and it means the device isn't horrifically larger than the 6" device.

3. PDF + BIG SCREEN = LOTS MORE USES: I can transfer my knitting patterns (complete with knitting graphs and diagrams) and cello music to my e-reader.

Using the Kindle for knitting -- I can highlight my place in the knitting pattern making it easier to work more complicated stitch patterns.

I play cello and many of my music books are available in PDF format -- again the Kindle is wonderful for carrying all my music with me at one time. Turning pages is faster and easier than with a physical book. The kindle sits well on the music stand (though you want to make sure the tray of the music stand is taller than the Kindle or the Kindle will be "top heavy" making the bottom slide forward and potentially falling off the stand.

4. SCREEN ROTATION -- You can rotate the screen in any direction and the page quickly re-orients itself. You can keep rotating 360 degrees and the screen follows you. The buttons remain the same but the thumb stick also reorients so that if you push right relative to the current orientation, that always means "page forward" no matter what direction you are in.

If you are left handed and really bothered by having the buttons only on the right side, you can turn the device upside down and voila -- now your buttons are on the left side.

5. BUTTON CONFIGURATION -- I actually PREFER having the next page and back page on the same side and in a contiguous location (as opposed to opposite sides of the device like the Kindle 2). It makes one-handed reading easier without having to reach over to the other side of the device to flip back and forth.

6. SOLID feeling -- I like the heavier feel -- it is comparable to the heft of a hardbound book.

7. READING While charging -- this sounds like a little thing but with the Sony, if you have the device plugged in for charging, you can't read on the device at the same time.

There are a two things I still think the Sony does better:

1. COLLECTIONS: It would be nice to have folders so that music could be separated from technical books which is also separated from knitting patterns etc. The absence of folders is even MORE annoying on the DX because you are likely to have a much more diverse collection of books/documents on there.

2. EPUB SUPPORT: ePUB would allow users to acquire content from public libraries and virtually any other online ebookseller. But that is basically why Amazon isn't doing that... they WANT you to only get your content from them. Frankly, the ability to view PDFs without having to do a bunch of emailing back in forth is a huge leap forward so I guess it is sort of a "baby steps" thing.

Sony has just really dropped the ball by not bringing out a larger format. You wouldn't think that a couple of extra inches on the screen would make that much of a difference in terms of your reading enjoyment. But then again, going from a 17" monitor to a 19" monitor is a huge difference in terms of usability of a computer screen.

All in all -- Amazon really made a brilliant move with the DX. It is clear that they have really thought through the little things this time around and even the DX is a substantial improvement over the K2. I'm very very happy!

[NCJAR]

1-0 out of 5 stars DO NOT BUY THIS PRODUCT!! AMAZON WILL DENY WARRANTY WHEN UNIT DEFECTIVE!!, September 8, 2009
My Kindle DX shipped July 30. I really liked it until today. There is a white out on about 1/12 of screen so you cannot read many words on the page and the text is running veritical and horizontal at the same time. The product has not been dropped or otherwise damaged during use. When I called Amazon Kindle support they said they had never heard of problem, even though I told them I found in a few seconds on the web. They asked me to reset, which I did, but problem persisted. I was then told that the problem was not covered by warranty!!!!!!!!!!! I asked how could they know that without looking at device and they said it was not on known list of manufacturer defects. They told me to not even bother sending it in for warranty service but if I wanted a new one, I could pay them $250.00!! I spoke to 2 supervisors at the Washington call center who gave me the same line. Amazon is not standng behind this product, and this is the worst example of poor customer service I have encountered. I asked them how could they make a technical diagnosis over phone and they had no good answer, just kept repeating that it was not a covered defect. I asked them why they would not just say "send it in and we will take a look at it", and they said it was a waste of time because it was not covered (even though they were 3000 miles away from unit and had not seen it) They wiggled when I demanded a written explanantion of denial of warranty service ( which to me is breach of contract.Kindle DX: Amazon's 9.7" Wireless Reading Device (Latest Generation) DO NOT BUY THIS PRODUCT. Amazon should be ashamed of itself. They have lost a valuable and up to now loyal customer.

5-0 out of 5 stars Kindle DX first impressions from a former Kindle 2 user, June 11, 2009
Here are my first impressions of the Kindle DX which I received earlier today. I've been using the Kindle 2 for the past three months and have loved it. It has improved the way I read by making it easy to download and try books before purchasing them, and allowing me to carry a variety of reading material with me. I was disappointed with the way it handled PDF's, which is important to me, so I sold the Kindle 2 and bought the DX.

- The DX works like the Kindle 2 in terms of keys, navigation, joystick etc., except all the navigation keys are on the right.
- Was concerned about lack of navigation on the left, but if you flip it 180 degrees, the display auto rotates and you can use your left hand. Very slick.
- The DX is heavier, but is still comfortable to hold and read.
- The overall size of the DX is not as big as I expected from the pictures on the web.
- The digital ink looks similar on both, but a little sharper on the DX.
- The DX works much better for PDF's overall. The bigger screen really helps here.
- A complex powerpoint I converted to pdf looks just like it does on my pc except in b&w.
- PDF's with columns work fine. I couldn't read them on the Kindle 2.
- If you have a PDF with multiple columns, the print may appear small on the DX, and you can't adjust fonts in PDFs.
- Newspapers are easier to read on the DX, especially pics and tables.
- I downloaded a sample chapter of a textbook. I can see this working well for students.
- The rotate feature is excellent on the DX; works as advertised.
- The Kindle 2 weighs less and is more portable. If reading only books, I'd probably prefer the Kindle 2, given the lower price and size, and nav keys on both sides.

Regarding the price, while I'd love Kindles to cost less, I think the price is reasonable. Here's how I justified it. I assumed I could resell the DX in 2 years for 50% of its purchase price, or $245. (50% seems reasonable based on the experience of Kindle 1). So my net cost is $245. The differentiating feature of the Kindle is the built in wireless capability. Not only is it elegant and integrated, it is also included in the purchase price. If unlimited wireless were priced separately, a reasonable price would be around $10/month. So effectively my out of pocket cost using the DX for 2 years is roughly equivalent to what the wireless would cost me if it was priced separately.

Both the DX and Kindle 2 are good values. If you only read books, the Kindle 2 is probably better. If you already own a Kindle 2, and don't read PDF's, I recommend keeping your Kindle 2. If you read a lot of pdf's or newspapers, or you like to read with large fonts, you'll be happier with the DX. For my needs, I like the DX more.

3-0 out of 5 stars Not "the answer" for academics and professionals, June 14, 2009
As a grad student who is tired of printing out scores of journal articles or straining my eyes (and sucking battery power) reading them on a conventional computer screen, I have been eagerly watching the evolution of e-book devices waiting for one that would meet the needs of academics and professionals who are constantly reading, highlighting, and annotating documents and books. Because Amazon has marketed the Kindle DX as the e-reader for academics and professionals, highlighting its large screen and native PDF support, I finally thought that this was a product suitable for types like me and forked out the five hundred dollars for the DX. Alas, upon receiving the Kindle yesterday in the mail, it did not take long to realize that this machine is not the "answer" that I had hoped it would be. The reason is simple: no highlighting or annotating PDFs, Word documents, and other personal documents. It did not even occur to me to inquire, before purchasing the DX, whether highlighting and annotating PDFs and Word docs was possible. After all, one can easily acquire free software that enables one to do this on a computer (e.g. Skim for Macs), and in the Kindle DX press conference Amazon made a big deal about bringing reality to paperless workplaces, putting an end to the routine of printing out document after document. Well, surely one of the major reasons people print out documents is so that they can mark on them with underlinings, highlights, and notes. And given that one cannot do that for PDFs and other documents on a Kindle DX, Amazon's sales pitch is quite misleading: anyone who needs to interact with documents in the way typical of academics and professionals will still need to print out those documents (or make due on an eye-straining and power-consuming computer). Not only is it impossible to add an annotation to a specific passage in a PDF or Word document, one cannot add any annotations whatsoever, even at the page level (or document level, for that matter). Clipping/highlighting support is also completely absent. This is frankly unacceptable for a product marketed as the Kindle for students and professionals.

As I'm sure other reviews here will attest, the Kindle DX is in other respects a beautiful and wonderful machine. If you just want to read PDFs, and have no desire to annotate or highlight them, then this would be a very satisfying device. And if you only need to annotate and/or highlight books (and can find the books you need in the Kindle store and can afford to buy them!), then the DX will be a wonderful piece of equipment to own. But if you are a typical student, academic or professional who needs to interact with your documents (and not just read them), and are looking for something that will replace the need to print documents or read them on your computer, the DX simply does not fit the bill. Wait for the next product, or for Amazon to update their firmware with respectable support for PDFs and other document types. I'll be mailing my Kindle back to Amazon tomorrow.

1-0 out of 5 stars Kindle DX - Amazon's Apathy and Greed At Work, July 31, 2009
First, let me say that I purchased and use my Kindle DX daily. I thought about how to accurately write this review for some time now. When it gets right down to it, all eReaders on the market - and the flood now hitting the market - use the same e-ink panels made by the same company, generally have the same features as far as reading an actual book, etc. When this was a niche product in a market with no real competition than the product would get a much higher rating. However, it is now a market with many choices. The only way to be fair about writing a review is to assume that there are some basic functions that MUST exist (wireless access, reader screen quality, basic zoom/bookmark features, etc.) that all e-readers today have. The review should be what is UNIQUE about the Kindle DX and review those features. If you just want to download a book and read it on an e-ink panel than every single e-reader on the market today will work fine.

To that end, when looking at what makes the DX unique, I have to honestly say that I would not purchase this reader again - there are better options out there with several more just announced. After careful consideration, it becomes clear that Amazon just felt that they could get away with a sub-par device based on their name and position in the market.

1) PDF issues: This is a larger format reader, presumably for the purpose of reading standard sized documents (8.5" by 11"). It is also being marketed heavily to students. Both of these demand native full PDF support. While the Kindle DX does render PDF's, it does so in an extremely crippled way. While I am well versed with the fact that some PDF's are rendered as images and the document itself does not contain links or text, most do. Despite that fact the Kindle does not allow you to change font size, add bookmarks, highlight text, use the dictionary feature, zoom in, use any links (i.e., the Table of Contents), etc. In other words, it presents that pages as pictures and provides absolutely zero "digital control" over the documents - the very features that someone would want to use an electronic reader instead of a hardcopy for. I purchased this device as an engineer because I have hundreds of PDF's (manuals, client systems documentation, etc.). I have found that I am completely unable to use it for the reason I purchased it for. Other readers treat PDF's as any other document allowing all the same e-reader functions and there is no reason - short of not wanting to pay Adobe a license fee - that the Kindle does not have this same functionality.

2) File formats: While the Kindle DX does support several file formats, Amazon is one of the last holdouts to insist on providing content in a DRM protected proprietary format. They also do not read many industry standard formats. CHM and LIT are two of the HUGE formats that come to mind. Many publishers - especially of technology books - release in CHM format, essentially a slightly marked up HTML derivative that should be easy to render. MOBI and others come to mind as well - with over 1,000,000 public domain titles available from many web sites in these other formats. Yes, I understand protecting content - but Amazon has gone overboard in trying to lock down the Kindle to only offer "all the features" on their proprietary format. This locks you in to buying eBooks from the Kindle store. I understand the financial drive to do that - but most of us have documents that we have created, or content we have previously purchased for other platforms and have rights to, that we would like to read on the Kindle. Devices that restrict access to their own formats are generally given away or sold for a very low cost, with the understanding that the profit will be made on content (think about some of the original movie on demand set-top devices). Amazon is selling this as a standalone device, and needs to not intentionally cripple it. And yes, there are tools to convert file type - which usually result in formatting issues and the burden should be placed on the end user.

3) File System Flaws: Amazon advertises the ability to hold 3,500+ books/documents (a HUGE exaggerating in and of itself). Even if it held 350 titles, the file system has a HUGE problem. There are no ways to create any type of folder structure. You have to go to a single large flat listing of the documents on the reader and hit Next Page over and over - a painfully slow process in and of itself - and hope do don't miss the title you were looking for and have to start over. Yes, the titles do start in alphabetical order, but they change based on most recently read being moved to the top. It is a ridiculous and unrealistic expectation to put more than a couple dozen documents on a device without any way to organize them into folders. The official Amazon reply: You can add tags and search by tags. Yep, you can - and if you want to take the couple weeks it would take to add tags to a couple thousand PDF's then you have far more free time than I do. The Kindle was purchased to save time - not to use my entire annual vacation time to organize it.

4) No Card Reader: For some unknown reason, Amazon decided to not include any type of card reader. The memory can hold a large number of books - but PDF's can get to be 100MB or more if they are heavily diagrammed. The memory cannot be upgraded, so there should be some method to pop in a memory card. All of my cells phones have had this feature...and my $500 Kindle DX does not?

5) Ergonomics: I admit that the e-reader market is emerging so there has not been a large pool of users to pull opinions from. That said, it seems that the Kindle DX made it through the art department and skipped the usability testing department. While it looks great and each to carry, the 5-way joystick thing, the lack of Next/Previous page buttons on both sides (that existed on previous models) and the absolute worst keyboard I have ever touched do not help the device. Again - being marketed to students and professionals - just look at the official page on the Amazon site. What is on the screen on the largest image there? It is a power plant diagram - not a page from a NYT Best Seller list. There should be a way to quickly type notes on things. There is no possible way a student could sit in a lecture and flip through pages and be able to type in notes and keep up with the class on this thing - completely unrealistic.

6) No Desktop Application: While Amazon advertises that no computer is required, they leave out the fact that even if you had one there isn't really anything you could do with it. There should be some application similar to Apple's iTunes that will auto convert file formats and allow organization of files and folders (if they existed), allow backup in case the device is lost/stolen/damaged and needs to be replaced, etc. This is especially true for students that would desire a full sized keyboard to add notes to documents/books and sync with the Kindle.

Bottom line: The Kindle DX is an absolutely great e-reader for someone that wants to simply read books, is comfortable buying only Kindle content and just desires a larger screen. This is what I am now using it for. To this end it works great. If this is your only expectation - then get out the credit card. If you have fantasies of using it to actually read PDF's with any functionality, store a large number of documents, use it in a classroom setting, etc. then get a different e-reader and sacrifice battery life and get a tablet or laptop and wait for the next generation.

4-0 out of 5 stars Perspective from a biomedical researcher, June 12, 2009
I don't generally write reviews, but I hope this one will be useful for other scientists who are contemplating a Kindle DX. My use for the DX will be different from most of the users who have posted reviews. I maintain a library of nearly 4,000 PDF manuscripts/grants/documents. I probably have minimal use for eBooks from the Kindle Store. The number of PDFs is constantly growing as new research manuscripts are published (and downloaded to my computer). My principle reasons for purchasing a DX were to:

1) Carry the electronic equivalent of binders of PDFs with me when traveling. An iPod for PDFs. This is a metaphor that works for the way that I view an eReader, though it probably doesn't apply equally well to everyone.

2) Have an easier way to read papers when traveling. Easier means not worrying about battery life, unfurling a laptop in a cramped airplane, or carrying a bag full of papers.

3) Reduce eye strain from staring at a computer screen by moving serious reading from the laptop screen to the DX.

From my preliminary use, I think the DX is a qualified success. Text in manuscripts looks great. Figures from manuscripts do not render well in portrait mode if there is a lot of detail; switching to landscape mode helps substantially. Zoom into individual images/sections of PDFs would be welcome.

Navigating large numbers of PDFs from the home screen is currently clumsy. Lack of directory support to organize large numbers of files is an issue. I've read about users using complex naming conventions to use 'search' as an indirect way to find files. Renaming hundreds (or thousands) of files to make them easier to find is not a great solution. I suspect this will improve in time, either through a firmware update to this device or in the next generation of hardware.

I'm also hoping against hope that one or more of the reference manager software providers (Bookends, I'm looking at you) realizes that their software is to the Kindle as iTunes is to the iPod. If I could manage the content of my Kindle through a reference manager, I would be thrilled. The idea of downloading a paper and syncing it in one step to the Kindle to take with me is really appealing. This wouldn't completely overcome the problem with a flat file hierarchy once the papers are on the Kindle, but it would help organize getting content onto and off the device.

The biggest surprise to me is the functionality of the web browser. Yes, it is pokey to render pages. No, I wouldn't want to use it to web surf. But if I had a destination web site that is heavy on content, I think reading on the Kindle will be vastly superior to reading on the iPhone or other mobile/tablet devices. I do doubt, however, that wireless data access will remain free on the Kindle long-term. I can't imagine how Amazon will be able to continue subsidizing the data costs. I think that this is a feature that should be enjoyed while it lasts, but I wouldn't be surprised if it goes away at some point in the future.

Though it adds another $50 to the cost, I think the matching case is attractive, functional, and creates an easy-to-carry package.

So is it worth the high cost? I don't think I (or anyone) can really evaluate that until determining how well it integrates into daily work habits. I suspect that I will get heavy use out of it, but then I read a ton of PDFs. I do hope that the PDF support for dictionary lookup, highlighting, and annotation improves, but I base my review on what the product does - not what I would like it to do.

Hope this helps other heavy PDF users! Read more


28. Kindle Lighted Leather Cover, Steel Blue (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle)
Accessory
-- our price: $59.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B003DZ1684
Manufacturer: Amazon Digital Services, Inc
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

Amazon.comAmazon's Kindle Lighted Leather Cover

Our new design seamlessly incorporates a reading light into the cover, so you can carry your Kindle wherever you go and always have a reading light with you. Simply pull the light out to illuminate Kindle when you need it, and slide it away to be invisible when you don't. And since the light draws its power from Kindle, no batteries are needed.

The contoured, pebble-grain leather (available in 7 different colors) keeps your Kindle safe and secure, while the soft charcoal microfiber interior protects the screen from scratches. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand.


The built-in, retractable LED light pulls out to illuminate Kindle, and slides away when not in use.


Never Be Without a Light

Our all-new Kindle cover features an integrated, retractable LED reading light that lets you read comfortably anytime, anywhere. The high-quality LED light illuminates Kindle's paper-like display, adding brightness without adding glare.

A permanent part of the cover, the reading light is located in the top right-hand corner of the back cover. When needed, simply pull the light out and it automatically illuminates, eliminating the need for a separate power switch. To turn the light off, slide it back in to the corner of the cover.

Since the light is powered by Kindle's battery, no batteries are needed.

 

How It Works

In addition to securing Kindle in place, our new hinge system conducts electricity from Kindle's battery to the reading light - when Kindle is attached to the hinge, an electrical connection is formed that powers the light.

The cover's hinge points are gold-plated, to ensure a reliable electrical connection. Gold is used because of its ability to make good electrical contact even with low force, and for its corrosion resistance.


Secure Your Kindle in Four Easy Steps


Read Comfortably with One Hand


Reading with the cover on, you can easily access Kindle's navigation features and power switch, while the rounded edges offer a perfect fit in your hands. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand. And the retractable reading light is easily accessible with the cover open or folded back.


On the Go

This compact cover is perfect for taking Kindle wherever you go. The sleek leather ensures the ultimate fit and protection, without adding bulk or weight. Our patent-pending hinge system secures Kindle in place, and an elastic strap keeps the cover firmly closed for maximum screen protection. Simply attach Kindle to the hinge, apply the strap, and rest assured it will stay securely in place even when you're on the go.

You'll never be without a reading light, and since the light draws its power from Kindle, no batteries are needed.



Amazon’s official Kindle lighted cover features contoured, pebble-grain leather available in 7 different colors.

 

 

Read Kindle easily in the dark with Amazon's revolutionary, all-new lighted leather cover.



The hinge points are gold-plated to ensure a reliable electrical connection. No batteries required.


Read easily with one hand, with or without the light on.


Protect your Kindle on the go, and never be without a reading light

 

... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Quality K3 Cover with Handy Light, August 26, 2010
I bought the burnt orange color cover so I can spot my Kindle where ever I leave it easily--and hopefully not misplace it! The cover is good quality leather, and even with the cover on, I can slip the K3 into my small purse without squeezing it in--something I could not do with my coverless Kindle 2.

I think for an easy purchase without having to buy a separate book light, the Kindle 3 lighted cover is a good choice. The light worked _great_ reading in bed last night. I could see all of the lighted screen just fine with the upper right corner a bit brighter. See the pics I loaded to customer images for the lighted cover to see the light in action in a dark room, and what the cover looks light from the back.

Pluses: Built in light that slips securely out of the way, no batteries to replace, better clips/fit than past covers that connect to Kindle, adequate to light the entire screen, no looking for a booklight, no clipping a booklight to my Kindle and scratching or damaging it, the book light LEDs point down towards the screen, so no bright lights in your eyes.

Minuses: The cover's weight doubles the weight of the Kindle 3 in your hand, the book light stays in one corner and doesn't move around the Kindle, uses more Kindle battery life (it's powered by the Kindle 3 -- and I noticed a definite drain on the battery from using the light)

UPDATE: I used the Kindle light for a couple days now, and the battery life goes down noticeably as you use the light (esp. if you keep the wireless "On"). Last night I read with the light for about 2 hours after a full charge and today the battery looks down about 15%. At that rate of use (with no wireless constantly "On" and regular reading in the daylight), I estimate the battery will need charging after approx. 1 week.

If the overall cover+Kindle weight is an issue for you--more than protecting your Kindle and the handy light--then this cover is not for you.

Kindle Lighted Leather Cover alone = 233 grams or 8.2 oz

Kindle Lighted Leather Cover + Kindle 3 = 447 grams or 15.75 oz. (almost 1 lb.)

Thickness: Kindle cover + Kindle 3 = 3/4 inch

Cover Measurements (with Kindle inside):

Front: 7 3/4" x 5 1/8" (closer to 3/16")
Back: SAME as front
Spine: 7/8"
Open side (to the right) with Kindle inside: 3/4"

I have to say I'm getting used to the weight with the cover as I use it. The piece of mind of extra Kindle protection, plus a handy light whenever you need it, is worth the trade off for me. '

November 20th UPDATE:

**Still love the cover** and having the light handy without having to think about needing a light _is better than ever_. One thing however, is that the hooks to connect the cover are not sturdy enough, IMO, to take the cover on and off often. The Kindle "wiggles" a bit on the connectors, and be careful not to pull the Kindle forward or up off the back of the cover to avoid bending or breaking the metal connectors. Despite this, I am very happy with this cover after using it almost 3 months now.

5-0 out of 5 stars Lighted Leather Case - Two Important Concerns, August 31, 2010
I've noticed that like myself customers have been concerned primarily with two things regarding the new lighted case from amazon. These are: 1)The weight and 2) The uneven lighting. My review will briefly discuss these two things.

1)The Weight - The lighted leather case is a nice weight, sturdy and comfortable to hold. In ounces it is about the weight of the kindle itself however don't let that concern you. With the case on it feels like a medium sized paperback, however it is far much more comfortable to hold. It's easy to hold the case open like a book (nice for couch and table type reading) or to fold the front back and close it with the bungee so that the bungee doesn't hang around (this is good for bedtime reading).Closing the front back with bungee keeps the case folded in position and you don't have to worry about it bothering you. BTW THIS CASE FOLDS BACK 100% - Very comfortable. In sum very comfortable to read with the case and very sturdy.

2) The uneven lighting - Amazon's pictures don't do this case justice. The light hits the ENTIRE screen. Yes if you look closely it's brighter in the top right corner then in the bottom left but Amazon's pics make it look the top is lighted while the bottom is dark. There is good light all over the screen. Trust me I'm fussy about these things - the lighting will not bother you, your entire screen will be lighted and it is extremely pleasant to read in the dark.

*Final Thoughts - Great case, good quality, works well, kindle feels very secure and protected (I would feel comfortable slipping this case into my backpack or suitcase and I think it would sustain some mild impact). Lastly hinges are a non-issue, casing of the kindle will not get damaged with normal or even slightly aggressive use. You could damage the kindle by trying to pull the back of the case but you'd have to really force it to cause any sort of damage to your kindle. The hinges work fine and should not be a concern to any case user.

Update 1st December 2010:

Have now been using the case for 3 months. Leather still looks impeccable. Some people expressed concern that the bungee cord might loosen with use. I have not experienced any loosening so far. Quality of the product has proven outstanding. I've occasionally spilled or messed the cover, just a wipe with a damp cloth has cleaned it up, and the case looks like new. Have to admit I enjoy the feel of the case in my hand, there's just something great about taking your kindle to a coffee shop in this case, it just looks and feels so classy. Also with regard to the hinges: I have had no scratches on my kindle or any other issues, so I remain convinced that the hinges are a non issue.

5-0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Kindle Case Yet, September 2, 2010
I read in bed every single night, so having my Kindle be able to read in the dark is very important to me. With my Kindle 2 I used a mighty bright light, and with my Kindle 3 I've been using this Lighted Leather cover - and I love it!

Check out my video review for a size comparison of this case against my Kindle 2 and also an actual hardcover and softcover book, and then a lights out comparison of the Mighty Bright vs Lighted Leather cover.

Sorry for the shaky camera, it's the best I could do with one hand!

If you're interested in seeing a video review of the Kindle 3 itself, check out the one I did one here:

http://www.amazon.com/review/R21YU59NMOGKUR

3-0 out of 5 stars For those that REALLY care, it's not worth the money., August 28, 2010
I've been an avid Kindle user since Kindle 1, and I take my lights VERY seriously.

The problem is that the new Kindle 3 cover+light does not evenly light the screen. This results in a very bright top right corner, including the top right of the frame of the Kindle 3. And while the light doesn't glare off the screen, it does glare off my graphite Kindle 3's top right corner, making for constant distraction while reading. The light then gets fainter and fainter in a diagonal line from the top right to bottom left. It's not very fun, unfortunately.

Now, for convenience, this new cover is fantastic. I have the non-lighted one and the one with the light, and the weight difference isn't very much, and the bulk difference is truly negligible, so kudos to Amazon for this.

That said, I simply cannot recommend this cover unless you don't mind an incredibly uneven light. I will stick to my Mighty Bright. Yes, it's an addition to the Kindle, but I know that when I sit down to read, I want the pages to "disappear" as I become immersed in my reading. It's very hard for them to do so when the light is so incredibly awkward and uneven, constantly distracting. I'm happy to spend a few extra seconds clipping my light to the back of my Kindle so I can spend hours enjoying my book. That simply wasn't possible with the Kindle Lighted Leather Cover.

3 stars out of 5.

5-0 out of 5 stars Compact and well made, August 27, 2010
For a folio type case, this looks and feels great and works very well. It does add significantly to the weight but that seems a predictable consequence of using leather, making it stiff enough to offer real protection, and building in a light.

Attaching Kindle is very simple using the directions on the product page. Make sure you heed the warning to work at it until ALL the gold is covered, which tells you Kindle is securely attached. Removing is quite simple: Slide down the top hook and rotate Kindle right off. I'm using a fingertip to do it rather than a fingernail. It's quick and easy enough to attach and detach Kindle that I won't have any difficulty switching to "naked" reading at will.

The cord seems to me strong enough for its purpose, but only time will tell. When the cover is closed, the cord is buried in a "channel" in the front cover so should not normally be subjected to much stress and strain. I did remove the little "flag" attached to the cord. Even without using fingernails, it's easy to open the cord up. Others have posted about the cord being in the way during reading, especially when holding Kindle and case in "open book" form. I put the cord between Kindle and the back cover, solving the issue to my own satisfaction. YMMV.

I don't think I'll use the "book style" reading position much. I'll "break the spine" as I did with my K2's case and read with the front cover folded flat against the back. It feels good like that, but when I have good light and will be reading a while I expect I'll do as I did with my K2: Remove Kindle from the case and read "naked." Still, even brand new, the leather folds flat easily and it's comfortable to hold and read.

The light seems to me to be well placed. I don't get any glare in any of my normal reading positions, so don't have a practical issue with its lack of adjustability. One very nice feature, particularly since it's powered by Kindle's battery, is that it turns off when Kindle turns off. So if you fall asleep reading, your light won't just keep running. I find it a bit stiff to pull out, but I expect it will ease in time. Also maybe stiff is good, as you don't want it just lolling out on its own while you've got it stowed away. Still, folks with difficulty applying much force with their fingers could find this an issue.

I bought this unseen, intending to return it if it didn't work well. It won't be going back. I may in fact buy another case for travel, as by design this folio style case is open on three sides. In some situations I would want more dust and bang protection, but I still give five stars because this is an unavoidable consequence of this style of design.

5-0 out of 5 stars well worth it, August 27, 2010
This is a comparison between mighty bright and the kindle cover light. NOTE: the bottom left of the kindle is the part that receives the less light because it is the farthest away. The light still shines well enough to read the bottom left of the kindle , but the light distribution is not even.

5-0 out of 5 stars Exceeded my expectations, August 27, 2010
I was hesitant to buy this cover mostly due to the pictures in its listing, which seem to show a light that doesn't even extend to the opposite corner. The fact that I have not been impressed with the Amazon's Kindle covers in the past didn't help. I went ahead and purchased it because the cover I wanted isn't available yet and I don't like to take my Kindle out and about without a cover. Now I am glad that I went ahead and bought it.

PROS:

1. The light is much better than I thought it would be. Using it in a darkened room I found that the light did the job very well. In a pitch black room, it performs even better. While the screen corner opposite the light is a bit dimmer than other areas, there is no problem reading the page at all.

2. The light gets its power from the Kindle itself, through the gold-plated hinges which attach it to the cover, so batteries are a thing of the past. When your Kindle goes to sleep, the light will go out as well. It will also turn off when you slide it back into the case.

3. The cover is slim, well-fitted and very easy to attach and detach using the hinges. The inside has good padding. The leather outer surface has a nice pebbled texture with the exception of a smooth area along the edge of the front. While stiff enough to protect the reader, the cover is slight flexible and the front easily folds behind when reading so you can hold your Kindle with one hand if you like.

4. A great plus is that the cover has an elastic cord that fits into a groove on the front of it. This holds your cover closed (unlike the original Kindle 2 cover that would flop open in your purse & let things slide into it) and easily distinguishes the front from the back--important as many owners of the Kindle 2 cover accidentally opened it from the back, which could cause cracking along the Kindle's spine.


CONS:

I haven't found any, really. The light Is a bit hard (stiff) to pull out of the cover, but then you wouldn't want it to be flopping out when you don't want to use it so that is more of a Pro than a Con.

The one concern I do have is about pulling the light in and out--I wonder if whatever wiring or conductor that is used to get the power from the hinges to the light will eventually break. But that is something to find out down the road. Right now, the more I use this cover, the more I like it.

4-0 out of 5 stars From the bungee cord thingy to the pull-out light, a solid choice for the Kindle, September 4, 2010
I ordered this cover because it was the only real game in town at the time. To let you know where I come from with this review... I purchased the 2nd generation Kindle back in March of 2009 with the Amazon cover. Didn't like that one, it actually cracked my mother's Kindle that I purchased shortly thereafter (Amazon replaced it, although it was probably from her opening the wrong side, doesn't matter, this isn't about Amazon great customer service). When that happened, we immediately went looking for a new cover and fell in love with the M-Edge Prodigy with light. Unfortunately, M-Edge isn't offering that for the 3rd generation Kindle, they changed it to have a nylon strap instead of leather and aren't utilizing the hinge technology for the light, which I think is genius and a terrible error on their part. I'm telling you this so you know that I ordered this new Amazon Lighted Cover with a WHOLE LOT of trepidation.

When deciding on the color, I didn't want black (I wanted purple, but Amazon doesn't offer that *boo*hiss*) and the green was backordered slightly, didn't like the other colors so I decided to get the orange. It looked interesting and since I live in Austin, some UT fan would buy it off me if I hated it, I was sure. It came in and it's the perfect burnt orange color. It might be slightly too tan colored, but it's not vibrant orange by any means. A great almost pumpkin pie color actually.

So... what did I think of the cover itself?

I slid the Kindle in there and pulled the light out and... nothing happened. I spent a good 3 to 5 minutes pulling the light out and pushing it back in, looking for a switch, something, anything. I finally gave up and turned the Kindle on and... yeah, the light came on. DUH! It works only if the Kindle is on. This is actually GREAT because I fall asleep reading a good deal and the light will go off when the Kindle goes to sleep after 15 minutes or so. I felt stupid, but at least I didn't call customer service and have them giggle in the background and the stupid lady that can't work the cover, eh?

ANYWAY... the Kindle slides in easily and the light works great. There is no glare at all because the LED lights are directed down the arm of the light so there's no "direct" light hitting the screen, it just flows down. It is brighter in the upper right than in the lower left because of that, but it's more than adequate. The light is NOT adjustable but you shouldn't need to adjust it either. I have found it really is a genius way of handling it.

The case itself is not too thick. In fact when I first picked up the case, I thought I had the wrong one because it looked too slim to have a light in there, but it's there. It is a little hard to pull the light out, but I guess the alternative is having it be too easy, right? I really wish they had included corner straps though. I read laying in bed and I worry it's going to flop open and crack the Kindle. I do realize this is probably unfounded and they fixed that flaw, but because I'm paranoid, I did put two small circles of velcro to the back of the Kindle and the cover so it couldn't accidentally bend the hinge system or crack the case. I'm aware this is insane overkill type stuff, so feel free to snicker... I'll wait... done? Okay, onward...

Now, back to reality... the chance of you opening the Kindle from the wrong side is basically zero. You have to unwrap it using this bungee cord thingy (yes, that's the technical term here, folks). It has a little leather tag on it that says "Amazon Kindle". The tag is a little annoying because I fold the cover back and use the cord to hold it and keep hitting the tag with my hand no matter where I put. I'm thinking of cutting it off. *shrug*

It does, of course, add some weight to the Kindle. The case, with Kindle and velcro circles weighs 15.5 oz on my postal scale. There's been some discussion if this is "too heavy" but I must say that I don't think so. I read with it folded back and the bungee cord thingy wrapped around the back. I have weak hands that keep me from reading hard backs and large paperback books. I think it's more of the force of holding the book open than the weight, so it's not been an issue at all for me. I also read with it propped up somewhere usually.

My favorite part is that with the new slim and sleek design of the Kindle and this slim and sleek cover (with a light, no less!) it really is a great size to grab and go, toss in my purse, in the car or my bedside. My other favorite (it's a tie) is the light. It runs off power from the Kindle itself so I'm never without a light. I don't have to find a battery somewhere when it burns out. Amazon knocked it out of the park as far as I'm concerned. I'm taking off a star just for the few little niggle things I mentioned before. After over a week of use though, this is the cover I'm recommending to friends/family at this time.

Well worth it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Data to compare colors and weights, with and without light, September 4, 2010
Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

4-0 out of 5 stars (4.5 stars) Very good, and not THAT heavy!, August 28, 2010
I bought two of these (burgundy for my wife's graphite kindle and green for my white kindle).

The colors are gorgeous, and exactly as shown in the pictures Amazon has here.

The look and feel of the leather is very good and should more than satisfy most folks. If you're willing to spend more for even better leather, you'll soon be able to get high-end leather cases from designers like Cole-Haan. (If you're interested, look up their Kindle 2 cases here at Amazon and you're get an idea of what they're likely to offer for Kindle 3).

We love the design. We've had no trouble hooking our kindles in and out of the case. We love that the light is built in and we will never need to replace its battery. The cover folds completely flat around the back, and the elastic band keeps it there, then it's easy and quite comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

A few reviews here complain about the weight of this case. I disagree. It is not heavy compared to other cases of this type (folio-style hard shell leather cases). My wife and I were up reading for hours last night, holding our kindles, cases on, in one hand, with no fatigue. (We're such an old married couple, that's how exciting our Friday nights are!) I used to have a nook with the same type of case (minus the light), and it was noticeably heavier. If you want something lighter, consider a neoprene sleeve or cloth case.

My only qualm about the Amazon lighted case is the uneven distribution of light on the screen - very bright in the upper right corner, dim in the lower left corner. It seems this doesn't bother most people here, but it bothers me a bit, enough to knock half a star off my review, but not enough to make me hesitate to recommend this case.

Some folks complain about the price. It is high, to be sure. But, you'd pay about the same if you bought a good leather case and a separate light. Then you'd have to worry about remembering to pack the light when you travel, making sure it has fresh batteries, making sure you don't lose it, etc etc. For me, the convenience of the built-in light is well worth the price.

And there's something intangible but very very nice about keeping our kindles in these gorgeous, almost luxuriously nice cases. They are definitely eye-catching and lust-worthy.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Quality K3 Cover with Handy Light, August 26, 2010
I bought the burnt orange color cover so I can spot my Kindle where ever I leave it easily--and hopefully not misplace it! The cover is good quality leather, and even with the cover on, I can slip the K3 into my small purse without squeezing it in--something I could not do with my coverless Kindle 2.

I think for an easy purchase without having to buy a separate book light, the Kindle 3 lighted cover is a good choice. The light worked _great_ reading in bed last night. I could see all of the lighted screen just fine with the upper right corner a bit brighter. See the pics I loaded to customer images for the lighted cover to see the light in action in a dark room, and what the cover looks light from the back.

Pluses: Built in light that slips securely out of the way, no batteries to replace, better clips/fit than past covers that connect to Kindle, adequate to light the entire screen, no looking for a booklight, no clipping a booklight to my Kindle and scratching or damaging it, the book light LEDs point down towards the screen, so no bright lights in your eyes.

Minuses: The cover's weight doubles the weight of the Kindle 3 in your hand, the book light stays in one corner and doesn't move around the Kindle, uses more Kindle battery life (it's powered by the Kindle 3 -- and I noticed a definite drain on the battery from using the light)

UPDATE: I used the Kindle light for a couple days now, and the battery life goes down noticeably as you use the light (esp. if you keep the wireless "On"). Last night I read with the light for about 2 hours after a full charge and today the battery looks down about 15%. At that rate of use (with no wireless constantly "On" and regular reading in the daylight), I estimate the battery will need charging after approx. 1 week.

If the overall cover+Kindle weight is an issue for you--more than protecting your Kindle and the handy light--then this cover is not for you.

Kindle Lighted Leather Cover alone = 233 grams or 8.2 oz

Kindle Lighted Leather Cover + Kindle 3 = 447 grams or 15.75 oz. (almost 1 lb.)

Thickness: Kindle cover + Kindle 3 = 3/4 inch

Cover Measurements (with Kindle inside):

Front: 7 3/4" x 5 1/8" (closer to 3/16")
Back: SAME as front
Spine: 7/8"
Open side (to the right) with Kindle inside: 3/4"

I have to say I'm getting used to the weight with the cover as I use it. The piece of mind of extra Kindle protection, plus a handy light whenever you need it, is worth the trade off for me. '

November 20th UPDATE:

**Still love the cover** and having the light handy without having to think about needing a light _is better than ever_. One thing however, is that the hooks to connect the cover are not sturdy enough, IMO, to take the cover on and off often. The Kindle "wiggles" a bit on the connectors, and be careful not to pull the Kindle forward or up off the back of the cover to avoid bending or breaking the metal connectors. Despite this, I am very happy with this cover after using it almost 3 months now.

5-0 out of 5 stars Lighted Leather Case - Two Important Concerns, August 31, 2010
I've noticed that like myself customers have been concerned primarily with two things regarding the new lighted case from amazon. These are: 1)The weight and 2) The uneven lighting. My review will briefly discuss these two things.

1)The Weight - The lighted leather case is a nice weight, sturdy and comfortable to hold. In ounces it is about the weight of the kindle itself however don't let that concern you. With the case on it feels like a medium sized paperback, however it is far much more comfortable to hold. It's easy to hold the case open like a book (nice for couch and table type reading) or to fold the front back and close it with the bungee so that the bungee doesn't hang around (this is good for bedtime reading).Closing the front back with bungee keeps the case folded in position and you don't have to worry about it bothering you. BTW THIS CASE FOLDS BACK 100% - Very comfortable. In sum very comfortable to read with the case and very sturdy.

2) The uneven lighting - Amazon's pictures don't do this case justice. The light hits the ENTIRE screen. Yes if you look closely it's brighter in the top right corner then in the bottom left but Amazon's pics make it look the top is lighted while the bottom is dark. There is good light all over the screen. Trust me I'm fussy about these things - the lighting will not bother you, your entire screen will be lighted and it is extremely pleasant to read in the dark.

*Final Thoughts - Great case, good quality, works well, kindle feels very secure and protected (I would feel comfortable slipping this case into my backpack or suitcase and I think it would sustain some mild impact). Lastly hinges are a non-issue, casing of the kindle will not get damaged with normal or even slightly aggressive use. You could damage the kindle by trying to pull the back of the case but you'd have to really force it to cause any sort of damage to your kindle. The hinges work fine and should not be a concern to any case user.

Update 1st December 2010:

Have now been using the case for 3 months. Leather still looks impeccable. Some people expressed concern that the bungee cord might loosen with use. I have not experienced any loosening so far. Quality of the product has proven outstanding. I've occasionally spilled or messed the cover, just a wipe with a damp cloth has cleaned it up, and the case looks like new. Have to admit I enjoy the feel of the case in my hand, there's just something great about taking your kindle to a coffee shop in this case, it just looks and feels so classy. Also with regard to the hinges: I have had no scratches on my kindle or any other issues, so I remain convinced that the hinges are a non issue.

5-0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Kindle Case Yet, September 2, 2010
I read in bed every single night, so having my Kindle be able to read in the dark is very important to me. With my Kindle 2 I used a mighty bright light, and with my Kindle 3 I've been using this Lighted Leather cover - and I love it!

Check out my video review for a size comparison of this case against my Kindle 2 and also an actual hardcover and softcover book, and then a lights out comparison of the Mighty Bright vs Lighted Leather cover.

Sorry for the shaky camera, it's the best I could do with one hand!

If you're interested in seeing a video review of the Kindle 3 itself, check out the one I did one here:

http://www.amazon.com/review/R21YU59NMOGKUR

3-0 out of 5 stars For those that REALLY care, it's not worth the money., August 28, 2010
I've been an avid Kindle user since Kindle 1, and I take my lights VERY seriously.

The problem is that the new Kindle 3 cover+light does not evenly light the screen. This results in a very bright top right corner, including the top right of the frame of the Kindle 3. And while the light doesn't glare off the screen, it does glare off my graphite Kindle 3's top right corner, making for constant distraction while reading. The light then gets fainter and fainter in a diagonal line from the top right to bottom left. It's not very fun, unfortunately.

Now, for convenience, this new cover is fantastic. I have the non-lighted one and the one with the light, and the weight difference isn't very much, and the bulk difference is truly negligible, so kudos to Amazon for this.

That said, I simply cannot recommend this cover unless you don't mind an incredibly uneven light. I will stick to my Mighty Bright. Yes, it's an addition to the Kindle, but I know that when I sit down to read, I want the pages to "disappear" as I become immersed in my reading. It's very hard for them to do so when the light is so incredibly awkward and uneven, constantly distracting. I'm happy to spend a few extra seconds clipping my light to the back of my Kindle so I can spend hours enjoying my book. That simply wasn't possible with the Kindle Lighted Leather Cover.

3 stars out of 5.

5-0 out of 5 stars Compact and well made, August 27, 2010
For a folio type case, this looks and feels great and works very well. It does add significantly to the weight but that seems a predictable consequence of using leather, making it stiff enough to offer real protection, and building in a light.

Attaching Kindle is very simple using the directions on the product page. Make sure you heed the warning to work at it until ALL the gold is covered, which tells you Kindle is securely attached. Removing is quite simple: Slide down the top hook and rotate Kindle right off. I'm using a fingertip to do it rather than a fingernail. It's quick and easy enough to attach and detach Kindle that I won't have any difficulty switching to "naked" reading at will.

The cord seems to me strong enough for its purpose, but only time will tell. When the cover is closed, the cord is buried in a "channel" in the front cover so should not normally be subjected to much stress and strain. I did remove the little "flag" attached to the cord. Even without using fingernails, it's easy to open the cord up. Others have posted about the cord being in the way during reading, especially when holding Kindle and case in "open book" form. I put the cord between Kindle and the back cover, solving the issue to my own satisfaction. YMMV.

I don't think I'll use the "book style" reading position much. I'll "break the spine" as I did with my K2's case and read with the front cover folded flat against the back. It feels good like that, but when I have good light and will be reading a while I expect I'll do as I did with my K2: Remove Kindle from the case and read "naked." Still, even brand new, the leather folds flat easily and it's comfortable to hold and read.

The light seems to me to be well placed. I don't get any glare in any of my normal reading positions, so don't have a practical issue with its lack of adjustability. One very nice feature, particularly since it's powered by Kindle's battery, is that it turns off when Kindle turns off. So if you fall asleep reading, your light won't just keep running. I find it a bit stiff to pull out, but I expect it will ease in time. Also maybe stiff is good, as you don't want it just lolling out on its own while you've got it stowed away. Still, folks with difficulty applying much force with their fingers could find this an issue.

I bought this unseen, intending to return it if it didn't work well. It won't be going back. I may in fact buy another case for travel, as by design this folio style case is open on three sides. In some situations I would want more dust and bang protection, but I still give five stars because this is an unavoidable consequence of this style of design.

5-0 out of 5 stars well worth it, August 27, 2010
This is a comparison between mighty bright and the kindle cover light. NOTE: the bottom left of the kindle is the part that receives the less light because it is the farthest away. The light still shines well enough to read the bottom left of the kindle , but the light distribution is not even.

5-0 out of 5 stars Exceeded my expectations, August 27, 2010
I was hesitant to buy this cover mostly due to the pictures in its listing, which seem to show a light that doesn't even extend to the opposite corner. The fact that I have not been impressed with the Amazon's Kindle covers in the past didn't help. I went ahead and purchased it because the cover I wanted isn't available yet and I don't like to take my Kindle out and about without a cover. Now I am glad that I went ahead and bought it.

PROS:

1. The light is much better than I thought it would be. Using it in a darkened room I found that the light did the job very well. In a pitch black room, it performs even better. While the screen corner opposite the light is a bit dimmer than other areas, there is no problem reading the page at all.

2. The light gets its power from the Kindle itself, through the gold-plated hinges which attach it to the cover, so batteries are a thing of the past. When your Kindle goes to sleep, the light will go out as well. It will also turn off when you slide it back into the case.

3. The cover is slim, well-fitted and very easy to attach and detach using the hinges. The inside has good padding. The leather outer surface has a nice pebbled texture with the exception of a smooth area along the edge of the front. While stiff enough to protect the reader, the cover is slight flexible and the front easily folds behind when reading so you can hold your Kindle with one hand if you like.

4. A great plus is that the cover has an elastic cord that fits into a groove on the front of it. This holds your cover closed (unlike the original Kindle 2 cover that would flop open in your purse & let things slide into it) and easily distinguishes the front from the back--important as many owners of the Kindle 2 cover accidentally opened it from the back, which could cause cracking along the Kindle's spine.


CONS:

I haven't found any, really. The light Is a bit hard (stiff) to pull out of the cover, but then you wouldn't want it to be flopping out when you don't want to use it so that is more of a Pro than a Con.

The one concern I do have is about pulling the light in and out--I wonder if whatever wiring or conductor that is used to get the power from the hinges to the light will eventually break. But that is something to find out down the road. Right now, the more I use this cover, the more I like it.

4-0 out of 5 stars From the bungee cord thingy to the pull-out light, a solid choice for the Kindle, September 4, 2010
I ordered this cover because it was the only real game in town at the time. To let you know where I come from with this review... I purchased the 2nd generation Kindle back in March of 2009 with the Amazon cover. Didn't like that one, it actually cracked my mother's Kindle that I purchased shortly thereafter (Amazon replaced it, although it was probably from her opening the wrong side, doesn't matter, this isn't about Amazon great customer service). When that happened, we immediately went looking for a new cover and fell in love with the M-Edge Prodigy with light. Unfortunately, M-Edge isn't offering that for the 3rd generation Kindle, they changed it to have a nylon strap instead of leather and aren't utilizing the hinge technology for the light, which I think is genius and a terrible error on their part. I'm telling you this so you know that I ordered this new Amazon Lighted Cover with a WHOLE LOT of trepidation.

When deciding on the color, I didn't want black (I wanted purple, but Amazon doesn't offer that *boo*hiss*) and the green was backordered slightly, didn't like the other colors so I decided to get the orange. It looked interesting and since I live in Austin, some UT fan would buy it off me if I hated it, I was sure. It came in and it's the perfect burnt orange color. It might be slightly too tan colored, but it's not vibrant orange by any means. A great almost pumpkin pie color actually.

So... what did I think of the cover itself?

I slid the Kindle in there and pulled the light out and... nothing happened. I spent a good 3 to 5 minutes pulling the light out and pushing it back in, looking for a switch, something, anything. I finally gave up and turned the Kindle on and... yeah, the light came on. DUH! It works only if the Kindle is on. This is actually GREAT because I fall asleep reading a good deal and the light will go off when the Kindle goes to sleep after 15 minutes or so. I felt stupid, but at least I didn't call customer service and have them giggle in the background and the stupid lady that can't work the cover, eh?

ANYWAY... the Kindle slides in easily and the light works great. There is no glare at all because the LED lights are directed down the arm of the light so there's no "direct" light hitting the screen, it just flows down. It is brighter in the upper right than in the lower left because of that, but it's more than adequate. The light is NOT adjustable but you shouldn't need to adjust it either. I have found it really is a genius way of handling it.

The case itself is not too thick. In fact when I first picked up the case, I thought I had the wrong one because it looked too slim to have a light in there, but it's there. It is a little hard to pull the light out, but I guess the alternative is having it be too easy, right? I really wish they had included corner straps though. I read laying in bed and I worry it's going to flop open and crack the Kindle. I do realize this is probably unfounded and they fixed that flaw, but because I'm paranoid, I did put two small circles of velcro to the back of the Kindle and the cover so it couldn't accidentally bend the hinge system or crack the case. I'm aware this is insane overkill type stuff, so feel free to snicker... I'll wait... done? Okay, onward...

Now, back to reality... the chance of you opening the Kindle from the wrong side is basically zero. You have to unwrap it using this bungee cord thingy (yes, that's the technical term here, folks). It has a little leather tag on it that says "Amazon Kindle". The tag is a little annoying because I fold the cover back and use the cord to hold it and keep hitting the tag with my hand no matter where I put. I'm thinking of cutting it off. *shrug*

It does, of course, add some weight to the Kindle. The case, with Kindle and velcro circles weighs 15.5 oz on my postal scale. There's been some discussion if this is "too heavy" but I must say that I don't think so. I read with it folded back and the bungee cord thingy wrapped around the back. I have weak hands that keep me from reading hard backs and large paperback books. I think it's more of the force of holding the book open than the weight, so it's not been an issue at all for me. I also read with it propped up somewhere usually.

My favorite part is that with the new slim and sleek design of the Kindle and this slim and sleek cover (with a light, no less!) it really is a great size to grab and go, toss in my purse, in the car or my bedside. My other favorite (it's a tie) is the light. It runs off power from the Kindle itself so I'm never without a light. I don't have to find a battery somewhere when it burns out. Amazon knocked it out of the park as far as I'm concerned. I'm taking off a star just for the few little niggle things I mentioned before. After over a week of use though, this is the cover I'm recommending to friends/family at this time.

Well worth it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Data to compare colors and weights, with and without light, September 4, 2010
Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

4-0 out of 5 stars (4.5 stars) Very good, and not THAT heavy!, August 28, 2010
I bought two of these (burgundy for my wife's graphite kindle and green for my white kindle).

The colors are gorgeous, and exactly as shown in the pictures Amazon has here.

The look and feel of the leather is very good and should more than satisfy most folks. If you're willing to spend more for even better leather, you'll soon be able to get high-end leather cases from designers like Cole-Haan. (If you're interested, look up their Kindle 2 cases here at Amazon and you're get an idea of what they're likely to offer for Kindle 3).

We love the design. We've had no trouble hooking our kindles in and out of the case. We love that the light is built in and we will never need to replace its battery. The cover folds completely flat around the back, and the elastic band keeps it there, then it's easy and quite comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

A few reviews here complain about the weight of this case. I disagree. It is not heavy compared to other cases of this type (folio-style hard shell leather cases). My wife and I were up reading for hours last night, holding our kindles, cases on, in one hand, with no fatigue. (We're such an old married couple, that's how exciting our Friday nights are!) I used to have a nook with the same type of case (minus the light), and it was noticeably heavier. If you want something lighter, consider a neoprene sleeve or cloth case.

My only qualm about the Amazon lighted case is the uneven distribution of light on the screen - very bright in the upper right corner, dim in the lower left corner. It seems this doesn't bother most people here, but it bothers me a bit, enough to knock half a star off my review, but not enough to make me hesitate to recommend this case.

Some folks complain about the price. It is high, to be sure. But, you'd pay about the same if you bought a good leather case and a separate light. Then you'd have to worry about remembering to pack the light when you travel, making sure it has fresh batteries, making sure you don't lose it, etc etc. For me, the convenience of the built-in light is well worth the price.

And there's something intangible but very very nice about keeping our kindles in these gorgeous, almost luxuriously nice cases. They are definitely eye-catching and lust-worthy. Read more


29. Mediabridge Ultra Series - High Speed HDMI Cable With Ethernet - Category 2 Certified - Supports 3D & Audio Return Channel - (6 Feet)

list price: $59.95 -- our price: $9.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0019EHU8G
Manufacturer: Mediabridge Products, LLC.
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

Mediabridge Ultra Series - High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet - Supports 3D, Audio Return Channel and Up To 4K Resolution

Buy With Confidence
Mediabridge Products is an Official HDMI Adopter Licensed by HDMI Licensing, LLC. See our certificate in product images section.

Quality Construction
Mediabridge's Full Metal Jacket Connectors provide the pinnacle of protection from physical strain and electronic interference.

HDMI combines both audio and video into one cable so it's all you need to connect your HDTV to your Blu-Ray Player, Xbox360, PS3, HD Cable Box, PC or any HD device with an HDMI output.

Compatibility
- Supports 3D Content
- 4K, 1440p, 1080p, 1080i, 720p, 480p, and 480i Resolutions
- Audio Return Channel

- Supports Highest Refresh Rates Available
- Transfer Rates of Up to 340Mhz or 10.2gbps
- True HD Dolby 7.1 and DTS-HD Master Audio
- HDCP Compliant
- Ethernet Channel For Sharing Internet Between HDMI Devices
NOTE: HDMI Ports that support Ethernet Channel are required for internet sharing. Ethernet Channel has no effect on audio or video and does not affect compatibility with devices that do not use the internet. This cable is the perfect solution for the most basic setup as well as the most advanced.

Physical Specifications
- 28 AWG Cable - Thicker For Durability Yet Flexible Due to Soft PVC Jacket
- Full Metal Jacket Connectors - For Durability and Interference Protection
- Shielding Throughout Cable
- Gold Plated

Warranty and Technical Support
Mediabridge HDMI Cables are backed by a Limited Lifetime Warranty. Contact Us Monday - Friday 9am to 5pm Eastern.

HDMI, the HDMI Logo, and High-Definition Multimedia Interface are trademarks or registered trademarks of HDMI Licensing LLC in the United States and other countries.
... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Product, June 26, 2008
These cables are an excellent deal and meet all of the relevant specifications that will allow you to get maximum throughput from 1080p equipment.

Don't believe those that claim all HDMI cables are the same. They are not all the same and those that claim they are have unfortunately been misled. While I am the last person to suggest going out and overpaying for an expensive retail brand, I would definitely recommend being a little careful not to use a cable that has the potential to degrade the picture on your new HD equipment. It is even more critical for PS3 gamers because of the deep color capabilities of PS3.

Fortunately for us, HDMI.org has made separating the good cables from the best cables very simple.

According to the HDMI website, Category 2 cables are required not only to guarantee 1080P FullHD but also for high refresh rates and deep color.

The following was cut and pasted from the HDMI.org website:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Q. What is the difference between a "Standard" HDMI cable and a "High-Speed" HDMI cable?
Recently, HDMI Licensing, LLC announced that cables would be tested as Standard or High-Speed cables.
Standard (or "category 1") cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 75Mhz, which is the equivalent of a 1080i signal.
High Speed (or "category 2") cables have been tested to perform at speeds of 340Mhz, which is the highest bandwidth currently available over an HDMI cable and can successfully handle 1080p signals including those at increased color depths and/or increased refresh rates. High-Speed cables are also able to accommodate higher resolution displays, such as WQXGA cinema monitors (resolution of 2560 x 1600).
.........................................................
Q. Will my Standard cable work in High Speed applications?
Although a Standard HDMI cable may not have been tested to support the higher bandwidth requirements of cables rated to support high speeds, existing cables, especially ones of shorter lengths (i.e., less than 2 meters), will generally perform adequately in higher speed situations. The quality of the HDMI receiver chip (in the TV, for example) has a large effect on the ability to cleanly recover and display the HDMI signal. A significant majority, perhaps all, of the HDMI TVs and projectors that support 1080p on the HDMI inputs are designed with quality receiver chips that may cleanly recover the 1080p HDMI signal using a Standard-rated HDMI cable. These receiver chips use technology called "cable equalization" in order to counter the signal reduction (attenuation) caused by a cable. We have seen successful demonstrations of 1080p signal runs on a >50 ft. cable, and a 720p signal run on a >75 ft. cable. However, the only way to guarantee that your cable will perform at higher speeds is to purchase a cable that has been tested at the higher speeds and labeled as "High-Speed."
.........................................................
Q. What are the technical and branding requirements for cables?
As part of the new Trademark and Logo Usage Guidelines, cables will be labeled as either Standard or High Speed.
1.Standard cables (referred to as Category 1 cables in the HDMI specification) are those tested to perform at speeds of 75Mhz, which is the equivalent of an uncompressed 1080i signal.
2.High Speed cables (referred to as Category 2 cables in the HDMI specification), are those tested to perform at speeds of 340Mhz, which is the highest bandwidth currently available over an HDMI cable and can successfully handle 1080p signals including those at increased color depths (e.g. greater than eight bits per color) and/or increased refresh rates (e.g. 120Hz). High Speed cables are also able to accommodate higher resolution displays, such as those at the latest 1440p and WQXGA resolutions (e.g. cinema monitors with a resolution of 2560 x 1600).
While many cables that are branded as Standard cables will work at higher speeds (especially at cable lengths of less than five meters), to guarantee performance, consumers should purchase a cable that is tested and rated for the specific speed required by their system.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There you have it. Word for word from the official HDMI website.

In summary, any certified HDMI cable will "generally" work fine, but use Category 2 rated cables if you want guaranteed 1080p throughput.

Mediabridge is a quality cable that meets the higher standards of Category 2. And this pricing is exceptionally good for this quality cable. There are certainly other cables around that meet this standard as well. But basically, Mediabridge is offering a high quality cable at a great price here.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent!, September 4, 2008
These cables worked great for me...I'm getting 1080p@24hz no problem. My setup is a Samsung 52" LCD TV (LN52A650) and a Playstation 3. Save yourself a whole lot of money and don't get ripped off buying "Monster" or any other overpriced HDMI cable. Order processing, USPS shipping, and receipt in Texas was lightling fast(7 days). Order 2 while you're at it...someday you'll need another one!

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Choice and Value for Money, July 29, 2008
Ok so I am a girl and I am not much of a techie but I didn't want to spend $100 on an HDMI cable. I came to Amazon and read a lot of the product reviews.

I first purchased the the HDMI cable from ClearAV, it was inexpesive and not the best product. It cost me a little over $4 for the item and S&H. I tested it on my upconverting Panasonic DVD player on 1080i resolution on my 40" 1080p Samsung LCD TV but it had poor signal quality and the cable was not an HDMI version 1.3. So when I played my DVDs the picture would go on and off and so would the sound and there was a flashing line on my screen. Then I thought maybe I need to get another cable but still was not willing to pay $100.

I continued to do my research and realized that not all HDMI cables were created equal :( So I decided to try my luck again with the MEDIABRIDGE : "Premium 6ft 1.3b Category 2 Super High Speed HDMI Cable - 1080p - PS3 - Blu-Ray." THIS CABLE IS THE REAL THING : the true HDMI version 1.3b Category 2 certified (whatever that means but sounds like a really good thing) which can be used with blu-ray or PS3 and will give you great 48-bit color. I paid a little under $7 for everything i.e for the item and S&H. The first thing I noticed was that it has the "HDMI" embossed on the cable; might not mean much but I thought it was note worthy. Second, the cable was thick and sturdy unlike the regular one I previously purchased. Third, apparently it's gold plated, I don't know how to prove this but it sure looks shiny :)

OK so I got the product 2 business days later from MEDIABRIDGE( I was so happy it arrived promptly), I tried it last night and everything was perfect. I didn't have to wiggle the cable to see if I could get a better signal, audio and picture quality. Just plugged everything in and one, two, we were in business. I even did my Core Secrets workout with all the movements and I still got perfect picture and sound. I should have just paid $2 extra to begin with for a better quality product...take it from me...I'm girl with not much knowledge on such stuff but I know a great product when I see one.

Hopefully it will last me a long time :) I'm off to do my research on the Play Station console, I am curious to see how much better Blu-Ray picture quality is...no sense in buying an expensive Blu- Ray dvd player when I can just get the game right?

5-0 out of 5 stars A company as excellent as their cables!, December 22, 2008
I just ordered the Mediabridge 6ft HDMI cable for $8.95 (same as the $9.95 one, just an Amazon mistake). I was very happy with how fast I got my order: 5 days even over a weekend! Ordered Wednesday, shipped out Thursday, got it by USPS on Monday! I am so impressed by the quality of this cable that I wanted to order a second one. But to make absolutely SURE I was ordering the SAME cable, I called Mediabridge. I almost fainted when a guy answered the phone after about 3 rings! You read that right: a human being! NO prompts, no automated crap! A real person. And his name wasn't Abdula Wantonobe! And he was one of the friendliest, most helpful people I've talked to in a long time regarding digital audio and video, their signals, and the differences in the cable construction and quality. It was like this guy went to home electronics school and got a degree in "Home Theater 101". Truly a knowledgeable professional at what he does. I appreciate the service, their great price, and especially the help I got when I called. I highly recommend MEDIABRIDGE if you want the finest quality at an affordable price! This growing company will most likely become the industry standard in home audio and video accessories. Buy from Mediabridge and you WILL get the finest quality available!

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Price...Great Results, September 17, 2008
I purchased these cables recently to hook up my HDTV's to the HD boxes I have from my cable provider. I was amazed to find out that the quality of the picture and sound is similar to, if not the same as, the $100 cable I purchased from Best Buy a few years ago. I wish I knew then what I know now regarding these cables.

I do not use them for any gaming systems, just HD cable. I am completely satisfied with the product I received and was convinced of purchasing this product after reading the on-line reviews that were submitted by other individuals.

5-0 out of 5 stars Does what's expected, honest pricing, December 16, 2008
Just in case someone may feel guilty for not paying a lot more for, basically the same thing, let's look at our top of the line offer, Monster HDMI 1000HD Ultra-High Speed HDMI Cable (2 meters) and do a quick comparison.

This item supports the HDMI 1.3b standard which is almost as good as it gets (1.3c doesn't add anything special). Any HDMI 1.3 cable can carry up to 10.2 Gbit/s. Hmmm... I suppose the Monster is much better, right? Well... it "guarantees a certified cable bandwidth of 10.2" Okay, but the Monster also supports "x.v.Color, and Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD". It turns out that, all of the above, and more, are part of the HDMI 1.3 specs and they are fully supported by every cable that complies to the standard and can be had for about 90% less in the Mediabridge. The expensive brand presentation simply enumerates the HDMI 1.3 specs as if it being HDMI 1.3 compliant was a really big deal. It is not a big deal. Even a cable that costs 95% less is HDMI 1.3 compliant.

My suggestion: if you think that the proponents of the expensive brand have a point when they claim that their product is a lot more durable, buy TWO Media Bridge wires and still pay almost 80% less than you would pay for one of the expensive ones.

My personal experience: I've never paid 'a lot' for an HDMI cable because it makes no sense to pay more. I took home one of the 'expensive' ones once because the salesman promised to take it back if I wasn't amazed by the difference. It made zero difference and I returned it.

_________________________________________________

The following are the HDMI 1.3 specs and all certified HDMI 1.3 cables (including Monster) are going to support them.

Maximum signal bandwidth (MHz) 340
Maximum TMDS bandwidth (Gbit/s) 10.2
Maximum video bandwidth (Gbit/s) 8.16
Maximum audio bandwidth (Mbit/s) 36.86
Maximum Color Depth (bit/px) 48

Maximum resolution over single link at 24-bit/px 2560�1600p75
Maximum resolution over single link at 30-bit/px 2560�1600p60
Maximum resolution over single link at 36-bit/px 1920x1200p75
Maximum resolution over single link at 48-bit/px 1920�1200p60

sRGB
YCbCr
8 channel LPCM/192 kHz/24-bit audio capability
Blu-ray Disc video and audio at full resolution
Consumer Electronic Control (CEC)
DVD-Audio support
Super Audio CD (DSD) support
Deep Color
xvYCC
Auto lip-sync
Dolby TrueHD bitstream capable
DTS-HD Master Audio bitstream capable
Updated list of CEC commands (only on HDMI 1.3a,b,c)

5-0 out of 5 stars Great product!, October 7, 2008
I recently purchased 2 of these cables and they exceeded my expectations. I ordered them because they are 1.3b Cat2 rated, which basically means they can more than handle a full HD 1080p signal and are actually rated to handle even larger resolutions not available in residential equipment (no need to worry about 1080i vs. 1080p issues some people complain about with super-cheap cables). That and the fact that they were $5. They shipped very quickly, even with standard shipping, and when they arrived I was VERY impressed with the quality of their physical construction. They are well constructed, appear very durable, and will perform side-by-side with any other cable out there 20x the price+. I am confident these are the last cables I will ever need to purchase for my existing equipment and would definitely buy them again for any additional future equipment needs.

5-0 out of 5 stars Works excellent for ps3, September 13, 2008
The cable looks and works like a $40 one. The cable is REALLY v1.3 certified, says REVISION v1.3 COPARTNER.

The images in my Sony Bravia M-Series KDL-26M4000 26-Inch 720p LCD HDTV looks amazing using my PlayStation 3 80 GB Metal Gear Solid 4 Pack. The quality of the cable is excellent, well protected from outside signals. I can say this is the greatest inexpensive v1.3 HDMI cable that amazon sells.

I bought this product from MediaBridge LLC. They shipped the cable very fast(3days)!

5-0 out of 5 stars Why Pay More???, September 4, 2008
I purchased this cable to go with a DVD recorder with upconversion, which I haven't received yet, but plugged it into my HD satellite and my HD TV and it works just as good as the $45. cable the Satellite company sold me. They said was top of the line. If you want to pay more go ahead I don't see any reason to.

update: Dec 2009 still works great!!!

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Purchase, November 16, 2008
Are you looking for a quality Category 2 HDMI cable that is six feet in length with a black coat? This is it. Stop looking at those other expensive cables because this is all you need. I have two of these running from my cable box and PS3 to my new LCD TV, and they work exactly as they should. Delivered on time, no issues. Go for it! Read more


30. Flip UltraHD Video Camera - Black, 8 GB, 2 Hours (3rd Generation) NEWEST MODEL
Electronics
list price: $199.00 -- our price: $179.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0040702HA
Manufacturer: Flip Video
Sales Rank: 3
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

The all-new Flip UltraHD video camera, now with image stabilization and a new slimmer design, combines Flip Video's signature shoot-and-share simplicity with better-than-ever HD. Simply power on and press record to start capturing up to 2 hours of incredible HD video. When you're done recording, just connect the flip-out USB arm to a PC or Mac and use pre-loaded FlipShare software to organize, edit and share your videos. The new UltraHD also works with Designed for Flip products, a new expanded accessory line from Flip Video and partner companies. ... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars The Best Flip once again so far...., September 22, 2010
This is now my 3rd Flip camera (they are all still in operation, I just can't help upgrading when a higher quality product hits the market). I always fall in love with my new Flip video camera and this one is no exception - I prefer the design of the Ultra HD over the Mino because of the larger screen, and the new 3rd generation is noticeably thinner than last year's model which makes it lighter and easier to hold. HUGE HUGE HUGE improvement in video quality on the 3rd generation model - image stabilization and now 60 frames per seconds (FPS) compared to 30 FPS in the previous HD model. This 60 FPS results in noticeably higher quality video and the ability to zoom more effectively. This model comes with a rechargeable battery pack so you can charge via your usb port on your computer, or if you are traveling and don't have access to USB the Flip Ultra also allows you to put 3 AA batteries for videographers who are "on the go."

Another A++ product from the folks up in San Francisco who design this product. Go out and get one - it's time for an Upgrade to the 3rd generation of Flip!!!!

5-0 out of 5 stars The Best Flip once again so far...., September 22, 2010
This review is very similar to the review that I gave for the Flip Slid HD when it first came out. (Please see that review also...)

I have been a Flip camera user since they released the first gen. Flip Mino HD (not the new metallic model). I loved the camera. For what I needed it for it was everything I wanted. I soon became addicted to the Flip cameras and needed to purchase the newest one every time they came out.

I currently own the Flip Mino HD (1st gen) Flip Ultra HD (2nd Gen) Flip Slide HD, and now the Flip Ultra HD (3rd Gen with Flip Port). I also own a Canon GL2 and Vixia 30 video cameras and a Canon Xi digital SLR.


I got home from school on Tuesday and found my brand new Flip Ultra HD waiting for me. I had about 20 minutes to open the package, look and set up the features (time, date, etc.) before I had to leave for marching band rehearsal. During rehearsal I did some test shooting and I was very impressed with the quality of this camera, but I was worried about a few features.

I was reluctant at first to purchase this camera because of the 60fps feature. I did own a Kodak Zi8 and the 720p 60fps setting didn't not import into Final Cut Pro. I had to take it into compressor or some other software and change the file extension in order for Final Cut Pro to import it. Of course this causes a decrease in quality.

I was also reluctant because of the image stabilization feature. When image stabilization is added to a camera (of this size) video quality usually suffers. I know flips can be very shaky if you do not have a well trained hand. After a few hours a playing you will figure out the right movements that the camera can incorporate so your video will not come out shaky.

I don't use my Flip Slide HD because of the omni directional microphone. I can not record loud situations because the microphone distorts. This is my biggest fault with the Slide HD. I was a little concerned with the new Flip Ultra HD that it would have the same problem even though it uses a different microphone, but what really sold me on this new Flip was the accessories and the FLIP PORT.

Right off the bat I noticed all of the new accessories that they are pushing for the Flips, the aquapacks, the igo chargers, and my favorite is the magnetic Bower Wide Angel Lens. Flip and Cisco have finally started listening to its customers, but what put it over the top for me was Blue Microphones. Blue Microphones makes vintage and out of this world recording, studio, usb microphones. I own one of their USB Microphones called the Snow Ball and the quality of that microphone is amazing. When I found out that Blue Microphones was making a microphone (mikey) for the new Flip to be used with the new Flip Port, I purchased mine right away.

So the Review...

The Ultra HD has always been my favorite because of its size. I think the bigger it is the better control you will have and the less shaky video you will produce. The new Ultra HD is smaller, but not that much. It feels good in your hands. The controls and the screen are in the same place. It is a nice fit in your hand.

I was very shocked at how well the image stabilization worked. If you have used a flip before this one you know that the slightest movement will create shaky video. You can tell that this one has image stabilization. It still can produce shaky video but it might take a big jolt to do it.

The 60 fps was great. It was much clearer video and with the image stabilization it made everything much smoother and clearer in the view finder, even in low light situations. I did check when I got home and the 60fps does import right into Final Cut Pro for editing without any compression. (Probably cause the videos are in MP4 format)

Overall I think this is the best Flip Camera out on the market. I like this one better than the Mino because of the touch screen controls. Sometimes pressing the touch screen controls on the Mino will cause the camera to shake.

I hope this review was helpful. Please feel free to leave comments or questions.

See my comparison of my Flip Cameras below.


Flip Mino HD - Good Microphone (2nd out of all of them), doesn't have as wide as a shooting angle as the Ultra's. Very small in the hand, at times hard to control.

Flip Ultra HD (2nd Gen) - Good Microphone (3rd out of all of them) Wide Angle for shooting, Feels good in the hand, sturdy, wont break if dropped. Double A batteries only last a few hours, rechargeable battery pack has short life span. Unit can get hot when charging - may even shut down.

Flip Slide HD - Poor Microphone (in loud situations) - its omni directional so it picks up all around the Flip not just in the front like the others. (4th out of all of them) Touch controls are better than the Flip Mino, however this has no hard buttons. The Slide does have the largest storage capacity and is second in video quality only to the new Flip Ultra HD.

Flip Ultra HD (3rd Gen Flip Port) - Widest Angle for shooting, feels the best in the hand, has the Best Microphone and currently I believe has the best video quality. This also is the only unit that has the new Flip Port.


Thanks

Nick

5-0 out of 5 stars HUGE improvement for the Flip - sleeker design, much higher video quality, September 27, 2010
This is now my 3rd Flip camera (they are all still in operation, I just can't help upgrading when a higher quality product hits the market). I always fall in love with my new Flip video camera and this one is no exception - I prefer the design of the Ultra HD over the Mino because of the larger screen, and the new 3rd generation is noticeably thinner than last year's model which makes it lighter and easier to hold. HUGE HUGE HUGE improvement in video quality on the 3rd generation model - image stabilization and now 60 frames per seconds (FPS) compared to 30 FPS in the previous HD model. This 60 FPS results in noticeably higher quality video and the ability to zoom more effectively. This model comes with a rechargeable battery pack so you can charge via your usb port on your computer, or if you are traveling and don't have access to USB the Flip Ultra also allows you to put 3 AA batteries for videographers who are "on the go."

Another A++ product from the folks up in San Francisco who design this product. Go out and get one - it's time for an Upgrade to the 3rd generation of Flip!!!!

4-0 out of 5 stars Great Basic Camera, somewhat lacking features for power users, November 7, 2010

Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
This is a powerful, easy-to-use, fairly cheap video camera; it records @ 1280 x 720, 60 FPS, and can hold about two full hours of video at that capacity. It fits neatly in a shirt pocket and is pretty much ideal for recording anything that doesn't need to be professionally produced film, from home movies to recording interviews. It comes packaged with a basic editing program that's designed to make it as easy as possible to produce basic home movies and post them to the web.

So far as that goes, it's a great camera, especially at the price. The only real problem with it is that the overall interface is fairly dumbed down -- for the sake of ease of use, they've traded away a *lot* of functionality. For example, it's easy to view the clips you've just recorded in the viewfinder, but you can't "fast forward" or "rewind" to a specific frame when you're not actively playing back videos, because there's only one set of "forward" and "reverse" buttons, and they also fill the "skip to next/previous clip" functions.

Similarly, the editing software is clean and easy to use, but lacks a lot of options. It's fairly easy to take a chunk of video, yank out a selection of favorite clips, and string them together into a movie, and maybe even put a title on the front and credits at the end, but anything more complicated than that ain't happening without third-party editing software. Perhaps most critical is the lack of a "resize" feature -- because this camera records at such a high resolution, even fairly short videos taken with it can quickly reach prohibitively high file sizes (two minutes of video from this camera took me approximately two hours to upload to YouTube, over a DSL connection).

All that's an issue because it seems, to me at least, that the only reason to purchase a dedicated video camera, in an era when everyone and their brother's cellphone already has video recording capability, is if you're at minimum a dedicated hobbyist. And if you're such a dedicated hobbyist, I would suspect that you'd want more bells and whistles (like focus and exposure controls, or better bundled editing software) than this thing has. What it does, it does great, I'm just having a hard time figuring out who the expected market is for this -- it records in higher resolution and better FPS than anyone who wants a casual camera for posting web videos really needs, and it lacks the advanced features that would make it appealing to dedicated hobbyists. The two-hour recording time and easy portability might make it very useful for people who want to record interviews or meetings, but archiving those recordings would be prohibitively difficult without, again, 3rd-party editing tools, due to the massive file size of the recordings this thing generates. The camera's best feature is probably the image stabilization, which works very well -- indeed, so well that I forgot about it, and just waved the camera around without even worrying about image shake at all. Because of that, this camera might be ideal for hobbyists who already have a full suite of editing software and are looking to shoot in uncontrolled conditions without a tripod.

The video to the left is an example of the sort of thing it's fairly easy to turn out with this camera -- you can see how it deals fairly well with indoor lighting conditions, has good color, etc., and you can see the "image stabilization" at work. I should note, however, that I did make two changes to this video using third-party software -- I reduced its resolution from 1280 x 720 to 640 x 360 and converted it to a .wmv file so that it would fit within Amazon's file size & format requirements for video reviews.

2-0 out of 5 stars Do the some of the reviewers work for FLIP?, October 2, 2010
I can't help but notice that the most stellar reviews are not from steady Amazon reviewers and have only reviewed FLIP products (for the most part). I am hoping that these reviews are not a product of shameless internal promotion. That said, even if this is the case, the FLIP is definitely convenient. The website (flipshare) definitely takes the difficulty quotient out of the picture. I bought the 3G only b/c I gave my 2G to a family member, and inertia (already being a member of their site) rears its passive head so I went with what is familiar.

So I re-starred my review due to comments-- And since I just got the flip, I wasn't able to fully review it initially and had given it lower star rating. However, I can say I've used it now for all of a month or two and thus far it seems pretty much the same as the 2nd Generation flip. Sure, there is supposed to be an added feature for image stabilization, but it's really not noticeable (IMO). The 3rd generation is also a tad thinner than the 2nd generation, but, again, not noticeable-- at all. Thus, I would recommend the 2nd generation over the 3rd generation, in part because there is no noticeable difference, and in part because the 2nd generation is so much cheaper! I'd say this new generation is ok... not great, not bad, just fine/so so. I'm not wowed by the new 3G version.

Two things to note: 1) HDMI cables are NOT included (for the 2G or 3G versions).
2) The FLIP Ultra HD is Mac compatible.

Many other mini HD camcorders are not fully Mac compatible. This may be a reason to go with the Ultra HD Flip.

VERY IMPORTANT TO NOTE: DO NOT, I REPEAT, DO NOT GET THE ONE HOUR FLIP. THE VIDEO QUALITY IS SOOOOO AWFUL THAT I WANT TO HURL IT AGAINST THE WALL. I bought the 1 hour 3rd generation flip as a backup, and just pulled it out b/c my son broke the 3rd generation 2 hour flip. I started taping him, and could not even see his features up close. It is the worst video quality ever. And when I say ever, I am not exaggerating. I am so upset, mad, frustrated. How can they even put this product on the market given its rediculously awful quality? I hate it. B/c of this 1 hour flip quality, I am going to try another brand. I don't care how easy it is to upload into the flipshare... At this point, I am too angry. Also, I see that Cisco people troll amazon to respond to all the reviews. Caveat Emptor. buyer beware.

3-0 out of 5 stars Hard to recommend with so many gadgets w/video in market now, October 27, 2010

Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
I wavered between giving this three or four stars, but settled on four because it delivers what it promises in spades: EASY to use, high quality video recording in a small package. If I could, I would give a 3.5. There's a BIG "but" though:

The caveat here is that this is now a single-purpose, niche product, whose single purpose can be found on a number of different devices, from DSLR's, to point and shoot cameras, to smartphones (and probably non smart phones). You would be hard pressed to find even the lowliest point and shoot digital camera that doesn't record 720p video these days.

The one differentiator here is that this Flip shoots video at 60 frames per second, which is great if you are mostly going to be shooting outdoors, in bright light (because you SHOULD get smoother looking action, although most people can't see the difference). But it can actually be a disadvantage (vs the more standard 24 or 30fps) when shooting in lower light situations. I found this to be true as I compared several gadgets of mine (iPhone 4, Canon S95 digital camera, Canon HV30 HD camcorder), shooting the same indoors scene.

Just hard to recommend that anyone buy this today, knowing that almost every digicam on the market does 720p video now (and several of the new gen point and shoots do 1080p!) I shot the same scene (outdoors, but in very cloudy conditions) with my iPhone 4 and the Flip. The iPhone's video was slightly less contrasty, and a little more shaky looking due to no optical image stabilization like the Flip has. BUT at least I could focus on certain areas with the iPhone. With the Flip, I have no way to focus on a particular object, which is tough. I would bet MOST people would not be able to tell much of a difference in the picture quality between the two (unless you were watching them side by side, and even then, was difficult to determine a clear winner)

When these Flips first came out, they were a standout product because video in digicams was horrible at that time, and either nonexistent or poor on cel phones, but times have changed. For $200,today, you can buy an iPhone 4, or a point and shoot Sony digicam with a CMOS, low light sensor, that will shoot better video, plus you get the primary functions of those devices to boot. The video is just gravy.

PROS:
- Svelte, easy to carry and handle, outside black soft touch material very nice
- Good to very good video quality
- SO easy to use and hook up to another device for viewing the results.
- optical image stabilization works surprisingly well considering form factor, weight and small size of the Flip
- 60 fps great for outdoors/good light shooting

CONS:
- Hard to justify price when you can get at least as good video in other devices that do more than just video
- No ability to focus
- I wish the lens had more protection, or even a built in lens cap/cover. Note it does include a soft case, but I mean something like you see on most camcorders these days.
- Not great in low light due to 60fps recording (at least give the option to switch to something slower for low light situations?)

4-0 out of 5 stars Warning about Flip Port, October 7, 2010
I'm a Flip lover, have had four of them and immediately got this new model because of the Flip Port and possibility of hooking up external mics. I was surprised to see how close it was to the tripod screw. I've tried it on four tripods and every one blocks access to the Flip Port. In other words, the only way to use the Flip Port is in handheld mode; no tripod. For video casting and similar uses, that's a strange design flaw. I asked Flip customer support and they have no tripods that would allow access to the port. It's a real head scratcher and something to consider if the Flip Port is your reason for making the purchase.

4-0 out of 5 stars Great Compact Video Camera, September 21, 2010
Really like the camera, and I'm not having short battery life like the other reviewer. Can't put an exact time on it but spent plenty of time recording, playback and just plain messing around on the battery right out of the box. still working on second charge after at least 30 minutes. Anyway, camera seems to work really well in low light situations. Overall I couldn't be happier, unless the camera came with an HDMI cable.

5-0 out of 5 stars Even more impressive than the last Flip., October 2, 2010
This Flip UltraHD camcorder is even more impressive than the last one. As usual with Flips, it's the ideal thing for any family hoping to videotape the kids, friends, events, etc. First of all, it's completely idiot proof: when you get the box, there is absolutely no assembly required. Your first guess about which buttons are the power switch, record button, and USB connector release will be correct; great intuitive design. The device looks and feels great (as other reviewers have mentioned) and easily fits in your hand comfortably for long periods of time (unlike my blackberry). It is a bit larger than the last one, which helps it fit snugly in the hand, though it takes a little bit more space in your pocket. It turns on and off instantly (unlike my home computer or cell phone) so you don't have to wait long to start recording that precious, fleeting moment.

The screen is large and the HD video is amazing on big-screen playback. The new 60 frames per second is noticeably better, and pretty much as smooth as you'll ever need. (Frames change twice as fast as than the eye can see, so it seems super-smooth to the human eye -- I did a bit of research!) Image quality continues to be excellent, and not too shaky/bouncy. The new image stabilization seems to remove some vibrations (like when videotaping a baby laughing in a driving car) but I didn't notice a major difference indoors since it can't remove the effects of the larger hand tilting movements (caused by my running around stepping on toys while following the baby around). The USB connector is a bit different, on the side instead of the top, which makes it easier to connect to a laptop. Otherwise it's the same: convenient, easy to connect, and you don't have to go running to find any special USB connector cable (like my old digital camera). The audio is still good, picking up faint background sounds that I hadn't even noticed at the time of recording and picking up simultaneous music and voices with great quality. The 2-hour battery life is more than I ever use, so it's great. There is a new battery pack (very easy to install if you've ever had a cell phone), but it doesn't seem to change anything for better or worse.

The Flip Video software continues to set the standard. It is ridiculously easy to setup, automatically starts when I plug in the camcorder, and makes it completely obvious how to download the videos, play back, freeze frames to make photos, and share. And it's fast-- not much waiting for videos to load up (like other video players). It's all in an easy-to-use, well-organized (by video date) layout very similar to the iPod control panel. I wish all software was this easy to use.

I highly recommend this device-- it's the most impressive Flip yet, and well worth the investment.

4-0 out of 5 stars Great at video capture, but doesn't compete w/other products, November 3, 2010

Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
This is the first FLIP video camera I've owned, but they're so popular, I figured they must be pretty good-and I'm not disappointed!! It's easy to use, synchs easily with the computer, charges rather quickly (4 hours on USB from completely dead), and takes AWESOME HD (720p) videos! The exterior is slim and rubbery, for easy gripping. It also has a wrist strap and a hole on the bottom to mount the camera on a tripod. It turns on quickly and only has a few buttons, which make it easy to use even for someone who isn't very tech-saavy! It synchs up with the computer immediately, uploads the videos and is easy to reset. It also has an HDMI port on the bottom, so you can plug it right into your HDTV to view the videos that way. It holds 2 hours of HD movies. When you turn the camera on it tells you how much time in free space remains, and when taking a video, it tells you how long you've been recording for. It has playback with sound, which is very clear. The video quality is better than anything I've seen on something this size and the audio quality is great too!

Now for the few things about it that make it 4 stars instead of 5. First off, I don't notice ANY image stabilization - the video I included pretty much shows that even the slightest of hand shaking can really make you feel woozy. There is no lens cover, which is a little concerning since this is the type of camera you'd like to be able to just toss in your purse or pocket, but without a lens cover, I get a little nervous that I might scratch the lens. It does NOT take still pictures, which isn't a big deal, but it would be nice to be able to switch back and forth from video to still, but again, not a deal breaker given the awesome quality of the video/audio. Lastly, it charges from the USB connection, which is not bad, but if you spend $40 more you can get the charger that plugs into a port at the bottom and then into the wall and it will charge twice as fast-it's just kind of annoying b/c I use a laptop and in order to charge it via USB, I have to leave the computer sitting open. I would also like to see a USB extension cable included with this camera because it is rather painful to see this thing plugged into my computer and hanging by it's little USB "arm".

Bottom line: this camera could do SO MUCH more for the price you pay, and although it does perform well, it's just not that great a deal when you consider what else is out there. For $50 more, I can get a device that is the same size, takes the same quality video, but also takes pictures, surfs the web, plays music, has wifi, bluetooth, GPS, runs apps, etc etc . . .

4-0 out of 5 stars Getting Better, October 2, 2010
I got this new model Flip because I have shakey hands. I have the previous model and have my wife shoot most of the videos since mine are usually too shaky. When I saw the new model had image stabilization I ordered one. I still can't shoot as steadily as my wife, but there is a definate improvement in my videos. Panning results are also much better since the capture rate has been upped to 60 fps. I haven't used the camera enough to know what kind of battery life to expect, but I ordered some Eneloop rechargeable batteries to carry as a backup power source. I do this as well with my other Flip, but it uses AAs rather than AAAs like the new Flip does.
I feel the Flip cameras would be easier to handle if they coulde be held horizontally, but that's only because I have to use both hands due to my tremors. Most people can operate the camera with one hand. I'm assuming the shape is just right for them. I liked the last model well enough to buy this newest version and have been pleased with the improvements. I ordered the camera from Amazon.com and got free overnight shipping. I recieved it the following afternoon and was shooting some nice fall videos the next day. Read more


31. Caselogic TBC-302 Ultra Compact Camera Case with Storage (Black)
Electronics
list price: $9.99 -- our price: $7.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B001V9KG0I
Manufacturer: Case Logic
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

Caselogic TBC-302 Ultra Compact Camera Case with Storage (Black) ... Read more

Reviews

4-0 out of 5 stars Nice snug fit for Canon S90, October 14, 2009
This little case is the perfect size for my new Polaroid digital camera. It has a handy little zippered pocket big enough to store an extra battery and/or SD cards. It also came with a 'caribiner' type belt clip. Plus, I like that it's orange, just like my camera. The price is right too!

4-0 out of 5 stars Nice snug fit for Canon S90, October 14, 2009
I tried several cases for my new Canon S90 and this case had the best snug fit for the S90 without being too snug. It will provide a modest level of protection for the camera without adding unnecessary bulk. The outer pocket will hold an extra battery and/or memory card.

5-0 out of 5 stars It saved my camera, December 22, 2009
I recently purchased a Canon S90 to complement my 5DmkII on a safari in Tanzania. Throughout the trip I had the S90 on my belt for quick and easy access; the case isn't bulky and seemed to protect the camera well enough from the occasional knock as the land cruiser hit big bumps.

On my last day in Tanzania I was walking through the streets of Arusha when suddenly I felt a hard tug that almost spun me around. I turned to see a man starting to flee. I started off in pursuit--concerned more about the memory card than the camera itself--but after a few steps realized the camera was still at my side, only a slight rip in the strap indicating anything had happened.

Recommended as a sturdy carrying case with a reasonable amount of padding for impact protection (you won't want to drop it from very high or expose it to strong blows).

4-0 out of 5 stars Nice generic, cheap case for the S90, January 14, 2010
This case happens to be a good fit for the Canon S90. If you're hiking or are on vacation, it'll get you that crucial amount of padding plus room for 1 or 2 spare batteries and SD card. I particularly like the fact that the belt loop is fixed (not a clip), so once you put it on, you can be confident that it stays on, no matter which woods you're cutting your way through. Use a wider belt if you have one, the case wiggles a little with slim belts.

If you're out in Metropolis though, the "outdoor factor" may be just a tad over the edge. You can remove the metal hook and cut off the bright label with sharp scissors, but it'll still look a bit too dorky for, say, the opera or sushi gathering. For such occasions, you'll do better with Canon's PSC900 Deluxe Leather Case.

3-0 out of 5 stars Snug fit for DMC-ZS7, June 26, 2010
I read this was a good case to get for the Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS7 so I ordered one at the same time I ordered my camera.

I got them on the same day and was happy.

I like the case, it is padded and has a little pocket in the front, but I was hoping the pocket was a little bigger. You can't really fit anything in there.. maybe a SD card, but it can't have to bulky a case and there is no way a battery will fit in there.

As for the camera, I liked it at first, it has a snug fit and seemed perfect, but then I realized how unperfect it was. I put the wrist band on it and all the sudden it was way to hard to close, I was afraid I'd scratch it trying to get it zipped. I found a way around this by turning the camera backwards facing away from the pocket.

Another thing I noticed and I HATED was when it was turned the right way with the wrist band on (not sure about without it.. only noticed after I put it on) is that the fit was TO tight that sometimes when zipping it up the zipper hits the on off switch and tries to turn it on.. which isn't good cuz the lense has no where to go! Again, turning it backwards seems to help with this, but I still have to be real careful when putting it up to avoid hitting it...

I like the snug fit but at the same time I wish it was a little bit bigger, I'm afraid if I am in to big of a hurry I might accidently hit the camera with the zipper or something.

5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect for a Canon S95, November 3, 2010
This case has the perfect fit for a Canon S95, and the outer pocket holds a spare battery and memory card. The belt loop and carabiner are both secure.

5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect fit in my pocket (For a Canon SD4000), July 15, 2010
I just purchased a Canon SD4000 and wanted a good case to secure the camera. I went with Caselogic TBC-302 and I love the fit.
I had many different cases and every time I get frustrated of keeping the camera in the case because it doesn't fit in my pocket.
Usually, I would just keep the case in my bag and the camera in my pocket.

The TBC-302 size fits comfortably in a regular pair of jeans.
Enough room for a spare battery and SD card.

5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect size for my Polaroid Digital Camera, May 14, 2010
This little case is the perfect size for my new Polaroid digital camera. It has a handy little zippered pocket big enough to store an extra battery and/or SD cards. It also came with a 'caribiner' type belt clip. Plus, I like that it's orange, just like my camera. The price is right too!

5-0 out of 5 stars Perfect little case, July 19, 2010
I bought this case to replace my old CaseLogic case because it didn't have a spare pocket to hold small accessories. This case is small and light enough so that I can carry it around all day without noticing it that much, but it is has enough room and padding so that it carries my camera (Panasonic FH20), a spare battery, and a SD card and it protects my camera if I drop it.

I would recommend this case to anyone looking for the perfect travel case for their ultra compact camera.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good case for Lumix, July 9, 2010
Purchased this on advise from other reviews for the Panasonic Lumix ZS7 I purchased. Case holds the camera and an extra battery in the main section, and the memory chips in the small section. Has a loop to be attached to your belt. It is very small and a tight fit for the above, but it is perfect for what I wanted. Sturdy construction and has a little bit of padding to keep the camera secure. Perfect case for this camera and the few esstentials you need to bring along.

5-0 out of 5 stars Caselogic TBC Camera Case, December 1, 2010
Bought this for my new Canon PowerShot SD1400IS 14.1 MP Digital Camera with 4x Wide Angle Optical Image Stabilized Zoom and 2.7-Inch LCD (Black) and everything i.e. extra batteries x 2 camera cable and camera itself fits in there. Good product. Read more


32. Garmin Portable Friction Mount
Electronics
list price: $39.99 -- our price: $24.73
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B002OL2MU4
Manufacturer: Garmin
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

Portable Friction Mount ... Read more

Reviews

4-0 out of 5 stars Best Solution for NUVI in my Prius and my Ford: Theft Protection As Well!!, June 1, 2007
My Prius has a rough dashboard and a windshield that slopes very sharply. Thus, the suction cup mounts are not good solutions. Fortunately, the friction mount is a great solution. It works much better than I expected. Very stable, does not slide, and lets me adjust my Nuvi to a variety of different angles. I can place the GPS anywhere on the dash or even on the center console. Also works great when transferred to my wife's Ford.

Only downside to the device is that it has a rather large footprint, but not prohibitively large. I like the fact that I can easily use this in both of our family vehicles depending on where we need the GPS.

UPDATE: Now that I have used this mount regularly since May, I have to say this is the best mounting solution I've found for a GPS or any other device for my car. It hasn't slid out of place once!! Given the rise in GPS units being stolen from cars, this mount allows you to easily stash your GPS Unit and mount out of sight and then put it back into position with ease.

2009 Update: Still using this in my Prius and my wife has one too. It's held up quite well. It IS a bit bulky to store out of the way when not in use, but still a good solution. I usually remove my GPS from the mount (a simple process) and then place the mount as far under the seat as it will go. Not perfect, but the best solution I've found to date.

5-0 out of 5 stars Well designed, May 19, 2007
This mount works great. The selection of Garmin mounts is confusing as some are two parts and some are one. If you have a Nuvi with the included windshield mount, then this is the only part you need to buy. The included mount disassembles at the ball and socket joint and attaches to this one. I can't say it will never come off the dash if I do some really high speed maneuver, but so far it's held steady for all regular driving.

I like that it's easy to move the mount and gps unit down to the floor when I park. Yeah a thief could still see it if they came right up to my car but at least it's not obvious from halfway across the parking lot like a windshield mount is. A thief that sees an empty windshield mount is probably going to assume (correctly) that I've just put the unit in the glove compartment.

5-0 out of 5 stars Finally, the right mounting solution, June 16, 2007
I have become addicted to my Garmin Nuvi 660 and used it for six months with a successful windshield mount. But now I have bought a new car. I discovered that the windshield suction mount left an ugly black ring on the window of my old car. (I assume I can get this cleaned up when I detail the car for selling.)

So no way was I going to put one of those on my beautiful new car. I tried the Garmin dashboard mount but shied away from the "permanent" disc. I found the "temporary" disc was just not up to the job of holding this device in place -- at least on my vehicle. I found this very frustrating. I read about the Portable Friction Mount, found a Best Buy store that had it in stock and ran out to buy it.

Though it is not terribly good looking, it does the job very well. I tried whipping around a few tight turns in parking lots and the whole thing stayed put. As another reviewer said, this lets you easily remove the thing and put it on the floor so it's not obvious. That may be more valuable than you would think. I know somebody who removed his Garmin Nuvi (and took it with him) but left the window mount in place. The car was broken into and the window mount alone was stolen. (Probably that was a pretty frustrated thief.)

Also, this will be easy to transfer to a rental car. And it will make it easy for my wife to borrow my Nuvi. Hmmm!

5-0 out of 5 stars Stable but here's an easy improvement, June 26, 2007
While the friction mount on the bottom of the beanbag is pretty darn stable even with stops, starts, and turns I sometimes would find it sliding across the dash. The solution has been to use one of those little 6x4 inch mats sold at Radio Shack or Walmart for keeping cellphones on the dash. The mat is sticky on one side but leaves no marks or glue. I have not had one slide since using the mat. I even bring the mat with me in rental cars. This gives a very secure mount that is very easy to take from car to car.

5-0 out of 5 stars Just the right mount for a Garmin Nuvi (works with all Nuvis), December 2, 2007
The first time I tried this mount was in a rental car for a Garmin C530, and I never thought it would stay on the slightly sloping dash of the Pontiac Grand Prix but it held firm going up and down San Francisco's hilly roads. That prompted me to buy one for my car. Essentially this mount is a bean bag with a mouse pad like rubber base but its engineered to stay where you put it and not slide around unless you move it. The good thing is that it stays put even if you brake suddenly, and if you drive in bumper to bumper rush hour traffic like me every day you'll appreciate this even more!

The advantages are:
- No sticking on windshield. This is a BIG advantage as the windshield mount starts to come off easily after a year of usage, less if you leave it in your car while it's parked in the sun. There is nothing worse than your GPS sliding off while you're driving round a tricky bend, especially if you are new to the area. Sometimes it can be downright dangerous.
- The windshield mount also alerts thieves that a GPS is in the car. A friction mount can be placed down under the car seat when you leave the car without needing to disconnect anything so that you're ready to go quickly when you come back to the car.
- The other big advantage is the ability to move it around to the position you want it. If a passenger is sitting in your car you can just slide it to their side and they can input the information while you are driving. It also makes it easy to slide it closer to yourself. Since I have the Nuvi 660 I often make calls with the bluetooth feature while driving, it is easy to slide it towards me when I am speaking to someone in order to get better voice reception.

This mount works for all Nuvis as they have the "snap the ball in the joint". If you buy any model of Nuvi then this is all you need, no other adapter parts are needed. It's also easy to switch this mount between cars or move it to a rental car when you travel. It has been the best and most useful accessory I could buy for my Nuvi 660.

5-0 out of 5 stars EXCELLENT, September 1, 2007
I purchased the Garmin Nuvi 350 to use for work since I travel quite a bit for my job. I was hesitant about buying the friction mount because I worried that it wouldn't stay put. I'm happy to report that I was wrong.

I recently used this friction mount with my Nuvi 350 on a long trip from NJ to Maine. Not only did it stay put exactly where I placed it on my dashboard for the entire trip, but it stayed put in a near accident. On one of the many highways we traveled, there was a car accident ahead and everyone in my lane slammed on the brakes. Now, mind you, we were all traveling at approximately 60-65 miles per hour. I'm most happy to report that we didn't collide with anyone. ---> Amazingly, the friction mount and my Nuvi didn't move an inch.

You can buy this friction mount with complete confidence. If it didn't move in the situation I was in, it won't move with normal driving. Not only that, but it is easy to remove and stow your friction mount and Nuvi without leaving evidence that you have a GPS (now a favored target for theives).

3-0 out of 5 stars Slides easier as it ages, December 5, 2007
I've had this item for 3 months, and initially was very impressed with it's holding power on the dash. It's not magic - it will come off if you make a sudden turn or floor it from a stop light - but generally it stayed put, even through some *very* curvy roads in West Virginia at a "spirited" pace.

Over time, however, it seems to have absorbed the oils or possiblly Armor-All out of the dash (leaving a distinct dry spot on the dash in the shape of the mount), which has impacted it's performance. It still generally stays put, but takes much less aggressive a maneuver to make it move. I am currently trying different cleaners to try to reclaim some of the original grip.

As mentioned many times, the ability to remove it from the car, put it on the floor, move it to different cars, etc. is very nice. I would buy it again.

5-0 out of 5 stars really easy to set up and use., August 15, 2007
I justed pulled my Nuvi 660 off the window attachment, the ball just popped right out, then pushed it onto this ball. It works great, even has a lock/unlock, so you can slide the GPS out of the base easily, or lock it into place. It's easy to move the GPS to get just the right angle but it stays put once It's how I like it. I don't have too much trouble with the unit sliding around. I have a large, flat dash and if it were going anywhere, there's nothing to stop it, but it stays where I put it(I'm not a speeder and don't take turns sharper than I have to). As I live in California where I can't use the window attachment, I wish it would have come with this option. I wouldn't want to stick sticky tape on my leather dash. So far, I"m real happy with it.

UPDATE: After a month or so driving around with this thing on my dash, I'm as happy as ever. It hasn't moved at all, over pumps, up or down really steep hills, even with the power cord pulling on it (as I have it plugged into my cigarette lighter all the time). It's light enough and small enough to move easily and tuck away, it doesn't get in the way at all when I'm driving. I think it's perfect and I love it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Works great, March 10, 2007
Although I was skeptical, this holds onto the dash in both my Highlander and RX300. The ball attached directly to the mount that came with my Nuvi 360. No other kits were required.

5-0 out of 5 stars Works with the Garmin Nuvi 660 -- no additional mount to purchase, June 14, 2007
As one of the other reviewers stated, it is unclear whether certain Garmin GPS units require one or more additional parts for the portable mounts. This portable friction mount works perfectly with the Garmin Nuvi 660 -- you do need the bracket that holds the GPS unit from the suction cup mount that ships with the Nuvi 660. Just remove it and snap it on to the ball of the friction mount.

The mount itself works perfectly -- my GPS stays put in typical California driving (which has included a few sudden braking maneuvers at rush hour). Excellent solution for those who want to be able to use the GPS in multiple vehicles.

4-0 out of 5 stars Best Solution for NUVI in my Prius and my Ford: Theft Protection As Well!!, June 1, 2007
My Prius has a rough dashboard and a windshield that slopes very sharply. Thus, the suction cup mounts are not good solutions. Fortunately, the friction mount is a great solution. It works much better than I expected. Very stable, does not slide, and lets me adjust my Nuvi to a variety of different angles. I can place the GPS anywhere on the dash or even on the center console. Also works great when transferred to my wife's Ford.

Only downside to the device is that it has a rather large footprint, but not prohibitively large. I like the fact that I can easily use this in both of our family vehicles depending on where we need the GPS.

UPDATE: Now that I have used this mount regularly since May, I have to say this is the best mounting solution I've found for a GPS or any other device for my car. It hasn't slid out of place once!! Given the rise in GPS units being stolen from cars, this mount allows you to easily stash your GPS Unit and mount out of sight and then put it back into position with ease.

2009 Update: Still using this in my Prius and my wife has one too. It's held up quite well. It IS a bit bulky to store out of the way when not in use, but still a good solution. I usually remove my GPS from the mount (a simple process) and then place the mount as far under the seat as it will go. Not perfect, but the best solution I've found to date.

5-0 out of 5 stars Well designed, May 19, 2007
This mount works great. The selection of Garmin mounts is confusing as some are two parts and some are one. If you have a Nuvi with the included windshield mount, then this is the only part you need to buy. The included mount disassembles at the ball and socket joint and attaches to this one. I can't say it will never come off the dash if I do some really high speed maneuver, but so far it's held steady for all regular driving.

I like that it's easy to move the mount and gps unit down to the floor when I park. Yeah a thief could still see it if they came right up to my car but at least it's not obvious from halfway across the parking lot like a windshield mount is. A thief that sees an empty windshield mount is probably going to assume (correctly) that I've just put the unit in the glove compartment.

5-0 out of 5 stars Finally, the right mounting solution, June 16, 2007
I have become addicted to my Garmin Nuvi 660 and used it for six months with a successful windshield mount. But now I have bought a new car. I discovered that the windshield suction mount left an ugly black ring on the window of my old car. (I assume I can get this cleaned up when I detail the car for selling.)

So no way was I going to put one of those on my beautiful new car. I tried the Garmin dashboard mount but shied away from the "permanent" disc. I found the "temporary" disc was just not up to the job of holding this device in place -- at least on my vehicle. I found this very frustrating. I read about the Portable Friction Mount, found a Best Buy store that had it in stock and ran out to buy it.

Though it is not terribly good looking, it does the job very well. I tried whipping around a few tight turns in parking lots and the whole thing stayed put. As another reviewer said, this lets you easily remove the thing and put it on the floor so it's not obvious. That may be more valuable than you would think. I know somebody who removed his Garmin Nuvi (and took it with him) but left the window mount in place. The car was broken into and the window mount alone was stolen. (Probably that was a pretty frustrated thief.)

Also, this will be easy to transfer to a rental car. And it will make it easy for my wife to borrow my Nuvi. Hmmm!

5-0 out of 5 stars Stable but here's an easy improvement, June 26, 2007
While the friction mount on the bottom of the beanbag is pretty darn stable even with stops, starts, and turns I sometimes would find it sliding across the dash. The solution has been to use one of those little 6x4 inch mats sold at Radio Shack or Walmart for keeping cellphones on the dash. The mat is sticky on one side but leaves no marks or glue. I have not had one slide since using the mat. I even bring the mat with me in rental cars. This gives a very secure mount that is very easy to take from car to car.

5-0 out of 5 stars Just the right mount for a Garmin Nuvi (works with all Nuvis), December 2, 2007
The first time I tried this mount was in a rental car for a Garmin C530, and I never thought it would stay on the slightly sloping dash of the Pontiac Grand Prix but it held firm going up and down San Francisco's hilly roads. That prompted me to buy one for my car. Essentially this mount is a bean bag with a mouse pad like rubber base but its engineered to stay where you put it and not slide around unless you move it. The good thing is that it stays put even if you brake suddenly, and if you drive in bumper to bumper rush hour traffic like me every day you'll appreciate this even more!

The advantages are:
- No sticking on windshield. This is a BIG advantage as the windshield mount starts to come off easily after a year of usage, less if you leave it in your car while it's parked in the sun. There is nothing worse than your GPS sliding off while you're driving round a tricky bend, especially if you are new to the area. Sometimes it can be downright dangerous.
- The windshield mount also alerts thieves that a GPS is in the car. A friction mount can be placed down under the car seat when you leave the car without needing to disconnect anything so that you're ready to go quickly when you come back to the car.
- The other big advantage is the ability to move it around to the position you want it. If a passenger is sitting in your car you can just slide it to their side and they can input the information while you are driving. It also makes it easy to slide it closer to yourself. Since I have the Nuvi 660 I often make calls with the bluetooth feature while driving, it is easy to slide it towards me when I am speaking to someone in order to get better voice reception.

This mount works for all Nuvis as they have the "snap the ball in the joint". If you buy any model of Nuvi then this is all you need, no other adapter parts are needed. It's also easy to switch this mount between cars or move it to a rental car when you travel. It has been the best and most useful accessory I could buy for my Nuvi 660.

5-0 out of 5 stars EXCELLENT, September 1, 2007
I purchased the Garmin Nuvi 350 to use for work since I travel quite a bit for my job. I was hesitant about buying the friction mount because I worried that it wouldn't stay put. I'm happy to report that I was wrong.

I recently used this friction mount with my Nuvi 350 on a long trip from NJ to Maine. Not only did it stay put exactly where I placed it on my dashboard for the entire trip, but it stayed put in a near accident. On one of the many highways we traveled, there was a car accident ahead and everyone in my lane slammed on the brakes. Now, mind you, we were all traveling at approximately 60-65 miles per hour. I'm most happy to report that we didn't collide with anyone. ---> Amazingly, the friction mount and my Nuvi didn't move an inch.

You can buy this friction mount with complete confidence. If it didn't move in the situation I was in, it won't move with normal driving. Not only that, but it is easy to remove and stow your friction mount and Nuvi without leaving evidence that you have a GPS (now a favored target for theives).

3-0 out of 5 stars Slides easier as it ages, December 5, 2007
I've had this item for 3 months, and initially was very impressed with it's holding power on the dash. It's not magic - it will come off if you make a sudden turn or floor it from a stop light - but generally it stayed put, even through some *very* curvy roads in West Virginia at a "spirited" pace.

Over time, however, it seems to have absorbed the oils or possiblly Armor-All out of the dash (leaving a distinct dry spot on the dash in the shape of the mount), which has impacted it's performance. It still generally stays put, but takes much less aggressive a maneuver to make it move. I am currently trying different cleaners to try to reclaim some of the original grip.

As mentioned many times, the ability to remove it from the car, put it on the floor, move it to different cars, etc. is very nice. I would buy it again.

5-0 out of 5 stars really easy to set up and use., August 15, 2007
I justed pulled my Nuvi 660 off the window attachment, the ball just popped right out, then pushed it onto this ball. It works great, even has a lock/unlock, so you can slide the GPS out of the base easily, or lock it into place. It's easy to move the GPS to get just the right angle but it stays put once It's how I like it. I don't have too much trouble with the unit sliding around. I have a large, flat dash and if it were going anywhere, there's nothing to stop it, but it stays where I put it(I'm not a speeder and don't take turns sharper than I have to). As I live in California where I can't use the window attachment, I wish it would have come with this option. I wouldn't want to stick sticky tape on my leather dash. So far, I"m real happy with it.

UPDATE: After a month or so driving around with this thing on my dash, I'm as happy as ever. It hasn't moved at all, over pumps, up or down really steep hills, even with the power cord pulling on it (as I have it plugged into my cigarette lighter all the time). It's light enough and small enough to move easily and tuck away, it doesn't get in the way at all when I'm driving. I think it's perfect and I love it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Works great, March 10, 2007
Although I was skeptical, this holds onto the dash in both my Highlander and RX300. The ball attached directly to the mount that came with my Nuvi 360. No other kits were required.

5-0 out of 5 stars Works with the Garmin Nuvi 660 -- no additional mount to purchase, June 14, 2007
As one of the other reviewers stated, it is unclear whether certain Garmin GPS units require one or more additional parts for the portable mounts. This portable friction mount works perfectly with the Garmin Nuvi 660 -- you do need the bracket that holds the GPS unit from the suction cup mount that ships with the Nuvi 660. Just remove it and snap it on to the ball of the friction mount.

The mount itself works perfectly -- my GPS stays put in typical California driving (which has included a few sudden braking maneuvers at rush hour). Excellent solution for those who want to be able to use the GPS in multiple vehicles. Read more


33. Apple TV MC572LL/A (2010)
Electronics
list price: $99.00 -- our price: $99.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B001FA1NK0
Manufacturer: Apple Computer
Sales Rank: 23
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

Apple TV has been redesigned to be small in size but big on entertainment. Rent from the largest selection of HD movies - many available the same day they come out on DVD. Watch Netflix titles instantly. Rent TV shows, commercial free in HD. And stream photos and music from your computer to your widescreen TV.

The sleek new Apple TV has been completely retuned for your entertainment. It's 80 percent smaller than the previous generation - even with a built-in power supply. Which makes it perfect for sitting neatly on a widescreen TV stand or squeezing into a crowded media cabinet. Not only does the new Apple TV have an amazingly small footprint, it's also incredibly energy efficient. It stays cool without a fan, so it's never noisy. And when it's not filling your living room with drama, romance, and comedy, it uses less power than a night-light.Processor -Apple A4 processor Ports & Interfaces -HDMI, Optical audio, 10/100BASE-T Ethernet, Built-in IR receiver, Micro-USB (for service) Power -Built-in 6-watt universal PS Wireless -802.11n Wi-Fi (a/b/g compatible) Video Formats -H.264 video up to 720p (.m4v,. mp4,. mov file formats), MPEG-4 video up to 640x480 9(.m4v,. mp4,. mov file formats), Motion JPEG up to 1280x720 (.avi file format) Audio Formats -HE-AAC (V1), AAC, protected AAC, MP3 VBR, Audible, Apple Lossless, AIFF, WAV, Dolby Digital 5.1 surround pass-through Photo Formats -JPEG, GIF, TIFFSystem Requirements -AirPort Extreme, Wi-Fi 802.11b, g, or n wireless network (wireless video streaming requires 802.11g or 802.11n) or 10/100BASE-T Ethernet network iTunes Store account for renting movies and TV shows Netflix account for streaming Netflix content For streaming media from a Mac or PC -iTunes 10 or later; iTunes Store account for Home Sharing Remote control uses CR2032 battery
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Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars Video Review: Apple TV, so much for so little, October 10, 2010
This is an amazing compliment to your home theater.
So many features, yet so simple to use.
My 7 year old son has it all figured out.

I hope you enjoy the video.
Let me know what you think.

5-0 out of 5 stars Apple TV - Good Now, Potential to be Great, October 15, 2010
I am not an Apple Afficianodo. I don't wear jeans and black turtlenecks in reverence to Steve Jobs. I don't hang out at the Apple Store and covet becoming a "genius"; however, I have to give credit where credit is due. The last few products Apple has brought out - the iPod, iPhone, iPad - have been incredible and changed the consumer electronics and media / software landscape. Apple TV is now positioned to do the same, but it will take some more time to fully realize the potential of this device.

Apple TV effectively allows you to stream whatever is on your iTunes to your TV and home theater system. Moreover, it has built in support for Netflix, You Tube and a few other internet based media content providers. The picture quality and performance for these services are worth the price of admission. There is significant potential to advance the platform - just give it some time.

System Overview: My Apple TV is plugged into a 60 inch Samsung 1080p LED HDTV via HDMI (video) and a Yamaha Home Theater Receiver via Toslink optical cable (audio). I have AT&T Uverse with their 802.11g Residential Gateway (combination of DSL modem and wireless router) with their Elite DSL service (6 MB per second). iTunes runs on a Dell Desktop with 4GB of memory, Intel Core 2 Duo processor and 500 GB Hard Drive operating on Windows Vista (64 bit) and secured with Norton 360 (firewall, antivirus, etc.). The network handles the Desktop, 2 iPhones, a Blackberry, an iPad, the Apple TV, 4 Laptops, a wireless Printer and a networked wired printer. The Computer / Residential Gateway are in the Den and the TV / Home Theater / Apple TV are in the family room. The two rooms are about 100 feet apart and are separated by five walls.

Set Up: Easy as pie. It took five minutes to plug in the HDMI cable, the optical cable, the power outlet and then adding it to the wireless network. Sharing iTunes from my desktop to Apple TV took another 20 minutes, since I had to download the new version of iTunes and restart my computer and Apple TV. Apple really makes it easy - I didn't have to make any adjustments to my firewall settings to share iTunes on the desktop with Apple TV. I also downloaded the Apple Remote on my iPhone and iPad, which took another 5 minutes.

User Interface: Apple's secret sauce is the simplicity of their products. Apple TV is no different. The menu is very simple - Movies, TV, Internet, Computer and Settings. Movies and TV are for renting content directly from iTunes within Apple TV. Internet gives you access to Netflix, You Tube, etc. Computer gives you access to iTunes on your computer. Settings allows you to change the various Apple TV options. The remote control is Apple's usual model of minimalist efficiency, with a menu button, a play / pause button and an iPod like controller. The supplied remote works well with Apple TV, but is a bit cumbersome when one has to enter data (e.g., e-mail addresses, search on YouTube or Netflix). A much better solution is downloading Apple Remote on your iPhone or iPad. It basically turns the iPhone or iPad into a big touch pad that allows you to use gestures to control the Apple TV (e.g., swipe left, swipe right, double click, etc.). Moreover, it automatically provides a keyboard when one is asked for text input (e.g., for search). Apple remote is free on the App Store.

Netflix Streaming / Video Quality: Setting up Netflix was quick - basically just enter your e-mail address / password and you're ready to go. I watched some TV from BBC, a foreign flick and Iron Man. Each program loaded quickly - less than 30 seconds. Picture quality was good to great, depending on the source material. Picture quality was comparable to DVD for SD material(perhaps slightly better), but slightly less sharp than upconverted DVD or blue-ray. HD Programming looked like the HD on-demand programming through uVerse. There was enough of a buffer that there was no jittering, pixelation or stuttering on the streaming to the TV. Sound quality on the stream was good - I don't think they stream in 5.1, so the video stream doesn't leverage the subwoofer. Considering that I'm running a heavily taxed wireless system on 802.11g with a 100 foot distance between Apple TV and the Gateway, the picture quality and streaming performance are impressive. Having this quality of Netflix compatibility is worth the price of admission by itself.

iTunes Streaming: I streamed some music from my Playlists from the Computer. Sound quality is good, but not great. My Yamaha CD Player sounds better, but it can only hold 5 cds. Having access to my entire library is very useful, so you lose sound quality but gain convenience. iTunes streams not only the music, but also the cover art. After a few minutes, Apple TV switches into screensaver mode and starts transmitting pictures to the TV along with the music. I also streamed some videos from my computer and the streaming was again flawless. One of the issues with Apple TV is that it only supports the Apple video standards, i.e., MP4. I had some DIVX files that I converted over to MP4 by using DVD Fab and imported them into iTunes. So if you have a library of AVI, Divx, Xvid, etc., this will require conversion of those files in order to stream from your computer.

iTunes from within Apple TV: There is access to an iTunes store within Apple TV as well. They have a different pricing structure, in that TV shows and movies are available for rent only. They have a limited number of titles at this point - primarily BBC, ABC (since Steve Jobs sits on their Board) and Fox. CBS and NBC are not on Apple TV. Movie selection is decent - they have all the latest movies. The Apple TV selection can be easily increased by just downloading the content you want from iTunes on your desktop and then streaming it to Apple TV.

YouTube Streaming: Surprisingly good. The HQ / HD You Tube pieces look remarkably crisp on the TV. The older content that was meant to watch on a small window on your computer looked a little pixelated, but acceptable.

Apple has built a great platform with a lot of potential. With what is available right now - Apple TV is a pretty impressive value at $99. It is worth it just for the Netflix streaming and integration with iTunes. Since Apple TV is actually built on the same hardware (at least the processing chip) as the iPhone and iPad and has the same operating system, I wouldn't be surprised if there are "apps" that will eventually make it to Apple TV to further enhance Apple TV (e.g., ABC Streaming, Games, Amazon on Demand, etc.). There is supposed to be an upgrade to the operating system with a new version of Airplay that comes out in November, 2010. This will allow you to stream from an iPad or iPod to the Apple TV as well.

I looked at other streaming devices (e.g., Roku, using my Panasonic Blue Ray for Netflix, etc.) and none of them had the simplicity and reliabilty that the Apple TV offers. The Wi Fi "stick" for my Blue Ray player is $80 anyway and the Netflix integration isn't anywhere nearly as robust as Apple TV. UVerse also has music and picture streaming built in using Microsoft Media Center - however, it required some network configuration and it crashes quite often. I didn't purchase a Roku, but a friend of mine has had a number of issues with streaming performance. At under $100, the Apple TV is competitively priced with other streaming options. Now just bring on the "apps".





4-0 out of 5 stars a great box for getting media from point A, B and C to your TV, October 2, 2010
I was looking forward to this product since it was announced early last month. I'm glad I pulled the trigger and bought it when it became available. For $99 it provides most of the functionality I was paying microsoft $50 a year for. I've become less dependent on the XBOX as a game machine, and more as a Netflix/Media Streamer since my family has grown, and not having to pay for XBOX Live was one of the driving reasons behind this purchase. The reason I say "most of the functionality" is due to it not having the codec support that the XBOX360 comes with out of the box. I've had no issues with playback of mp4 or m4v files, and I'm happy with that, but it lacks support for WMV and AVI (as far as I've experienced). This isn't exactly a deal breaker since I can re-encode any content to supported codecs with handbrake and use iTunes to take care of my video library.

The UI is slick, the setup was somewhat easy (but would have been easier with keyboard support) and the ability to control music from my laptop and desktop is fantastic (through iTunes via the currently limited "airplay" functionality).

I'm really happy with the YouTube, Flickr and Netflix support. They are by far the best I've seen from a media center, but I can see certain aspects being a pain if you use the included remote (there is no keyboard to speak of, and scrolling through letter to spell things out is a hassle). The remote app on iOS devices more than makes up for the lack of a keyboard since it provides added functionality (such as alpha numeric input, quick seeking and library browsing). I look forward to video support with airplay and will update this review once I get to play with that (in November?).

One last thing - it's quiet. The thing barely makes a peep.

3-0 out of 5 stars Unrealized Potential (so far), October 2, 2010
PROS
*Low Power (less than 6 watts)
*Compact
*Good-looking UI
*Netflix support (unlike previous generation AppleTV)
*Remote App for iPad/iPhone/iPod touch
*Airplay (though basically we just have Airtunes functionality until iOS 4.2 comes out for iPad/iPhone/iPod touch).
*Closed Captions (Content dependent)

CONS
*Lots of "Loading..." screens
*No Local Storage! (must stream over Internet or via iTunes on PC/Mac using Home Sharing. I know you were trying to cut costs Apple, but why not at least allow local USB storage? I know, I know: DRM.)
*IR Sensor inferior to previous generation AppleTV (requires more direct line of sight)
*Lag before videos and podcasts start playing (even when located on a local computer)
*Netflix controls are not as good as Roku. Infrequent keyframes makes it hard to rewind to an exact spot. Roku does much better (and even PS3 Netflix controls are better).
*Podcast controls sometimes get confused (screen indicates reversing at maximum speed, but video is actually reversing at 1x)
*Doesn't precache artwork icons (Scrolling down through a list of podcasts or Netflix movies, it loads the screen with empty icons then slowly downloads them. This happens no matter how long you wait before scrolling down. Sometimes, it never gets around to downloading certain icons. Hey Apple, how about displaying the name of the movie while you are retrieving the artwork so we can start using the interface even if all of the artwork isn't there?) [Update: there may be some precaching going on, but just not in a very intelligent manner. I have about 170 movies in my Netflix instant queue and a 1.5 Mbps DSL connection so that may contribute to the slowness displaying artwork. If you have a very fast internet connection, you will probably have minimal delay.]
*No Pandora
*No App support (Yet? Come on Apple, enable App support. It won't take long before we have lots of useful 3rd party apps. I'm sure Pandora would be one of the first and then NPR and local weather forecast.)
*No 1080p - 720P only (Yes, most people don't have the bandwidth to support 1080p streaming over the internet, but someday we will. Also, it would be nice to be able to show your 1080p video you shot with your new camcorder or high-end DSLR.)
*Rotten Tomatoes movie reviews are not available for Netflix movies.
*Remote app could display the actual menus for faster selections.
*Home Sharing must be activated for a specific single account. (Result: If both you and your spouse have an iTunes account you will have to choose one or the other and will only have access to media in that person's iTunes account.)

UPDATE:
Removed from Cons:
"*Can't add internet radio stations to a favorites list (and there are hundreds if not thousands to scroll through)." Someone commented that you can add a radio station to your favorites by holding the center button down. I tried this and it works. Not sure how you're supposed to know this as it's not mentioned in the brief instruction book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Media Player, October 11, 2010
I got this little box on last Friday and I could setup everything in 30 min. It's typical apple product which gives you very intuitive usage model with limitation.

It requires only 3 connections. Power and HDMI cable. Optical cable is optional if you are fine with your TV's speakers. Since Video connection is HDMI, video quality is superb. I really like the clean and well refined UI screen. It's not fixed screen. It changes depending on your contents. Whenever I browse through menu, upper section of screen shows snapshot of what I can choose and it updates very quickly when you add new contents.

It has built in wireless LAN so, you don't need internet cable though it has port if you want. The wireless seems better than mobile device since it could play Youtube pretty smoothly where iPad couldn't play very well. It detects available AP automatically and detects what type of security is used. Just type in password then you are good to go.

This device comes with following features.

1. Playing Movie and TV shows you can purchase or rent from iTune store
2. Playing Netflix, Youtube and Flicker
3. Playing your own contents
4. Playing internet radio
5. Playing photo slide shows

#1 is very easy if your wallet is ready. Just click and browse movies then click to play.

#2 is also very easy if you have netflix account. Just type ID and password then you have full access.

#3 is super easy if you are familiar with iTune on desktop. Apple doesn't find all movies automatically. It doesn't make UI super complicated to support everything. Apple TV uses Home Sharing feature and grab whatever you have in your iTune library. So the only supported video format is Mpeg4/h.264. If you have videos purchased from iTune store, those are already mp4. so you don't need to do anything. If you have lots of videos in other format, you will need to convert the format. There are some tools available on the market so it won't be very difficult. Once you add your contents, it appears on apple TV instantly. Though all movies are seen on same screen in iTune SW, it's possible to define category. Then Apple TV shows category such as Comedy, Drama and so on. When you scroll through categories, left screen shows snapshot of movies you have.

#4 it plays audio pretty well as well though there's one annoying bug. If you have songs and didn't mark in iTune, you can't play using Apple TV. You need to mark songs to play. I hope this is fixed in software update soon.

#5 I like photo slide show very much. You can define the style of slide shows and you can decide if you want to add background music or not. If you have your friends or relatives coming, this feature is very nice to share your great moments.

What I like about this device is typical Apple's intuitive UI. It's super easy to use. No complicated long list of hierarchy. I haven't read manual at all. And also, it supports most of the video contents you will need such as netflix and youtube. I use AT&T Uverse so I know how IPTV works but Apple TV works much better. In the first day of use, I changed my plan from U200 to U-family to save some bucks and pay for Netflix.

Video quality is also very nice. I have lots of low quality video with lots of artifact. Those are still visible but post processing smoothes out those. For high quality video, screen is super crisp and bright.

Also box is so small that it's hardly seen. I put close to my Harman Kardon receiver and apple TV fits very well. And it's also very easy to move around the rooms. I bought several HDMI cables so that I can move between living room, master bed rooms and others. Power consumption is so little that you don't need to bother to turn off all the time. It actually doesn't have power button.

There's some possibility of upgrade. This device has built in strong processor, A4 to handle video decoding. Everything is implemented using software meaning, it can be easily expanded. I am not sure what's Apple's strategy but this device might have great potential. This device is too strong for the media player.

The catch of all above feature is very good internet connection and faster desktop. If you have good internet connections, you won't notice much lags. When you play movies that are stored in your desktop, the lag depends on how fast your PC is. So, Apple TV is not standalone device. It smartly uses infra structure that are common in many of household these days. In my case, I upgraded internet speed since Netflix uses about 1.5Mbps.

Though what Apple TV provides is nothing new and all can be done by PC or similar boxes, it just makes perfect with $99. I think it's great addition to your media system.

5-0 out of 5 stars Love it!, October 22, 2010
I got my Apple TV two weeks ago and I love it. It took me all of 10 minutes to set up, but I had purchased HDMI and Ethernet cables before hand. I logged onto Netflix and Youtube within minutes, and was watching streamed TV within 20 minutes.

The design is typical Apple elegance. It's tiny and sleek. The remote is almost too small and I'm afraid of losing it. The streaming is flawless and fast.

The only downside is the Apple content is not worth buying the device for. Pair it with Netflix and you have a large enough library to cancel your premium cable channels. The radio stations are also a nice bonus.

Not only has it expanded my TV viewing options and allowed me to watch commercial free what I want, when I want, it has saved me a lot of money because Netflix is much cheaper than HBO, Showtime, Starz, Epix, Cinemax, etc.

5-0 out of 5 stars Try it for yourself!.... And ignore reviews from non-owners., October 5, 2010
Got my own Apple TV (ATV) yesterday, spent a few minutes installing, then a few hours enjoying the features. Bottom line, I think that it's a GREAT device at a good price that will fully satisfy many but not ALL users.

1) Setup - this is simple. Took less than 10 minutes.

2) Netflix - don't know how anyone could complain. On my 50" high-end plasma, the picture quality is very good. As good or better than standard DVD. Sure, some blu-rays are better, but I can't watch those without buying, or renting and waiting. The Roku? Give me a break, mine stuttered and skipped. When it worked.

3) iTunes library - Played songs, albums and playlists from my iTunes library of about 400 albums instantly, with no drop-outs and good sound. This alone is worth $99, since other music streaming solutions cost well over $200, and don't have nearly as usable of an interface.

4) Photos - Streamed 12mP photos easily, and they looked great. Even in 720p. Honestly, the limit in resolution for most images is not going to be the 720p of the ATV. Think about your computer monitor - unless you've got a professional graphics monitor, photos are going to look as good or better on your home theater monitor than through your computer screen. Sure you could burn them to a disk, watch them off a thumb drive or something (which I've done). But it's not nearly as easy or convenient.

No, it's not perfect. I would have liked to see Hulu, Picassa and maybe internet browsing just as much as the other guy. But for $99 the ATV does a GREAT job of STREAMING music, pictures and video from your iTunes library to your home theater. And the Netflix service and interface are excellent.

I think that some of the negative reviewers really don't get that the main point of the Apple TV is to STREAM content from your iTUNES library to your TV. The fact that it lets you stream from Netlix is an excellent additional feature, one that I think will make it pretty popular.....

BUT - it's not supposed to be a web browser, a picassa viewer, or an email portal. That's what COMPUTERS are for. If you want to use your home theater display as a computer monitor, then go ahead and connect your computer DIRECTLY to your home theater. This is not rocket science.

On the other hand if you have a computer with a substantial iTUNES library that's NOT NEAR your main television montitor, then this is a great and reasonably priced way to easily enjoy that content in your theater. The netflix streaming is great (at least for me), in fact I'm sure that Netflix could offer some version of the ATV along with a basic streaming-only subscription nad have a lot of happy customers watching instead of renting and waiting......

3-0 out of 5 stars Get Roku XDS at same price instead or Roku XD for $20 cheaper, November 28, 2010
I have purchased both Apple TV as well as Roku XDS. Both are the same price and both are quite easy to use and provide access to some great content.

However, once we purchased Roku, my girlfriend and I no longer have use for Apple TV. Why? Here are the key reasons for us:
1. Roku provides Hulu Plus, Apple TV does not. With Hulu Plus, you get access to lots of shows that Netlflix doesn't have available for online viewing.
2. Roku provides Pandora, Apple TV does not. Although Apple TV does provide the AirPlay (streaming your iTunes library), Pandora is a preferable alternative for us as we are not interested in maintaining an iTunes library, and don't like to have to keep a computer on to have to access to music of interest.
3. Roku has a brighter user interface than Apple TV: This might sound like minute issue, but both my girlfriend and I found the black background and overall darker colors in use in Apple TV to place one in a less cheerful mood. The brighter colors in Roku make it a more enjoyable experience to navigate through its menus.

The above points are specific to my girlfriend and I. However, there are other reasons for going with Roku that we don't care much for but other may. Here are a few:
1. Roku provides 1080p resolution support whereas Apple TV maxes out at 720p
2. Roku arguably provides access to more pay-per-view content and for a better price through Amazon Video on Demand than Apple's more limited content selection available for rental.
3. For sports fans, Apple TV doesn't provide access to any sports games, whereas Roku gives you access to MLB.TV, UFC and soon NHL GameCenter.
4. Roku may not support Apple TV's AirPlay but does provide you with a way to access your iTunes library through MP3Tunes app. MP3Tunes has the added advantage of letting you store your iTunes content online and so you don't need to have your computer on to play your iTunes content. However, beyond 2GB you need to pay for MP3Tunes.
5. If you don't care much for dualband wirless technology, wider range of video/audio outputs or playing content via USB, then you could get a Roku XD for $79.99 and all of the above-mentioned Roku advantages still apply.

Having said all of the above, some people may still prefer Apple TV because of the Apple brand, the AirPlay feature, or iPhone remote control app. However, for us, these were not features we cared for.

4-0 out of 5 stars Bought It For Netflix But After Getting It, Use It More For iTunes, November 15, 2010
I'm a PC person but when it comes to MP3 players Apple is the standard--period. Using iTunes and iPods daily, I was curious to see how Apple TV would integrate into iTunes in addition to being able to add additional Netflix streaming capability to my house--which was my main objective in getting one.

First off hooking into your music or video library is very seamless--once you enable Home Sharing. I use an Airport Express to stream to a 7.1 surround set up (using optical digital-out) and the Apple TV through HDMI sounds virtually the same for stereo music. But where it shines is the ability to pass through 5.1 surround (along with 720P resolution). The on-screen display is nothing short of ergonomic bliss and wonderful eye candy. While playing music you get a nice sized picture of your album art and the standard progress bar which alternates between the left and right sides of your screen (I'm assuming for people worried about image burn-in).

The interface and ease of use with iTunes is so cool that I've done something I hadn't contemplated doing with iTunes, and that is turn it into a digital media server for video. It has been a hobby of mine to record OTA broadcasts of Late Night Musical Guests in 1080i 5.1 surround on my TiVo and burn them to DVD for repeated viewing. However, the technical specs of the Apple TV are such that with a little compression I can create very good copies of the TiVo source MPGs and organize them using iTunes. So with the Apple TV interface and iTunes you can watch ad hoc videos instantly on-demand or pre-assembled movie/video playlists. Of course your photos are at your beck and call as well if you like doing slide shows etc.

The remote is very intuitive but if you have the Remote App for iPod Touch, iPhone, or iPad, it's much easier to use insofar as typing in searches. There is one other feature gained with the Remote App over the ATV remote and that is a 10-second rewind. You simply flick two fingers to the left on the iPod screen and you go back 10 seconds a pop. Very nice feature for video.

The Netflix interface was a very pleasant surprise compared to my TiVo which is all but useless except for viewing movies that are already stacked in the Instant Queue using my PC on the Netflix website. You can search every which way you can think of, but the only bummer is you must click on a movie's thumbnail to get the synopsis. I did encounter one glitch on Netflix that didn't affect my TiVo. There was at least one Netflix title that would not stream giving me a 112 network error. For the heck of it I also tried the title on my iPod Touch and got the same error. Not sure why it only affected the Apple hardware and not the TiVo, but I'm assuming Apple and Netflix will continue to upgrade their software to make them more integrated. Otherwise the image and sound from the Apple TV have been excellent with Netflix. Very few stutters once the stream gets under way.

[UPDATE to 112 error-12/5/10: I called Netflix support regarding the 112 error and within a few days I could stream those titles that had the error on both iPod and Apple TV. Since that time there was also an online Apple firmware upgrade to the ATV as well.]

Since the Apple TV is so small and compact it makes it very easy to move from room to room, which is what I do now since using it to stream iTunes to my main media room.

I'd give the Apple TV 5 stars except that it only puts out 720P and not 1080P like some of its competitors. But that notwithstanding 720P never looked or sounded so good--nor has my iTunes.



1-0 out of 5 stars Newer is not Better, November 30, 2010
I purchased this AppleTV to expand my home entertainment (I also have the older 40gb AppleTV Model). After receiving it and finally hooking it up, I was extremely disappointed in it compared to the older AppleTV. If you want this just for the netflix and renting movie feature this will work great. If you like to stream your movies from another computer through Itunes, this new appletv is worthless!!!!!! It takes forever to load each menu up, at one time it took over 10 min to open up a subgroup of menus (on a wired internet connection). If you have TV shows that you stream, it doesn't group them together or put them in order of seasons. (like the old version). I recently had a update that I installed and it messed up all my tv shows, prior to the update at least the shows were in order by name, after the update they are all messed up with no reason or rhyme to the ordering. So if you plan on streaming movies pay the extra money and get the older version! If you plan on using to watch your Netflix or rent movies from apple, this will work for you.
Overall on a scale of 1-10, I give this new apple a -5
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34. AmazonBasics High-Speed HDMI Cable (9.8 Feet/3.0 Meters) [Supports 3D + Audio Return Channel]
Electronics
-- our price: $9.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B001TH8UUA
Manufacturer: AmazonBasics
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

AmazonBasics products are quality electronics accessories offered at a great value. ... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars Great inexpensive HDMI cables, December 1, 2009
WHO NEEDS IT?

This cable will work well with anything that supports HDMI 1.3x but it's built to comply with the higher HDMI 1.4a standard of which it is a PARTIAL implementation (no Ethernet). If what you need is a true HDMI 1.4x cable, then the one to get is that which is described as "HDMI with Internet" which adds the data channel and support for higher video resolutions.

You may consider this product if you have TWO devices that support the HDMI 1.4 standard such as TVs, receivers or Blu-ray players. For these, the cable will carry through HD images and will allow you TV to send audio data BACK to your receiver if so connected, therefore eliminating the need for one dedicated audio cable. This specific cable will probably NOT support HDMI 1.4 Ethernet feature. You may also consider this cable if you currently need an extra HDMI 1.3 cable but you are planning to to replace your existing equipment with some HDMI 1.4-ready hardware in the near future.

Unless either of the above is true, you will not need this cable and, given that the HDMI 1.4 standards aren't set in stone yet - this cable complies with the recently released HDMI 1.4a specs for 3D - you should be better off waiting for the dust to settle. Keep in mind that BOTH connected devices need to support the HDMI 1.4 standard for this cable to make a difference and that it is NOT possible to upgrade any existing equipment (TV, Blu-ray player) to support HDMI 1.4.


HOW GOOD IS IT?

On my equipment, this worked as well as any older HDMI 1.3x cable. It replaced an existing 'cheap' wire at the back of my entertainment center and, nothing unexpected happened. The picture on my TV was as beautiful as before. The cable's short length (2 meters) and its 'high speed' certification make me confident that this cable will serve me well.


Briefly, this cable:

- Behaves as a HDMI 1.3x 'high speed' or 'category 2' cable. If all you need is HDMI 1.3x then go for it or go for any other cheap HDMI 1.3x wire.
- As a 'high speed' HDMI 1.4 cable, it supports video resolutions of at least 1080p including in 3D.
- The 'data channel' (Ethernet support) is missing but it that would only work with HDMI 1.4 ready equipment so I'm not sure if it would be missed for the next couple of years.
- The advertised audio return channel is another HDMI 1.4 feature that most currently owned equipment can't take advantage of.
- It should support all the HDMI 1.4 extra color palettes because those are implemented by the HDMI 1.4 compliant connected equipment NOT by the cable.


WHY 3 STARS

A 3-star rating should be fair (and I am not factoring in the price) because this cable, while working perfectly as an HDMI 1.3x, is an incomplete HDMI 1.4 implementation. Incomplete HDMI 1.4 implementations are allowed by the HDMI consortium but there I see no advantage in purchasing a feature-crippled cable when full-featured alternatives are available. 'Niche' HDMI cables make sense form a vendor's point of view because a buyer may be willing to pay more for such an item but their marketing can only confuse and annoy the buyers. It should cost a vendor about the same to manufacture a 'universal' HDMI 1.4 wire as it does to make an incomplete (niche) product. In fact there may be economies of scale in producing 'universal' HDMI 1.4 cables only so marketing seems to be the only reason we get to see these intentionally crippled products.

My recommendation would be NOT to buy this cable. Get the 'High-Speed with Ethernet' if you want/need HDMI 1.4 or get an HDMI 1.3x otherwise.



END OF REVIEW

______________________________________________________


What follows is the byproduct of me attempting to clarify 'HDMI 1.4' for myself and understanding this specific product's features. I thought I'd share.


WHAT'S IN A NAME? (understanding this cable's features)

HDMI 1.4 is a new HDMI standard adopted in 2009, backward compatible with HDMI 1.3. This cable should work with your existing equipment.
- HIGH SPEED indicates that this cable supports resolutions of 1080p or higher and 3D video (unlike the HDMI 1.4 STANDARD cables which, believe it or not, are limited to 720p/1080i - why? nobody knows).
- ETHERNET (NOT supported by this specific product) means that a cable supports a full-duplex 100 Mb/sec Ethernet connection - if you have 2 HDMI 1.4 ready devices and they both need an network connection, this cable will carry through the Ethernet datastream to the second device, therefore saving you the need for one extra Ethernet cable.
- Audio Return Channel (supported) would save you the need of a dedicated audio cable between 2 HDMI 1.4 compliant devices, usually a TV that might get content directly from a USB storage device or the Ethernet and an HDMI 1.4 compliant receiver.
- HDMI 1.4a brought HDMI in line with the recently agreed upon 3D TV industry standards but, consistent with HDMI's consortium's encouraging vendors to avoid talking about the actual version their HDMI cables are implementing, we simply don't know whether this one is HDMI 1.4 or HDMI 1.4a. Since '3D' is mentioned it's probably safe to assume HDMI 1.4a.


THE HDMI 1.4x DIFFERENCE

HDMI 1.4 allows for the following new features:

- Ethernet Channel - allows for the 2 connected devices to communicate with each other and share one network connection.
- Audio Return Channel - eliminates the need of a second cable if you want to send audio from your TV back to your receiver.
- 3D - It's supported by HDMI 1.3x but HDMI 1.4a specifically supports all the currently agreed-upon industry standards
- 4K resolution - good to have it but there is nothing on today's market that would take advantage of this
- Expanded support for new color spaces - by supporting sYCC601, AdobeRGB, and AdobeYCC601 it better aligns your display with the color spaces supported by digital cameras.
- Type D connector - the 'Micro' connector is to be used by small, portable devices with supported resolutions of up to 1080p. Be aware that there are now THREE different HDMI connectors: standard, mini and micro.


The HDMI Consortium defines 4 broad types of HDMI 1.4 cables:

* Standard HDMI Cable
* High Speed HDMI Cable
* Standard HDMI Cable with Ethernet
* High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet

Of all of the above, only the a 'High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet' makes sense.

Standard cables are limited to lower-resolution displays up to (approx. 720p or 1080i). High Speed cables support higher-resolution display (e.g. 1080p). They can deliver all video content currently defined for the HDMI standard (i.e. more than two 1080p/60 video streams, including 3D). HDMI cables with Ethernet are capable of sending 100/mbps over the HDMI Ethernet Channel. Since it is not likely that many HDMI 1.4 'standard' cables will be made or sold, I suspect that the crippled 'standard' type exists only to allow for calling the cables that support 1080p 'high speed' which sounds good and high-end.

--
>> Brush your teeth, it's the law! <<

5-0 out of 5 stars AmazonBasics makes a very good HDMI cable, October 11, 2009
These cables are VERY thin/provide little shielding. It worked BUT my dvd player doesnt get signal sometimes. I switched over to a quality cable and the device gets detected everytime. My conclusion is these cables will get you by but Id pay a bit more for quality cable. Go with the MediaBridge it is twice as thick/more shield. If you are baller go w/ Monster.

1-0 out of 5 stars Poor Quality, October 9, 2010
I purchased this "inexpensive" HDMI cable looking to save a few dollars. When the cable arrived, I tried it in every video component I have. None of them worked with this cable. The connections were loose and flimsy. I have other "inexpensive" HDMI cables that have performed flawlessly for years. Don't waste your money or time with this product. Pay a few extra dollars and get a better cable.

I will be a little more specific:

When connected to my PS3, the cable caused the PS3 to flicker and eventually stop video feed to the receiver all together. Same result when connected to Apple TV. I switched the cable to the video out on my media center PC. The screen had terrible video distortion and constant flickering. Same result when used with my Dish Network Receiver.

I have never felt compelled to leave feedback on any product purchased from Amazon in the past, but I was very dissappointed with the performance of this cable.

3-0 out of 5 stars Limited capabilities in this cable, January 19, 2010
HDMI cables are notorious for being expensive. I assumed the prices were over inflated just because people who were plunking big bucks for a new, big,flat screen TV would be gullible enough to take the bate and overpay. Sadly, my theory was wrong. This Amazon cable cost about half of what I paid for one of similar length at Sam's Club. It is fine as long as your are not transferring fast video over a long distance. When I use the cable to connect my laptop to the Big Screen TV, surfing the 'net poses no problem. But when I try to play a DVD through the same laptop, the screen motion becomes jerky and fast moving objects "tear apart" momentarily. When I swap out the Amazon cable for the Sam's Club version, the problems disappear. There is a physical difference in the cables. The Amazon cable is pencil thin and supple. The Sam's Club cable is thick and chunky. Obviously the Sam's Club cable has more "stuff" inside. This can only be shielding. Bottom line? For SHORT distances (less than 6' and preferably 3'), the Amazon cable is fine. But if you are transferring video, you will need the costlier thicker version. I suppose the old adage "you get what you pay for" applies here.

1-0 out of 5 stars Great Looking Cable, Poor Quality, November 11, 2009
I purchased 3 of these HDMI cables and only 1 worked properly . 2 of them caused intermittent connectivity. When they did work, they caused display failures like bright yellow color-shift in the entire image, or horizontal green blocks in the picture. These problems were encountered using multiple HDMI inputs on a new Panasonic TV using both an Apple TV and a Roku digital video player. Swapping out these cables for known-good cables cleared the problems. Amazon, your house brand cables are a nice idea, just poorly executed.

1-0 out of 5 stars Too Good to be True?, January 19, 2010
It seems like a review of an HDMI cable can't be written without arguing the philosophy of whether it's worth it to pay exhorbitant amounts of money for an A/V cable, or if a "cheap" cable will do the trick. Rather than reinvent the wheel I'll simply say that:

1) This cable is about $6 (and eligible for free Prime shipping)
2) Amazon offers a one year warranty
3) Amazon has an excellent returns policy

Given those items, what have you got to lose by giving this cable a try? If you aren't satisfied, return it and then spend the big bucks.

Having said that, I use it to connect my PS3 (i.e. my BluRay player) to my HDTV and my personal experience with this cable has been positive. The cable is sturdy and feels well-made, unlike some other $6 cables I have used in the past. The picture/sound quality meets my expectations and I could discern no problems whatsoever. Overall I am pleased enough that I will purchase the same cable again in the future. I also plan to give other Amazon branded cables a try as needed.

2-0 out of 5 stars Intermittent problems, June 19, 2010
I bought one of these cables as part of a Christmas present, which included a Sony Blu-Ray player, for friends. Immediately they had problems with the signal. The movie would play and then the picture would go "black and white" or just fritz out. They called Sony support who suggested reversing the cable. This works better but there are still times when the cable 'needs' moved because the connections just are solid enough. I will not buy another AmazonBasics cable. It's Monster cables for me.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great inexpensive HDMI cables, December 1, 2009
It is a relief to find HDMI cables that are inexpensive and deliver high quality video. I paid $40 for a 4ft cable at Circuit City a year ago, and less than half that price for the 10ft cable from Amazon.

As an electrical engineer I can tell you copper is copper. Unless Monster cable has coaxial wire for each signal line, which they don't because then the cable would be 10x larger than it is, then it's just copper wire inside a shield. There's still going to be crosstalk and capacitive coupling and all that stuff. All that "gas filled" stuff doesn't matter either. If you look at the mathematical equasions for the frequency response of an unshielded wire, you'd know none of this stuff makes any major difference.

The biggest thing to avoid, if you can, are ferrite cores on a cable. Ferrite cores are those black blob things that overmold the cable near one or both of the connectors. Ferrite cores act as high frequency filters and may cause signal degradation. They are typically used to comply with FCC laws and other regulatory bodies' radiated emissions laws. They add cost to the cable and typically degrade performance.

Regarding expensive cables, HDMI or otherwise, what no one asks is the most fundamental question - Why? Let's assume Monster cable isn't lying and they can provide 300 GHz bandwidth or whatever they claim. Why do you need a cable that outperforms so much? It's like owning a car that can go 1000 MPH but the speed limit is 55MPH. In my field, that's called "over-engineering" which equates to unnecessary additional cost, which is exactly the problem Amazon has solved by sourcing this simple low cost HDMI cable.

While I'm soapboxing, gold plating isn't necessary either. Silver is the best conductor, followed by Copper, and then Gold (third best). Stainless Steel isn't far behind. The only reason gold plating is "better" is Gold does not corrode (but neither does stainless steel... they actually gold plate the stainless steel, how dumb is that?). If you are using your cables in a house where the humidity & temp is relatively constant, you should never need gold. As far as I can tell, Gold is just a gimmick to charge more for cables.

3-0 out of 5 stars HDMI 1.4 cable lacking data channel support but still OK as an HDMI 1.3x, gets full Amazon support, October 1, 2009
WHO NEEDS IT?

This cable will work well with anything that supports HDMI 1.3x but it's built to comply with the higher HDMI 1.4a standard of which it is a PARTIAL implementation (no Ethernet). If what you need is a true HDMI 1.4x cable, then the one to get is that which is described as "HDMI with Internet" which adds the data channel and support for higher video resolutions.

You may consider this product if you have TWO devices that support the HDMI 1.4 standard such as TVs, receivers or Blu-ray players. For these, the cable will carry through HD images and will allow you TV to send audio data BACK to your receiver if so connected, therefore eliminating the need for one dedicated audio cable. This specific cable will probably NOT support HDMI 1.4 Ethernet feature. You may also consider this cable if you currently need an extra HDMI 1.3 cable but you are planning to to replace your existing equipment with some HDMI 1.4-ready hardware in the near future.

Unless either of the above is true, you will not need this cable and, given that the HDMI 1.4 standards aren't set in stone yet - this cable complies with the recently released HDMI 1.4a specs for 3D - you should be better off waiting for the dust to settle. Keep in mind that BOTH connected devices need to support the HDMI 1.4 standard for this cable to make a difference and that it is NOT possible to upgrade any existing equipment (TV, Blu-ray player) to support HDMI 1.4.


HOW GOOD IS IT?

On my equipment, this worked as well as any older HDMI 1.3x cable. It replaced an existing 'cheap' wire at the back of my entertainment center and, nothing unexpected happened. The picture on my TV was as beautiful as before. The cable's short length (2 meters) and its 'high speed' certification make me confident that this cable will serve me well.


Briefly, this cable:

- Behaves as a HDMI 1.3x 'high speed' or 'category 2' cable. If all you need is HDMI 1.3x then go for it or go for any other cheap HDMI 1.3x wire.
- As a 'high speed' HDMI 1.4 cable, it supports video resolutions of at least 1080p including in 3D.
- The 'data channel' (Ethernet support) is missing but it that would only work with HDMI 1.4 ready equipment so I'm not sure if it would be missed for the next couple of years.
- The advertised audio return channel is another HDMI 1.4 feature that most currently owned equipment can't take advantage of.
- It should support all the HDMI 1.4 extra color palettes because those are implemented by the HDMI 1.4 compliant connected equipment NOT by the cable.


WHY 3 STARS

A 3-star rating should be fair (and I am not factoring in the price) because this cable, while working perfectly as an HDMI 1.3x, is an incomplete HDMI 1.4 implementation. Incomplete HDMI 1.4 implementations are allowed by the HDMI consortium but there I see no advantage in purchasing a feature-crippled cable when full-featured alternatives are available. 'Niche' HDMI cables make sense form a vendor's point of view because a buyer may be willing to pay more for such an item but their marketing can only confuse and annoy the buyers. It should cost a vendor about the same to manufacture a 'universal' HDMI 1.4 wire as it does to make an incomplete (niche) product. In fact there may be economies of scale in producing 'universal' HDMI 1.4 cables only so marketing seems to be the only reason we get to see these intentionally crippled products.

My recommendation would be NOT to buy this cable. Get the 'High-Speed with Ethernet' if you want/need HDMI 1.4 or get an HDMI 1.3x otherwise.



END OF REVIEW

______________________________________________________


What follows is the byproduct of me attempting to clarify 'HDMI 1.4' for myself and understanding this specific product's features. I thought I'd share.


WHAT'S IN A NAME? (understanding this cable's features)

HDMI 1.4 is a new HDMI standard adopted in 2009, backward compatible with HDMI 1.3. This cable should work with your existing equipment.
- HIGH SPEED indicates that this cable supports resolutions of 1080p or higher and 3D video (unlike the HDMI 1.4 STANDARD cables which, believe it or not, are limited to 720p/1080i - why? nobody knows).
- ETHERNET (NOT supported by this specific product) means that a cable supports a full-duplex 100 Mb/sec Ethernet connection - if you have 2 HDMI 1.4 ready devices and they both need an network connection, this cable will carry through the Ethernet datastream to the second device, therefore saving you the need for one extra Ethernet cable.
- Audio Return Channel (supported) would save you the need of a dedicated audio cable between 2 HDMI 1.4 compliant devices, usually a TV that might get content directly from a USB storage device or the Ethernet and an HDMI 1.4 compliant receiver.
- HDMI 1.4a brought HDMI in line with the recently agreed upon 3D TV industry standards but, consistent with HDMI's consortium's encouraging vendors to avoid talking about the actual version their HDMI cables are implementing, we simply don't know whether this one is HDMI 1.4 or HDMI 1.4a. Since '3D' is mentioned it's probably safe to assume HDMI 1.4a.


THE HDMI 1.4x DIFFERENCE

HDMI 1.4 allows for the following new features:

- Ethernet Channel - allows for the 2 connected devices to communicate with each other and share one network connection.
- Audio Return Channel - eliminates the need of a second cable if you want to send audio from your TV back to your receiver.
- 3D - It's supported by HDMI 1.3x but HDMI 1.4a specifically supports all the currently agreed-upon industry standards
- 4K resolution - good to have it but there is nothing on today's market that would take advantage of this
- Expanded support for new color spaces - by supporting sYCC601, AdobeRGB, and AdobeYCC601 it better aligns your display with the color spaces supported by digital cameras.
- Type D connector - the 'Micro' connector is to be used by small, portable devices with supported resolutions of up to 1080p. Be aware that there are now THREE different HDMI connectors: standard, mini and micro.


The HDMI Consortium defines 4 broad types of HDMI 1.4 cables:

* Standard HDMI Cable
* High Speed HDMI Cable
* Standard HDMI Cable with Ethernet
* High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet

Of all of the above, only the a 'High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet' makes sense.

Standard cables are limited to lower-resolution displays up to (approx. 720p or 1080i). High Speed cables support higher-resolution display (e.g. 1080p). They can deliver all video content currently defined for the HDMI standard (i.e. more than two 1080p/60 video streams, including 3D). HDMI cables with Ethernet are capable of sending 100/mbps over the HDMI Ethernet Channel. Since it is not likely that many HDMI 1.4 'standard' cables will be made or sold, I suspect that the crippled 'standard' type exists only to allow for calling the cables that support 1080p 'high speed' which sounds good and high-end.

--
>> Brush your teeth, it's the law! <<

5-0 out of 5 stars AmazonBasics makes a very good HDMI cable, October 11, 2009
I got an email from Amazon announcing their new line of AmazonBasics cables. They said that their goal was to make a high quality cable and sell it at a very reasonable price.

They have achieved that goal.

I ordered two of the six foot HDMI cables and on nine foot cable for about eight bucks each.

The cable came in a simple cardboard box with nothing but a twist tie aside from the cable (which is a good thing, I hate the plastic blister packs that cut your hands and unnecessary stuff in the box to go in the landfill).

The cable has a solid, quality feel to it. Nothing feels cheap or chintzy.

Connecting the cable between my TV and several compontents including my brand new Samsung Blu Ray player, the connection just worked every time.

For comparison purposes, I bought a $50 super delux, high end, will solve all the problems in your life (according to the sales guy) HDMI cable at Radio Shack. Connecting the AmazonBasics cable to the same Blu Ray player as the fancy cable I saw **NO DIFFERENCE**!

Looking into it I found out that HDMI is a standard that is run by an organization. In order for anyone to make an HDMI cable and put the HDMI logo on it (which the AmazonBasics cable does), the cable must be made to the HDMI organizations standards. So the group basically tells the companies how the cable must be made in order to be given the HDMI logo. The long and short of it is that cheap cable or expensive cable, it must work to the same standards in order to have the HDMI logo.

So, super fancy $50 cable gets thrown back across the counter to Radio Shack guy for return and AmazonBasics cable gets a new home in back of my entertainment center.

I'm now going to purchase several more of these for family and friends to have as spares since they don't know any better and will get suckered by the sales guy at best buy into buying a $50 Monster Cable HDMI cable that does nothing better than this one.

3-0 out of 5 stars cable just ok..., April 3, 2010
These cables are VERY thin/provide little shielding. It worked BUT my dvd player doesnt get signal sometimes. I switched over to a quality cable and the device gets detected everytime. My conclusion is these cables will get you by but Id pay a bit more for quality cable. Go with the MediaBridge it is twice as thick/more shield. If you are baller go w/ Monster.

1-0 out of 5 stars Poor Quality, October 9, 2010
I purchased this "inexpensive" HDMI cable looking to save a few dollars. When the cable arrived, I tried it in every video component I have. None of them worked with this cable. The connections were loose and flimsy. I have other "inexpensive" HDMI cables that have performed flawlessly for years. Don't waste your money or time with this product. Pay a few extra dollars and get a better cable.

I will be a little more specific:

When connected to my PS3, the cable caused the PS3 to flicker and eventually stop video feed to the receiver all together. Same result when connected to Apple TV. I switched the cable to the video out on my media center PC. The screen had terrible video distortion and constant flickering. Same result when used with my Dish Network Receiver.

I have never felt compelled to leave feedback on any product purchased from Amazon in the past, but I was very dissappointed with the performance of this cable.

3-0 out of 5 stars Limited capabilities in this cable, January 19, 2010
HDMI cables are notorious for being expensive. I assumed the prices were over inflated just because people who were plunking big bucks for a new, big,flat screen TV would be gullible enough to take the bate and overpay. Sadly, my theory was wrong. This Amazon cable cost about half of what I paid for one of similar length at Sam's Club. It is fine as long as your are not transferring fast video over a long distance. When I use the cable to connect my laptop to the Big Screen TV, surfing the 'net poses no problem. But when I try to play a DVD through the same laptop, the screen motion becomes jerky and fast moving objects "tear apart" momentarily. When I swap out the Amazon cable for the Sam's Club version, the problems disappear. There is a physical difference in the cables. The Amazon cable is pencil thin and supple. The Sam's Club cable is thick and chunky. Obviously the Sam's Club cable has more "stuff" inside. This can only be shielding. Bottom line? For SHORT distances (less than 6' and preferably 3'), the Amazon cable is fine. But if you are transferring video, you will need the costlier thicker version. I suppose the old adage "you get what you pay for" applies here.

1-0 out of 5 stars Great Looking Cable, Poor Quality, November 11, 2009
I purchased 3 of these HDMI cables and only 1 worked properly . 2 of them caused intermittent connectivity. When they did work, they caused display failures like bright yellow color-shift in the entire image, or horizontal green blocks in the picture. These problems were encountered using multiple HDMI inputs on a new Panasonic TV using both an Apple TV and a Roku digital video player. Swapping out these cables for known-good cables cleared the problems. Amazon, your house brand cables are a nice idea, just poorly executed.

1-0 out of 5 stars Too Good to be True?, January 19, 2010
I know that retail HDMI cables are priced extremely high and thought this cable was a real bargain by comparison. But, when substituted for another cable, this one gave dropouts in video and audio with the screen going to a speckled black and white pattern. Maybe I got the only bad one....maybe not.

I have purchased many items from Amazon over the years and have always been satisfied with price, quality and service. This is the first item that has not measured up.

5-0 out of 5 stars High Quality, Excellent Warranty, December 22, 2009
It seems like a review of an HDMI cable can't be written without arguing the philosophy of whether it's worth it to pay exhorbitant amounts of money for an A/V cable, or if a "cheap" cable will do the trick. Rather than reinvent the wheel I'll simply say that:

1) This cable is about $6 (and eligible for free Prime shipping)
2) Amazon offers a one year warranty
3) Amazon has an excellent returns policy

Given those items, what have you got to lose by giving this cable a try? If you aren't satisfied, return it and then spend the big bucks.

Having said that, I use it to connect my PS3 (i.e. my BluRay player) to my HDTV and my personal experience with this cable has been positive. The cable is sturdy and feels well-made, unlike some other $6 cables I have used in the past. The picture/sound quality meets my expectations and I could discern no problems whatsoever. Overall I am pleased enough that I will purchase the same cable again in the future. I also plan to give other Amazon branded cables a try as needed.

2-0 out of 5 stars Intermittent problems, June 19, 2010
I bought one of these cables as part of a Christmas present, which included a Sony Blu-Ray player, for friends. Immediately they had problems with the signal. The movie would play and then the picture would go "black and white" or just fritz out. They called Sony support who suggested reversing the cable. This works better but there are still times when the cable 'needs' moved because the connections just are solid enough. I will not buy another AmazonBasics cable. It's Monster cables for me. Read more


35. LG BD530 1080p Network Blu-ray Disc Player
Electronics
list price: $89.99 -- our price: $79.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00400NL02
Manufacturer: LG
Sales Rank: 20
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

Experience Full HD 1080p with the BD530 Network Blu-ray Disc Player. Get superior picture quality and sound of Blu-ray technology along with direct access to internet services like YouTube, Picasa and Accuweather. ... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars LG BD530 Vs Sony BDP-S370, November 30, 2010
This Black Friday, Blu-ray player was on my agenda, I have a 46" Samsung LCD HDTV with internet options. I did not want to go for internet enabled Blu-ray player to play netflix or Picasa or Youtube as I already have it in my TV. I wanted a best to the price and awesome quality Blu-ray player which has a brilliant blu-ray as well as DVD upscale conversion for HDTV resolution.

I bought this LG BD530 and Sony BDP-530 at the same time because Sony had the highest ranking in terms on voting on many sites including bestbuy,com. After connecting both players to my TV i used Bly-ray and it played very well on both player, I tried same Bluray disc on both player couple of times alternatively and could not see the difference. Bluray played brilliantly

When i came to DVD playing, after couple of runs with same DVD on same TV (with same settings) I found that LG has a excellent DVD upconversion as compared to Sony, Sony pics were a little more blurr as compared to LG BD530. I tested 2 different DVD movies (lord of the rings and American beauty) to check the DVD quality and I have to admit, LG was awesome. Also somehow I felt the LG remote is much user friendly than Sony remote, but that's a matter of individuals preference.

After carefully reading Sony's review I figured out that it;s sony blu-ray players internet abilities which took it;s rating so high and not the DVD upscale conversion qualities. If you have an old TV with no internet on it and want internet connectibility to watch netflix online, then probably Sony is your candidate. But if you have a new internet enabled TV and have a huge collection of DVD which you wanna keep it for a while and wanna enjoy over and over again, then LG is your best candidate.

I am returning back my Sony BDP-370 player tomorrow to Bestbuy. I hope this review helps to reader.

Santosh Gaikwad

5-0 out of 5 stars Plays DivxHD, AVI, MKV directly from Blu Ray Disc & USB, November 15, 2010
I have used this Blu Ray player for more than a week and it plays the following without any issues directly from Blue Ray disc as well as DVD, CD and USB:
DivxHD (Divx HD 720p and 1080p profile that create files with Divx extension) NOTE: DivxHD Plus profile creating mkv files seems not working
AVI ( I haven't tried all codecs but whatever I tried worked without any issues)
MKV
AVCHD
I was successfully able to play couple of 720p 4.35 GB mkv files with that's encoded with H264 & DTS audio with subtitle without any issues. Subtitle worked perfectly fine.
Files with DTS audio plays flawless directly on TV speakers without requiring any additional DTS receiver.
Very responsive remote control.
Played lots of MKV files of size 8GB and greater with h264 and DTS audio from an external USB drive and they all played very well. Subtitles were supported and no jitter in playback.
MKV playback is awesome and Up-conversion works great.I can clearly see the difference between regular playback and upconversion (the files I have used were IMAX HD documentaries and Disney Pixar movies i.e. quality of the original file was good to start with).

I tried Verbatim LTH some very cheap media from Meritline and Optical Quantam BD-R burned using IMGBURN in my LG WH10LS30 Blue Ray burner and everything worked flawless.
I tried about 20 of dirt cheap DVD media Dynex, Teon, Playo etc. which had avi files with variety of codecs recorded about 5-6 years ago and they all played without any issues.
Blu Ray disc loads really fast the picture quality is crystal clear. Also quality of You tube and picasa is great.
Overall, it's great inexpensive player that played many media from various sources. It played various file formats not even supported by Philips 5982 Divx player but I still can't retire my WD Live as its picky about codecs i.e. not all mkv files plays flawless and MOV doesn't work at this point.

UPDATE: I was successfully able to play Blu-Ray video files (m2ts) directly from hard drive via. USB connection. Menu is not supported but the files played successfully.

4-0 out of 5 stars reasonably good media/blue ray player for under $70, November 19, 2010
I got this at sears when it was $65, it will be on sale again, try walmart if amazon doesn't lower price. It plays all my discs and most of my multimedia files. It will not play wmv files and doesn't seem to like my AAC files (plays MP3's okay), but will play H264/mov files if you rename them as .mp4, a common trick with these cheaper players. It powers my two external portable hd's and will play one of my two pen drives, but not both. Its upscaling of 420p material from the usb side not as good as my WD or my PS3, but plays native 1080i/p files with very impressive results.
It does have the BD live function if you want to plug a pen drive into it since it needs external storage. It has limited internet options right now, who cares about accuweather? LG updates their firmware online and my other LG equipment has seen third party hacks that improve it so I look forward to when this is hacked to provide either Netflix, or better yet Playon support.

It did freeze on me at least once as other reviews have noted, have to pull the plug to reset it.
Only 4 stars since it did freeze for no good reason, and I too will need to keep my WD Media player for awhile, but it this had netflix would have given it 5 stars, as for the price it just can't be beat. I will update when I have played with it a bit more, only had it the week so far.

3-0 out of 5 stars Worth the $, November 27, 2010
Came across this one at Walmart for $65 on Thanksgiving. Easy to set up. Just plug in what you have to and have at it. Watched Fifth Element straight away. Good quality. Played with the buttons so the 2 hour movie ended up being 2 1/2 hours. The next day I throw in Big Trouble in Little China. Tried to make adjustments during the movie, but, unfortunately the movie would not pick up where it left off. Would always go back to the beginning...showing the threatening stills from Interpol and how comments weren't the opinions of Fox, blah, blah. Kept experimenting and the same thing would happen. Didn't happen with Fifth Element. Got frustrated and gave up for the night. Next day threw in Good, Bad and Ugly. The quality of this movie is AMAZING in BRay. But, that's another story. Anyway, the same thing would happen. Can not go to SET UP without stopping the movie and starting over. Very difficult to check adjustments without waiting for the movie to start over. On regular dvd that I tried this was not a problem. My suggestion is to expect to spend a little bit of time making adjustments to get it right before you watch the whole movie.
One other situation that I came across was a setting to audio. The 2 discs that would restart movies after adjustment would not play audio unless you fumble through the info menu and change that setting to 2 CHANNEL just to hear something. The player goes from HDMI into TV and from TV via coaxial cord out to stereo which will play dts hd. Didn't have problem with Fifth Element, but with the next 2 discs. Could be a setting I messed up but hard to tell because of the constant reset of the movies.
Take this for what it's worth. The player still seems like a good deal for the price with a good quality picture.

5-0 out of 5 stars Best value !, November 20, 2010
The USB port can power my Seagate USB-powered Freeagent hard drive, which is convenient. And I can confirm it can play a 15G mkv movie file. While I cannot compare the video quality with another Blu-ray or multi-media player, the quality is definity better than the video play back from a PC.

4-0 out of 5 stars GOOD player but read my review for details., December 2, 2010
I bought this player (despite my future purchase of a Playstation 3) mainly because I wanted a Blu-Ray player that could play MKV files. That let's me store a ton of content on an external hard drive, high definition content, and play it "on demand" without ever having to change a disc.

As far as MKV playback goes, it's hit and miss but for the most part MKV files work. It doesn't matter what size it is.
For MKV files that did NOT play I (and others) pinpointed the problem: if a file is encoded with level/profile 4.2 or higher it will NOT play on this player. If you get a file that does not play, run it through MKV2VOB. It has to transcode a lot of movies which takes time but there are a few that don't need transcoding. Playback is good and depends on the speed of your external hard drive. Controlling files can be hit or miss; some let you control things such as speed/fast forward/rewind etc while others will not. I have noticed a few lockups at times.

As far as Blu-Ray playing goes, once you get into the movie it's great. Other than that I think there are some options that were leftout of this player and its remote control that I would have liked such as title program (for discs and files).

The main problem with this player is its frequent lockups and freezes. There is also considerable lag with the remote and sometimes it takes over a minute for the player to respond in certain menus.

The internet connectivity is weird with this player. I have tried WB (Warner Brothers discs) and BD-Live does not work. Universal discs do work but you have to have the internet plugged in before you start the disc. If you do have it plugged in, it takes over two minutes to load up to the disc's menu.

I will update with other things I think of but for the price I think it's a good blu-ray player. It's actually better in a few respects (MKV file playback, DVD up conversion) than its older brother the BD550. On LG's website and the manual this player is referred to as the BD551 so if that tells you something.

UPDATE 1: As far as BD-live goes, a forum member on AVSforum found a method to get it to work. Welcome to a whole new world of commercials and unwanted trailers.

DJPOJACK:
"I was getting all those messages like the player needed to be hooked up to an internet connection or "coming soon"...etc..

This is how I got BD-LIVE to work:

-format USB thumb/drive (fat 16 or 32)
-boot up your LG 530 (without disc and without USB inserted) so it goes to main on-screen menu..

-go to setup
-go to others
-go to initialize

NOW...insert USB drive/device

You should notice that "BD Storage Clear" is now selectable...Select it and confirm "yes"...It will do a momentary "clear" (even though your USB drive is already empty).

Now, you leave that USB drive in there and load any Blu-Ray movie with BD-Live, and when you run the BD-Live features, it should work....

At least it did for me....

If you leave the USB drive in the slot, you can eject and load different Blu-Rays and BD-Live should still work (until your USB drive is full, which then you can initialize it again!)...

P.S. - If you format or use this USB drive on any other device, it will probably corrupt/overwrite the BD530 BD-Live data....So, it's probably best to have a dedicated drive just for the BD530 (I.E. Just leave it in the USB slot FOREVAHHHHH!)

good luck
-drew"

5-0 out of 5 stars I love it., November 29, 2010
i bought this to view Blu Rays discs... i use my wii for netflix, so the "No Netflix" option wasnt a problem. My only complaint is that this unit does not include a HDMI cable (the box should at least mention this) .... i was lucky to have one laying around the house so it didnt bother me as much. The quality is great, the navigation is easy to follow, and the player performs flawlessly. My tv is LG as well so i get added bonuses... such as only have to use the tv remote to control the player... and if my tv is off, and i pop a disc into the player... it will automatically turn on the tv and set it to the right input for viewing a movie. I dont use it for watching computer media, or codecs... or whatever.... only blu ray movies... so im very happy with the price and the quality i have received in this player. If you want more bells and whistles then i suggest you look into a higher priced unit. =)

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Player! Gotta love the USB feature!, December 5, 2010
I am not sure what are the negative reviews on here are all about, its possible some customers may have received a defective product from LG but mine has been working great! First off let me say I am not going to complain about the player not having Netflix, Rhapsody, Facebook ect. My TV has wifi built in that allows me to access Netflix so I had no need to shell out the extra money for a fancy player that could surf the full extent of the web. Those who wanted a player like that should have looked for something else. This player clearly states that its features are limited to Youtube, Picasa, and AccuWeather. To buy it and expect otherwise is poor shopping on the consumers' part. As far as video quality, I don't own a vast collection of Blu-rays so my experience has mostly been with upconverting DVD's, which the player does an excellent job with. Unlike the Memorex I own, this player minimizes almost all of the DVD grain and blur to the point that it almost looks as good as a blu-ray. The Blu-rays I have played also have shimmered in pure 1080p HD with this player. The real attraction for me though, is the USB drive. All you have to do is pop in an external hard drive or memory stick and the player is ready to play the contents whether it be video, picture, or music. I have watched two movies this way, one MPEG4 and the other AVI, and both played without a hiccup. Some reviewers have reported freezing and locking up, but I have experienced neither with my player. I haven't updated the firmware, though, so who knows if the new updates may actually be the cause of the problems. The player does take a little time to initially boot up, but I hardly consider waiting a few seconds to be an inconvenience. Overall, the LGBD530 is a great value and a player I recommend for anyone who's looking for a solid player to watch movies on via DVD, Blu-Ray, or USB. If you want something to play your Netflix with, look elsewhere.

5-0 out of 5 stars Plays Blu-ray movies. Simple to use., December 8, 2010
Plays Blu-ray movies. Simple to use. Period. Be careful of reading a bad review from people who want their blu-ray player to take them to the moon and back.If you want a simple cheap blu-ray player then this is it. If you want a radio, a computer, and blu-ray player and a robotic dog, then this is not for you. You get what you pay for. I wanted a blu-ray player. That is what this is.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great BD Player for the price., December 18, 2010
This is the 2nd LG BD530 Blu-ray player that I have purchased. The first one came from WM as a "One Day" special for $65. I figured I couldn't go wrong at this price so I got one. Especially since it's intended use was going to be upstairs in my bonus room where that tv gets occasional use only. After getting it home, connecting it to my TV via HDMI and Home Theater system via coaxial audio, I was very pleased with the unit. It is easy to set up and loads discs (at least the ones I have tried) quickly. In my opinion it is hard to tell the difference between Blu-ray and upconverted DVD's with this player. They both look great. I thought it may have been because I connected it to a 42" Panasonic 720p plasma. Now that I have the 2nd unit connected to a different tv, I still can't tell. Maybe if I placed two identical tv's side by side with two of these players you might be able to see a difference then, but switching back and forth between BD and DVD it is not very obvious. My original plans where to get a "nicer" one for the main t.v. in my great room later. After a couple of weeks using the LG and enjoying it, as well as finding it on Amazon for $69 with free shipping, I just couldn't resist so I purchased a 2nd one. It too has worked well on my 46" Samsung 1080p LCD t.v. and Sony HT-CT150 Soundbar system. The LG BD530 is connected to the Sony Home Theater via HDMI and from the Sony Soundbar I have an HDMI cable connected to the TV. Just like the 42" plasma upstairs, both BD and DVD look great using it even though they are not connected the same way due to equipment differences.
I have read some negative reviews about this unit, but so far my experience has been great with it. I cannot comment much on the network connectivity for internet usage as my means of going online are by way of a Verizon air card that I use on my laptop. I don't have a router or any other means to connect this player to online services. I have to go to the LG website, download any updates for the player to a flash drive and then load them on the player. So far I have not done this, so I don't know if there are problems doing it this way. But, as far as watching Blu-rays or upconverted DVD's I highly recommend this unit, especially for the price. Read more


36. Scotch(TM) Thermal Laminating Pouches, 9 Inches x 11.4 Inches, 50 Pouches (TP3854-50)
Office Product
list price: $13.99 -- our price: $9.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0019K3LI8
Manufacturer: 3M Office Products
Sales Rank: 2
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

3 mil thick thermal laminating pouches for use in a thermal laminator. For Items up to 8.5 in x 11 in. ... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars good quality pouches, August 28, 2009
This product works great! The feature I love is that the laminated sheets come out cool instead of hot. It is not a bulky unit and does not require a lot of storage space. I use it and place back in its original box until I need it again. I will add that after purchasing it online I found the exact same one in walmart about $9.00 cheaper. I have no complaints about this product.

5-0 out of 5 stars good quality pouches, August 28, 2009
Good quality compare to other non-brand name pouches. Wish Scotch sell it in 100 per pack or something, to lower the price.

5-0 out of 5 stars Scotch, a brand to trust... unlike others, February 23, 2009

Whatever you do, make sure that the machine that uses this product doesn't need a sleeve to operate. I found that this gives the best seal for the lamination with the machines that are run through without the lamination sleeve.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Title Says It Best.....Scotch Thermal Laminating Pouches, June 5, 2009
If you are in the market for laminating supplies for your Scotch Thermal Laminator, this is the only product to buy; you can buy the 50 pouches or the 20 pouches. My guess is that 50 pouches are the more economic deal. If you only buy the pack of 20 pouches, you might as well go to an office supply store and have them perform the job; that way, the laminator won't sit in the box while you forget you have it. Real serious people who laminate projects keep it nearby; there are so many uses for it.
The Thermal Laminating Pouches also come in three smaller sizes (in the event you aren't clever enough to cut through the laminated product). The sizes are for 5" by 7" photos or whatever, 4" by 6" photos, and also for ID cards. Personally, the creative person will go for the 50 Thermal Laminating Pouches and become a creative cutter, "after the laminating has been completed".
Take a look at the previous review for the Scotch Thermal Laminator, preceding this review; they are a great match.

5-0 out of 5 stars Nicely priced for good quality pouches, May 19, 2010
These pouches are very nicely priced for how many you get and the quality of the pouches. They work best in machines that you don't need to use a carrier sleeve with like the Scotch(TM) TL901 Thermal Laminator 15.5 in x 6.75 in x 3.75 in 2 roller system. They are 3 mm pouches and they seal very well, crystal clear and very shiny.
If you're a crafter, they make a good way to protect non-dimensional paper art, to make custom dry erase boards as gifts or for yourself, or to protect recipe cards.

5-0 out of 5 stars Worked flawlessly, December 23, 2009
I have lamenated a dozen or more items with no bubbling nor burning. I used these with Scotch TL901 lamentator. I lamentated standard 20 wt paper as well as thicker presentation 32 wt paper. I have used these to make bookmarks and feel it provides sufficient stiffness. So far These are the only laminating pouches I have used. I believe that the laminator is just as significant as the pouches.

I selected these pouches even though more costly than others advertised on Amazon because with Super Saver free shipping, they were a couple of bucks cheaper than the no name 5mil pouches offered which required an additional S&H which was the supplier means of adding to their profit margin. Be leery and look at total costs.

5-0 out of 5 stars Scotch brand laminator, February 26, 2010
This product works great! The feature I love is that the laminated sheets come out cool instead of hot. It is not a bulky unit and does not require a lot of storage space. I use it and place back in its original box until I need it again. I will add that after purchasing it online I found the exact same one in walmart about $9.00 cheaper. I have no complaints about this product.

5-0 out of 5 stars Recommended product, November 12, 2009
I have the scotch thermal laminator, and those pouches are the brand that goes with it, I never buy anything else, the output is hard as a sheet of glass and stays intact and never peels off. I recommend it all the way.

5-0 out of 5 stars good quality, thick pouches, September 12, 2010
I was looking for the 5 mil, but couldn't find them. These 3 mil pouches are pretty thick though. I've used almost half of my pack and there has been no bubbles or burning. I've not needed to run them thru a second time, either. Like others, I wish I could order larger quantities at a discount, but the product is great! I've made workbox grids for school and a chore chart and added velcro dots and the laminated pieces have held up very nicely to little 5 year old hands!

5-0 out of 5 stars More than pleased!, July 25, 2010
I have been more than pleased with both the Scotch laminator & pouches. They seal well, and are thicker & more durable than laminating at my local copy shop, not to mention convenient. Highly recommend.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Laminating Sheets, March 24, 2010
These laminating sheets work very well. I am a grad student doing a lot of projects for an early childhood classroom - seems to be very durable with very little bubbling. Well worth what I paid for them. Read more


37. Apple iPod shuffle 2 GB Silver (4th Generation) NEWEST MODEL
Electronics
list price: $49.00 -- our price: $44.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B001FA1NUK
Manufacturer: Apple Computer
Sales Rank: 19
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

The main body of the iPod shuffle is crafted from a single piece of aluminum and polished to a beautiful shine, so it feels solid, sleek, and durable. Thanks to the color choices too it's the perfect fashion accessory. Choose gleaming silver, blue, green, orange, or pink. Hundreds of songs to go Never leave a favorite tune behind. Along with up to 15 hours of battery life, iPod shuffle gives you 2GB of storage capacity, good for hundreds of songs. That's plenty of room for the essential songs of your workout or commute, multiple playlists, Genius Mixes, podcasts, and audiobooks, too. Goes anywhere. And with anything iPod shuffle isn't just portable. It's wearable, too. Clip it to your shirt, jacket, workout gear, backpack, or purse strap, and it stays put—whether you're running an errand or running around the track. Control your music with just a click It's back—the big, clickable control pad on the front of iPod shuffle. It's 18 percent larger than on previous iPod shuffle models, so it's even easier to see and use the music controls. Press the center button to play and pause. Press the outer buttons to skip forward or back and adjust volume. Click, click, click. It's music to your fingers. Play it your way Maybe you're the spontaneous type. Or maybe you prefer a little order. Just flip the shuffle switch to suit your listening style. Flip it to the left, and you'll hear your music in a refreshingly random way. Flip it to the middle, and your songs play in order. Or flip to the right to turn iPod shuffle off. Voiceover tells you what you want to hear Say you're listening to a song and want to know the title or the artist. Just press the VoiceOver button on top of your iPod shuffle, and it tells you. You can even use VoiceOver to hear the names of playlists and switch between them. If your battery needs charging, VoiceOver tells you that, too. It speaks your language It speaks your language. A French love song. A Spanish bolero. An Italian cantata. Your ... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars Great little thing, September 10, 2010
Just to correct some of the previous reviews...the big problem with the 3rd gen shuffle was not that it was "too small" or even that the controls were not on the unit itself, but instead were on the headphone line...the problem was if those controls got even the SLIGHTEST (and I do mean slightest) bit of moisture on them it would totally jack up the shuffle. Now, what kind of activities would most people buy the tiny shuffle mp3 player for versus a nano or standard iPod? Oh, maybe jogging or working out? And what do you do with physical activities like this? That's right, you sweat! So it doesn't take a rocket scientiest to see the problem with the 3rd gen shuffle...a problem that should have been seen before they ever even produced it. Just read all the reviews for the 3rd gen and you'll see that this was not just a minor issue, but a huge one that the majority of the users had to deal with. It is good to see they came to their sense and we can once again use the shuffle during exercise.

5-0 out of 5 stars So ive had this thing for a month now, September 22, 2010
The fourthApple iPod shuffle 2 GB Blue (4th Generation) NEWEST MODEL generation shuffle is a great improvement over the second generation which I loved in terms of the addition of voice-over, fast forward, etc, but why couldn't Apple have retained the same size as the 2nd generation? The 4th generation's size makes it inconvenient to attach the clip without interrupting the music selection. The only way to overcome this decided disadvantage is to clip the shuffle on before turning it on. However, I still am happy I bought it.

Now that I've tried the Apple iPod shuffle 2 GB Blue (4th Generation)for a month, I'd like to amend my previous review by saying that this version of the shuffle is truly a remarkable engineering achievement. Even though it's capacity is only 2 GB, it's sufficient for hours of enjoyment and has great features e.g., long battery life, voice-over information about amount of battery left and title of songs being played and the artist. What more can one ask for for a reasonable pice of less than 50 bucks? I had previously commented about its too small size, but I now find this not to be the disadvantage noted.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great little thing, September 10, 2010
I just got my new shuffle in the mail today. I needed something for running and dreadmilling when it is too snowy/icy to run outside.
My initial impressions:

Pros
Great little thing (small)
strong clip
easy to use (hooray for buttons!)
simple, multi-position switch on the top lets you play in order or shuffle. Voice over button is easy to use and works well.
Easy to sync (choose playlists, genius playlists, albums, artists, podcasts, etc...)
Looks good (see my notes about online photos at the bottom)
Long (15h) battery life.

EDIT: A "hold" function has been added, just hold the center button to activate and deactivate, good feature. It would be useful if I had just gotten mine, but I learned how to use it without the feature so I don't end up using hold much.

Cons
None. (As far am I concerned, there are cons like "no screen" and such, but if you order this to get an ipod shuffle, not a nano or other mp3 player, you will not be disappointed. I was not let down at all).

EDIT: After some thought and use, I thought of some cons.
$50 for 2gb is not a great price compared to other mp3 players.
2gb might be limiting to you. This just means you have to choose or let itunes choose what music goes on there carefully.
Because the buttons take up most of the front of the ipod, it can be hard to use the clip while it is turned on without pressing the next button.

Conclusion:
If you know what an ipod shuffle does, need a reasonable music player that syncs with your itunes, and don't need more. GET ONE!!! I can't imagine you will be let down.

One last note: From all the photos online, you can't really tell, bu this is not a matte finish ipod. The finish is shiny, but not mirror-y. And actually, no one will care about this, but the top and bottom are matte silver. It looks good.

3-0 out of 5 stars 2nd Gen is still the best, September 13, 2010
Just ran down to the Apple store yesterday and got one, a few thoughts

Pros:
+Thank god the buttons are back
+The clip has good tension
+Voiceover is actually useful
+Price


Cons:
-no hold function out of the box
-requires iTunes 10
-no equalizer
-build quality is lacking
-usb cord is short
-Applecare costs $30

The iPod shuffle is story with lots of twists, a tragedy, and now they are trying to restore this to it's original glory. The 2nd generation has a hold function, a long, and quality USB dock and was built like a rock. It was my favorite iPod out of the 10+ I've had over the years.

This one is far too small, there's no room no grip it without hitting the buttons, which would be okay if there was a hold switch, but there isn't. If you want to grip this thing hard enough to open the clip then you are going to hit the control dial and change songs. The build quality is also lacking, I got it for snowboarding, and I would be very scared in a fall with the new iPod shuffle. It's too light and feels as if you can depress the body with a hard enough press.

One thing I do like about the new shuffle is the voiceover, it's not a native ability and needs to be downloaded and synced using iTunes. Fairly straightforward; hit the dedicated button to hear what you are listening to (song name, then artist), hold it to scroll through your playlists and have them read aloud to you as you hit FF or RR, and then press it twice in quick succession to hear the battery level. What I love about it though, is that if you pause and then hit FF or RR it will call out the songs you're passing though, so you can just find one you want and then hit play. Is it that much better than listening to the first few seconds of the song?...a little, like if you want to hear a certain artist but don't know every song from them that made it onto your iPod.

All and all it's a good little player, I'm so glad the design is back, it's priced well and exceedingly charming, but a few problems, especially the hold switch keep it from being truly great like the second generation was.
-------
A few updates after a week or so of usage and to elaborate on points in original review:

Hold switch: it's definitely going to be a problem, not enough to return it but enough to negatively affect day to day usage

Durability: the iPod took a hard fall directly on concrete, still works fine but the part where it hit the ground looks like it went through a car wreck

iTunes 10: the hype and hatred against iTunes 10 seems to be misplaced, it's just another update, however I still don't like having to update to use the new iPods

USB cord: would have been nice to stick with the old dock, the new cord is 3 inches long, usb on one side and 3.5mm stereo on the other, easily transported but easily lost, doesn't compliment a desk well

Applecare: I would have gotten Applecare would it have been $20, but at $30 it's approaching doubling the overall purchase price, it would most likely be best to hold off, and if you ever break it chances are the next iPod shuffle will be out by the time you do

Equalizer: still wish it was there, it could be easily set within iTunes. I will try and see if setting the equalizer of each individual song will help but when listening to the iPod in my car, and CD's burned using iTunes, the iPod songs have no mid range, the equalizer in the car was the same with each
-------
It seems the hold function has been added with a software update so everything I said about that can only apply to the out of the box firmware
-------

----Last round of updates----

The hold function works flawlessly and has alleviated much day to day headache and I'm glad they implemented it in the same way that it was before

Build quality no longer worries me, it's solid enough for just about anything...I was mistaken because of the low weight

There is no way to adjust the equalizer, you're stuck listening to your songs flat

There's a few quirks with syncing and autofill. The easiest way is to sync select playlists and then they will update automatically every time you attach it to the computer, as far as I've seen there is no way to dump songs and autofill randomly, at least not easily

Still a good price if you appreciate having an iTunes capable device like I do, really can't be beat

I haven't managed to lose the sync cord

Headphones and hardware with iPod remotes work with the shuffle (like Skullcandy's remotes on their 2010 headphones)

5-0 out of 5 stars Back on track, September 9, 2010
Just to correct some of the previous reviews...the big problem with the 3rd gen shuffle was not that it was "too small" or even that the controls were not on the unit itself, but instead were on the headphone line...the problem was if those controls got even the SLIGHTEST (and I do mean slightest) bit of moisture on them it would totally jack up the shuffle. Now, what kind of activities would most people buy the tiny shuffle mp3 player for versus a nano or standard iPod? Oh, maybe jogging or working out? And what do you do with physical activities like this? That's right, you sweat! So it doesn't take a rocket scientiest to see the problem with the 3rd gen shuffle...a problem that should have been seen before they ever even produced it. Just read all the reviews for the 3rd gen and you'll see that this was not just a minor issue, but a huge one that the majority of the users had to deal with. It is good to see they came to their sense and we can once again use the shuffle during exercise.

5-0 out of 5 stars So ive had this thing for a month now, September 22, 2010
So ive had my new little shuffle for almost a month now and am very proud to have bought it. I wanted to post one little review against all the criticisms that ignorant people have posted on here so here it goes..

you pay for what you get, and even though apple is a name brand i am willing to pay the little extra for a name brand product that has few flukes. yea last years shuffle sucked big fat ones but the people have been heard and so thanks apple for bringing back the buttons! Ppl seem to forget that yea u can buy a sansa 4gb for the same price but apple is like the sony of music, and the more you pay the better quality the product is. how often do you see the little sansa players last more than a yr? if your like most americans that would be never..

and as for those people who are moaning about itunes 10 - just download the f-ing thing..honestly..i have windows xp basic and have had no problems with anything. syncing music is not that difficult plz ppl..dont listen to the negative reviews they do not know how to set itunes correctly..if you have something b4 xp you need to upgrade already seriously! its totally not hard and there are tons of ways of doing it for free. if itunes still has problems then find a solution instead of giving up so easy. mine didnt come out of the box with perfect compatibility either SO I FIXED IT - press the help button

as for the clip - yea u tend to press buttons while clipping it but you could have figured that out by looking at the thing before buying it. i am a marathon runner and am obsessed with my shuffle so trust me it is not that big of a deal just clip it and go back to the song if you have to (or turn it on after you clip if your SO worried about it..) are we that lazy that we cant go back to the prev song because its not convenient?

as for being afraid to scratch the device by turning it on - dont be. it wont cuz i turn mine on with my nail all the time and still looks new, and even if it does it wont diminish the sound quality or function any different. you cant see micro scratches like those unless you try so don't worry bout it!

the voiceover is very ez to use..just press once for description, 2x for battery, and hold for playlist...IT IS NOT HARD

the little 3 inch or so usb connector leaves your shuffle dangling lol but yea whats the big deal about this guys? its not going anywhere

and if your worried about whether or not you shuffle is on heres what you do - TURN IT OFF OR PLUG IN HEADPHONES - why would you leave it on ??????

and dont get me started on "you can lose it its so small!..", if you lose this thing you dont deserve one anyway so take care of your stuff

all in all i love my new shuffle and it is a blessing to runners or gym rats. so yea apple forgot a hold button O WELL...for 50 bucks you need to overlook the little things and learn to appreciate what is already there. Simplicity meets style, and apple has not let us down with this one. If your still upset about the shuffle go buy something else, otherwise enjoy

5-0 out of 5 stars The New Ipod Shuffle!, September 22, 2010
Apple iPod shuffle 2 GB Silver (4th Generation) NEWEST MODEL

I bought the Ipod Shuffle 4th generation to replace my 5th generation 30 gb Ipod, which now has inadequate battery power. I have used the Shuffle for a few days now, since it arrived in the mail from Amazon.com. There are a few small downsides too it, that can easily be ignored. The usb cord that plugs into both the computer and ipod shuffle is about four inches long. It's also hard to clip the shuffle onto my pants without pressing a button at the same time. I don't mind these cons as long as I'm careful not to lose the short cord. I also don't mind pressing a button (usually on the face) while I clip it onto my pants, as it usually just rewinds the song a few seconds, or skips to the next song--which can easily be set back to the original song by pressing the back button.

I really like the VoiceOver feature on the Shuffle. In a feminine monotone voice, it'll tell you what song you're listening too or what playlist you're using. And for 2gb of music, it's not bad, and holds just about as much music as I will ever need. I also like how I can put playlists on the Shuffle, which can come in handy when I want to listen to a certain genre.

I should also mention that I chose the blue color. It's not the same color as the display picture, and is actually more of a smoky blue color--which is still a really pretty color.

________


I copy and pasted the following from the Apple website for those who are confused on how to use the VoiceOver feature (Like I was). [...]
VoiceOver

Artist and song name:
Press to hear current track and artist

Multiple playlists:
Press and hold to hear playlist menu.

Battery status:
Press twice to hear battery status

5-0 out of 5 stars perfect design, but be warned -- no Nike+ iPod compatibility, September 7, 2010
Apple has a history of being slow to admit mistakes (how many years did we suffer through those hockey-puck mice?). The third generation of iPod shuffles was a mistake. I wanted to like them. I tried them out more than once but recognized that in practice, it was better to drag around even a Sony Walkman than the buttonless, screenless oddity that was the Shuffle 3rd generation.

So credit to Apple, they went back to the second generation model, which everybody loved, and just made it better. It looks great, it feels great, it has a nice clip. I got an early unit, which I use with Nike SHJ036 Flexible Earhook Headphone (White)s, which I find comfortable and which, crucially, have a short cord that won't hang down for me to trip over if the Shuffle is clipped somewhere on my shirt.

The one shame of this device is that, though it is perfect for running, it is not compatible with the Nike+ iPod running kit.

5-0 out of 5 stars a Home Run...Great Ipod!!, October 4, 2010
I have been using my shuffle for a few weeks and I couldn't be happier with it.

I bought the shuffle for use while exercising, I have a Touch which I had been using and was tired of having such a large device strapped to my arm with a smelly band (if you run/exercise with an armband you know what I'm talking about...eventually all bands get pretty rank). I was looking for something small and easy to use and the Shuffle fits the bill perfectly.

It is tiny, which some reviews see as a con. I do not. As a point of reference the diameter of the click wheel is exactly the size of a quarter, and it weighs about as much. You can clip it anywhere (no band) and it stays put because it is so small and light. Depending on where you clip it (sleeve/collar/waistband) it may bounce a little while running, but a little trial and error and you will find the spot that works best for you.

Synching is easy, which was a very pleasant surprise. I have had issues with synching multiple iPods in the past, needed to maintain separate libraries which was a huge pain. I'm not a techie, so I don't know if it's the new ITunes or the shuffle...but either way if you have an IPod now and want to add the shuffle as a second you won't have any synch issues.

Voice over is great. No need to look at the iPod. Without breaking stride you can hit the Voice button, the voice will run through your play lists, when she says the name of the list you want to switch to you hit play and you are done. Beyond easy.

No major frills or knock your socks off features, just a great little IPod that serves it purpose very very well. Highly recommend it for anyone who wants a little music in their ears while exercising.

5-0 out of 5 stars remarkable engineering achievement, October 3, 2010
The fourthApple iPod shuffle 2 GB Blue (4th Generation) NEWEST MODEL generation shuffle is a great improvement over the second generation which I loved in terms of the addition of voice-over, fast forward, etc, but why couldn't Apple have retained the same size as the 2nd generation? The 4th generation's size makes it inconvenient to attach the clip without interrupting the music selection. The only way to overcome this decided disadvantage is to clip the shuffle on before turning it on. However, I still am happy I bought it.

Now that I've tried the Apple iPod shuffle 2 GB Blue (4th Generation)for a month, I'd like to amend my previous review by saying that this version of the shuffle is truly a remarkable engineering achievement. Even though it's capacity is only 2 GB, it's sufficient for hours of enjoyment and has great features e.g., long battery life, voice-over information about amount of battery left and title of songs being played and the artist. What more can one ask for for a reasonable pice of less than 50 bucks? I had previously commented about its too small size, but I now find this not to be the disadvantage noted.

5-0 out of 5 stars Runner's Delight, September 16, 2010
Heavenly...TechnoArt...suitable for the French...made for the Queen...Perfect

My first generation iPod shuffle's battery is nearing its four-year battery lifespan, so I needed to think about a replacement. The prior 3rd generation doesn't cut it for Minnesota weather: We sweat profusely here during the summer and freeze as only as an ice fisherman could appreciate so those controls on earbud wires do not survive. This new model with the click wheel where it needs to be is the remedy. Yes!

Love the new capacity compared my prior 512kb. Love the ability to have multiple lists and put several new albums on it and play them straight through for proper effect and to populate an iTunes genius-produced playlist when my creativity has gone amiss. Sweet! The voice-over button is fun for exacting song announcing detail and selecting playlists. I especially like the slick transition from one song to the next. What a delight. What a smooth morph to the next compared to the one-to-two second delay between songs on my 1st generation shuffle!

The small, light size is wonderful. My 1st generation while on its lanyard around my neck could annoy me as it thumped my chest as if attempting a cardiac maneuver, which I do not need. Plus, I tried a 2nd generation and its heavier bulk could smack my hand when I was running and bruise. This is much better.

About twice as long before battery needs a charge compared to the old shuffle. Great. Small convenient firewire for USB charging is neat compared to the bulky dockpad the 2nd generation shuffle required.

Thank you so much for designing this! This will survive. Cool.

3-0 out of 5 stars Much improvement over the 3rd gen shuffle., December 3, 2010
The iPod that I currently use on a daily basis is my Apple iPod shuffle 4 GB Silver (3rd Generation) OLD MODEL. The main problem with THAT UNIT for me is that there is no other option than to use the Apple earphones, seems a greedy move by Apple. When the 4th generation came along, and I heard it had buttons I started to get excited. I would be able to use the Bose In Ear headphones with it. I don't exactly know why, but I wished the second generation shuffle would become available again. There was no hold function on the unit I tested, and the square shape wasn't something I was accustomed to.
Here's a general list of pros & cons:
PROS:
-Longer battery life[15h, compared to 10h on 3rd gen, and 12h on 1st & 2nd gen]
-BUTTONS were returned to the unit itself [not on the earphone cord]
-Price dropped to $49, dropped by about 17%
-Another color choice added, ORANGE

CONS:
-Price, $49 for 2GB, not great compared to other brands
-No hold function, though I hear Apple might add one
-No option for 4GB of storage anymore
-USB cable is 45mm[about 1.8 inches] VERY SHORT
-When the clip is pushed, it's hard not to push one of the buttons
-Buttons slightly harder to press than other models
-Square shape makes it harder to use when not looking.

Thanks for reading, hope the review helped. Read more


38. Apple iPod classic 160 GB Black (7th Generation) NEWEST MODEL
Electronics
list price: $245.00 -- our price: $228.54
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B001F7AHOG
Manufacturer: Apple Computer
Sales Rank: 16
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

Amazon.com Product Description

The new iPod classic comes with 160GB of storage in the same compact size, making it the take-everything-everywhere iPod. It's available in quintessential silver or striking black. iPod classic also has plenty of battery life (up to 36 hours of audio playback or 6 hours of video playback), good looks (a sleek, anodized aluminum design), and other great features (Cover Flow and Genius playlists for creating perfect playlists). You can even rent a movie from iTunes and watch it on the go.

iPod classic is the take-everything-everywhere iPod. Click to enlarge.

Your Top 40,000

Meet a Musical Genius
Say you're listening to a song you really like and want to hear other tracks that go great with it. With a few clicks, the Genius feature finds the songs in your library that go great together and makes a Genius playlist for you. You can listen to the playlist right away, save it for later, or even refresh it and give it another go. Count on Genius to create a mix you wouldn't have thought of yourself.

Hold Everything
iPod classic gives you 160GB of storage capacity, good for up to 40,000 songs, 200 hours of video, 25,000 photos, or any combination. And you get up to 36 hours of battery life, so you can keep on rocking for a long, long time.

With 160GB of space, iPod classic means you can always have your entire music and movie library with you. Carry it from the living room to a party in the backyard. Or take it on a cross-country road trip and never listen to the same song twice.

Click to Enjoy
Finding exactly what you want to watch or listen to is easy. Use the Click Wheel to browse by album art with Cover Flow or navigate your songs and videos by playlist, artist, album, genre, and more. You can also search for specific titles and artists. Want to mix things up? Click Shuffle Songs for a different experience every time.

Watch Movies and TV Shows
The vivid 2.5-inch display makes video come alive. Purchase or rent movies, buy TV shows, and download video podcasts from the iTunes Store, then sync them to your iPod classic to watch anywhere, anytime.

Available in quintessential silver or striking black. Click to enlarge.

Play iPod Games
Put hours of fun at your fingertips. iPod classic comes with three games--Vortex, iQuiz, and Klondike--and you can purchase games such as Cake Mania from the iTunes Store. All iPod games are designed specifically for the iPod interface.

Share Your Photos
iPod classic uses iTunes to sync the photos you have in iPhoto on a Mac. You can view photo slideshows complete with music and transitions on iPod classic, or play them on a TV using an optional Apple component or composite AV cable.

Reduced Environmental Impact
iPod classic embodies Apple's continuing environmental progress. It is designed with the following features to reduce environmental impact:

  • Arsenic-free display glass
  • BFR-free
  • Mercury-free LED-backlit display
  • PVC-free
  • Highly recyclable aluminum and stainless steel enclosure

What's in the Box
Apple iPod classic 160 GB Black (7th Generation), Earphones, USB 2.0 cable, Dock adapter, Quick Start guide

1 ... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars My favorite iPod to date. (A.K.A. The iPod Apple should've released in 2007.), September 16, 2009
NOTICE: This review is for the NEW 2009 160GB iPod Classic, NOT the 2007 160GB iPod Classic!

The new 160GB iPod Classic is easily Apple Inc.'s best iPod to date, and out of all of the iPods that I own, this is my favorite.

First, the capacity of this iPod is simply unbeatable. I've yet to see another portable media player that can match the iPod Classic in capacity. I have a huge music library, and it's nice to be able to carry every song that I own on my person at all times. What's more, thanks to the iPod Classic's capacity, I also have room to carry a few videos with me, and some of my photos. If you don't like having to pick which songs to load onto your portable media player, the iPod Classic is the way to go.

The second thing that I love about this iPod can be summed up in two words: it works. The 160GB iPod Classic that was introduced in 2007 was extremely buggy, had a non-responsive Clickwheel on many units, crashed frequently, and required a hit-and-miss firmware update to stop the hard drive from spinning even when the device was "off," which often lead to dead batteries. All of these problems left the 2007 160GB iPod Classic warming shelves and earning it the infamous "honor" of being the "worst selling iPod ever," according to Apple. I'm pleased to say that the new 160GB iPod Classic released earlier this month has virtually none of these problems. There's no "spinning hard drive bug," the Clickwheel is incredibly responsive, and the device isn't crash-prone. While it's true that many of these issues were fixed with last year's iPod Classic, there hasn't been a truly functional 160GB model until now. To put it bluntly, this is the iPod that Apple should've released in 2007.

Another thing that I really like about this iPod, and the iPod Classic in general, is it's ability to double as an external hard drive. While I believe that the iPod Nano is also capable of this, the only iPod that really has enough space to function as an external hard drive is the iPod Classic. The hard drive functionality admittedly reduces the number of devices I have to carry on me at any given time. If you regularly work with large files and are considering a new iPod, the iPod Classic is the way to go, plain and simple.

So what are the caveats? Well for starters, as with every other iPod Classic, this is a hard-drive (rather than flash-memory) based device. As a result, it has moving parts which make it unsuitable for running or any physical activity that exerts mechanical shock onto the iPod. Unless you exercise constantly with your iPod though, this really shouldn't be an issue. The only other caveat, which is more of personal taste than an actual flaw, that I can find, is that Apple has not made any cosmetic changes to this device since they introduced it in 2007. Now don't get me wrong, the point of an iPod "Classic," is to retain the "Classic" design, but after seeing how much better a black Clickwheel looks on the silver iPod Nano, I'd have thought that Apple would have given the silver iPod Classic a black Clickwheel as well. However, I admit that this is entirely my personal preference and not a "flaw" per se. I've put a quick list of pros and cons together, which can be seen below:


Pros: Largest iPod Capacity-wise, long battery life, "Genius" feature, excellent value for your money, well-built, doubles as an external hard drive, and improvements to Cover Flow.

Cons: Hard Drive (rather than Flash memory) based storage medium; device is cosmetically identical to the 2007 80GB model. (I still don't understand why Apple hasn't colored the Clickwheel black on the silver model to match the iPod Nano.)

Finally, I would highly recommend this product, which is why it gets five stars from me. I don't like the iPod Nano; it's too small for my hands, and the screen is too small for my eyes. While the iPod Touch may have app store access and Wi-Fi, I find it to be a really gimmicky device, that makes for a poor portable media player, (Apple was wise to position it as a handheld game system,) and is really an "iPhone without a phone." In contrast, the iPod Classic is an excellent portable media player, it has an excellent interface, and it only costs $249 dollars. To put things in perspective, the 2009 160GB iPod Classic costs $70 dollars more than a 16GB iPod Nano, and $150 dollars less than a 64GB iPod Touch. All in all, I highly recommend this product.

4-0 out of 5 stars Great iPod, great upgrade, but you might not want to throw away you 5th Gen Ipod yet..., November 9, 2009
I am quite new to the portable mp3 world, although I have about 250 gb of music on my computer. The only mp3 player I own is a 1 gb Samsung Pebble, which I use at the gym. This was the only mp3 player I thought I needed since both of the stereos in my vehicles have mp3 disc players. But then I started thinking...since my new Camry has an auxilary jack to hook up an mp3 device, wouldn't it be great to have one and get rid of those giant cd wallets?! The first task was to get permission from my wife to spend 250 bucks. After a little hesitation, she agreed. And then it was on to the research. Since I have such a large collection of music, the capacity of the device was number one on my list (as well as positive reviews & quality). I was pleasantly surprised to see that Apple had reissued the Classic in 160 gb form instead of the 120 gb. So after much personal debate between the Zune and the new 160 gb iPod Classic, the iPod won out.

Although the iPod is a fantastic little device with a large capacity, the software is not without its troubles. I downloaded the most current version of iTunes (verison 9) and immediately began importing my mp3 files from my hard drive. This process can take some time, but not much longer than any other media player. I was so excited to finally have the majority of my music all on one device; and have the cover art as well (I just think that is awesome)! After loading a large chunk of my files into iTunes, I noticed that only a handful of the albums had the cover art. I attempted using the "get cover art" function, but it didn't work. My only option was to track down the cover art online, right click, save, and then add the picture to the album file in iTunes. I know that it's not such a huge deal, but when you're dealing with A LOT of music, it can become quite a pain & time consuming. I later learned that the files have to be spelled exactly like they are in iTunes. And if they didn't come from iTunes in the first place, 9 times out of 10, the album art won't come up anyway. I would like to see a function that gets the cover art from other online sources, not just iTunes; and without a strict spelling criteria. There's no reason that the way I name my "The" bands should restrict the retrieval of cover art. An example being "Animals, The" instead of "The Animals."

So other than the minor annoyance with the cover art, the player itself is fantastic. I found the interface very user-friendly and intuitive, without much of a learning curve. Again, I am new to the world of iPod, but I can honestly say that I am very pleased. I wanted to write a review for people that have a large digital music collection that came mostly from ripping cd's to their computers. I am one of the people who still enjoy listening to an entire album, and is not satisfied by just downloading the single, so I still buy physical cd's & collect vinyl. I would definitely recommend the 160 gb iPod to any music fan with a large collection. Just remember to be patient when getting the artwork for all of those older albums. If you don't have a collection full of Taylor Swift, the Jonas Brothers, or Beyonce, iTunes just may not recognize your music!

2-0 out of 5 stars Disappointing quality/sound, October 15, 2009
I love the iPod but this has been a huge disappointment. The hard drive is really noisy when it changes songs, and it did not remember where it was paused in a couple of audiobooks. I assumed this was a defective one and got a new one. Amazon customer service is impeccable!
The second iPod has a less noisy hard drive, but it reset itself for no reason in the middle of a song and then when I tried to re-sync it would not connect to iTunes. Once it finally connected, iTunes says that there is no music on the iPod and that it cannot be synched/recognized. This was after 1 day of use where it was not dropped or mistreated and never left the house. My 5th generation iPod, 3rd generation and shuffle synchronized just fine, so it's not iTunes or my Mac.

Also, I would say the music quality is not as good as the 5th generation with video. It lacks depth on the new Classic. The size of the device and the hard drive capacity is fantastic and I really like the ability to use the genius function. I even like the slightly odd split screen. I will probably try again with another one, but this is really disappointing. My first bad experience with many years of Apple products.

5-0 out of 5 stars My favorite iPod to date. (A.K.A. The iPod Apple should've released in 2007.), September 16, 2009
NOTICE: This review is for the NEW 2009 160GB iPod Classic, NOT the 2007 160GB iPod Classic!

The new 160GB iPod Classic is easily Apple Inc.'s best iPod to date, and out of all of the iPods that I own, this is my favorite.

First, the capacity of this iPod is simply unbeatable. I've yet to see another portable media player that can match the iPod Classic in capacity. I have a huge music library, and it's nice to be able to carry every song that I own on my person at all times. What's more, thanks to the iPod Classic's capacity, I also have room to carry a few videos with me, and some of my photos. If you don't like having to pick which songs to load onto your portable media player, the iPod Classic is the way to go.

The second thing that I love about this iPod can be summed up in two words: it works. The 160GB iPod Classic that was introduced in 2007 was extremely buggy, had a non-responsive Clickwheel on many units, crashed frequently, and required a hit-and-miss firmware update to stop the hard drive from spinning even when the device was "off," which often lead to dead batteries. All of these problems left the 2007 160GB iPod Classic warming shelves and earning it the infamous "honor" of being the "worst selling iPod ever," according to Apple. I'm pleased to say that the new 160GB iPod Classic released earlier this month has virtually none of these problems. There's no "spinning hard drive bug," the Clickwheel is incredibly responsive, and the device isn't crash-prone. While it's true that many of these issues were fixed with last year's iPod Classic, there hasn't been a truly functional 160GB model until now. To put it bluntly, this is the iPod that Apple should've released in 2007.

Another thing that I really like about this iPod, and the iPod Classic in general, is it's ability to double as an external hard drive. While I believe that the iPod Nano is also capable of this, the only iPod that really has enough space to function as an external hard drive is the iPod Classic. The hard drive functionality admittedly reduces the number of devices I have to carry on me at any given time. If you regularly work with large files and are considering a new iPod, the iPod Classic is the way to go, plain and simple.

So what are the caveats? Well for starters, as with every other iPod Classic, this is a hard-drive (rather than flash-memory) based device. As a result, it has moving parts which make it unsuitable for running or any physical activity that exerts mechanical shock onto the iPod. Unless you exercise constantly with your iPod though, this really shouldn't be an issue. The only other caveat, which is more of personal taste than an actual flaw, that I can find, is that Apple has not made any cosmetic changes to this device since they introduced it in 2007. Now don't get me wrong, the point of an iPod "Classic," is to retain the "Classic" design, but after seeing how much better a black Clickwheel looks on the silver iPod Nano, I'd have thought that Apple would have given the silver iPod Classic a black Clickwheel as well. However, I admit that this is entirely my personal preference and not a "flaw" per se. I've put a quick list of pros and cons together, which can be seen below:


Pros: Largest iPod Capacity-wise, long battery life, "Genius" feature, excellent value for your money, well-built, doubles as an external hard drive, and improvements to Cover Flow.

Cons: Hard Drive (rather than Flash memory) based storage medium; device is cosmetically identical to the 2007 80GB model. (I still don't understand why Apple hasn't colored the Clickwheel black on the silver model to match the iPod Nano.)

Finally, I would highly recommend this product, which is why it gets five stars from me. I don't like the iPod Nano; it's too small for my hands, and the screen is too small for my eyes. While the iPod Touch may have app store access and Wi-Fi, I find it to be a really gimmicky device, that makes for a poor portable media player, (Apple was wise to position it as a handheld game system,) and is really an "iPhone without a phone." In contrast, the iPod Classic is an excellent portable media player, it has an excellent interface, and it only costs $249 dollars. To put things in perspective, the 2009 160GB iPod Classic costs $70 dollars more than a 16GB iPod Nano, and $150 dollars less than a 64GB iPod Touch. All in all, I highly recommend this product.

4-0 out of 5 stars Great iPod, great upgrade, but you might not want to throw away you 5th Gen Ipod yet..., November 9, 2009
This is the second iPod I own. The first one was a 30 Mb 5th Generation Ipod Video.


First, the plus.

There are many improvements in the 7th generation comparing it to the 5th, although I think most of them were introduced with the 6th Gen. The whole Cover Flow/Genius capabilities are definetly an improvement to the previous software. The games are a nice bonus. I've only had it for three days, but I can already see that I like the new interface a lot more.

And the disk space, I mean, WOW! The ipod is basically the same size as my 30 Gb one, but it's capacity is over 5 times bigger. I am an avid music fan, have tons of music, and my musical taste ranges from ambient to heavy metal, but I think it's going to be a long time before I fill this one up. I think this is the best feature of this iPod, and by itself, the reason you should buy it.

There are also video capabilities, which have always been a plus, and some other stuff, but I didn't see a major difference from the previous versions.


But then, why did I give it 4 stars? I wanted 4.5 stars, but Amazon doesn't let me do that.

Here are the cons.

First, as previous reviewers have stated, the sound quality seems to have downgraded from the 5th Gen iPod. The sound lacks depth, the songs sound more flat. I don't mean to say that the sound is bad, because it still has a very good sound, and I've tested it with headphones, computer speakers and my car stereo. I'm just saying that the 5th Generation iPod sounds better, and the difference is quite noticeable.

The other thing, which might be just my iPod, because I didn't see other reviewers mentioning it, is that the click wheel seems to be less sensitive/responsive than the 5th Generation one. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but it is annoying sometimes that you try so select a song or an option on the menu and the wheel doesn't respond right away.

There's also the fact that using Cover Flow seems to make the iPod proccess slower, but then again, loading the covers of literally thousands of records is not a quick task, and you can always not use Cover Flow, so I won't hold this against the iPod.


To sum it all up. If you have a lot of music and want to carry it all with you; if 30, 60, 80 or 120 Gb is just not enough; if this is your first iPod purchase, or if you just really, really like the new interface and games (I know I did), then I highly reccomend it, and you won't be dissapointed. To me this is definetly the best music player on the market. You will need to sit down and learn how to use iTunes, but when you do, you're just going to love this little gadget.

However, if you have a 5th generation iPod that's working just fine, and you prefer sound quality to disk space, you might not want to buy this one. Just try to be more more picky with the songs you put on it, I guess.

5-0 out of 5 stars New To iPod - A Review for People with Large mp3 Collections, September 15, 2009
I am quite new to the portable mp3 world, although I have about 250 gb of music on my computer. The only mp3 player I own is a 1 gb Samsung Pebble, which I use at the gym. This was the only mp3 player I thought I needed since both of the stereos in my vehicles have mp3 disc players. But then I started thinking...since my new Camry has an auxilary jack to hook up an mp3 device, wouldn't it be great to have one and get rid of those giant cd wallets?! The first task was to get permission from my wife to spend 250 bucks. After a little hesitation, she agreed. And then it was on to the research. Since I have such a large collection of music, the capacity of the device was number one on my list (as well as positive reviews & quality). I was pleasantly surprised to see that Apple had reissued the Classic in 160 gb form instead of the 120 gb. So after much personal debate between the Zune and the new 160 gb iPod Classic, the iPod won out.

Although the iPod is a fantastic little device with a large capacity, the software is not without its troubles. I downloaded the most current version of iTunes (verison 9) and immediately began importing my mp3 files from my hard drive. This process can take some time, but not much longer than any other media player. I was so excited to finally have the majority of my music all on one device; and have the cover art as well (I just think that is awesome)! After loading a large chunk of my files into iTunes, I noticed that only a handful of the albums had the cover art. I attempted using the "get cover art" function, but it didn't work. My only option was to track down the cover art online, right click, save, and then add the picture to the album file in iTunes. I know that it's not such a huge deal, but when you're dealing with A LOT of music, it can become quite a pain & time consuming. I later learned that the files have to be spelled exactly like they are in iTunes. And if they didn't come from iTunes in the first place, 9 times out of 10, the album art won't come up anyway. I would like to see a function that gets the cover art from other online sources, not just iTunes; and without a strict spelling criteria. There's no reason that the way I name my "The" bands should restrict the retrieval of cover art. An example being "Animals, The" instead of "The Animals."

So other than the minor annoyance with the cover art, the player itself is fantastic. I found the interface very user-friendly and intuitive, without much of a learning curve. Again, I am new to the world of iPod, but I can honestly say that I am very pleased. I wanted to write a review for people that have a large digital music collection that came mostly from ripping cd's to their computers. I am one of the people who still enjoy listening to an entire album, and is not satisfied by just downloading the single, so I still buy physical cd's & collect vinyl. I would definitely recommend the 160 gb iPod to any music fan with a large collection. Just remember to be patient when getting the artwork for all of those older albums. If you don't have a collection full of Taylor Swift, the Jonas Brothers, or Beyonce, iTunes just may not recognize your music!

2-0 out of 5 stars Disappointing quality/sound, October 15, 2009
I love the iPod but this has been a huge disappointment. The hard drive is really noisy when it changes songs, and it did not remember where it was paused in a couple of audiobooks. I assumed this was a defective one and got a new one. Amazon customer service is impeccable!
The second iPod has a less noisy hard drive, but it reset itself for no reason in the middle of a song and then when I tried to re-sync it would not connect to iTunes. Once it finally connected, iTunes says that there is no music on the iPod and that it cannot be synched/recognized. This was after 1 day of use where it was not dropped or mistreated and never left the house. My 5th generation iPod, 3rd generation and shuffle synchronized just fine, so it's not iTunes or my Mac.

Also, I would say the music quality is not as good as the 5th generation with video. It lacks depth on the new Classic. The size of the device and the hard drive capacity is fantastic and I really like the ability to use the genius function. I even like the slightly odd split screen. I will probably try again with another one, but this is really disappointing. My first bad experience with many years of Apple products.

5-0 out of 5 stars Almost everything I want, October 8, 2009
I'll admit it, I've been avoiding buying an MP3 player for years. I have a 6-CD changer in the car, and I used to not drive more than 1/2 per day, so that was perfectly adequate. But, now with an auto commute of over 3.5 hours per day, I quickly realized that I needed more than 6 albums to keep me from going insane. With a music collection of several thousand albums, I wanted something with significant capacity. Having tried unsuccessfully in the past to use the MP3 player on my 3G phone with Microsoft Mobile OS, I wanted something with an easy and intuitive user interface that would actually work(!!!!). The iPod Classic with 160 GB meets these criteria handsomely.

Already a long-term user of iTunes on my PC, loading my collection on my new iPod was easy and relatively quick. With a separately purchased connection cord, I was able to quickly and successfully (hint, hint, Microsoft) hook my new iPod up to my car's stereo, where the sound was crisp, clear, and compelling. Even after a LONG drive, remaining battery life was barely dented, and the simple touch wheel user interface meant that I could switch play lists with a minimum amount of fiddling and distraction (at stoplights).

Admittedly, I'm not a high-end user. I don't care about cameras (video or still), I don't care about watching movies (although I might start now), and I don't care about sexy graphics. But I do care about large storage capacity, ease of use, and excellent sound quality, and the new iPod Classic has all of these in spades at a relatively reasonable price. The only thing that would make this better would be even more capacity, but realistically 160 GB is plenty for the foreseeable future.

4-0 out of 5 stars Mixed feelings on an otherwise great device, November 5, 2009
I have mixed feelings about the new iPod Classic. As with all iPods, it's an elegant, easy to use device that does exactly what it sets out to do. The interface is intuitive, the device is attractive, and the ergonomic design remains the best on the market.

So why do I have mixed feelings? Some changes to the interface and general workings make no sense to me. The split-screen menu, for instance, is a pointless bells&whistles addition that only serves to clutter up menus that were once streamlined. Also, when the unit goes idle the screen displays the clock instead of the artist & song playing -- not very handy when you're shuffling a library of new tunes. And finally, I'm not sure if it's the new version of iTunes or the unit itself, but half my album covers don't want to display anymore. The first two gripes (and make no mistake, they're only minor gripes, not deal-breakers) could EASILY be rectified with an option to adjust the settings ... but Apple thought better of giving the user more options.

HOWEVER!

The unit itself remains an iPod through and through. It's my fourth, so needless to say I like the product. This one is slimmer than the 60GB I just got rid of, nice and light so it's not a burden in your pocket, and feels much sturdier than my nano. The new Classic has a pretty loud hard drive that may concern a new user, but in reading up on the unit that appears normal. Feels like a well-made product.

The capacity is, of course, to die for. The 160GB this offers will be more than enough for most users, and for power users like me it's the best option available to us as far as capacity goes. It also doubles as a USB hard drive, so you can use it for data storage, too. Nice. The video playback looks great, a larger screen is a great way to store and show photos, and it even has support for a selection of decent little video games.

Maybe best of all is the "Genius" feature. Like Pandora radio and other such services, you play a song and it will queue up other songs from your collection that fit in with the sound/genre/whatever. Really great feature when you have 160GB of music to play with.

So misgivings aside, I really enjoy the iPod Classic. Best capacity on the market coupled with that elegant iPod interface makes this a winner.

5-0 out of 5 stars Room to grow, September 14, 2009
I got this new 160GB because my old 80GB had been full for a while. I wanted a 160GB so bad that a few months ago I almost broke down and got the discontinued 160GB from '07 at $500. glad I waited for Apple to release the 160GB again. I like everything about the Classic. the cover flow is really nice, not just working with album covers but photos and movies too. I love how it also shows the number of songs in library or playlist just by highlighting and not selecting. It's crazy that this is twice the hard drive space but is like 1/3 less in actual size. Guess I'll hold on to this till they come out with a 320GB

3-0 out of 5 stars Indispensable but flawed, July 23, 2010
I started three years ago with an ipod Classic 80gb and was overwhelmed with the ease of use and the sound quality. I planned to convert my entire music library to it ... and relatively soon had to upgrade to the 120gb, which did not match the sound quality of the 80gb but was more than acceptable. All along the way I have converted my CDs and downloaded masses of music from iTunes, Amazon and Classicsonline. For important sets (e.g, the complete Haydn symphonies), I bought the CDs as backups. Then the fated day came ... I was again out of space and needed to upgrade.

I bought the 160gb fully aware of the reviews that stated the sound quality was problematic. Indeed, it does not have the richness of sound that the 80gb had, and the upper registers give treble new meaning. But with 120gb+ of music already, what else can I do?

It is not bad sound; it's just not as good as before. Apple again is giving us what they want to, catering to the lowest common denominator, and not what people who value sonorities need.

So, I shall exist with the 160gb, but after paying hundreds already I will not download any new items from iTunes, but will either buy CDs and convert them or download from the services which will allow me some time in the future to use those downloads on an MP3 player with as much space.

A shame. Yet another once-superior product brought down by technological arrogance.

5-0 out of 5 stars One Problem to watch out for, October 22, 2009
I connected a Belkin Tune Talk microphone to my new ipod and spent a few hours recording at an annual event. Came home, hooked the ipod up to my Mac and my Mac immediately said it would initialize the ipod to make it work with the Mac. Of course it erased the hours of recording I had on the ipod. So, when you buy a new ipod, hook it up to your computer before you use it or you'll lose your data.

4-0 out of 5 stars great product, as long as you don't use itunes to sync, November 4, 2009
After using this new ipod for a few days I have noticed that some of the problems of the 6th gen ipod have been resolved, for example, the click wheel reacts a lot quicker and, so far, there aren't problems like skipping songs, however, IMO besides the new, thinner design, not much of an evolution has happened, they haven't put an option to sort the albums according to the year, and they still show you the time in big numbers and battery state instead of the song name when the screen is turned off, which is extremely dumb, since every time I want to see the name of the song I have to click so it turns on again, epic , huge FAIL apple people.

As said on my title, if you want to make the most out of this device, don't use itunes, seriously, it's like allowing a virus in your PC, a very slow, stupid program that freezes all the time and doesn't allow you much configuration, I hate it and am glad that I have uninstalled it forever.

I have a 147 GB music collection and have been using winamp + ml_ipod plugin with amazing results, synced all my files in just 4 hours, the plugin is completely customizable, allowing you to simply take folder.jpg or the embedded images on the mp3s to manage artwork, thus not creating the moronic itunes folder to manage artwork which is a waste of space in your PC and will make it extremely slow, also, the program won't put random cover art on your files(with itunes you may expect to see a shakira cover on a metallica song, eww!) and will let you have control of it. If you are extremely organized with tags and artwork like I am, this plugin will be your favourite program
The plugin also comes with an option to sort albums by year and show additional information on the files you are playing.

Apple keeps on repeating the same fails but there are alternatives if you want to like this product, winamp+ml_ipod+ipod classic is a great combination and I'm loving it.


PS. Pardon my english.
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39. Kindle Lighted Leather Cover, Hot Pink (Fits 6" Display, Latest Generation Kindle)
Accessory
-- our price: $59.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B003DZ168E
Manufacturer: Amazon Digital Services, Inc
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

Amazon.comAmazon's Kindle Lighted Leather Cover

Our new design seamlessly incorporates a reading light into the cover, so you can carry your Kindle wherever you go and always have a reading light with you. Simply pull the light out to illuminate Kindle when you need it, and slide it away to be invisible when you don't. And since the light draws its power from Kindle, no batteries are needed.

The contoured, pebble-grain leather (available in 7 different colors) keeps your Kindle safe and secure, while the soft charcoal microfiber interior protects the screen from scratches. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand.


The built-in, retractable LED light pulls out to illuminate Kindle, and slides away when not in use.


Never Be Without a Light

Our all-new Kindle cover features an integrated, retractable LED reading light that lets you read comfortably anytime, anywhere. The high-quality LED light illuminates Kindle's paper-like display, adding brightness without adding glare.

A permanent part of the cover, the reading light is located in the top right-hand corner of the back cover. When needed, simply pull the light out and it automatically illuminates, eliminating the need for a separate power switch. To turn the light off, slide it back in to the corner of the cover.

Since the light is powered by Kindle's battery, no batteries are needed.

 

How It Works

In addition to securing Kindle in place, our new hinge system conducts electricity from Kindle's battery to the reading light - when Kindle is attached to the hinge, an electrical connection is formed that powers the light.

The cover's hinge points are gold-plated, to ensure a reliable electrical connection. Gold is used because of its ability to make good electrical contact even with low force, and for its corrosion resistance.


Secure Your Kindle in Four Easy Steps


Read Comfortably with One Hand


Reading with the cover on, you can easily access Kindle's navigation features and power switch, while the rounded edges offer a perfect fit in your hands. The cover is designed to fold back, so you can read comfortably with just one hand. And the retractable reading light is easily accessible with the cover open or folded back.


On the Go

This compact cover is perfect for taking Kindle wherever you go. The sleek leather ensures the ultimate fit and protection, without adding bulk or weight. Our patent-pending hinge system secures Kindle in place, and an elastic strap keeps the cover firmly closed for maximum screen protection. Simply attach Kindle to the hinge, apply the strap, and rest assured it will stay securely in place even when you're on the go.

You'll never be without a reading light, and since the light draws its power from Kindle, no batteries are needed.



Amazon’s official Kindle lighted cover features contoured, pebble-grain leather available in 7 different colors.

 

 

Read Kindle easily in the dark with Amazon's revolutionary, all-new lighted leather cover.



The hinge points are gold-plated to ensure a reliable electrical connection. No batteries required.


Read easily with one hand, with or without the light on.


Protect your Kindle on the go, and never be without a reading light

 

... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Quality K3 Cover with Handy Light, August 26, 2010
I bought the burnt orange color cover so I can spot my Kindle where ever I leave it easily--and hopefully not misplace it! The cover is good quality leather, and even with the cover on, I can slip the K3 into my small purse without squeezing it in--something I could not do with my coverless Kindle 2.

I think for an easy purchase without having to buy a separate book light, the Kindle 3 lighted cover is a good choice. The light worked _great_ reading in bed last night. I could see all of the lighted screen just fine with the upper right corner a bit brighter. See the pics I loaded to customer images for the lighted cover to see the light in action in a dark room, and what the cover looks light from the back.

Pluses: Built in light that slips securely out of the way, no batteries to replace, better clips/fit than past covers that connect to Kindle, adequate to light the entire screen, no looking for a booklight, no clipping a booklight to my Kindle and scratching or damaging it, the book light LEDs point down towards the screen, so no bright lights in your eyes.

Minuses: The cover's weight doubles the weight of the Kindle 3 in your hand, the book light stays in one corner and doesn't move around the Kindle, uses more Kindle battery life (it's powered by the Kindle 3 -- and I noticed a definite drain on the battery from using the light)

UPDATE: I used the Kindle light for a couple days now, and the battery life goes down noticeably as you use the light (esp. if you keep the wireless "On"). Last night I read with the light for about 2 hours after a full charge and today the battery looks down about 15%. At that rate of use (with no wireless constantly "On" and regular reading in the daylight), I estimate the battery will need charging after approx. 1 week.

If the overall cover+Kindle weight is an issue for you--more than protecting your Kindle and the handy light--then this cover is not for you.

Kindle Lighted Leather Cover alone = 233 grams or 8.2 oz

Kindle Lighted Leather Cover + Kindle 3 = 447 grams or 15.75 oz. (almost 1 lb.)

Thickness: Kindle cover + Kindle 3 = 3/4 inch

Cover Measurements (with Kindle inside):

Front: 7 3/4" x 5 1/8" (closer to 3/16")
Back: SAME as front
Spine: 7/8"
Open side (to the right) with Kindle inside: 3/4"

I have to say I'm getting used to the weight with the cover as I use it. The piece of mind of extra Kindle protection, plus a handy light whenever you need it, is worth the trade off for me. '

November 20th UPDATE:

**Still love the cover** and having the light handy without having to think about needing a light _is better than ever_. One thing however, is that the hooks to connect the cover are not sturdy enough, IMO, to take the cover on and off often. The Kindle "wiggles" a bit on the connectors, and be careful not to pull the Kindle forward or up off the back of the cover to avoid bending or breaking the metal connectors. Despite this, I am very happy with this cover after using it almost 3 months now.

5-0 out of 5 stars Lighted Leather Case - Two Important Concerns, August 31, 2010
I've noticed that like myself customers have been concerned primarily with two things regarding the new lighted case from amazon. These are: 1)The weight and 2) The uneven lighting. My review will briefly discuss these two things.

1)The Weight - The lighted leather case is a nice weight, sturdy and comfortable to hold. In ounces it is about the weight of the kindle itself however don't let that concern you. With the case on it feels like a medium sized paperback, however it is far much more comfortable to hold. It's easy to hold the case open like a book (nice for couch and table type reading) or to fold the front back and close it with the bungee so that the bungee doesn't hang around (this is good for bedtime reading).Closing the front back with bungee keeps the case folded in position and you don't have to worry about it bothering you. BTW THIS CASE FOLDS BACK 100% - Very comfortable. In sum very comfortable to read with the case and very sturdy.

2) The uneven lighting - Amazon's pictures don't do this case justice. The light hits the ENTIRE screen. Yes if you look closely it's brighter in the top right corner then in the bottom left but Amazon's pics make it look the top is lighted while the bottom is dark. There is good light all over the screen. Trust me I'm fussy about these things - the lighting will not bother you, your entire screen will be lighted and it is extremely pleasant to read in the dark.

*Final Thoughts - Great case, good quality, works well, kindle feels very secure and protected (I would feel comfortable slipping this case into my backpack or suitcase and I think it would sustain some mild impact). Lastly hinges are a non-issue, casing of the kindle will not get damaged with normal or even slightly aggressive use. You could damage the kindle by trying to pull the back of the case but you'd have to really force it to cause any sort of damage to your kindle. The hinges work fine and should not be a concern to any case user.

Update 1st December 2010:

Have now been using the case for 3 months. Leather still looks impeccable. Some people expressed concern that the bungee cord might loosen with use. I have not experienced any loosening so far. Quality of the product has proven outstanding. I've occasionally spilled or messed the cover, just a wipe with a damp cloth has cleaned it up, and the case looks like new. Have to admit I enjoy the feel of the case in my hand, there's just something great about taking your kindle to a coffee shop in this case, it just looks and feels so classy. Also with regard to the hinges: I have had no scratches on my kindle or any other issues, so I remain convinced that the hinges are a non issue.

5-0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Kindle Case Yet, September 2, 2010
I read in bed every single night, so having my Kindle be able to read in the dark is very important to me. With my Kindle 2 I used a mighty bright light, and with my Kindle 3 I've been using this Lighted Leather cover - and I love it!

Check out my video review for a size comparison of this case against my Kindle 2 and also an actual hardcover and softcover book, and then a lights out comparison of the Mighty Bright vs Lighted Leather cover.

Sorry for the shaky camera, it's the best I could do with one hand!

If you're interested in seeing a video review of the Kindle 3 itself, check out the one I did one here:

http://www.amazon.com/review/R21YU59NMOGKUR

3-0 out of 5 stars For those that REALLY care, it's not worth the money., August 28, 2010
I've been an avid Kindle user since Kindle 1, and I take my lights VERY seriously.

The problem is that the new Kindle 3 cover+light does not evenly light the screen. This results in a very bright top right corner, including the top right of the frame of the Kindle 3. And while the light doesn't glare off the screen, it does glare off my graphite Kindle 3's top right corner, making for constant distraction while reading. The light then gets fainter and fainter in a diagonal line from the top right to bottom left. It's not very fun, unfortunately.

Now, for convenience, this new cover is fantastic. I have the non-lighted one and the one with the light, and the weight difference isn't very much, and the bulk difference is truly negligible, so kudos to Amazon for this.

That said, I simply cannot recommend this cover unless you don't mind an incredibly uneven light. I will stick to my Mighty Bright. Yes, it's an addition to the Kindle, but I know that when I sit down to read, I want the pages to "disappear" as I become immersed in my reading. It's very hard for them to do so when the light is so incredibly awkward and uneven, constantly distracting. I'm happy to spend a few extra seconds clipping my light to the back of my Kindle so I can spend hours enjoying my book. That simply wasn't possible with the Kindle Lighted Leather Cover.

3 stars out of 5.

5-0 out of 5 stars Compact and well made, August 27, 2010
For a folio type case, this looks and feels great and works very well. It does add significantly to the weight but that seems a predictable consequence of using leather, making it stiff enough to offer real protection, and building in a light.

Attaching Kindle is very simple using the directions on the product page. Make sure you heed the warning to work at it until ALL the gold is covered, which tells you Kindle is securely attached. Removing is quite simple: Slide down the top hook and rotate Kindle right off. I'm using a fingertip to do it rather than a fingernail. It's quick and easy enough to attach and detach Kindle that I won't have any difficulty switching to "naked" reading at will.

The cord seems to me strong enough for its purpose, but only time will tell. When the cover is closed, the cord is buried in a "channel" in the front cover so should not normally be subjected to much stress and strain. I did remove the little "flag" attached to the cord. Even without using fingernails, it's easy to open the cord up. Others have posted about the cord being in the way during reading, especially when holding Kindle and case in "open book" form. I put the cord between Kindle and the back cover, solving the issue to my own satisfaction. YMMV.

I don't think I'll use the "book style" reading position much. I'll "break the spine" as I did with my K2's case and read with the front cover folded flat against the back. It feels good like that, but when I have good light and will be reading a while I expect I'll do as I did with my K2: Remove Kindle from the case and read "naked." Still, even brand new, the leather folds flat easily and it's comfortable to hold and read.

The light seems to me to be well placed. I don't get any glare in any of my normal reading positions, so don't have a practical issue with its lack of adjustability. One very nice feature, particularly since it's powered by Kindle's battery, is that it turns off when Kindle turns off. So if you fall asleep reading, your light won't just keep running. I find it a bit stiff to pull out, but I expect it will ease in time. Also maybe stiff is good, as you don't want it just lolling out on its own while you've got it stowed away. Still, folks with difficulty applying much force with their fingers could find this an issue.

I bought this unseen, intending to return it if it didn't work well. It won't be going back. I may in fact buy another case for travel, as by design this folio style case is open on three sides. In some situations I would want more dust and bang protection, but I still give five stars because this is an unavoidable consequence of this style of design.

5-0 out of 5 stars well worth it, August 27, 2010
This is a comparison between mighty bright and the kindle cover light. NOTE: the bottom left of the kindle is the part that receives the less light because it is the farthest away. The light still shines well enough to read the bottom left of the kindle , but the light distribution is not even.

5-0 out of 5 stars Exceeded my expectations, August 27, 2010
I was hesitant to buy this cover mostly due to the pictures in its listing, which seem to show a light that doesn't even extend to the opposite corner. The fact that I have not been impressed with the Amazon's Kindle covers in the past didn't help. I went ahead and purchased it because the cover I wanted isn't available yet and I don't like to take my Kindle out and about without a cover. Now I am glad that I went ahead and bought it.

PROS:

1. The light is much better than I thought it would be. Using it in a darkened room I found that the light did the job very well. In a pitch black room, it performs even better. While the screen corner opposite the light is a bit dimmer than other areas, there is no problem reading the page at all.

2. The light gets its power from the Kindle itself, through the gold-plated hinges which attach it to the cover, so batteries are a thing of the past. When your Kindle goes to sleep, the light will go out as well. It will also turn off when you slide it back into the case.

3. The cover is slim, well-fitted and very easy to attach and detach using the hinges. The inside has good padding. The leather outer surface has a nice pebbled texture with the exception of a smooth area along the edge of the front. While stiff enough to protect the reader, the cover is slight flexible and the front easily folds behind when reading so you can hold your Kindle with one hand if you like.

4. A great plus is that the cover has an elastic cord that fits into a groove on the front of it. This holds your cover closed (unlike the original Kindle 2 cover that would flop open in your purse & let things slide into it) and easily distinguishes the front from the back--important as many owners of the Kindle 2 cover accidentally opened it from the back, which could cause cracking along the Kindle's spine.


CONS:

I haven't found any, really. The light Is a bit hard (stiff) to pull out of the cover, but then you wouldn't want it to be flopping out when you don't want to use it so that is more of a Pro than a Con.

The one concern I do have is about pulling the light in and out--I wonder if whatever wiring or conductor that is used to get the power from the hinges to the light will eventually break. But that is something to find out down the road. Right now, the more I use this cover, the more I like it.

4-0 out of 5 stars From the bungee cord thingy to the pull-out light, a solid choice for the Kindle, September 4, 2010
I ordered this cover because it was the only real game in town at the time. To let you know where I come from with this review... I purchased the 2nd generation Kindle back in March of 2009 with the Amazon cover. Didn't like that one, it actually cracked my mother's Kindle that I purchased shortly thereafter (Amazon replaced it, although it was probably from her opening the wrong side, doesn't matter, this isn't about Amazon great customer service). When that happened, we immediately went looking for a new cover and fell in love with the M-Edge Prodigy with light. Unfortunately, M-Edge isn't offering that for the 3rd generation Kindle, they changed it to have a nylon strap instead of leather and aren't utilizing the hinge technology for the light, which I think is genius and a terrible error on their part. I'm telling you this so you know that I ordered this new Amazon Lighted Cover with a WHOLE LOT of trepidation.

When deciding on the color, I didn't want black (I wanted purple, but Amazon doesn't offer that *boo*hiss*) and the green was backordered slightly, didn't like the other colors so I decided to get the orange. It looked interesting and since I live in Austin, some UT fan would buy it off me if I hated it, I was sure. It came in and it's the perfect burnt orange color. It might be slightly too tan colored, but it's not vibrant orange by any means. A great almost pumpkin pie color actually.

So... what did I think of the cover itself?

I slid the Kindle in there and pulled the light out and... nothing happened. I spent a good 3 to 5 minutes pulling the light out and pushing it back in, looking for a switch, something, anything. I finally gave up and turned the Kindle on and... yeah, the light came on. DUH! It works only if the Kindle is on. This is actually GREAT because I fall asleep reading a good deal and the light will go off when the Kindle goes to sleep after 15 minutes or so. I felt stupid, but at least I didn't call customer service and have them giggle in the background and the stupid lady that can't work the cover, eh?

ANYWAY... the Kindle slides in easily and the light works great. There is no glare at all because the LED lights are directed down the arm of the light so there's no "direct" light hitting the screen, it just flows down. It is brighter in the upper right than in the lower left because of that, but it's more than adequate. The light is NOT adjustable but you shouldn't need to adjust it either. I have found it really is a genius way of handling it.

The case itself is not too thick. In fact when I first picked up the case, I thought I had the wrong one because it looked too slim to have a light in there, but it's there. It is a little hard to pull the light out, but I guess the alternative is having it be too easy, right? I really wish they had included corner straps though. I read laying in bed and I worry it's going to flop open and crack the Kindle. I do realize this is probably unfounded and they fixed that flaw, but because I'm paranoid, I did put two small circles of velcro to the back of the Kindle and the cover so it couldn't accidentally bend the hinge system or crack the case. I'm aware this is insane overkill type stuff, so feel free to snicker... I'll wait... done? Okay, onward...

Now, back to reality... the chance of you opening the Kindle from the wrong side is basically zero. You have to unwrap it using this bungee cord thingy (yes, that's the technical term here, folks). It has a little leather tag on it that says "Amazon Kindle". The tag is a little annoying because I fold the cover back and use the cord to hold it and keep hitting the tag with my hand no matter where I put. I'm thinking of cutting it off. *shrug*

It does, of course, add some weight to the Kindle. The case, with Kindle and velcro circles weighs 15.5 oz on my postal scale. There's been some discussion if this is "too heavy" but I must say that I don't think so. I read with it folded back and the bungee cord thingy wrapped around the back. I have weak hands that keep me from reading hard backs and large paperback books. I think it's more of the force of holding the book open than the weight, so it's not been an issue at all for me. I also read with it propped up somewhere usually.

My favorite part is that with the new slim and sleek design of the Kindle and this slim and sleek cover (with a light, no less!) it really is a great size to grab and go, toss in my purse, in the car or my bedside. My other favorite (it's a tie) is the light. It runs off power from the Kindle itself so I'm never without a light. I don't have to find a battery somewhere when it burns out. Amazon knocked it out of the park as far as I'm concerned. I'm taking off a star just for the few little niggle things I mentioned before. After over a week of use though, this is the cover I'm recommending to friends/family at this time.

Well worth it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Data to compare colors and weights, with and without light, September 4, 2010
Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

4-0 out of 5 stars (4.5 stars) Very good, and not THAT heavy!, August 28, 2010
I bought two of these (burgundy for my wife's graphite kindle and green for my white kindle).

The colors are gorgeous, and exactly as shown in the pictures Amazon has here.

The look and feel of the leather is very good and should more than satisfy most folks. If you're willing to spend more for even better leather, you'll soon be able to get high-end leather cases from designers like Cole-Haan. (If you're interested, look up their Kindle 2 cases here at Amazon and you're get an idea of what they're likely to offer for Kindle 3).

We love the design. We've had no trouble hooking our kindles in and out of the case. We love that the light is built in and we will never need to replace its battery. The cover folds completely flat around the back, and the elastic band keeps it there, then it's easy and quite comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

A few reviews here complain about the weight of this case. I disagree. It is not heavy compared to other cases of this type (folio-style hard shell leather cases). My wife and I were up reading for hours last night, holding our kindles, cases on, in one hand, with no fatigue. (We're such an old married couple, that's how exciting our Friday nights are!) I used to have a nook with the same type of case (minus the light), and it was noticeably heavier. If you want something lighter, consider a neoprene sleeve or cloth case.

My only qualm about the Amazon lighted case is the uneven distribution of light on the screen - very bright in the upper right corner, dim in the lower left corner. It seems this doesn't bother most people here, but it bothers me a bit, enough to knock half a star off my review, but not enough to make me hesitate to recommend this case.

Some folks complain about the price. It is high, to be sure. But, you'd pay about the same if you bought a good leather case and a separate light. Then you'd have to worry about remembering to pack the light when you travel, making sure it has fresh batteries, making sure you don't lose it, etc etc. For me, the convenience of the built-in light is well worth the price.

And there's something intangible but very very nice about keeping our kindles in these gorgeous, almost luxuriously nice cases. They are definitely eye-catching and lust-worthy.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Quality K3 Cover with Handy Light, August 26, 2010
I bought the burnt orange color cover so I can spot my Kindle where ever I leave it easily--and hopefully not misplace it! The cover is good quality leather, and even with the cover on, I can slip the K3 into my small purse without squeezing it in--something I could not do with my coverless Kindle 2.

I think for an easy purchase without having to buy a separate book light, the Kindle 3 lighted cover is a good choice. The light worked _great_ reading in bed last night. I could see all of the lighted screen just fine with the upper right corner a bit brighter. See the pics I loaded to customer images for the lighted cover to see the light in action in a dark room, and what the cover looks light from the back.

Pluses: Built in light that slips securely out of the way, no batteries to replace, better clips/fit than past covers that connect to Kindle, adequate to light the entire screen, no looking for a booklight, no clipping a booklight to my Kindle and scratching or damaging it, the book light LEDs point down towards the screen, so no bright lights in your eyes.

Minuses: The cover's weight doubles the weight of the Kindle 3 in your hand, the book light stays in one corner and doesn't move around the Kindle, uses more Kindle battery life (it's powered by the Kindle 3 -- and I noticed a definite drain on the battery from using the light)

UPDATE: I used the Kindle light for a couple days now, and the battery life goes down noticeably as you use the light (esp. if you keep the wireless "On"). Last night I read with the light for about 2 hours after a full charge and today the battery looks down about 15%. At that rate of use (with no wireless constantly "On" and regular reading in the daylight), I estimate the battery will need charging after approx. 1 week.

If the overall cover+Kindle weight is an issue for you--more than protecting your Kindle and the handy light--then this cover is not for you.

Kindle Lighted Leather Cover alone = 233 grams or 8.2 oz

Kindle Lighted Leather Cover + Kindle 3 = 447 grams or 15.75 oz. (almost 1 lb.)

Thickness: Kindle cover + Kindle 3 = 3/4 inch

Cover Measurements (with Kindle inside):

Front: 7 3/4" x 5 1/8" (closer to 3/16")
Back: SAME as front
Spine: 7/8"
Open side (to the right) with Kindle inside: 3/4"

I have to say I'm getting used to the weight with the cover as I use it. The piece of mind of extra Kindle protection, plus a handy light whenever you need it, is worth the trade off for me. '

November 20th UPDATE:

**Still love the cover** and having the light handy without having to think about needing a light _is better than ever_. One thing however, is that the hooks to connect the cover are not sturdy enough, IMO, to take the cover on and off often. The Kindle "wiggles" a bit on the connectors, and be careful not to pull the Kindle forward or up off the back of the cover to avoid bending or breaking the metal connectors. Despite this, I am very happy with this cover after using it almost 3 months now.

5-0 out of 5 stars Lighted Leather Case - Two Important Concerns, August 31, 2010
I've noticed that like myself customers have been concerned primarily with two things regarding the new lighted case from amazon. These are: 1)The weight and 2) The uneven lighting. My review will briefly discuss these two things.

1)The Weight - The lighted leather case is a nice weight, sturdy and comfortable to hold. In ounces it is about the weight of the kindle itself however don't let that concern you. With the case on it feels like a medium sized paperback, however it is far much more comfortable to hold. It's easy to hold the case open like a book (nice for couch and table type reading) or to fold the front back and close it with the bungee so that the bungee doesn't hang around (this is good for bedtime reading).Closing the front back with bungee keeps the case folded in position and you don't have to worry about it bothering you. BTW THIS CASE FOLDS BACK 100% - Very comfortable. In sum very comfortable to read with the case and very sturdy.

2) The uneven lighting - Amazon's pictures don't do this case justice. The light hits the ENTIRE screen. Yes if you look closely it's brighter in the top right corner then in the bottom left but Amazon's pics make it look the top is lighted while the bottom is dark. There is good light all over the screen. Trust me I'm fussy about these things - the lighting will not bother you, your entire screen will be lighted and it is extremely pleasant to read in the dark.

*Final Thoughts - Great case, good quality, works well, kindle feels very secure and protected (I would feel comfortable slipping this case into my backpack or suitcase and I think it would sustain some mild impact). Lastly hinges are a non-issue, casing of the kindle will not get damaged with normal or even slightly aggressive use. You could damage the kindle by trying to pull the back of the case but you'd have to really force it to cause any sort of damage to your kindle. The hinges work fine and should not be a concern to any case user.

Update 1st December 2010:

Have now been using the case for 3 months. Leather still looks impeccable. Some people expressed concern that the bungee cord might loosen with use. I have not experienced any loosening so far. Quality of the product has proven outstanding. I've occasionally spilled or messed the cover, just a wipe with a damp cloth has cleaned it up, and the case looks like new. Have to admit I enjoy the feel of the case in my hand, there's just something great about taking your kindle to a coffee shop in this case, it just looks and feels so classy. Also with regard to the hinges: I have had no scratches on my kindle or any other issues, so I remain convinced that the hinges are a non issue.

5-0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Kindle Case Yet, September 2, 2010
I read in bed every single night, so having my Kindle be able to read in the dark is very important to me. With my Kindle 2 I used a mighty bright light, and with my Kindle 3 I've been using this Lighted Leather cover - and I love it!

Check out my video review for a size comparison of this case against my Kindle 2 and also an actual hardcover and softcover book, and then a lights out comparison of the Mighty Bright vs Lighted Leather cover.

Sorry for the shaky camera, it's the best I could do with one hand!

If you're interested in seeing a video review of the Kindle 3 itself, check out the one I did one here:

http://www.amazon.com/review/R21YU59NMOGKUR

3-0 out of 5 stars For those that REALLY care, it's not worth the money., August 28, 2010
I've been an avid Kindle user since Kindle 1, and I take my lights VERY seriously.

The problem is that the new Kindle 3 cover+light does not evenly light the screen. This results in a very bright top right corner, including the top right of the frame of the Kindle 3. And while the light doesn't glare off the screen, it does glare off my graphite Kindle 3's top right corner, making for constant distraction while reading. The light then gets fainter and fainter in a diagonal line from the top right to bottom left. It's not very fun, unfortunately.

Now, for convenience, this new cover is fantastic. I have the non-lighted one and the one with the light, and the weight difference isn't very much, and the bulk difference is truly negligible, so kudos to Amazon for this.

That said, I simply cannot recommend this cover unless you don't mind an incredibly uneven light. I will stick to my Mighty Bright. Yes, it's an addition to the Kindle, but I know that when I sit down to read, I want the pages to "disappear" as I become immersed in my reading. It's very hard for them to do so when the light is so incredibly awkward and uneven, constantly distracting. I'm happy to spend a few extra seconds clipping my light to the back of my Kindle so I can spend hours enjoying my book. That simply wasn't possible with the Kindle Lighted Leather Cover.

3 stars out of 5.

5-0 out of 5 stars Compact and well made, August 27, 2010
For a folio type case, this looks and feels great and works very well. It does add significantly to the weight but that seems a predictable consequence of using leather, making it stiff enough to offer real protection, and building in a light.

Attaching Kindle is very simple using the directions on the product page. Make sure you heed the warning to work at it until ALL the gold is covered, which tells you Kindle is securely attached. Removing is quite simple: Slide down the top hook and rotate Kindle right off. I'm using a fingertip to do it rather than a fingernail. It's quick and easy enough to attach and detach Kindle that I won't have any difficulty switching to "naked" reading at will.

The cord seems to me strong enough for its purpose, but only time will tell. When the cover is closed, the cord is buried in a "channel" in the front cover so should not normally be subjected to much stress and strain. I did remove the little "flag" attached to the cord. Even without using fingernails, it's easy to open the cord up. Others have posted about the cord being in the way during reading, especially when holding Kindle and case in "open book" form. I put the cord between Kindle and the back cover, solving the issue to my own satisfaction. YMMV.

I don't think I'll use the "book style" reading position much. I'll "break the spine" as I did with my K2's case and read with the front cover folded flat against the back. It feels good like that, but when I have good light and will be reading a while I expect I'll do as I did with my K2: Remove Kindle from the case and read "naked." Still, even brand new, the leather folds flat easily and it's comfortable to hold and read.

The light seems to me to be well placed. I don't get any glare in any of my normal reading positions, so don't have a practical issue with its lack of adjustability. One very nice feature, particularly since it's powered by Kindle's battery, is that it turns off when Kindle turns off. So if you fall asleep reading, your light won't just keep running. I find it a bit stiff to pull out, but I expect it will ease in time. Also maybe stiff is good, as you don't want it just lolling out on its own while you've got it stowed away. Still, folks with difficulty applying much force with their fingers could find this an issue.

I bought this unseen, intending to return it if it didn't work well. It won't be going back. I may in fact buy another case for travel, as by design this folio style case is open on three sides. In some situations I would want more dust and bang protection, but I still give five stars because this is an unavoidable consequence of this style of design.

5-0 out of 5 stars well worth it, August 27, 2010
This is a comparison between mighty bright and the kindle cover light. NOTE: the bottom left of the kindle is the part that receives the less light because it is the farthest away. The light still shines well enough to read the bottom left of the kindle , but the light distribution is not even.

5-0 out of 5 stars Exceeded my expectations, August 27, 2010
I was hesitant to buy this cover mostly due to the pictures in its listing, which seem to show a light that doesn't even extend to the opposite corner. The fact that I have not been impressed with the Amazon's Kindle covers in the past didn't help. I went ahead and purchased it because the cover I wanted isn't available yet and I don't like to take my Kindle out and about without a cover. Now I am glad that I went ahead and bought it.

PROS:

1. The light is much better than I thought it would be. Using it in a darkened room I found that the light did the job very well. In a pitch black room, it performs even better. While the screen corner opposite the light is a bit dimmer than other areas, there is no problem reading the page at all.

2. The light gets its power from the Kindle itself, through the gold-plated hinges which attach it to the cover, so batteries are a thing of the past. When your Kindle goes to sleep, the light will go out as well. It will also turn off when you slide it back into the case.

3. The cover is slim, well-fitted and very easy to attach and detach using the hinges. The inside has good padding. The leather outer surface has a nice pebbled texture with the exception of a smooth area along the edge of the front. While stiff enough to protect the reader, the cover is slight flexible and the front easily folds behind when reading so you can hold your Kindle with one hand if you like.

4. A great plus is that the cover has an elastic cord that fits into a groove on the front of it. This holds your cover closed (unlike the original Kindle 2 cover that would flop open in your purse & let things slide into it) and easily distinguishes the front from the back--important as many owners of the Kindle 2 cover accidentally opened it from the back, which could cause cracking along the Kindle's spine.


CONS:

I haven't found any, really. The light Is a bit hard (stiff) to pull out of the cover, but then you wouldn't want it to be flopping out when you don't want to use it so that is more of a Pro than a Con.

The one concern I do have is about pulling the light in and out--I wonder if whatever wiring or conductor that is used to get the power from the hinges to the light will eventually break. But that is something to find out down the road. Right now, the more I use this cover, the more I like it.

4-0 out of 5 stars From the bungee cord thingy to the pull-out light, a solid choice for the Kindle, September 4, 2010
I ordered this cover because it was the only real game in town at the time. To let you know where I come from with this review... I purchased the 2nd generation Kindle back in March of 2009 with the Amazon cover. Didn't like that one, it actually cracked my mother's Kindle that I purchased shortly thereafter (Amazon replaced it, although it was probably from her opening the wrong side, doesn't matter, this isn't about Amazon great customer service). When that happened, we immediately went looking for a new cover and fell in love with the M-Edge Prodigy with light. Unfortunately, M-Edge isn't offering that for the 3rd generation Kindle, they changed it to have a nylon strap instead of leather and aren't utilizing the hinge technology for the light, which I think is genius and a terrible error on their part. I'm telling you this so you know that I ordered this new Amazon Lighted Cover with a WHOLE LOT of trepidation.

When deciding on the color, I didn't want black (I wanted purple, but Amazon doesn't offer that *boo*hiss*) and the green was backordered slightly, didn't like the other colors so I decided to get the orange. It looked interesting and since I live in Austin, some UT fan would buy it off me if I hated it, I was sure. It came in and it's the perfect burnt orange color. It might be slightly too tan colored, but it's not vibrant orange by any means. A great almost pumpkin pie color actually.

So... what did I think of the cover itself?

I slid the Kindle in there and pulled the light out and... nothing happened. I spent a good 3 to 5 minutes pulling the light out and pushing it back in, looking for a switch, something, anything. I finally gave up and turned the Kindle on and... yeah, the light came on. DUH! It works only if the Kindle is on. This is actually GREAT because I fall asleep reading a good deal and the light will go off when the Kindle goes to sleep after 15 minutes or so. I felt stupid, but at least I didn't call customer service and have them giggle in the background and the stupid lady that can't work the cover, eh?

ANYWAY... the Kindle slides in easily and the light works great. There is no glare at all because the LED lights are directed down the arm of the light so there's no "direct" light hitting the screen, it just flows down. It is brighter in the upper right than in the lower left because of that, but it's more than adequate. The light is NOT adjustable but you shouldn't need to adjust it either. I have found it really is a genius way of handling it.

The case itself is not too thick. In fact when I first picked up the case, I thought I had the wrong one because it looked too slim to have a light in there, but it's there. It is a little hard to pull the light out, but I guess the alternative is having it be too easy, right? I really wish they had included corner straps though. I read laying in bed and I worry it's going to flop open and crack the Kindle. I do realize this is probably unfounded and they fixed that flaw, but because I'm paranoid, I did put two small circles of velcro to the back of the Kindle and the cover so it couldn't accidentally bend the hinge system or crack the case. I'm aware this is insane overkill type stuff, so feel free to snicker... I'll wait... done? Okay, onward...

Now, back to reality... the chance of you opening the Kindle from the wrong side is basically zero. You have to unwrap it using this bungee cord thingy (yes, that's the technical term here, folks). It has a little leather tag on it that says "Amazon Kindle". The tag is a little annoying because I fold the cover back and use the cord to hold it and keep hitting the tag with my hand no matter where I put. I'm thinking of cutting it off. *shrug*

It does, of course, add some weight to the Kindle. The case, with Kindle and velcro circles weighs 15.5 oz on my postal scale. There's been some discussion if this is "too heavy" but I must say that I don't think so. I read with it folded back and the bungee cord thingy wrapped around the back. I have weak hands that keep me from reading hard backs and large paperback books. I think it's more of the force of holding the book open than the weight, so it's not been an issue at all for me. I also read with it propped up somewhere usually.

My favorite part is that with the new slim and sleek design of the Kindle and this slim and sleek cover (with a light, no less!) it really is a great size to grab and go, toss in my purse, in the car or my bedside. My other favorite (it's a tie) is the light. It runs off power from the Kindle itself so I'm never without a light. I don't have to find a battery somewhere when it burns out. Amazon knocked it out of the park as far as I'm concerned. I'm taking off a star just for the few little niggle things I mentioned before. After over a week of use though, this is the cover I'm recommending to friends/family at this time.

Well worth it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Data to compare colors and weights, with and without light, September 4, 2010
Have a good scale and have now seen all cover colors, so here's data to help you pick. VERY well made cover.

Weights are for the cover only, not including the Kindle:
Cover without light -- 170 grams or 6 ounces
Cover WITH light -- 240 grams or 8-1/2 ounces
Only you know whether the 2-1/2 ounce difference in weight is worth carrying all the time to have a light always at hand.

The most accurate depiction of the cover colors is the photograph at the bottom of the sales page.
Burnt Orange -- same shade as a basketball
Burgundy Red -- closer to a vibrant brick red as it has no purple overtone
Steel Blue -- pure grey blue which shows well on web page
Hot Pink -- deeper shade than it appears anywhere but photograph
Green -- picture a Granny Smith apple
Brown -- very deep brown, not a chocolate color

4-0 out of 5 stars (4.5 stars) Very good, and not THAT heavy!, August 28, 2010
I bought two of these (burgundy for my wife's graphite kindle and green for my white kindle).

The colors are gorgeous, and exactly as shown in the pictures Amazon has here.

The look and feel of the leather is very good and should more than satisfy most folks. If you're willing to spend more for even better leather, you'll soon be able to get high-end leather cases from designers like Cole-Haan. (If you're interested, look up their Kindle 2 cases here at Amazon and you're get an idea of what they're likely to offer for Kindle 3).

We love the design. We've had no trouble hooking our kindles in and out of the case. We love that the light is built in and we will never need to replace its battery. The cover folds completely flat around the back, and the elastic band keeps it there, then it's easy and quite comfortable to hold in one hand for long reading sessions.

A few reviews here complain about the weight of this case. I disagree. It is not heavy compared to other cases of this type (folio-style hard shell leather cases). My wife and I were up reading for hours last night, holding our kindles, cases on, in one hand, with no fatigue. (We're such an old married couple, that's how exciting our Friday nights are!) I used to have a nook with the same type of case (minus the light), and it was noticeably heavier. If you want something lighter, consider a neoprene sleeve or cloth case.

My only qualm about the Amazon lighted case is the uneven distribution of light on the screen - very bright in the upper right corner, dim in the lower left corner. It seems this doesn't bother most people here, but it bothers me a bit, enough to knock half a star off my review, but not enough to make me hesitate to recommend this case.

Some folks complain about the price. It is high, to be sure. But, you'd pay about the same if you bought a good leather case and a separate light. Then you'd have to worry about remembering to pack the light when you travel, making sure it has fresh batteries, making sure you don't lose it, etc etc. For me, the convenience of the built-in light is well worth the price.

And there's something intangible but very very nice about keeping our kindles in these gorgeous, almost luxuriously nice cases. They are definitely eye-catching and lust-worthy. Read more


40. Roku XD Streaming Player 1080p
Electronics
list price: $79.99 -- our price: $79.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B00426C56U
Manufacturer: Roku, Inc.
Sales Rank: 11
US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Editorial Review

Roku is a little box that allows you to instantly stream tons of entertainment on your TV. Watch over 100,000 movies and TV shows from Netflix, Amazon Video On Demand, and more. Listen to music on Pandora, or listen to your own iTunes playlists. Even watch major sports, news, or original Internet programming. It's all available whenever you want it. The all-new Roku XD delivers the highest quality HD video, in the smallest box, at the lowest price. No wonder Roku is the best selling streaming player ever. ... Read more

Reviews

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent product, October 6, 2010
One can make a good case that with Roku you really don't need cable or satellite TV. With a $10 monthly subscription to Netflix you can get more movies than you have time for over the internet at the time that you want to see them. I doubt that one movie that TCM shows is not available this way.

You can listen to almost any radio station in the country free, meeting your needs if you like any particular kind of music or listen to talk radio, sports, etc.

You can watch Youtube clips on your big TV as well and can send the sound to your stereo system, home theater nowadays.

There are lots of other specialized sites, both free and by subscription, that are available. I like Pub-D-Hub which has movies in the public domain for free, many are poor but others can be quite good, I had never seen a picture with legendary Lillian Gish before.

Roku is a winner.

4-0 out of 5 stars Apple TV vs. Roku XD. Fight!, October 29, 2010

Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
I recently bought the new Apple TV, but was curious how the Roku XD compared. After all, while I like the Apple TV, it's tied to the Apple ecosystem, for better or worse. Meanwhile the Roku offered a broader feature set, but not as much of an established brand as Apple.

Luckily, I was able to satisfy my curiosity by getting a Roku XD, and I thought my experiences and opinions might be useful for those shopping for such internet-streaming set top boxes.

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Quality/Content
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My first and biggest question was, "How does the quality compare?". 1080p capability is one of Roku's biggest selling points against Apple, because the Apple TV "only" streams 720p. What I found was that it was a mixed bag. Roku has the capability to stream 1080p, but something surprising is that a huge portion of available content isn't HD to start with and doesn't take full advantage of Roku's hardware. Some content you can stream from Amazon and Netflix looks little better than VHS quality, while some looked somewhere between DVD and HD broadcast quality.

The vast majority of Netflix, for example, is SD content including most bigger-name movies that make their way to the library. Thus, the HD capability of Roku is MOST noticeable in Amazon Video On-Demand's vast library of HD TV shows and movies.

Amazon Video On-Demand offers everything you could find through Apple TV's store and then some, but it has a superior pricing model. You can PURCHASE TV shows for .99c vs. .99c rentals on Apple TV, and you may save a buck or two renting older movies, especially if they're SD.

A drawback (maybe an advantage to some) to the Amazon's On-Demand store is its availability of soft-core porn, so parents be ready to tweak parental controls a little more than you'd have to with Apple TV, which limits its offerings to R-rated major studio movies.

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Flexibility
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The biggest selling point of the Roku in my opinion is the flexibility already established with its "channels" store, which is basically like an app store for your Roku. The big-three apps are "Amazon Video On-Demand", "Netflix" and "Hulu+ (coming soon)", but you can also choose channels from "Pandora" (if you like listening to music on your TV), or "UFC" (though the UFC channel is a bit of disappointment since they want to charge you $45 a pop to view past UFC events!).

Apple TV doesn't currently have an app store, though one is probably coming, and it will soon pick up the ability to stream a variety of content from an iOS device via something called "AirPlay", but Roku is clearly a bit more flexible at this point.

That said, a big feature I like about Apple TV that isn't available in Roku is the ability to view iTunes content. I like being able to watch movies on my TV then take them with me on my iPhone for my kids to watch on car trips or plane rides, and Apple has a better, more integrated ecosystem to support such capability.

I also like watching YouTube, which I can do on my Apple TV, but not straightforwardly on the Roku as far as I can tell (EDIT: apparently there's a secret beta YouTube channel if you Google for it, but it's not highlighted in the channel store).

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User Experience/Interface
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I think the biggest disadvantage of Roku vs. Apple TV is in its user experience. The Roku is slightly more complicated to set up (for instance, you need to find the TV settings menu then designate that you have a 1080p TV before you can watch HD content), and the user interfaces for many features, while good, just don't match the smooth feel and responsiveness of the Apple TV. With Roku, you tend to get longish, frequent load animations when navigating between channels. Plus Roku's content suggestion features don't work quite as well as Apple TV, and with Roku you don't have an "Apple Remote"-quality iPhone app to let you control the device.

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Conclusion
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While Roku markets its device as higher quality than devices like the Apple TV because of "1080p", limited content and bitrate minimize any noticeable advantage. The fact is that if you REALLY care about quality, you get a Blu Ray player, not a media streamer from any manufacturer. Nevertheless, the Roku is at least as good, if not better than competing streaming devices if you're viewing the right content.

It lacks a few of the iTunes-specific features of Apple TV, and the user experience isn't quite as good, but if you don't care about those things, the Roku is more flexible, cheaper both in purchase price and content prices, and offers more content than the Apple TV.

Overall, the Roku XD is an EXCELLENT device that's priced to move! For $80, why not try it?

5-0 out of 5 stars Loyal customer!, October 9, 2010
I've owned my Roku for 10 months. I'm sorry that that one person had a bad experience. I, myself, have had great experience with their customer service. Wow, last month, when my wifi went out on my old player, the guy trouble shooted it (even though I had told him that I had already done every trouble shoot 19 times), and then he gave me the needed number to write down on the return label and mailed me a box to send it back to them for free. I didn't have to collect a bunch of paperwork and (receipts and stuff) like most other companies require for a full refund. Just the player and the remote! My brand new Roku arrived within the week.
I have never regretted buying this player. Now it's even $40.00 less than I originally paid for it. It's a fricken steal if you ask me. Not only do you get your movies mailed to you from Netflix, but you get to watch, from the comfort of any room you decide to put the thing in, all the tv shows and kids shows and movies and free music and OMG the list goes on and on. Ren and Stimpy, 30 Rock, Lie to Me, Spongebob, on and on and on. The kids love it. When I'm bored at night, I get a huge list of choices to entertain me and I really couldn't live without this cute little tiny machine. I HIGHLY recommend!!

5-0 out of 5 stars Roku Rocks with NetFlix and Playon, December 4, 2010
We were a longtime Dish Network customer paying $80 a month for video service. While we had no complaints about Dish, we decided this past summer to take the plunge into internet video to see if we could save some dollars. My family was shocked the day I unplugged all of the Dish receivers and sent them back to Dish Network. "What are we going to watch?" "What about my favorite shows?"

As a 3 HDTV family and not knowing the best hardware option to use, we decided to try a selection of devices. For our main living room TV, we purchased a Roku device. For the den, we used our Wii and for the master bedroom a Sony Blu Ray Internet DVD player.

For content, we have moved our NetFlix usage from DVDs in the mail to internet streaming. We also installed playon.tv on our PC for access to Hulu (primarily), CBS (Survivor and Amazing Race) and Comedy Channel. Both NetFlix and Playon streaming to all of the devices we use work fine. This includes the Roku via playon, despite reports that Roku pulled the plug on playon (continues to work fine to this day).

We also purchased Comcast Basic (Limited) Cable ($14) for local news and sports. This is the plan that just uses the cable, no digital cable boxes required, allowing us to wire cable to all of our TV's. What Comcast will not tell you is with HDTV's we get full HD channels for ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, PBS, CBS, etc. without having to purchase a digital plan or rent their digital boxes.

Comparing the Roku, Wii and Sony Internet DVD devices, we like the Roku the best of the three. In fact, we just installed a second Roku, moving the Wii back to a game system. The reason was primarily ease of use. Some of the reasons include the following:
- Roku Remote is the simplest to use than the Wii and Sony remotes with fewer and easier to understand buttons
- Roku provides access to NetFlix suggested titles and search. This is also available for the Wii but not the Sony Internet DVD player
- The Roku seems to do a better job at buffering the streaming content resulting in less video interuptions

In conclusion, we have a better video experience today than when we were paying $80 for Dish. Netflix gives us access to movies and past seasons of TV shows. Playon with Hulu gives us DVR access to all of the latest TV shows, we love the Hulu favorites Queue and the emails letting us know the latest episodes are in the queue.

Outside of our internet connection (need 2MBPS or more) which we already had in place, our total internet video monthly fees are $12.95 for NetFlix and $14 for Basic (Limited) Comcast Cable. A great savings with a better video experience.

5-0 out of 5 stars I don't want to oversell it ..., October 16, 2010
... but Roku is the greatest thing EVER in the history of the universe.

Setup was ridiculously easy. Plug the box into an AC outlet, connect the AV cables to your TV, and switch your TV to the appropriate channel. If using a wireless router, enter the encryption key or passcode. (For WEP security, this will be 13 pairs of alphanumeric symbols.) Then follow the on-screen instructions to sync your Roku account to your Netflix account and/or your Amazon Video On Demand account, using a simple activation code.

Within 15 minutes or less, I was searching Netflix on my TV screen and choosing things to watch. I settled on "Aliens." Picture quality was better than cable, comparable to DVD. There was no pixellation, buffering, signal breakup, or any other glitch. After a while I forgot I was watching a streaming video. Colors were bright, outlines were sharp. My Roku is hooked up to a non-state-of-the-art, non-widescreen, non-digital TV that only accepts 480i input. The image quality would undoubtedly be even better on a newer set with 1080i capabilities.

Later that night I intended to watch syndicated reruns of "King of the Hill." But because of a dispute with Cablevision, Newscorp pulled the local Fox channel off the air. No KOTH! What to do? Luckily, there was no need to panic. Netflix has at least 9 seasons of KOTH available for streaming. I watched two episodes and found the picture quality significantly better than the local broadcast. Plus, no commercials! I may never watch KOTH on the Fox affiliate again. That's one less viewer for Fox. Well played, Newscorp!

I haven't really looked into the various other channels that are available for Roku, which seem to vary widely in quality. New channels are being added all the time. I understand Hulu is coming soon.

Truthfully, I could imagine ditching cable TV altogether once the selection of streaming videos becomes even better. This is the future of TV. And did I mention it's the greatest thing EVER?

Technical caveat: I have a cable Internet connection that downloads at 12-13 Mbps. Connections slower than 5 Mbps may be less satisfactory.

Bottom line: Buy this thing. It works as advertised, and it's just cool.

1-0 out of 5 stars Was a great box before Firmware Update, November 8, 2010
The Roku Auto-Updates, so there is no way to stop it. When loading a video, it will freeze up or load very slowly. Sometimes it will play and then kick back to the beginning of the video. Even some developers are complaining of broken channels and other issues. It was perfect before the update, and there is no way to rollback the firmware.
Before buying, do yourself a favor and read the Roku forums, and Roku owners thread at avsforums.

4-0 out of 5 stars Worth the Money!, December 1, 2010
I'm a spartan tightwad, so for me to say that something is worth the money is high praise indeed. Roku isn't perfect, but it's a great idea and well executed.

We have been cable/satellite free for over five years (before we bought our house, our apartment included free cable). I have never paid for premium TV, I just can't imagine doing it. When our tube TV died a few years ago, we tried to get it fixed, but they no longer make the part. So we started watching shows online. After the digital conversion last year, our remaining tiny tube TV became just a DVD watching monitor.

Well, the holiday season of 2010 offered such spectacular deals on TVs that it turned even me, and we bought a 42" plasma for $350 because it's only 720p/60hz. As I planned on hooking up a home theatre PC (much of streaming is still standard def), I'll accept the slightly out of date technology for that great of a price.

I looked at the Boxee Box, a Dell Zino, and laughed hysterically at the price of Google TV and internet enabled televisions and Blu Ray players. But the Roku, starting at $60... that price held my attention.

I bought the mid level Roku for the price of the low end one, $60+ shipping, on their Black Friday sale. Shipping was fast- it was here on Monday.

Set up is pretty simple, but you do need a computer or at least a smartphone to input the codes. Choosing the channels and inputting the codes takes ten times as long as actual hardware setup, but you can do this over time, you don't have to do it right away unless you are like me and very Type A.

The Bad: there is still lots of content out there, for free, that Roku can't access. You'll either have to pony up the dough on Amazon's video on demand, wait for the DVD from Netflix, or plug your laptop into your computer with an HDMI cable. This is true even if you have Hulu+. For example, "Medium" moved to CBS. CBS, because they are a network run by and for old people, doesn't participate in Hulu. I can't watch Medium on my TV unless I pay for it from AVOD. Bummer, when I could watch for free on CBS.com. Same thing with Disney- if you have Disney Magic Codes, you can watch movies (as much as you want, whenever you want) online. But not on a TV, at least not through the Roku. Mr. HDMI cable has to come out, or Disney is confined to the computer screen.

I don't need or want Roku to have a full browser, but if it did this problem would be solved. The business model behind Hulu+ would also collapse, though, so I'm not sure what the solution is.

We are not a family of sports fans, so we don't subscribe to MLB or NHL pay channels, but we do have Netflix and Hulu+ for a grand total of $16/mo. There are tons of good, free Roku channels, especially if you bother to look for the "Private" channels, which include YouTube and HGTV.

What is very, very good about the Roku is the price and ease of use. I would have spent an absolute minimum of $250 on a little nettop to use as an HTPC, plus more for a wireless keyboard, and it would have been a PITA to use. You'd have to open a browser and search. If I lived alone, this would not be a big deal, but we have three kids, and if I lived alone, I probably would get along with just a laptop. The primary reason we got a TV was to cuddle on the couch and watch movies. My littles would make mincemeat out of a a keyboard-as-remote. On the other hand, while you can search pretty easily with Roku remote, you don't HAVE to. You can browse. The remote and interface is so dead simple my four year old learned how to use it in about 15 minutes, despite the fact that we've never used a TV remote in this house until about a week ago. My dad could use this, hell, my husband's grandma could use it. It's that straightforward.

Also, Kidlet is AMAZING. It's a kids' TV network that contains three channels and tons of cartoons. There are no commercials whatsoever, which are my main objection to childrens' TV. (Yeah, we get PBS OTA, too.) We discovered "Redwall" through Kidlet on Roku, something that Netflix doesn't even have, and is fantastic- we have the books on hold now at the library.

This is the way TVs and movies are meant to be watched- when you want, no discs to scratch, no mindless channel surfing, no/few commercials, no schedule to keep, with a picture that far outstrips everything but DVD. Roku is the future.

5-0 out of 5 stars Less than 5 Minutes to Set up - LOVE the Simple Remote, October 6, 2010
Picked up the Roku XD to validate its use with Netflix streaming. The box showed up and it took less than 5 minutes to get running. The unit powered up, joined wifi then upgraded code from the net within minutes. After the upgrade I registered the unit in my Netflix account and started streaming. DONE! Now I will purchase two more and turn off satellite service.

5-0 out of 5 stars Saved money on Cable bill,I LOVE ROKU!, October 12, 2010
I had a $9 a month Netflix account which my husband and I used to watch movies on our iphones and computers. Plus we would get DVD's included in the mail. Now we just added this ROKU to our large livingroom TV and get instant movies and so much more. I just cancelled Shotime,HBO,and Cinemax. Saved lots of money because of this little box. Movies are easy to find and come on screen instantly with perfect clarity.I can even shop for Amazon items on TV using this box. I highly recommend ROKU!

4-0 out of 5 stars Lots of choice for content, could be easier to use, nice little streaming media player!, November 18, 2010

Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What's this?)
The Roku is a brilliant little box and once it has been setup it really works well. That said, it's not fun to setup. You have to create a Roku account, which is a combination of going to their site and setting that up, getting a number from the Roku on your TV screen, entering that in to the site and then waiting for it to activate. It's faster than it sounds, perhaps several minutes of work... it's just slightly awkward.

Once the Roku is working (it usually restarts itself a couple times, which also take a few minutes to finish), you then go to a 'Channel Store' and decide what you want your Roku to do. Each content provider is a different channel. So, Netflix is a channel. Pandora is a channel. Amazon is a channel. Each of these requires setup. It takes time to add your channels, and then some more time to configure them the way you want. Some of this requires that you go to the website and then back to the Roku, too... this part I found to be the least fun.

Finally, once you have the channels you want... you're ready to actually use the Roku. From there it's cake and video looks and sounds great, streams quickly on my 802.11n wireless network at home. I use an Airport Extreme, and the Roku had no issue finding and using that WiFi signal

The remote works great, and I love the little piece of fabric they have attached to it. During setup you'll be wishing you didn't have to enter all the info with the remote, but after setup and when browsing content it works just fine.

The interface itself is a bit dated, but completely functional and gets most channel surfing done easily.

The biggest downfall for the Roku was that I bought a new AppleTV at the same time. Reviewing them next to each other, the Apple TV was much easier to use, the HD video was clearer and began playing a bit faster than the Roku unit, the remote is made out of solid Aluminum and feels amazingly good in the hand, and the interface is easier to navigate. All that said, the Roku has more choices like Amazon and Pandora that you just can't get on the AppleTV. CHOICE IS GOOD! As a result, for me, it's not one or the other. I use them both almost daily and I highly recommend the Roku - it's a great little machine for getting movies/tv/music to your big screen. Read more

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